Coley-Rogers Wedding

William and Mary Rogers are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Hannah Maria Rogers to Stephen Coley, son of James and Letitia Coley.  They were married 3 October 1852 in Halesowen, England.

This family has limited information, but since we stumbled upon a picture recently, I thought I would make it available.  Hopefully some other photos of the family will appear.  Another appeared, it is posted below.  A darker picture, but closer.  Hopefully I can get the whole thing at some point with the clearer resolution.

Light photo of Stephen

Stephen was the third child born to Letitia Willetts and James Coley on 28 January 1830 in Lutley, Worcestershire, England.  James, as far as I can tell was a hired man, but we do not know anything more.  The family stayed in Lutley and by the age of 21 Stephen was working as a servant for the widow Ann Page as a farm laborer on her farm.  Stephen continued working as a farm laborer until he took a job in the Iron Works of Haley Green by 1871.  The 1881 census lists him as a mender, we do not know what kind. When he shows up on the 1900 Census in Syracuse, Davis, Utah he is a day laborer.

Darker photo of Stephen

Darker photo of Stephen

Hannah was the first child born to Mary Harris and William Rogers on 4 June 1832 in Romsley, Worcestershire, England.  Some of the census records show Lutley too.  This family we know little about as a whole.  Mary died in 1859 and Roger in 1862.  We do not know his occupation or even where the family and other children end up.  The name is too common and tracking down siblings to this point has been unsuccessful.  The family lived near enough Romsley to be married there and each of the children christened there.  The only reason we know anything more about Hannah is because she left her own record with her posterity and church.

We have records of 7 children born to Stephen and Hannah Coley.

William Coley born 19 October 1854 in Hasbury, Worcestershire, England.  William married Sylvia James 19 Aug 1877 in Dudley, Worcestershire, England.  We do not know anything more about this family.

Charles N Coley born January 1857 in Hasbury, England.  Charles married an Ann and had 7 children we know of.

Martha Ann Coley born 18 August 1860 in Haley Green, Worcestershire, England.  She married Theophilus France, and more is written of them at that link.

Arthur Coley born 17 January 1862 in Lutley and married an Elizah Willett.  We know nothing more about him.

Herbert Coley born 12 February 1864 in Lutley and married Martha Christiansen 1 December 1896 in Lewiston, Cache, Utah.  This are my Great Great Grandparents and I will write more of them later.

George Harry Coley born 16 April 1868 in Lutley and married Caroline Wilson, and more is written of them at that link.

Francis Henry Coley born 8 October 1871 in Lutley and died 10 July 1893.  We do not know where, but that is the date passed down by the family.

While the family lived in Lutley, Mormons came to the community.  We do not know the conversion story, but Martha joined 23 August 1867, Herbert 1 June 1881, George 22 August 1881, and Frank 2 June 1882.  The call to gather to Utah was strong enough that these four children decided to make the venture.  We do not know if Stephen and Hannah came begrudgingly or not, but they accompanied the children on their journey.

The family boarded the RMS Wisconsin in Liverpool.  They arrived 23 October 1890 in New York City, New York.  Stephen traveled with Hannah, daughter Martha, niece Letitia Lea Willetts, one of Letitia’s daughters Clara,  and an unknown Frank and Mary.  We don’t know who these last two children are, but they traveled with the company.  The confusing thing is that Clara is listed as a Coley, yet her mother Letitia is a Willetts.  We believe it is this same Frank who shows up in the 1900 Census living in the Martha France household where he is listed as a step-son to Theophilus.  Therefore, it appears this Frank is Martha’s child, but we have no record of his birth, father, or where he ended up after the 1900 census.  Mary may be the daughter of Charles Coley, but the age is two years off, and she disappeared once they arrived in Utah, so we do not know.

Martha married in Logan, Cache, Utah on 4 November 1891.  Interestingly, Hannah was baptized a Mormon that same day.  Martha was sealed to Theophilus in the Logan Temple.  It is likely that Hannah attended to the temple the same day and was baptized in the font of the temple.  (They used to allow convert and children of record baptisms in the temple font)  Stephen was baptized 5 January 1892, we do not know the location.

Stephen and Hannah were both endowed on the 12 October 1892 in the Logan Temple.  They were sealed to each other the same day.  George married 23 November 1892 and his parents likely attended.

Hannah died 22 October 1894 in Franklin, Franklin (then Oneida), Idaho.  I don’t believe they were living outside of Lewiston so she was probably visiting or died there for some other reason (Lewiston and Franklin are only a few miles apart).  She was buried two days later, 24 October 1894 in Lewiston.

By the time the 1910 Census rolls around, Stephen is staying with Edwin Paice, step-son of his niece Letitia Lea Willetts who had remarried to William Paice.  Edwin lived next door to William and Letitia.  The photo above was likely taken between the death of his wife his own death 19 years later.  I am guessing somewhere after 1900, which year would put him about 70, since I guess he looks like he is in his 70’s.

Stephen died at home in Lewiston 22 October 1913 (same day as his wife) and was buried two days later, 24 October 1913 in Lewiston.

Grandpa and Grandma Wanner

I have previously provided a limited history of Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Schmid.  As I wrote that history and compiled some other histories, I kept finding a couple of references to a history written by Edna Wagstaff Owen.  I started trying to contact a member of that family and to see if they had a copy of that history.  Fortunately after some time, a copy of that history was provided.  I now provide it in full with minimal edits.

Wanner Family about 1895,

Wanner Family about 1895,

Grandpa and Grandma Wanner
Compiled and delivered by Edna Wagstaff Owen at the Wanner, Schmid reunion at Lagoon in Farmington, Utah on Saturday, 17 June 1978
I was asked a few day ago to represent Mary Wanner Wagstaff’s family at the 1978 Wanner – Schmid reunion, to do something on the program. I haven’t had much time to get ready for it and really didn’t know what I could do. After much thought and meditation, I decided it would be nice to honor Grandpa and Grandma Wanner by telling you a few things I can remember about them.
On 6 June 1870, a little 24 year old man from Holzgerlingen, Germany, John George Wanner and a beautiful 21 year old girl, with beautiful auburn hair named Anna Maria Schmid from Holzgerlingen, Germany were married and started a life for themselves together.
This lovely couple, we love to call our grandparents, became the proud parents of 10 children – 5 boys and 5 girls, all of whom lived long good lives, except 2 sons, who died in Germany and dear Aunt Pauline, who passed on at the age of 37. Their youngest daughter Wilhelmina is here with us today and we are honoring her. She is 90 years young. They have had 73 grandchildren born to them and now their posterity runs into the hundreds.
They dearly loved these children and tried untiringly to bring them up and taught them by example as well as precept. Some of the great qualities they left us always to love the Lord and our fellowman. To be honest always and how to work. I don’t know of one of their children, grandchildren or great grandchildren, who haven’t tried very hard to do this.
Grandpa and Grandma never lost sight of what they left Germany for – which was the Gospel and to live in America where they were free and could worship as they choose.
It was in May 1891 while Grandpa was working on the highway, two missionaries came along and told him about the Gospel and the Lord’s work. In October 1891, they and their three eldest daughters were baptized. George was the first to be baptized in July 1891 and came over to America with one of the missionaries, Brother Terrell from Providence, Utah. Louise, Frederich and Pauline were baptized in June 1894. Gottlob in June 1894 and Wilhelmina in August 1896.
Grandma took the missionaries in and accommodated them with beds, food, etc. and helped them with the German language.
Over in Germany, it was the custom for women to do the farm work, cutting of the hay with a scythe and putting it up by hand. When the children needed shoes or dresses, the shoemaker and the dressmaker would come to the home to do these services.
In writing this little history and remembrances about Grandpa and Grandma Wanner, I thought it would be proper, nice, and informative to tell just a little about the country they lived in before coming to America.
Germany had been a great country and has produced many great and talented people. It has become known as the land of poets and thinkers. Germany as a nation state did not exist until the German Reich of 1871. The Roman Empire was in control for five centuries. It is a diversified country – wooded areas account for 29 percent of the land, providing beautiful forests with hiking trails. The people of Germany love nature and most of the homes have plants and flowers in them.
Germany has become known for its beautiful castles and for being a progressive country. Germany has been described by some of our relatives and friends who, have visited it, as a very beautiful country of mountains, streams, rivers and beautiful forests.
Grandma left behind a sister, a brother and her father. She was the only one that joined the church. She was the youngest in her family. Grandpa was the only one in his family also that joined the church.
What a serious though it must have been to them as they contemplated the LONG, LONG JOURNEY TO AMERICA AND THE HEADQUARTERS OF THE CHURCH WHICH THEY BELONGED TOO.
I wonder if any of us grandchildren can even realize what it meant to undertake the task of bringing their family to America. They sold their property in Germany and packed up the thing they could bring. They left behind their friends, loved ones, and many happy memories. It was brave family, who loved the Lord, were grateful for the Gospel Plan and for their membership in the TRUE CHURCH ON THE EARTH. Such was their faith, and it was enough to bring them through every trial, every hardship, every discouragement that came their way. They triumphed in the end and WE AS THEIR POSTERITY HAVE BEEN GREATLY BLESSED BY THEIR WISDOM, FAITH, AND ENDURANCE.
They rode the train for a day and then got on a ship and went up the Rhine River. This took them three or four days. They then rode the train another day and got on a ship on the North Sea that took them to England; the sea was very turbulent and they had a rough voyage.
At Liverpool they boarded a ship and was on the ocean 13 days. They stayed in New York for two days and in Chicago one day and a night. They then rode the train straight to Franklin, Idaho. They arrived on the 18th of June 1893. This was Uncle Gottlob’s birthday. It was 85 years ago tomorrow.
They were met by their son George and Fred Nuffer, who was the man George was working for. They brought a buggy and wagon and took the family to Brother Nuffer’s place in Cub River. Here they stayed about a week; then purchased the farm of John Nuffer in Glendale, Idaho. It was during this week Grandpa took his daughter Mary, my mother, and they walked to the Bear Lake County seeking a farm and a home to see what was available there. They slept on the ground at nights and saved some of their bread to feed the bears so they wouldn’t bother them. They had to take off their shoes as they forged streams. It was a rough trip.
From Glendale they bought a farm in Whitney and from here to Preston. In 1910 they moved to Logan, Utah to be near the Temple where they could go often. In Logan, they lived at two or three different places, but I wasn’t able to find out for sure. The places I distinctly remember was on 3rd North and two or so block East and their last home in Logan was a lovely home thy built located on 4th North and two blocks East.
The first Sunday they were in Glendale, Grandpa and Grandma went to church with these five beautiful daughters and two sons. My dad, William Addison Wagstaff was the ward clerk and mother had on a red dress; dad looked down at her and winked. You see dad was well past 30 and not married. I bet he thought here is my chance. Of course there were other nice gals available, but he hadn’t married and we are happy he choose mother.
Grandma soon joined the Relief Society and in the minutes of the meetings that I have, tell of her bearing her testimony often and donating eggs, wheat, calico or whatever, when ask to do so.
They had a strong testimony and remained true to the Church and were ardent Temple Workers till their last days on earth.
I feel these parents, children, grandchildren and great grandchildren have accomplished so much in that time 85 years tomorrow, all of the children have gone to the Temple, many have done Temple work and many of the grandchildren and great grandchildren also. Many have gone on Missions. There are Bishops, Doctors, poets, Nurses and professional people in the family.
I being one of the younger ones of Grandpa and Grandma’s grandchildren, I have had the privilege of attending the funerals of some of their children and their children’s mates and many of the grandchildren and I have really been thrilled and lifted up about the wonderful things that have been said – of their good lives – their devotion to their families. I have felt so thrilled and humble to belong to such a good family and I know for a fact the wonderful words that have been spoken are true, because I have observed and could say Amen to it all.
I have felt many times that if Grandpa and Grandma could see their posterity and how wonderful, faithful, devoted they ware; with a strong testimony and ardent Temple workers; they surely would be thrilled and happy.
They taught their children the way they should live by example and precept and each in turn taught their children the same principles and they in turn did the same to their children. This is very commendable, I am sure.
While in Germany, Grandpa worked on the roads and was a road overseer. He also worked in the Black Forest and fought in the Civil War in Germany in 1865 and the war of 1870-71. He also owned a little farm and cattle. He wasn’t a very large man about 5 foot 6 inches. He always looked well dressed, clean and very nice.
Grandma was about 5 foot 3 or 4 inches and had a good shape. She always fixed her hair so beautiful, she looked nice and well dressed. I can remember this beautiful black knit winter dress she had and she always wore gloves.
While in Logan Grandpa always had a lively horse, a good looking single black buggy and a real snazzy buggy whip. This one place they lived on in Logan had an extra lot where he grew hay for his horse and he’d cut it with a scythe. They also always had a nice garden and beautiful flowers. As I remember this home was on 3rd North and a few blocks East.
They were hard working, thrifty people and handled their affairs very well. They really made hay while the sun shone and were able to retire at a reasonable age and had enough to live on plus an estate they left.
Speaking of hard working people which they were, their children were also. I know Mother always worked in the fields, had a lovely garden – flowers and fruits and berries. Also plus making soap, butter, curing meat and those good sausages and canning besides washing on the board and knitting stockings for all of us 8 children, one pair for Sunday and one for school and everyday use. I know mother’s sisters and brothers were of the same caliber.
Now I have just mentioned Mother mostly, but I guess because I knew her better, but I have observed through my life and I know for a fact that all their children, grandchildren and great grandchildren have been hard working people and early risers. At least I and my brothers and sisters and all my children know how to work, so some of it has rubbed off.
I am sure life for them in Germany was hard. It wasn’t always sunshine and roses. Of course all of us knew we’d have trials and sorrows to go thru when we came to earth and I’m sure they had their share.
Grandma lost her mother at age two and she was said her stepmother wasn’t very good to her. She said her father was a weaver and Grandma had to walk many miles through dark woods at night to deliver the linen to different customers. She’d carry it on her head with arms and hands to help. Often she was afraid she prayed and was never harmed. She said many times all she had to eat was a piece of brown bread and potato peeling soup, but she was thankful for that.
I feel sure Grandma and Grandpa had many happy times, but they also knew sorrow. It must have been heart breaking to loose their two little boys at a tender age and have to leave them buried in Germany, when they came to America. I’m sure as most all parents are, they were grieved at times over their children’s actions.
In Germany they all worked hard to help make a living. Grandma and children would do most of the farm work and care for the animals, so Grandpa could work away on roads, etc to bring a little extra means in. They would put the hay up and spend long hard days getting wood in from the forest for fuel for winter.
At Christmas time and other special occasions, they could have white bread and some little cakes. They had beautiful Christmas trees decorated, Grandma really tried hard to make a sweet happy home and life for her children. Now I’d like to quickly relate a few things I can remember about them.
I can remember Mother and Grandma most always conversed in German and she’d also always write letters often to her in German. She was so good at keeping up her correspondence. She’d always send love and kisses to us kids. At Christmas time they always sent a check to their children and 50 cents for each of us grandchildren. I thought I was really rich to have this half dollar to spend.
The last time I saw Grandpa was in December of 1921, when he came to Ogden to Aunt Pauline’s funeral. In February 1922 he had just finished helping to pay Aunt Pauline’s funeral expenses when he took sick and died. I believe it was of Pneumonia.
The last time I saw Grandma was in July 1929, when we stopped in to visit her on our way to Idaho. We took her some nice fresh strawberries from our garden.
I can remember how sad and lonely she looked. She had carried on alone for almost 8 years. She was a dear and faithful to the end. She passed away in December 1929. I can remember how sad I was and what a lovely funeral they had and the nice things that were spoken of her.
As a child I can remember going to Logan on the U.I.C., Railroad, or sometimes called the Galloping Goose, with Mom and Dad to visit them. It was the joy of my life. They always made you welcome and shared willingly what they had with you.
It seemed we always had the same thing for supper. She would sauté a little onion in the fry pan and then add boiled potatoes cut up or sliced and browned, a piece of cheese, bread, butter and applesauce, but oh! It was good. It was such a thrill to sleep on her feather bed.
I can well remember they always went to the Temple and I can see them now walking Temple hill in high gear, especially Grandpa.
They always had some mints for the Grandchildren and you always got loves and kisses. I didn’t always like Grandpa’s kisses and his beard would tickle my face and his kisses were kind of wet, but I knew then and I know now also that he loved us all.
What a thrill it was to go to Logan to be baptized and stay at their place and I was always so happy when they came to visit us, or we went to visit them, especially after Grandpa died and Grandma spent time with us is Ogden.
They were really hospitable and in 1917 Annie our sister and Mary Wanner Andra stayed at their home while taking a course in sewing and pattern drafting at the college.
Electricity at their home in Logan was cheap and they’d burn the lights most all day and night. I was really fascinated by them, as when we lived in Glendale we just had kerosene lamps, until the last two years, when we had gas lights.
It seemed to me as a young child when Grandma would kneel beside her bed to say her night prayers, she’d sure pray a long time – always I the German language, but I now realize it was a sweet humble and sincere prayer.
When I go to Logan now and to the Budge Clinic, I look across the street to their last beautiful house and well remember going there to visit them many times.
There are many reasons why we should honor and love our Grandparents, but among their most wonderful accomplishments, we would have to list their diligent pursuit in genealogy and Temple Work. Both Grandma and Grandpa had a great deal of research done to find the names and vital information concerning their progenitors. Each one of us are taught to do this by the leaders of our church. Grandma and Grandpa carried on this responsibility to the best of their ability for many years. I am sure when they learned of the statement of Prophet Joseph Smith to the effect if we neglect this important work we do so at the peril of our own salvation, that it aroused in them a never ending desire to see that nothing was left undone, that was within their ability to do.
After having had the research done they were able to secure the names of hundreds of their dead ancestors and spent many many hours I the Temple acting as proxy for those who never had the opportunity to hear the Gospel and take upon themselves the sacred covenants, which are necessary for exaltation in the Celestial Kingdom.
I am most grateful to them for their integrity and not only teaching the highest principles of honorable dealings in their daily affairs, but for the example of following the Savior’s admonition “To love one another and to do our best to help those in need”.
Dear cousins, second and third cousins, in-laws and others, our grandparents are long since gone, but I am sure their memory lives on and it could be said of them they laughed a lot and cried a little. They aren’t really dead for no man dies as long as there is one living person in the world who remembers them with fond memories and no man really dies as long as there are people on earth who really loved them. This can be said of them, many many people loved them for what they really were. They had many many friends and as I have told Horace many times, I truly loved my Grandma and Grandpa Wanner.

Wanner-Schmid Wedding

Jakob and Salome Schmid are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Anna Maria to Johann, son of Johann and Anna Wanner.  Johann and Anna were married 6 June 1870 in Holzgerlingen, Böblingen, Württemberg.

Anna Maria Schmid was the third child of three born to the marriage of Jakob Frederick Schmid (he went by Frederick) and Salome Notter on 21 January 1849 in Holzgerlingen.  Solome was 38 years old when Anna was born and died two and a half years later in Holzgerlingen.  Anna’s father, Jakob, then remarried to Agnes Margarete Hasenmaier in 1852.  Unfortunately, Agnes passed away a year and half later when Anna was barely over 3 years old.  Jakob remained single as far as we know and raised the two girls and boy on his own afterward.  Jakob was a weaver.  Anna likely had few if any memory of either of her mothers.  Anna was christened the same day she was born.  Below is a picture of St. Mauritius’ tower in Holzgerlingen where Anna was christened.  This tower has been there since the eleventh century.

St. Mauritius Church in Holzgerlingen where Anna Schmid was christened

Johann Georg Wanner was the fourth child of five born to the marriage of Johann Friedrich Wanner and Anna Maria Marquardt on 18 October 1845 also in Holzgerlingen.  He was christened the next day in the same church as Anna.

St. Mauritius

St. Mauritius from the nave looking toward the chancel.  Inside this church is where Johann Wanner was christened

Holzgerlingen is a small town and it is very likely that Johann and Anna knew of each other growing up if not more personally.  Johann and Anna were married 6 June 1870 in the same church in which they were christened.

The altar of St. Mauritius in Holzgerlingen where Johann and Anna were likely married

The altar of St. Mauritius in Holzgerlingen before which Johann and Anna were likely married

Johann and Anna welcomed a baby boy named after his father on 29 October 1870.  Young Johann Georg was christened the next day in the same church, likely before a congregation seated in the below nave.

The chapel/nave of St. Mauritius where family sat for generations if not hundreds of years attending church

The chapel/nave of St. Mauritius where family sat for generations if not hundreds of years attending church

Johann and Anna welcomed Christina Wanner 30 March 1872 in Holzgerlingen.  She was christened on 1 April 1872.

The train platform at Holzgerlingen

The train platform at Holzgerlingen

Between 1872 and 1873 Johann and Anna moved to Grünkraut, Ravensburg, Württemburg.  This is about 50 miles to the south.  We don’t know why they moved to this tiny town.  It was in Grünkraut that Maria Magdalena Wanner was born 12 September 1873.  She was christened 14 September 1873 but I do not know which church the family used in Grünkraut.

Johannas Wanner was born 23 June 1875 and christened the same day in Grünkraut.  He died later that year on 5 November 1875.  He was buried at Atzenweiler according to family records, but I cannot find this place so it must be an area nearby Grünkraut.

Johannas Frederick Wanner came 28 July 1878 and was christened on 3 August 1878.  He died 12 November 1878 and is also apparently buried at Atzenweiler.

On 30 March 1879 Johann and Anna welcomed Luise Sophia Wanner.  Christening followed 6 April 1879 in Grünkraut.

Jakob Frederick Wanner appeared 14 January 1881 with christening 23 January 1881.

Fred told a couple of stories I think proper to share here.  I cannot verify accuracy or the time frame.  “They left the farm work to Grandfather and the children.  They used the milk cows to do the farm work and then would milk them morning and night.  They also got wood from the forest for fuel.  It rained a lot in Germany so the out buildings were connected to the house.  One time Grandma went downstairs to get some fruit.  She reached over and touched something hairy and she thought it was the devil!  It was a cow that had wandered down from the barn.  Dad didn’t talk much about his life as a child but he did say he got a drum for Christmas and then it would disappear about New Years Day and he would get it for Christmas again the next year.  He may have been joking.  The family belonged to the Lutheran Church and was very religious.”

Pauline Wanner arrived 1 April 1884 in Atzenweiler and was christened 10 April 1884 in Atzenweiler.

Gottlop Wanner showed up 18 June 1886 in Kronhalden with christening 29 June 1886 in Atzenweiler.

Lastly, Wilhelmina ended the caravan on 12 September 1887 in Atzenweiler and was christened 19 September 1887 in Atzenweiler.

During the summer of 1890 LDS missionaries visited Grünkraut.  The missionaries apparently visited with Jakob, Anna’s father.  The missionary showed Jakob the Book of Mormon and Jakob took the missionaries home with him.  The missionaries lived with the family for a time and the Wanner family was converted.  Johann Georg Jr was the first to join the LDS Church on 11 July 1891.  Johann Sr, Anna, Christina, and Maria were all baptized 16 October 1891.  Jakob, Anna’s father, joined 22 February 1892.

Johann Jr emigrated to America with Elder Theurer.  They went to his home in Providence, Cache, Utah.  We don’t know who Elder Theurer is, but he helped Johann Georg, now John George, find employment with Fred Nuffer who lived in Mapleton, Franklin, Idaho.  Elder John Theurer had converted the Nuffer family in Germany, so it was likely a sibling of John who helped find John Jr his employment.

In 1893, the family emigrated from Germany.  John, Anna, Christina, Maria, Luise, Fredrick, Pauline, Gottlop, and Wilhelmina all departed Liverpool, England on 3 June 1893 on the Arizona.  They arrived on 13 June 1893 at Ellis Island in New York, New York, New York.  Immediately, the family caught multiple trains through Chicago and Salt Lake with the last stop at Franklin, Franklin, Idaho near where John Jr met them with a wagon.  The family arrived at Franklin on 18 June 1893 where John took them in to Preston.  It was in Preston that Luise, Fred, and Pauline, were baptized 7 June 1894.  Gottlob followed on 6 June 1895 with Wilhelmina 6 August 1896, all in Preston.

The family immediately began to integrate with society.  Christina married Charles August Nuffer 1 February 1894 in the Logan LDS Temple.  John Jr married Eliza Stirland 14 November 1894 in the Logan Temple.

Wanner Family about 1895,

Wanner Family about 1895.  Standing (l-r): Maria (Mary), Christina, Johann (John but went by George), Pauline.  Sitting (l-r): Anna, Jakob (Fred), Luise (Louise), Wilhelmina, Gottlop, Johann (John).

Maria, now Mary, married William Addison Wagstaff 17 June 1896 in the Logan Temple.  Luise, now Louise, married Jeffery Marcelin Bodrero 16 March 1898 in the Logan Temple.  John Jr remarried after divorce to Regina Frederike Nuffer 31 August 1898 in the Logan Temple.  Jakob, now Fred, married Mary Elizabeth Carter 30 September 1903 in the Logan Temple.  Pauline married William Henry Crossley 14 December 1904 in the Logan Temple.  Wilhelmina married Moses Bodrero 18 December 1907 in the Logan Temple.  Gottlop married Rebecca Hicks 16 November 1908 in Preston.

The Wanner family purchased a farm from John Nuffer, a brother to Charles and Regina, near Glendale, Franklin, Idaho.  Fred purchased the farm from them around 1910.  John Sr and Anna moved to Logan where they were living at 791 North 500 East when the 1910 Census was taken (the whole family was in Preston city limits for the 1900 Census).  On the 1920 Census I believe they lived at 304 East 500 North, but the census is unclear exactly what street 304 is on, but going from the pattern of the census taker I believe it is the address I have listed.

Johann Georg Wanner 1921

John died 16 February 1922 of pneumonia in Logan.  Anna listed their address as 272 East 400 North in Logan.  He was buried on the 19th in the Logan Cemetery.  She also died of pneumonia but on 9 December 1929.  She was living at the same address when she passed away.  She was buried 12 December 1929 next to her husband.

Anna Schmid Wanner

Ivan Stephen Coley

This is from the autobiography of Ivan Stephen Coley.  I recently wrote on the passing of his widow, Clara McMurdie Coley.

Since Ivan does not give much background information, I will provide some.  Ivan is the sister to my Lillian Coley Jonas.  Ivan is the sixth of ten children born to Martha Christiansen and Herbert Coley born 26 June 1912 in Richmond, Cache, Utah.  He married Clara McMurdie on 22 October 1930 in Buhl, Twin Falls, Idaho.  Ivan and Clara had four children.  Ivan passed away 22 September 1994 in Buhl.  He was buried 27 September 1994 in West End Cemetery near Buhl.  Clara just joined him this year.

~

I was born in the little town of Richmond, Utah in Cache Valley.  We lived up in the foothills called Nebo, about 3 1/2 miles from town.  It was really pretty up there.  You could see all over the valley.

The snow really got deep in the wintertime.  In the spring when the snow melted, the field flowers would come up.  It sure was pretty.

I was one of ten children with four sisters and five brothers.  We didn’t have a car so we had to hitch the horses up to the white-top buggy when we went to church.  In the winter we used the bobsleds.  Sometimes the show would be so deep that you didn’t know where the road was.  Sometimes I would ride skis or hand sleigh to school in the winter.  We had to pack our lunches because they didn’t have hot school lunches then.

I remember in the first grade, we had a pot bellied stove and the teacher would have to keep putting coal in it to keep the room warm.  The toilets were outside.

I would help the neighbor do chores and feed calves and help take the milk to the creamery.  Once in a while they would give me ten or fifteen cents spending money.

Ivan Coley and dog

My dad had an old buckboard and he said he wanted to get it over to the house.  One day when my parents weren’t home, I decided to hook the horse up to the buckboard and pull it over to the house for my dad.  It didn’t have any shavs to guide it so I just put a chain on it to get it to the house.  I was doing okay until the wheel hit a rock and the other wheel hit the horse in the belly.  The horse got scared and ran away and I fell off the buckboard.  It tore out about 100 yards of fence.  When I got up, the horse was down by the haystack eating hay.  I was afraid to tell my dad about it for fear that I would get my butt kicked because he had told me not to do it.

Dad finally bought a house close to town so it would be easier for us kids to get to school in the winter.  One day they left me and my older brother Wilford home alone.  He was frying sausage and I was standing with my back to the stove trying to keep warm.  He stuck the hot fork that he was frying the meat with on the back of neck.  I got warm in one spot and you could see the mark of the fork tines in my neck.

I was sick a lot when I was young.  The doctors said that I had liver trouble.  I was ruptured and had to wear a truss for seven years.  I finally got to where I didn’t have to wear it anymore.

I didn’t know what a long pair of dress pants were until I was about thirteen.  We wore levis or kickerbockers pants that came just below the knees and buttoned.  I also wore long black socks that came up to the knees.

At Christmas we didn’t get things like they do now.  We would get a little wagon and it had to be for all of us.  Our gifts were mostly clothes.  We may get an orange, some hardtack and sugar candy and that was a treat for us.

Mother would take the eggs to town in a milk bucket and trade them for groceries.  We didn’t know what hand soap and shampoo were then as we just used the old laundry soap and mother made most of it.  About once a week we would get a little butter for our bread.  We used mostly fryings from the bacon and dipped our bread or biscuits into it.  It was really good.  About the only time we would get cake or pie was on a holiday or birthday.  We didn’t get both cake and pie together and we only got one piece when we did get it.

I used to ride about eight miles to Lewiston with my dad to take a wagon load of wheat to the mill to have it ground for flour and cereal.  We brought the bran home for the hogs every fall for our winter supply as we couldn’t go to town every day like they do now.  We would get snowed in sometimes and couldn’t get to town for several days.  Then we would have to go through the fields as the roads would be drifted full.

We didn’t have a telephone.  The only ones that had a phone were the rich people.  The phones then had a little crank on the side of them and you had to crank it before you could get the operator.

I worked for Melvin Smith in Richmond milking cows and plowing for $5.00 a month.  There was one time I was plowing and the horses took off for the barn.  I couldn’t get the plow out of the ground.  I must have plowed a furrow about 1/4 mile long.  The horses didn’t stop until they got to the barn.  I went to unhitch them from the plow and one horse kicked me in the leg.  It made me mad and I was going to quit but I was afraid to tell the boss so I worked a little longer.  I was only about 23 or 13 years old at the time.

On the days we had to spare, some of the neighbors would get together and round up some of the cattle.  We would put them in a corral and have a rodeo.  I rode the first one and we put a surcingle on him.  The bigger boys put me on him and turned me loose.  He sure did some bucking, but I stayed on.  They passed a hat around and got about 25 or 30 cents and they gave it to me.  I sure was ticked to death to get it.

I didn’t go to school very much.  My folks would send me and I would play hookey.  I would go anywhere but to school.  Now I can see where I made a mistake as I hurt no one but myself.

My uncle was blind.  I would lead him from door to door selling church books for several days and he gave me 15 cents.

I never did get to go to the circus.  I would ride the streetcar to Logan once in a while though and see a show.  It cost 10 cents to ride the streetcar and 10 cents to see the show.  You didn’t get popcorn or candy to eat in the theater then.

My brother and I were sleeping on the porch and the dog started barking in the middle of the night.  I raised up in bed and saw a man coming up toward the house.  I reached over and got the gun and fired a shot. It hit the drain pip on the side of the house.  My brother-in-law came running out of the house to see what the shooting was all about.  Whoever it was took off and never came back.  It sure scared me.

One time one of my friends and I rode a horse to Franklin, Idaho.  That was about 10 miles from where we lived.  This was in the middle of the winter and we had gone to check on some cattle.  It was sure cold (about 20 degrees below zero).  I rode back in the middle of the night.  I came to the neighbors who had a sheep wagon.  I went inside and there was a little wood in it.  I built a fire and laid down on the bed springs.  There was no bedding because they had taken it out for the winter.  I nearly froze to death.  I sure was glad to see morning come.  The neighbor took me to his house and gave me breakfast because I hadn’t had anything to eat since dinner the day before.

The first time I ever tasted corn flakes was up to the neighbors.  They put sugar and real straight cream on it.  I thought I would founder as I had tasted nothing like that before.  We didn’t know what prepared cereal was in those days and we called it mush.

I remember one time my dad made some elderberry wine and put it up in the attic in the house.  Every once in a while you would hear one go “BANG” as it blew up.  One time we had an old man over for supper.  He was an old man with long whiskers who we called “Grandpa Andrews”.  Dad went up in the attic to get a bottle of wine.  He went to open the bottle and it blew the cork out and hit the ceiling and Grandpa Andrews’ whiskers.  It sure went off with a bang.  One of the kids ran outside hollering “Grandpa got shot!”  I sure did laugh.  They got another bottle and one held it while the other tried to open it and it blew the pitcher out of their hand.  I don’t think anyone got wine that night.

When I wasn’t very old, I remember my dad and I went to thin beets to buy a bull.  I had a dog called “Bob” once and we used to hook him to the hand sleigh and haul the milk to the neighbor’s house about two blocks away as Bob pulled the sleigh.  Wherever I went the dog was with me.  The neighbor gave me a calf that broke his leg and I killed it and used it for coyote bait.  I poisoned some of it.  I thought the dog was home but he must have followed me.  He got some of the poison and it killed him.

I used to go out at night and sit on the haystack in the winter and shoot those big mountain hare rabbits with a shotgun.  I would sell them for 5 cents apiece.  Sometimes I would get for and five a shot as the rabbits were so thick they would undermine the haystacks.

We had homemade skis.  They were about 5 inches wide.  All they had to hold them on your feet were a 3/4 inch strap to go over the foot and a broomstick split and nailed on the skis to go under the arch.  They turned the toes up on the skis by driving a nail in them and using a wife, twisting it and steaming the skis.  They way I learned to ride the skis was to straddle a long stick and have it drag behind me.  It worked really good.  If you wanted to slow down, yo would pull upon the front of the stick and sit down real hard on it.  It would dig in the snow and slow you down.  After we learned to ride good, we didn’t hold on to anything.

When I was a kid there were very few deer and elk because people killed them for their hides.  I can remember when they brought some elk, 4 cows, and a bull on a boxcar and turned them loose in the hills.  They closed the season on them.  You couldn’t hunt for several years.  Then they got so thick that they would come down and eat the farmers’ haystacks at night.

My sister, her husband, and her husband’s family moved to Buhl, Idaho in the fall and the next summer I went to Franklin, Idaho to get a job on the highway.  They said they didn’t hire kids.  “I was 16 at the time.”  A friend of mine and I decided to keep going the rest of the way to Buhl.  We hitch-hiked all the way!  We got off on the wrong road and ended up in Blackfoot so we had to go back to Pocatello.  I didn’t have any money and my friend had 11 cents.  A sheepherder picked us up and we slept on the desert that night.  He took us to Pocatello and bought us some breakfast, which sure tasted good.  He got us on the right road for Buhl.  We would get a ride for a few miles, then we would have to walk again.  All we had to eat were a few apricots.  We finally made it after 2 or 3 days.

I sure was glad to get a job sorting some spuds.  They had a mule to pull the sorter.  The people would pick the spuds and dump them on the sorter and I would sort them.  They sorter didn’t have any wheels under it, it just had runners.  After we got the spuds all sorted out, they didn’t have any money to pay me.  They said that we could have spuds for pay.  We took the car out and got several sacks of spuds.  I gave them to my future in-laws as I was living with them at this time.

I later got a job working for a man in Castleford for $15 a month as they would only pay a kid half a man’s wages.  I would have to get up and help do chores and be out in the field by 7 o’clock a.m. and work until 6 o’clock that night.  Once a week I would go to Buhl and take the whole family to a show.  They had family ight once a week at that time.  The whole family could go to the show for 50 cents.  They all looked forward to this.  A bull killed the man I worked for that summer.

I quit Claude Browns, went back to Utah, and stayed there until spring.  Then I came back to Buhl and started to work for Roy Fait.  I helped them tear the old livery stable down.  The West One Bank is located there now.  I helped them put a miniature golf course in there.  I mixed the green for it from sand, sawdust, and feathers.  I can’t remember what we used to make it green.  Then we had to use a heavy roller to smooth it down.  This is when I bought my first car, a 1922 Overland.

Rulon McMurdie and I went to the Shoshone Basin one day to hunt sage hens and on the way up my car quit so we pushed it to the side of the road.  A day or two later we went back to get it and someone had pushed it down an embankment about 100 feet and we had to drive it down the canyon to get it out.  I drove it back to Buhl and took it to a guy to have it fixed.  He charged me $125 dollars and I couldn’t pay him so I just gave him the car.

Rulon and I were working for a guy milking cows.  When we turned them out of the barn, we would grab them by the tail, pull it over their back, grab a hand full of hide on their neck, jump on their backs, and ride them out of the barn.  They sure would buck.  We had a lot of fun until one stepped on my leg and I thought for sure she broke it.  That ended the riding of milk cows.

We were down fishing in the Salmon Canyon and my little dog was lying down just a little way from me.  I heard a noise and turned around and there was a rattle snake.  It had bitten my dog and a little while later he died.  It didn’t take me long to get out of there.  It sure did scare me.

Rulon and I went duck hunting and a man came out to tell us to get out of there.  We asked him who he thought he was talking to.  He said, “Who are you?” and I said, “I am the Game Warden.”  He left us alone and we went on hunting.  We would also stop cars for one light being out and tell them they had better get it fixed.  I made a badge out of a piece of tin.  They didn’t argue with me.  I guess they thought I was a Traffic Cop.

Rulon and I went trapping for muskrats on Deep Creek.  There was a boat there and I got in it to go to the other side.  I got almost in the middle of the creek and the boat tipped over with me in it.  I thought for sure I was going to drown because I had a sheep skin coat and a pair of hip boots on.  Rulon just sat on the bank laughing at me.  I finally got out and thought I would freez to death because it was snowing and blowing.  We couldn’t even make a fire because there wasn’t anything to burn so we got in Rulon’s old Model-T Ford with no top on it and drove home.  I was sure glad to get to a warm house.

We were coming home one evening and there was a truck load of apples ahead of us.  I got the lariat rope and got on the front of the car.  I was going to lariat a box of them and just as I got close enough to throw, they turned the corner into Buhl so we didn’t get any apples.

Every time we would go down the road passed this man’s house, a mean dog would come out after us.  I told Rulon the next time he came out after us, I would shoot him and sure enough, he came out after us and I shot and killed him.  That night the sheriff came and said he wanted to talk to us.  He took us up to the City Hall.  The guy was there that owned the dog.  We knew then that we were in trouble.  He said I shot the dog and hit his boy and I called him a damn liar.  The sheriff said, “none of that” and he got me by the shoulder and locked us both up in jail all night.  We didn’t have anything to eat all that night and the next morning.  Rulon’s mother and sister, Carrie, brought us something to eat.  We sure were glad to see them.  They let us out that afternoon.  That really taught us a lesson to be good as we didn’t want to go to jail again.  They just had the old iron beds and we didn’t have any blankets.  That learned us to be good kids as I thought if that is the way jails were, we didn’t want any part of them.

The government wanted me, and friend of mine, and some other men to round up wild horses, and drive them from Bliss, Idaho to Elko, Nevada.  They corralled them there and shipped them out on a train.  I don’t know now where to, but we didn’t go because this man’s wife didn’t want him to go.  They said we wouldn’t be riding the same horse when we got there as we did when we left.

I started dating Clara McMurdie when I worked at the golf course.  We had known each other in grade school in Richmond, Utah.  My sister, Carrie, married her brother, Lorus.  They moved to Buhl, Idaho and that’s why I came to Buhl.  I stayed in Buhl for a while and then went back to Richmond.  I wrote to Buhl to ask Clara’s folks if we could get married.  I thought if they said no, I was far enough away from them that they couldn’t shoot me.  “Ha, ha!”  But they did say yes so my dad, my mother, and I went to Buhl and we got married at her parent’s home.  They next morning we went back to Richmond to live.

Joseph McMurdie, Clara, RaNae Coley, Ivan Coley

Joseph McMurdie, Clara, RaNae, Ivan

I worked on my dad’s ranch for 2 years.  I packed groceries back in the mountains to my brother and brother-in-law on pack horses as they were up there getting wood out.  We would put two drags of wood that we pulled on 2 horses and we hooked one drag behind the other so the other would hold it back going down the mountain.  It just took one horse to drag it down the hill then we would get the bobsled and take it the rest of the way home.

I used to drive a covered school wagon in the winter.  It was a covered bobsleigh with a hole big enough to put the lines through to drive it and a little window to see through.  I got a dollar a day for driving it.  We had to furnish the horses, bobsleigh, and wagon.

We lived with my folks in one small room of their house.  That spring, we moved into a place closer to town.  We only stayed there a little over a month because we couldn’t afford the rent (it was $5.00).  So we moved back with my folks again.  That fall, we moved into a little 2-room log house.  It cost us 6 dollars a month.  It got so cold we couldn’t keep the rooms warm so we moved our bedspring and mattress out onto the kitchen floor.  We nearly froze to death.  You could see through the cracks in the logs.  We only stayed there 1 week and we moved back with my folks again.  We tried to get them to give us back some of our rent money and they wouldn’t do it.

In the spring, our oldest daughter (Sarah Colleen) was born in the same house and same room that I was born in.  We had to go and get the doctor in a white top buggy as the roads were too muddy.  They wouldn’t get there in a car.

That fall, I threshed the grain and got 50 dollars for my share.  I also topped beets and made 35 dollars.  This is when we moved to Buhl, Idaho.  My brother-in-law, Lorus McMurdie, came down with his car and got us as we didn’t have a car.  We moved in with my wife’s folks.  They lived in an old hotel on 8th street.

Ivan Coley with nephew Gary Coley

Ivan Coley with nephew Gary Coley

Lorus and I took two teams of horses and wagons and drove them up in the Shoshone Basin and cut wood.  All we took with us to eat was spuds, bread, onions, fruit, and bacon.  The spuds froze.  We had to scoop the snow off the ground to put our quilts on the ground to sleep because we didn’t have a sleeping bag or tent.  We would get cold, so we walked alongside the wagon and drove the horses.  One of our loads of wood slipped off the side of the road.  We camped there that night and reloaded the wagon the next morning.  It was so cold, the edge of our quilt froze to the ground.  We were supposed to get 3 dollars a cord for the wood (split and cut).  He never did pay us.

I went to work for Jess Eastman.  We walked to work and back.  I had to be there at 7 o’clock in the morning and work until 7 o’clock at night.  It was four miles down there and four miles back.  If we were lucky, we would get a ride once and a while.  We had to take our own lunch.  Once in a while after I got home, I would go back to work at Shields warehouse shoveling clover seed in bins until 10 o’clock or midnight and be ready for work again at 7 o’clock the next morning.

Art, Golden, Wilfred, Roland, Lloyd, Edna, Hannah, Carrie, Lillian, Ivan at their mother's grave 17 August 1961

Art, Golden, Wilfred, Roland, Lloyd, Edna, Hannah, Carrie, Lillian, Ivan at their mother’s grave 17 August 1961

We lived with my wife’s folks in that old hotel.  The next spring we moved down closer to our work.  One night I came home and there were a bundh of people there and I couldn’t figure out why.  I soon found they had a strawberry roan horse for me to break and ride.  They said if I could ride it they would buy me a new cowboy hat.  I put the saddle on it and snubbed it up to another horse.  I climbed on her and they turned her loose.  The first jump she made, my hat flew off and she tore every button off my shirt.  She sure did some bucking and bawling.  You could hear her for a half mile.  She headed for a rock fence and Lorus, my brother-in-law, was on his horse.  He tried to keep her away from the rock fence and his stirrup on the saddle broke and he fell off.  When the horse got to the rock fence she turned and quit bucking.  I rode her every day for three weeks and every time I got on her she wanted to buck.  I won my new hat, but I sure did earn it!  I bought a fat cow for 10 dollars and butchered her.  We didn’t have a deep freezer at that time so we hung the meat outside and hoped it stayed frozen.  Some of it thawed out and froze again and boy did we get a belly ache.  We sure did run races for the outhouse (ha, ha!).

We didn’t have electricity or telephones.  I finally got enough money to buy a Model T Ford for 25 dollars and we didn’t have to walk so much anymore.  We finally moved ourselves down to Jess Eastman’s and I worked for him for 3 years.  He didn’t have the money to hire us any longer, so we got me a job uptown sorting spuds for 15 cents an hour.  We would go at 7 o’clock a.m and sometimes work until midnight nearly every night.  We finally bought the old shack we were living in for 50 dollars and moved it on a lot on 8th Street in Buhl.  It cost us 15 dollars to have it moved.  It was the first house on lower 8th Street in Buhl at that time.  The house was 2 rooms and the walls were plastered with mud and straw.  We took cheesecloth and old rags and pasted on the walls then we wallpapered over that and made it real cute.  We had orange crates nailed on the walls for cupboards.  We bought the lot next to us for 25 dollars.  We just lived there a short time.  Our son, “Bud” Lorus, was born.

Ivan, Danny, Bud, RaNae

Ivan holding Danny Todd, Bud, RaNae

Then we moved to Castleford and I farmed for a guy for 30 dollars a month.  He hired 2 other men to help me farm it.  He paid one 15 dollars and the other 10 dollars a month and we had to board and feed them.  He gave us a table and chairs for their board.  We still have their chairs.  We started breaking horses and we hitched them up to the wagon one time and they ran away.  The lane they ran down wasn’t wide enough for the wagon as it was just a cow lane.  They tore the wagon all to pieces and all they had left when they stopped was the tongue and front wheels.

We stayed here for about a year and a half and then we moved and worked for another man for about a year.  He made me mad as he didn’t keep his promise to give me a couple of heifers.  I was bunching clover with a pitchfork and he came and told me he couldn’t give them to me.  He promised me that spring that if I would stay with him, he would give them to me as a bonus and that fall he backed out on his deal.  I told him I was going to quit and he said I couldn’t.  So I showed him I could and left the pitchfork in the field and walked out on him.

Siblings Ivan, Carrie, and Roland

Siblings Ivan, Carrie, and Roland

The next day we went to Utah and saw my folks.  When we came back we moved again to Melon Valley (known as Little Country Club).  We only stayed there a short time until spring.  I would walk to town (about 4 miles) to sort spuds as we couldn’t afford to drive the car.  Sometimes we would stay all day waiting to work and they would come tell us that we wouldn’t be working that day and to come back tomorrow.

It was cold and I was going to drive the car that morning.  I couldn’t afford alcohol at that time as there wasn’t any anti-freeze in those days, so I put fuel oil in the radiator.  It got hot and blew it all out, so I had to put water in it and drain it out when I got to work, then put more in it when I came home and cover the radiator with a blanket to keep it from freezing.

I bought a cow for 30 dollars and had her for a while.  Then I traded her for 2 heifers that were going to freshen.  I took them to my father-in-law’s and when they freshened, he milked them.  Later, I bought another one and let him milk her too for the milk as we had moved to Castleford.  I worked for a man out there for 30 dollars a month and he wouldn’t let me keep them.  I worked there for about 2 years and then we moved to Melon Valley where we rented a place from Stan Webber.

Coley 60th

We got 1300 dollars from FHA and bought some cows, a team of horses, and some machinery to get started with.  We didn’t think we would ever pay it back as that seemed like a lot of money to us, but in 2 years, we had it paid off.  It was a hard struggle and some of our horses died.  One died with colic and one foundered on grain and died.  Our cattle kept dying and we couldn’t figure out what was wrong.  We finally found out they were eating wild parsnips.  Another time we woke up in the night and saw the chicken coop was on fire.  WE jumped out of bed and ran to get the neighbors.  They came to help us put the fire out, but it was too late.  It burned down the coop and one hundred little chicks.  We had 6 hens setting outside the coop and they burned right on the nests as the dump things wouldn’t leave their nests.  I had just went to town that day and bought one hundred pounds of chick feed and kerosene for the brooder as we didn’t have electricity.  I had been sleeping out in the coop in order to watch the brooder so it didn’t get too hot.  I decided to sleep in the house that night as they had been getting along so good.  It’s a good thing I did or I might have been roasted with the chickens!

We used to go salmon fishing.  Sometimes it was a lot of fun when they let us spear them.  I went elk, deer, and antelope hunting as it was a lot of fun.  We usually got our limit of game.  I killed a big brown bear and had a rug made of it and a few years later, I got a little black cub.  We had him mounted standing up on a frame.

Clara and Ivan Coley

We rented the ranch for 3 years and decided what money we were giving for rent, we might just as well be buying it.  We bought the one hundred sixty acres for 10 thousand dollars.  We sure did raise some good beets and potatoes.  We used to have good times there.  Every Saturday night, there would be a get-together of the valley people.  We would take our families and have a dance and potluck.  We sure did have fun and the little kids would dance.  We wouldn’t have to worry where they were or what they were doing.

Our third child Clarene RaNae was born.  After that my health wasn’t very good.  I had to have surgery and we had to borrow $8,060 and mortgage everything we had to get the money.  We bought a few more cows to milk as we figured that was the only way we could pay the money back.  We had a hard struggle but we made it.  We farmed and lived on that place for 21 years, then we sold it to our neighbor and moved to town where we are living now.

I got a job for the City where I worked for 8 1/2 years.  I got hurt on the job and had to quit as the doctor said I wasn’t able to do any hard work again.

Clara and Ivan Coley

I always tried to go fishing and hunting every year.  One time, my father-in-law and I and about 4 others went in the Selway to hunt elk.  WE got snowed in for 12 days.  The guy that packed the hunters in and out lost 17 head of pack mules over a cliff as they tied one behind the other as they had to follow a narrow trail around the mountain.  We asked the guy that lost them if he ever found them again.  He said “Yes, everyone of them came home later on”.  It was about 70 miles from where he lost them to where he lived.  One of the hunters that he had packed in had a heart attack and died while we were there and all we had to get him out of there was my horse and the packers horse.  We left camp at 7 o’clock that night and didn’t get him to camp til about 7 o’clock the next morning as the horses had to wade in snow to their bellies.  We left him in one of the camps for 2 days until the forest service could get in to get him out.

Nichol Harms, Ivan, Alisa Harms on 6 March 1977

Nichol Harms, Ivan, Alisa Harms on 6 March 1977

Another time we went in we rolled my two mules down the mountain.  It didn’t hurt them.  We got them out again.  Another time two other saddle horses rolled down the mountain within about 30 minutes apart.  It sure was steep, but we had a good time and would look forward to going back the next year.  My father-in-law said I know I should not have came and maybe you would have got your elk and wouldn’t have got snowed in.  We just laughed.

The other time, I took my father-in-law fishing and we were in the boats.  I cast my line out and didn’t think I case out far enough.  When I reeled in, I had a pair of glasses on my hook.  I couldn’t figure out where they came from.  Dad felt his eyes and his glasses were gone.  He said, “How in the devil did that happen?  I thought I felt something jerk on my ears”.  We sure did have a good laugh out of that.  He often talked about it and had a good laugh.  I still don’t know how I ever hooked onto them without him knowing it.  We sure had some good times together.  One other time, we had been up to Galena Summit getting out corral poles.  We were coming home and we had a horse in a trailer.  A car was trying to pass us and she ran off the side of the road.  It looked like she was going to hit a telephone pole.  She swerved back onto the road and she it our car on the hind wheel and it threw the horse out of the trailer onto the front of our car.  It hurt his back and he couldn’t get up so we had to shoot him.

Ivan and Clara 60th

We used to take our children camping and fishing when they were little.  Then came the grandchildren.  We used to take them fishing and camping.  We sure did enjoy having them with us.  Now they are growing up and have their friends and activities.  So now we just go alone.  We sure do miss them but we still have our memories of the past.  Would like to relieve some of the happy ones again.

~

Had Ivan of lived one more month, we could have celebrated our 64th wedding anniversary as he passed away on the 22nd of September, 1994.  Our anniversary was the 22nd of October.  He hadn’t been well for a long time as he got to where he couldn’t see to drive a car and was going to the doctor off and on for a year or two.  They didn’t seem to know what was wrong with him until it was too late.  They found out it was melanoma cancer of the rectum.  They operated on him on January 18,1994 and they said they got 99.9 percent of it.  They thought they had the worst of it, but he lived just 8 months longer when he passed away.

We bought us a nice self contained trailer house.  It had a propane refrigerator in it.  It sure was nice, but we didn’t get to enjoy it very much as he didn’t feel like going.  We bought it the year before.

The last month, he sure suffered.  We sure had a lot of memories behind us.  A lot of them were good and a lot of them were bad.  We wondered sometimes if we would make it.  But I guess that’s the way life is.  As they say, we have to have trials to learn to appreciate the good times and we had a lot of good times together.  I sure miss them and him.  But we still had a lot of good memories.

Wanner, John George, Jr. and Eliza Sterling/Regina Nuffer

I found this biography written by Mary Louise Wanner Andra of her parents.  I will write a separate history for them in the future, but I thought I would make this one available unadulterated by me (typed completely as written in the book, although I added the photo).

This biography was published in Whitney Centennial 1889-1989: Whitney’s First 100 Years.  It was published in 1991 by the Whitney Ward, written and edited by the Whitney Ward Centennial Book Committee.

John George Wanner Jr Family abt 1912. (l-r): Eva, William, Golden, Serge (sitting), John, Regina, Rulon, Willard, Mary.

Our father, John George Wanner, Jr., was born in Holzgerlingen, Neckarkreis, Wuerttemberg 29 October, 1870.  His parents were John George Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  He was the oldest in the family of five boys and five girls.

His father had a small farm and some cattle.  He was also a road overseer.  So dad, his mother and brother and sisters did most of the farm work.  They also got wood from the forest for winter fuel.

Dad’s parents were very religious people and belonged to the Lutheran church.  They were very hard workers and tried to teach their children correct principles.  Dad tried hard to follow in their footsteps.

His parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1891.  They made sure all their children were baptized as they became of age.  His parents could see that it was the only true church on the earth, and they wanted to go to America, where they could worship as they wished.  They also felt it would give their children a better opportunity in life.

His parents were the only ones in their respective families who joined the LDS church.  Our dad was baptized in July in 1891, and came to America with one of the missionaries – a brother Terrell who was from Providence, Utah.  Brother Terrell took good care of him and helped find work for him to do and provide for himself.

Dad got a job working for brother Fred Nuffer in Glendale, Oneida County (now Franklin County), Idaho.  In 1893 his father, mother, and his brothers and sisters came to Cache Valley from Germany.  Dad and brother Nuffer met them with a wagon and buggy in Franklin, Oneida County, Idaho, June 18, 1893.  I am sure he was happy to see his family again, as it had been almost two years since he had seen any of them.

Dad met a lovely girl from Providence, Utah, by the name of Eliza Sterling, and this relationship blossomed into marriage in 1894.  They were blessed with two sons, George and Earl Wayne.  This marriage was not a very happy one and they were divorced.

On the 31st of August 1898, dad married Regina Nuffer who was a sister of our uncle Charles August Nuffer.  [Daughter of the marriage of Eva Katherine Greiner and Johann Christopher Nuffer]  On 9 November 1899, they were blessed with twin boys, William and Willard.  As time went on they were blessed with more children, a total of five boys and two girls.

Dad went on a mission to Germany in the fall of 1907, leaving a wife and six children.  On March 8, 1908, their son Serge was born.  Mother and the family were living in a home John Nuffer built for dad.  It is a rock house on East Oneida Street in Preston, Idaho.  This house is still standing and is in good condition at this writing – June 1979.

When Serge was a few months old, mother took all the children and had a picture taken and sent it to dad so he could see the new baby.

While Dad was in Germany, he met William Andra’s mother and family and baptized the eldest daughter Freda.

In 1910, Dad’s mother and father sold their home and farm in Whitney to Dad.  This is the farm Lawrence Bodily now has.  Dad built a red barn that is still in use on the farm.  After grandpa and grandma sold their farm to dad, they moved to Logan, Utah.

In 1913 dad’s parents, brothers and sisters had a family reunion at their home in Whitney.  There was a large crowd and we all had a good time.

We all had to work hard and dad relied on his daughter Mary for many hard farm jobs.  However, on Saturday nights he would take us to the picture show and give us each 25¢ to spend on the show and treats.

In 1917, I begged to take the sewing class at the USAC in Logan, as I wanted to learn to sew.  However, I was only there a short time when dad brought me home to work on the dry farm.  I have always felt bad about this as I wanted to learn to sew.

My brother, William, enlisted in the Army on August 5, 1917.  He was with the 145th Light Field Artillery, Battery C.  He left Salt Lake City for Camp Kearney on October 11, 1917.  He left for France August 2, 1918.  William contracted the influenza and died December 1, 1918.  His body was brought home November 11, 1920, and interred in the Whitney Idaho Cemetery.

Just a few days before they got the sad news of William’s death, their son, Golden, died November 26, 1918 in Salt Lake City from influenza.

On January 8, 1921, dad sent his son Willard on a mission to New Zealand.

Dad and mother were to face still more sorrow when their son Rulon died February 26, 1924, in the Logan hospital.

Dad believed in missionary work with all his heart and soul and on December 15, 1925, he went to Tennessee on a six month mission.

In 1928, Serge went to New Zealand on a mission and died there October 5, 1929.  His body was brought home for burial.  The funeral was held in the old opera house in Preston, Idaho.  These were trying times for our parents.  Losing four sons, and all their bodies returned home in a box.  This left them with only one son and two daughters.

On April 7, 1930, dad sent Eva on a mission to California.  Dad was not a stranger to hard work.  He raised crops and took good care of his farm animals.  He took pride in having things looking neat and clean around the farm and yard.

When Dad operated his farm in Whitney, he was always up early in the morning and usually was the first to get to the beet dump in the morning.  The story is told about some of his neighbors who decided to beat him to the dump.  They got up extra early to get a head start.  Before they got to the beet dump, they could hear George Wanner going down the rad ahead of them.  They could hear him saying to his horses, “Gid up–gid up–gid up.”

When dad sold his farm in Whitney, he purchased 40 acres nearer to Preston and built a beautiful home on it.  Part of it is where the Oakwood School is now located.  When he retired he sold his farm and home to his daughter Mary and her husband William Andra.

Dad was successful in the various undertakings he engaged in.  He was one of the first in Preston to have an automobile.  When he brought it home he did not know how to stop it.  He yelled “whoa” when he got in the garage, but before he got it stopped he had gone through the end of the garage.

Dad built the two little homes on the west side of second east and first south in Preston, Idaho.  He also built three homes on first south and the south side of the street in Preston.  Dad and mother lived in one of them until she died in 1942.  Mother was ill for quite a while before she passed away.  Dad cared for her the best he could and would take her for little rides in the car.  She was unable to walk and dad would carry her on his back from place to place as they went visiting.

As many of you will remember, there was a humble side to dad.  I have seen him cry when bearing his testimony and when he was grieved over the death of a loved one, a relative, or friend.  He wanted to leave this world a better place than he found it, and I feel sure he made some contributions and brought this desire to fulfillment.

After mother died, dad remarried and went to live in Salt Lake City, Utah.  This marriage was not successful and they were divorced.  Later on he remarried again and was living in Florida.  He became ill and wanted to get back to Preston.  My son William went to Florida to bring him home, but when they got to Chicago, he was too ill to go on.  So, William put him in the hospital where he passed away on January 5, 1947.

Regina Nuffer was born January 26, 1869 at Neuffen, Germany, a daughter of Johann Cristoph and Eva Katharina Greiner, she came to Utah with her family after they were converted to the gospel.  She married Jacob Scheibel July 15, 1889, in Pleasant Valley, Carbon County, Utah.  Her first child, Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef, was born, September 27, 1889.  When her child was six months old, she and her husband separated and she moved back to Mapleton, Idaho, where she stayed with her parents on their farm.  During this period, she would help people when they were sick, and her mother would take care of her child.

In about 1893, after the death of her mother, she moved to Weber County, Utah, and worked for the Will Taylor family in Farr West and the Bowman family in Ogden.  She again returned to her father’s farm.  On her way home, she stopped in Logan and walked out to Providence to visit a friend.  While eating lunch, she happened to think that she had left her new coat on the train.  She went back to Logan to the train station and they sent out a tracer.  In a few days she got her coat back.  After returning to Idaho, she worked for several people in Franklin and Preston.  She lived in one room of her brother John’s home in Preston.  Her brother was on a mission in Germany at the time.

On August 31, 1898, she married John George Wanner in Logan, Utah.  That winter she lived on his ranch in Worm Creek or Glendale, Idaho.  In April she moved with her husband, daughter, and step son, Wayne, to the Bancroft flat, a little west of where Grace is now.

She was known as a fine, well mannered woman.  Her niece, Athene Hampton, said that toward the end of her life her health was not very good and she had a hard time speaking.  When Athene and Louisa Nuffer would visit, they would converse by writing notes to each other.  She died on March 10, 1942, in Preston, Idaho.  Her funeral in Preston was very well attended.

George and Caroline Coley

Since I just finished writing about Theophilus and Martha France, I thought I would write about the other sibling whose photo also appeared in the collection mentioned.  As I wrote about before, I was able to scan a stash of photos that belonged to my Great Grandmother, whose father, Herbert Coley, was a brother to George and Martha.  I have yet to write his history.

I have never been able to track down members of the family of George and Caroline, although plenty of people have told me where to find them.  Each lead has come up short.  Like other photos, I will write what I know and hope someone may come to me.

George Harry Coley was born 16 Apr 1868 in Lutley, Worcestershire, England to Stephen and Hannah Maria Rogers Coley.  As I will write about later, there the family joined the LDS church, George joined 22 August 1881.  The family immigrated in 1890 to Zion and settled in Lewiston, Cache, Utah.

George, who went by Harry, had not been in Utah long when he met Caroline Wilson.  She was born 11 February 1871 in Bishop Auckland, Durham, England.

George and Caroline were married in LDS Temple in Logan, Cache, Utah on 23 November 1892.  To their marriage were born 12 children.

Myrtle Coley born 8 September 1893 and died 20 September 1894, both in Lewiston.

Wallace W Coley born 28 August 1894 in Franklin, Franklin, Idaho and died 21 June 1895 in Lewiston.

Melvin Harris Coley born 16 September 1895 in Lewiston and died 25 November 1940 in Rupert, Minidoka, Idaho.  He married Orlean Dopp.

Lucilla Coley born 17 Dec 1897 and died 4 May 1993, both in Lewiston.  She married Cethel Jay Van Orden.

Rosella Coley born 24 January 1899 in Lewiston and died 3 August 1971 in Nampa, Canyon, Idaho.  She married Lloyd Rawlins Hogan and Milton Rawlins.

Lloyd Goldsbrough Coley born 30 Mar 1900 in Lewiston and died 15 February 1965 in Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho.  He married Verna Dorothy Shipley and Opal Jenkins.

Gretta Coley born 1 August 1901 in Lewiston and died 15 April 1990 in Shasta County, California.  She married Stanley Alexander Picot.

Edith Coley born 25 September 1902 in Lewiston and died 19 December 1954.  I do not know where she died.  She married Golden Keith Cunningham (who lived to 100).

Stewart Leroy Coley born 30 January 1904 and died 28 December 1982 in Lewiston.  He married Lola Margaret Richardson.

Ethel May Coley born 12 May 1905 in Lewiston and died 15 November 1987 in Calaveras County, California.  She married Harry Fisher Croshaw.

Thelma Coley born 30 June 1909 and died 16 May 1912, both in Lewiston.

Keith Coley born 2 April 1913 in Lewiston and died 24 November 1961.  I do not know where he died or if he married.

George Harry died 16 April 1933 in Lewiston at 65 years old.  Caroline died 22 July 1958 in Lewiston at 87.  Many of the family are buried in the Lewiston Cemetery.

Theophilus and Martha France

In an odd twist of fate, I thought I might share my latest story in search of the family of Theophilus and Martha France.  I stumbled on this photograph when scanning the photos of my Great Great Grandmother.  She married Herbert Coley, whose sister, Martha Ann, is shown above.  This photo was in the collection, likely from Martha France herself, to my Great Great Grandfather Herbert.  The photo just had the two names written on the back of the photo.

Since, I have tried to track down the family with little or no success.  I will give some of the limited history I know at this point and then close with my latest little find.

Theophilus was born 26 December 1863 in Dudley, Staffordshire, England.  He married Martha Ann Coley 4 November 1891 in Logan, Cache, Utah in the Logan LDS Temple.  Martha was born 18 August 1860 in Lutley, Worcestershire, England to Stephen and Hannah Maria Rogers Coley.  I will write more on this family later.

Theophilus was a musician that took the family to various places chasing performing and music instructions.  Mostly in Cache Valley, but also taking in a jaunt to Salina, Sevier, Utah.

Born to the family were 5 children.

Ada France born 1 April 1893 in Franklin, Franklin, Idaho and died 14 February 1957 in Caldwell, Canyon, Idaho.  She married Henry James Flippence.

Marguerite France born 19 October 1894 in Franklin and died 20 Mar 1936 in Logan.  She married George Bright.

Wilford France born 25 Mar 1897 in Lewiston, Cache, Utah and died 28 August 1986 in Los Angeles County, California.  He married Elsie Arvilla Brown.

John France born 22 May 1899 in Lewiston and died 18 June 1953 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  He married Meryln Burton.

Beatrice France born 16 October 1901 in Lewiston and died 14 October 1997 in Salt Lake City.  She married Robert Wallace Ekenstam.

From the census records, it appears Martha had a son (maybe a brother) named Frank.  He appears and then disappears.  I believe he was a cousin who came over from England and then died, married, or just moved away.  I cannot trace him down again, so this is one question I have always wanted to answer.  But finding a member of this family has not proved easy.

I knew Theophilus and Martha are buried in the Lewiston Cemetery.  Her brother, George, and their parents, Stephen and Hannah, my Great Great Great Grandparents are also buried there.  Theophilus died 30 October 1923 in Lewiston.  I do not even know where Martha died, other than on 18 July 1949.

George Bright and Marguerite Coley had at least 8 children, but only one of them lived to marry.  I knew her name was Gennevieve Bright and that she had married a man by the name of Elvon Monson Jensen 22 April 1947.  He died in 1990 and trying to track down a lady Jensen in Utah or Idaho, especially where she could have remarried, seemed an impossible task.  I left it there and tried some of the other lines.

This past week I was in my office and visiting with the wife of the other attorney who I rent office space.  I knew Kent was from Preston and in a lull of the conversation asked the name of Kent’s parents.  She mentioned Elvon and Gennevieve.  I could not tell where, but I knew that Elvon Jensen was in my family history.  That night I looked him up and sure enough, there he was.  I rent office space in Burley, Idaho from my 3rd cousin, once removed!  Kent’s children are my 4th cousins.

It was with some sweet satisfaction that I was able to provide a copy of the photograph above to him.  He had not seen a picture of them before.  I asked that he put me in contact with the member of his family who does the family history on the France/Coley line.  Maybe I can help bridge some of the divide and flesh out more fully the Coley line in Utah and Idaho.

The picture above was scanned in 2006.  Who knew that I would be providing a photo of ancestors to a line who did not have a photograph.  Maybe there will be more such stories in the future with all the photos I have and continue to make available.  We can only hope.