The Burks

John and Charlotte Burk and the four boys John, George, Jim, Robert

John and Charlotte Burk and the four boys John, George, Jim, Robert

Again, scanning photos for some friends.  This photo intrigued me.  I would like to introduce you to the Burk family.  I assume this picture is at their home in Buffalo, Washington, Pennsylvania.  They were living in Buffalo on both the 1920 and 1930 censuses.

John Davis Burk was born 29 November 1873 in Buffalo to Henry and Mary Earnest Burk.  Somewhere along the way he met Charlotte Fyfe.

Charlotte Fyfe

Charlotte Fyfe

Charlotte Fyfe was born 15 August 1893 in Scofield, Carbon, Utah to William Weir and Christina Wylie Fyfe (sometimes spelled Fife).

I have written of Charlotte’s nephew, William Weir Bridges, and sister, Agnes Fyfe Ashcraft.

John and Charlotte married 14 October 1914 in St Anthony, Fremont, Idaho.  The marriage certificate indicates she lived in Lyman, Madison, Idaho and he lived in Washington, Washington, Idaho.

John and Charlotte had at least 7 children.  I don’t know much on them, but here is the limited information I have.

John W Burk was born 17 August 1915 in Idaho and died 6 July 1986.  He is buried at Forest Lawn Cemetery in McMurray, Washington, Pennsylvania.

George H Burk was born 4 March 1919 in Buffalo and died 7 October 1986 in Washington, Washington, Pennsylvania.

James Edward Burk was born 23 September 1921 in Buffalo and died 8 November 2007 in Washington, Pennsylvania.

George & James Burk

George & James Burk

Robert W Burk was born around 1923 in Buffalo and died.

John, George, James, and Robert Burk

John, George, James, and Robert Burk

Robert Burk

Robert Burk

 

Joseph E Burk was born 26 December 1924 in Buffalo and died 23 January 2012 in Washington, Pennsylvania.

Theodore Smith Burk was born 13 August 1927 in Buffalo and died 31 March 2008 in Washington, Pennsylvania.

Dora Marie Burk was born in around 1936 and as far as I can tell is still alive.

John Davis Burk died 1 October 1963.  Charlotte died 13 January 1973 in Washington, Pennsylvania.

White Clouds

It has been several months, but here are some pictures from our Super Activity for this year.  We went as a Scout Troop, but just the Priest’s Quorum of the Paul 1st Ward.  We went to the White Clouds here in Idaho.  We left around 6:00 AM and drove to the 4th of July trail head.

Looking back with 4th of July Lake behind us.

Looking back with 4th of July Lake behind us.

Our first day we hiked over Ants Basin and in to the Born Lakes.

Saddle near Blackman Peak looking toward the White Clouds down the Warm Creek watershed

Saddle near Blackman Peak looking toward the White Clouds down the Warm Creek watershed.

Looking toward the Born Lakes.  Devil's Staircase is the rockslide down from the notch in the distance

Looking toward the Born Lakes. Devil’s Staircase is the rock slide down from the deepest notch in the horizon.

We camped at the last lake that still had somewhere to camp around it on the far northwest bank of the lake, just near where the water enters the lake.  From our camp at the Born Lake, some call it the third lake, some call it the fourth lake, looking back the way we came earlier in the day.

Looking back across our Born Lake.  Martin Barclay stands in the picture.

Looking back across our Born Lake. Martin Barclay stands in the picture.

From our Camp at this Born Lake, the ridge to the south east of us is quite imposing.  You can see the jagged rocks standing as sentinels.

The ridge to the east of our Born Lake.

The ridge to the east of our Born Lake.

We could also look up at the climb that awaited us the next morning.  The aptly named, Devil’s Staircase.

You can see the "tooth" in the saddle at the top of Devil's Staircase.

You can see the “tooth” in the saddle at the top of Devil’s Staircase.

We set up camp and enjoyed our evening.

Kerry Sandford stands behind his tent, Ryan Lindsay stands behind the fire, Dallin Fisher sits preparing dinner, Austin Silver warms, and Paul Ross sets up his tent.

Kerry Sandford stands behind his tent, Ryan Lindsay stands behind the fire, Dallin Fisher sits preparing dinner, Austin Silver warms, and Paul Ross sets up his tent.

The next morning arrived and we all arose for the feat before us.  We ate breakfast and mulled around.  Nobody overly anxious to start the climb.

Sitting after morning breakfast, Austin Silva, Greg Ellinger, Michael Fisher, Paul Ross

Sitting after morning breakfast, Austin Silva, Greg Ellinger, Michael Fisher, Paul Ross.

The time to depart finally arrived.  We tanked up on water and left.

Austin Silva, Paul Ross, Greg Ellinger, Martin Barclay.

Austin Silva, Paul Ross, Greg Ellinger, Martin Barclay.

This is from the lake at the base of Devil’s Staircase.  Obviously at a 45 angle to get the entire climb into the photo.

Devil's Staircase

Devil’s Staircase

Another shot of us starting to ascend.

The team moving upward, Greg Ellinger, Paul Ross, Ryan Lindsay, and Dallin Fisher with more farther up the climb.

The team moving upward, Greg Ellinger, Paul Ross, Ryan Lindsay, and Dallin Fisher with more farther up the climb.

A view from the top of Devil’s Staircase looking back over the Born Lakes.

Looking back over Born Lakes and the Warm Springs Creek Basin.

Looking back over Born Lakes and the Warm Springs Creek Basin.

Top of Devil's Staircase looking east over the Slickenside Basin.

Top of Devil’s Staircase looking east over the Slickenside Basin.

Looking up at Devil's Staircase from Shallow Lake.

Looking up at Devil’s Staircase from Shallow Lake.

We took a much needed breather and rest at Shallow Lake after coming off Devil’s Staircase.

Paul Ross, Kerry Sanford, Martin Barclay, Josh Barclay, Ryan Lindsay at Shallow Lake.

Paul Ross, Kerry Sanford, Martin Barclay, Josh Barclay, Ryan Lindsay at Shallow Lake.

Austin Silva and Greg Ellinger soothing their feet in Shallow Lake.

Austin Silva and Greg Ellinger soothing their feet in Shallow Lake.

We passed Shallow Lake and Scree Lake before we descended the steep decline along Slickenside Creek.  Here is a shot just past Scree Lake with Castle Peak starting to emerge.  Can you see why the ridge from Merriam Peak to the left to Castle Peak is called Serrated Ridge?

Merriam Peak, Serrated Ridge, and Castle Peak

Merriam Peak, Serrated Ridge, and Castle Peak.

Looking across Quiet Lake at Serrated Ridge and Castle Peak.

Looking across Quiet Lake at Serrated Ridge and Castle Peak.

Serrated Ridge with a number of rocks that look like men standing guard.

Serrated Ridge with a number of rocks that look like men standing guard.

Our campsite on the west side of provided a much needed collapsing station.

Quiet Lake Camp

Quiet Lake Camp

Oh, and swim.

Austin Silva diving into Quiet Lake.

Austin Silva diving into Quiet Lake.

I did not add more of the swimming pictures in case somebody might get upset.  But the water was deep enough to dive in and swim around, cold enough to keep it short.

Another view of the Serrated Ridge from our camp.

Another view of the Serrated Ridge from our camp.

We crashed pretty hard that night.  The dreams were not necessarily pleasant knowing we had to do it again the next day.

The next morning we arose, ate breakfast, and started preparing for our final ascent.  We were exhausted by this point so nobody thought much of taking pictures.  This is part of our climb out of camp toward the Four Lakes Basin.

Climbing toward Four Lakes Basin.

Climbing toward Four Lakes Basin.

We eventually found Cornice Lake, Emerald Lake, Rock Lake, and Glacier Lake.  Here is a picture of Castle Peak with Rock Lake in the foreground.

Rock Lake and Castle Peak.

Rock Lake and Castle Peak.

It was a long haul climbing Patterson Peak.

Greg Ellinger (in black), Kerry Sanford, Martin Barclay, Austin Silva, and Ryan Lindsay.

Greg Ellinger (in black), Kerry Sanford, Martin Barclay, Austin Silva, and Ryan Lindsay.

Four Lakes Basin and Castle Peak from near the top of Patterson Peak.

Four Lakes Basin and Castle Peak from the saddle nearing the top of Patterson Peak.

I hope the above picture gives some idea of the climb we just came up.  Plus the drop-off is enough that you cannot see any of Quiet Lake beyond the basin.  It was a hard climb.  Cornice Lake is the furthest with Emerald Lake just closer from it.  Rock Lake is to the right of Emerald Lake, and Glacier Lake is closest.  Then it was time to descend the other side.  It looked so unsafe we were consulting the map just to find out how to get down.  It was steep enough we could not see the whole trail down.

Paul Ross and Kerry Sanford trying how to get off this ridge to Fourth of July Lake below.

Paul Ross and Kerry Sanford trying how to get off this ridge to Fourth of July Lake below.

Closest is Greg Ellinger, then Ryan Lindsay, and Austin Silva with Patterson Peak in the background.

Closest is Greg Ellinger, then Ryan Lindsay, and Austin Silva with Patterson Peak in the background.

The steep descent, Austin Silva, Ryan Lindsay, Greg Ellinger.

The steep descent, Austin Silva, Ryan Lindsay, Greg Ellinger.

As you can see from this picture, we came down the rock slides of Patterson Peak (on the right).  Half our group took the one right in the middle, the rest trying coming down the left slides (which turned out to be less safe and more steep).

Between Patterson Peak and 4th of July Lake.

Between Patterson Peak and 4th of July Lake.

Here is what remained of our party at the end of the third day.  We were all so anxious to get out nobody took any more pictures.  Plus, all our cameras had died or were out of film.

Patterson Peak with (l-r) Paul Ross, Austin Silva, Dallin Fisher, Michael Fisher, Greg Ellinger, Ryan Lindsay, Kerry Sanford, Martin Barclay, and Josh Barclay.  Art Silva took the picture.

Patterson Peak with (l-r) Paul Ross, Austin Silva, Dallin Fisher, Michael Fisher, Greg Ellinger, Ryan Lindsay, Kerry Sanford, Martin Barclay, and Josh Barclay. Art Silva took the picture.

Grandpa and Grandma Wanner

I have previously provided a limited history of Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Schmid.  As I wrote that history and compiled some other histories, I kept finding a couple of references to a history written by Edna Wagstaff Owen.  I started trying to contact a member of that family and to see if they had a copy of that history.  Fortunately after some time, a copy of that history was provided.  I now provide it in full with minimal edits.

Wanner Family about 1895,

Wanner Family about 1895,

Grandpa and Grandma Wanner
Compiled and delivered by Edna Wagstaff Owen at the Wanner, Schmid reunion at Lagoon in Farmington, Utah on Saturday, 17 June 1978
I was asked a few day ago to represent Mary Wanner Wagstaff’s family at the 1978 Wanner – Schmid reunion, to do something on the program. I haven’t had much time to get ready for it and really didn’t know what I could do. After much thought and meditation, I decided it would be nice to honor Grandpa and Grandma Wanner by telling you a few things I can remember about them.
On 6 June 1870, a little 24 year old man from Holzgerlingen, Germany, John George Wanner and a beautiful 21 year old girl, with beautiful auburn hair named Anna Maria Schmid from Holzgerlingen, Germany were married and started a life for themselves together.
This lovely couple, we love to call our grandparents, became the proud parents of 10 children – 5 boys and 5 girls, all of whom lived long good lives, except 2 sons, who died in Germany and dear Aunt Pauline, who passed on at the age of 37. Their youngest daughter Wilhelmina is here with us today and we are honoring her. She is 90 years young. They have had 73 grandchildren born to them and now their posterity runs into the hundreds.
They dearly loved these children and tried untiringly to bring them up and taught them by example as well as precept. Some of the great qualities they left us always to love the Lord and our fellowman. To be honest always and how to work. I don’t know of one of their children, grandchildren or great grandchildren, who haven’t tried very hard to do this.
Grandpa and Grandma never lost sight of what they left Germany for – which was the Gospel and to live in America where they were free and could worship as they choose.
It was in May 1891 while Grandpa was working on the highway, two missionaries came along and told him about the Gospel and the Lord’s work. In October 1891, they and their three eldest daughters were baptized. George was the first to be baptized in July 1891 and came over to America with one of the missionaries, Brother Terrell from Providence, Utah. Louise, Frederich and Pauline were baptized in June 1894. Gottlob in June 1894 and Wilhelmina in August 1896.
Grandma took the missionaries in and accommodated them with beds, food, etc. and helped them with the German language.
Over in Germany, it was the custom for women to do the farm work, cutting of the hay with a scythe and putting it up by hand. When the children needed shoes or dresses, the shoemaker and the dressmaker would come to the home to do these services.
In writing this little history and remembrances about Grandpa and Grandma Wanner, I thought it would be proper, nice, and informative to tell just a little about the country they lived in before coming to America.
Germany had been a great country and has produced many great and talented people. It has become known as the land of poets and thinkers. Germany as a nation state did not exist until the German Reich of 1871. The Roman Empire was in control for five centuries. It is a diversified country – wooded areas account for 29 percent of the land, providing beautiful forests with hiking trails. The people of Germany love nature and most of the homes have plants and flowers in them.
Germany has become known for its beautiful castles and for being a progressive country. Germany has been described by some of our relatives and friends who, have visited it, as a very beautiful country of mountains, streams, rivers and beautiful forests.
Grandma left behind a sister, a brother and her father. She was the only one that joined the church. She was the youngest in her family. Grandpa was the only one in his family also that joined the church.
What a serious though it must have been to them as they contemplated the LONG, LONG JOURNEY TO AMERICA AND THE HEADQUARTERS OF THE CHURCH WHICH THEY BELONGED TOO.
I wonder if any of us grandchildren can even realize what it meant to undertake the task of bringing their family to America. They sold their property in Germany and packed up the thing they could bring. They left behind their friends, loved ones, and many happy memories. It was brave family, who loved the Lord, were grateful for the Gospel Plan and for their membership in the TRUE CHURCH ON THE EARTH. Such was their faith, and it was enough to bring them through every trial, every hardship, every discouragement that came their way. They triumphed in the end and WE AS THEIR POSTERITY HAVE BEEN GREATLY BLESSED BY THEIR WISDOM, FAITH, AND ENDURANCE.
They rode the train for a day and then got on a ship and went up the Rhine River. This took them three or four days. They then rode the train another day and got on a ship on the North Sea that took them to England; the sea was very turbulent and they had a rough voyage.
At Liverpool they boarded a ship and was on the ocean 13 days. They stayed in New York for two days and in Chicago one day and a night. They then rode the train straight to Franklin, Idaho. They arrived on the 18th of June 1893. This was Uncle Gottlob’s birthday. It was 85 years ago tomorrow.
They were met by their son George and Fred Nuffer, who was the man George was working for. They brought a buggy and wagon and took the family to Brother Nuffer’s place in Cub River. Here they stayed about a week; then purchased the farm of John Nuffer in Glendale, Idaho. It was during this week Grandpa took his daughter Mary, my mother, and they walked to the Bear Lake County seeking a farm and a home to see what was available there. They slept on the ground at nights and saved some of their bread to feed the bears so they wouldn’t bother them. They had to take off their shoes as they forged streams. It was a rough trip.
From Glendale they bought a farm in Whitney and from here to Preston. In 1910 they moved to Logan, Utah to be near the Temple where they could go often. In Logan, they lived at two or three different places, but I wasn’t able to find out for sure. The places I distinctly remember was on 3rd North and two or so block East and their last home in Logan was a lovely home thy built located on 4th North and two blocks East.
The first Sunday they were in Glendale, Grandpa and Grandma went to church with these five beautiful daughters and two sons. My dad, William Addison Wagstaff was the ward clerk and mother had on a red dress; dad looked down at her and winked. You see dad was well past 30 and not married. I bet he thought here is my chance. Of course there were other nice gals available, but he hadn’t married and we are happy he choose mother.
Grandma soon joined the Relief Society and in the minutes of the meetings that I have, tell of her bearing her testimony often and donating eggs, wheat, calico or whatever, when ask to do so.
They had a strong testimony and remained true to the Church and were ardent Temple Workers till their last days on earth.
I feel these parents, children, grandchildren and great grandchildren have accomplished so much in that time 85 years tomorrow, all of the children have gone to the Temple, many have done Temple work and many of the grandchildren and great grandchildren also. Many have gone on Missions. There are Bishops, Doctors, poets, Nurses and professional people in the family.
I being one of the younger ones of Grandpa and Grandma’s grandchildren, I have had the privilege of attending the funerals of some of their children and their children’s mates and many of the grandchildren and I have really been thrilled and lifted up about the wonderful things that have been said – of their good lives – their devotion to their families. I have felt so thrilled and humble to belong to such a good family and I know for a fact the wonderful words that have been spoken are true, because I have observed and could say Amen to it all.
I have felt many times that if Grandpa and Grandma could see their posterity and how wonderful, faithful, devoted they ware; with a strong testimony and ardent Temple workers; they surely would be thrilled and happy.
They taught their children the way they should live by example and precept and each in turn taught their children the same principles and they in turn did the same to their children. This is very commendable, I am sure.
While in Germany, Grandpa worked on the roads and was a road overseer. He also worked in the Black Forest and fought in the Civil War in Germany in 1865 and the war of 1870-71. He also owned a little farm and cattle. He wasn’t a very large man about 5 foot 6 inches. He always looked well dressed, clean and very nice.
Grandma was about 5 foot 3 or 4 inches and had a good shape. She always fixed her hair so beautiful, she looked nice and well dressed. I can remember this beautiful black knit winter dress she had and she always wore gloves.
While in Logan Grandpa always had a lively horse, a good looking single black buggy and a real snazzy buggy whip. This one place they lived on in Logan had an extra lot where he grew hay for his horse and he’d cut it with a scythe. They also always had a nice garden and beautiful flowers. As I remember this home was on 3rd North and a few blocks East.
They were hard working, thrifty people and handled their affairs very well. They really made hay while the sun shone and were able to retire at a reasonable age and had enough to live on plus an estate they left.
Speaking of hard working people which they were, their children were also. I know Mother always worked in the fields, had a lovely garden – flowers and fruits and berries. Also plus making soap, butter, curing meat and those good sausages and canning besides washing on the board and knitting stockings for all of us 8 children, one pair for Sunday and one for school and everyday use. I know mother’s sisters and brothers were of the same caliber.
Now I have just mentioned Mother mostly, but I guess because I knew her better, but I have observed through my life and I know for a fact that all their children, grandchildren and great grandchildren have been hard working people and early risers. At least I and my brothers and sisters and all my children know how to work, so some of it has rubbed off.
I am sure life for them in Germany was hard. It wasn’t always sunshine and roses. Of course all of us knew we’d have trials and sorrows to go thru when we came to earth and I’m sure they had their share.
Grandma lost her mother at age two and she was said her stepmother wasn’t very good to her. She said her father was a weaver and Grandma had to walk many miles through dark woods at night to deliver the linen to different customers. She’d carry it on her head with arms and hands to help. Often she was afraid she prayed and was never harmed. She said many times all she had to eat was a piece of brown bread and potato peeling soup, but she was thankful for that.
I feel sure Grandma and Grandpa had many happy times, but they also knew sorrow. It must have been heart breaking to loose their two little boys at a tender age and have to leave them buried in Germany, when they came to America. I’m sure as most all parents are, they were grieved at times over their children’s actions.
In Germany they all worked hard to help make a living. Grandma and children would do most of the farm work and care for the animals, so Grandpa could work away on roads, etc to bring a little extra means in. They would put the hay up and spend long hard days getting wood in from the forest for fuel for winter.
At Christmas time and other special occasions, they could have white bread and some little cakes. They had beautiful Christmas trees decorated, Grandma really tried hard to make a sweet happy home and life for her children. Now I’d like to quickly relate a few things I can remember about them.
I can remember Mother and Grandma most always conversed in German and she’d also always write letters often to her in German. She was so good at keeping up her correspondence. She’d always send love and kisses to us kids. At Christmas time they always sent a check to their children and 50 cents for each of us grandchildren. I thought I was really rich to have this half dollar to spend.
The last time I saw Grandpa was in December of 1921, when he came to Ogden to Aunt Pauline’s funeral. In February 1922 he had just finished helping to pay Aunt Pauline’s funeral expenses when he took sick and died. I believe it was of Pneumonia.
The last time I saw Grandma was in July 1929, when we stopped in to visit her on our way to Idaho. We took her some nice fresh strawberries from our garden.
I can remember how sad and lonely she looked. She had carried on alone for almost 8 years. She was a dear and faithful to the end. She passed away in December 1929. I can remember how sad I was and what a lovely funeral they had and the nice things that were spoken of her.
As a child I can remember going to Logan on the U.I.C., Railroad, or sometimes called the Galloping Goose, with Mom and Dad to visit them. It was the joy of my life. They always made you welcome and shared willingly what they had with you.
It seemed we always had the same thing for supper. She would sauté a little onion in the fry pan and then add boiled potatoes cut up or sliced and browned, a piece of cheese, bread, butter and applesauce, but oh! It was good. It was such a thrill to sleep on her feather bed.
I can well remember they always went to the Temple and I can see them now walking Temple hill in high gear, especially Grandpa.
They always had some mints for the Grandchildren and you always got loves and kisses. I didn’t always like Grandpa’s kisses and his beard would tickle my face and his kisses were kind of wet, but I knew then and I know now also that he loved us all.
What a thrill it was to go to Logan to be baptized and stay at their place and I was always so happy when they came to visit us, or we went to visit them, especially after Grandpa died and Grandma spent time with us is Ogden.
They were really hospitable and in 1917 Annie our sister and Mary Wanner Andra stayed at their home while taking a course in sewing and pattern drafting at the college.
Electricity at their home in Logan was cheap and they’d burn the lights most all day and night. I was really fascinated by them, as when we lived in Glendale we just had kerosene lamps, until the last two years, when we had gas lights.
It seemed to me as a young child when Grandma would kneel beside her bed to say her night prayers, she’d sure pray a long time – always I the German language, but I now realize it was a sweet humble and sincere prayer.
When I go to Logan now and to the Budge Clinic, I look across the street to their last beautiful house and well remember going there to visit them many times.
There are many reasons why we should honor and love our Grandparents, but among their most wonderful accomplishments, we would have to list their diligent pursuit in genealogy and Temple Work. Both Grandma and Grandpa had a great deal of research done to find the names and vital information concerning their progenitors. Each one of us are taught to do this by the leaders of our church. Grandma and Grandpa carried on this responsibility to the best of their ability for many years. I am sure when they learned of the statement of Prophet Joseph Smith to the effect if we neglect this important work we do so at the peril of our own salvation, that it aroused in them a never ending desire to see that nothing was left undone, that was within their ability to do.
After having had the research done they were able to secure the names of hundreds of their dead ancestors and spent many many hours I the Temple acting as proxy for those who never had the opportunity to hear the Gospel and take upon themselves the sacred covenants, which are necessary for exaltation in the Celestial Kingdom.
I am most grateful to them for their integrity and not only teaching the highest principles of honorable dealings in their daily affairs, but for the example of following the Savior’s admonition “To love one another and to do our best to help those in need”.
Dear cousins, second and third cousins, in-laws and others, our grandparents are long since gone, but I am sure their memory lives on and it could be said of them they laughed a lot and cried a little. They aren’t really dead for no man dies as long as there is one living person in the world who remembers them with fond memories and no man really dies as long as there are people on earth who really loved them. This can be said of them, many many people loved them for what they really were. They had many many friends and as I have told Horace many times, I truly loved my Grandma and Grandpa Wanner.

Wanner-Schmid Wedding

Jakob and Salome Schmid are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Anna Maria to Johann, son of Johann and Anna Wanner.  Johann and Anna were married 6 June 1870 in Holzgerlingen, Böblingen, Württemberg.

Anna Maria Schmid was the third child of three born to the marriage of Jakob Frederick Schmid (he went by Frederick) and Salome Notter on 21 January 1849 in Holzgerlingen.  Solome was 38 years old when Anna was born and died two and a half years later in Holzgerlingen.  Anna’s father, Jakob, then remarried to Agnes Margarete Hasenmaier in 1852.  Unfortunately, Agnes passed away a year and half later when Anna was barely over 3 years old.  Jakob remained single as far as we know and raised the two girls and boy on his own afterward.  Jakob was a weaver.  Anna likely had few if any memory of either of her mothers.  Anna was christened the same day she was born.  Below is a picture of St. Mauritius’ tower in Holzgerlingen where Anna was christened.  This tower has been there since the eleventh century.

St. Mauritius Church in Holzgerlingen where Anna Schmid was christened

Johann Georg Wanner was the fourth child of five born to the marriage of Johann Friedrich Wanner and Anna Maria Marquardt on 18 October 1845 also in Holzgerlingen.  He was christened the next day in the same church as Anna.

St. Mauritius

St. Mauritius from the nave looking toward the chancel.  Inside this church is where Johann Wanner was christened

Holzgerlingen is a small town and it is very likely that Johann and Anna knew of each other growing up if not more personally.  Johann and Anna were married 6 June 1870 in the same church in which they were christened.

The altar of St. Mauritius in Holzgerlingen where Johann and Anna were likely married

The altar of St. Mauritius in Holzgerlingen before which Johann and Anna were likely married

Johann and Anna welcomed a baby boy named after his father on 29 October 1870.  Young Johann Georg was christened the next day in the same church, likely before a congregation seated in the below nave.

The chapel/nave of St. Mauritius where family sat for generations if not hundreds of years attending church

The chapel/nave of St. Mauritius where family sat for generations if not hundreds of years attending church

Johann and Anna welcomed Christina Wanner 30 March 1872 in Holzgerlingen.  She was christened on 1 April 1872.

The train platform at Holzgerlingen

The train platform at Holzgerlingen

Between 1872 and 1873 Johann and Anna moved to Grünkraut, Ravensburg, Württemburg.  This is about 50 miles to the south.  We don’t know why they moved to this tiny town.  It was in Grünkraut that Maria Magdalena Wanner was born 12 September 1873.  She was christened 14 September 1873 but I do not know which church the family used in Grünkraut.

Johannas Wanner was born 23 June 1875 and christened the same day in Grünkraut.  He died later that year on 5 November 1875.  He was buried at Atzenweiler according to family records, but I cannot find this place so it must be an area nearby Grünkraut.

Johannas Frederick Wanner came 28 July 1878 and was christened on 3 August 1878.  He died 12 November 1878 and is also apparently buried at Atzenweiler.

On 30 March 1879 Johann and Anna welcomed Luise Sophia Wanner.  Christening followed 6 April 1879 in Grünkraut.

Jakob Frederick Wanner appeared 14 January 1881 with christening 23 January 1881.

Fred told a couple of stories I think proper to share here.  I cannot verify accuracy or the time frame.  “They left the farm work to Grandfather and the children.  They used the milk cows to do the farm work and then would milk them morning and night.  They also got wood from the forest for fuel.  It rained a lot in Germany so the out buildings were connected to the house.  One time Grandma went downstairs to get some fruit.  She reached over and touched something hairy and she thought it was the devil!  It was a cow that had wandered down from the barn.  Dad didn’t talk much about his life as a child but he did say he got a drum for Christmas and then it would disappear about New Years Day and he would get it for Christmas again the next year.  He may have been joking.  The family belonged to the Lutheran Church and was very religious.”

Pauline Wanner arrived 1 April 1884 in Atzenweiler and was christened 10 April 1884 in Atzenweiler.

Gottlop Wanner showed up 18 June 1886 in Kronhalden with christening 29 June 1886 in Atzenweiler.

Lastly, Wilhelmina ended the caravan on 12 September 1887 in Atzenweiler and was christened 19 September 1887 in Atzenweiler.

During the summer of 1890 LDS missionaries visited Grünkraut.  The missionaries apparently visited with Jakob, Anna’s father.  The missionary showed Jakob the Book of Mormon and Jakob took the missionaries home with him.  The missionaries lived with the family for a time and the Wanner family was converted.  Johann Georg Jr was the first to join the LDS Church on 11 July 1891.  Johann Sr, Anna, Christina, and Maria were all baptized 16 October 1891.  Jakob, Anna’s father, joined 22 February 1892.

Johann Jr emigrated to America with Elder Theurer.  They went to his home in Providence, Cache, Utah.  We don’t know who Elder Theurer is, but he helped Johann Georg, now John George, find employment with Fred Nuffer who lived in Mapleton, Franklin, Idaho.  Elder John Theurer had converted the Nuffer family in Germany, so it was likely a sibling of John who helped find John Jr his employment.

In 1893, the family emigrated from Germany.  John, Anna, Christina, Maria, Luise, Fredrick, Pauline, Gottlop, and Wilhelmina all departed Liverpool, England on 3 June 1893 on the Arizona.  They arrived on 13 June 1893 at Ellis Island in New York, New York, New York.  Immediately, the family caught multiple trains through Chicago and Salt Lake with the last stop at Franklin, Franklin, Idaho near where John Jr met them with a wagon.  The family arrived at Franklin on 18 June 1893 where John took them in to Preston.  It was in Preston that Luise, Fred, and Pauline, were baptized 7 June 1894.  Gottlob followed on 6 June 1895 with Wilhelmina 6 August 1896, all in Preston.

The family immediately began to integrate with society.  Christina married Charles August Nuffer 1 February 1894 in the Logan LDS Temple.  John Jr married Eliza Stirland 14 November 1894 in the Logan Temple.

Wanner Family about 1895,

Wanner Family about 1895.  Standing (l-r): Maria (Mary), Christina, Johann (John but went by George), Pauline.  Sitting (l-r): Anna, Jakob (Fred), Luise (Louise), Wilhelmina, Gottlop, Johann (John).

Maria, now Mary, married William Addison Wagstaff 17 June 1896 in the Logan Temple.  Luise, now Louise, married Jeffery Marcelin Bodrero 16 March 1898 in the Logan Temple.  John Jr remarried after divorce to Regina Frederike Nuffer 31 August 1898 in the Logan Temple.  Jakob, now Fred, married Mary Elizabeth Carter 30 September 1903 in the Logan Temple.  Pauline married William Henry Crossley 14 December 1904 in the Logan Temple.  Wilhelmina married Moses Bodrero 18 December 1907 in the Logan Temple.  Gottlop married Rebecca Hicks 16 November 1908 in Preston.

The Wanner family purchased a farm from John Nuffer, a brother to Charles and Regina, near Glendale, Franklin, Idaho.  Fred purchased the farm from them around 1910.  John Sr and Anna moved to Logan where they were living at 791 North 500 East when the 1910 Census was taken (the whole family was in Preston city limits for the 1900 Census).  On the 1920 Census I believe they lived at 304 East 500 North, but the census is unclear exactly what street 304 is on, but going from the pattern of the census taker I believe it is the address I have listed.

Johann Georg Wanner 1921

John died 16 February 1922 of pneumonia in Logan.  Anna listed their address as 272 East 400 North in Logan.  He was buried on the 19th in the Logan Cemetery.  She also died of pneumonia but on 9 December 1929.  She was living at the same address when she passed away.  She was buried 12 December 1929 next to her husband.

Anna Schmid Wanner

My Mind’s Eye

Looking east on Idaho Street, Paul, Idaho

Looking east on Idaho Street, Paul, Idaho

The other day I took Aliza out for a walk in the stroller.  It was only the two of us and we went on a bit longer walk than normal.  We rounded the corner near Paul Elementary and started up this sidewalk.  My personal memory of Paul, Minidoka, Idaho only extends about 28 years into the past for this little town.  However, my historical and genealogical memory of this town extends a bit, in some instances back to the founding.

As I walked up this little sidewalk I found myself in my memory riding down this sidewalk on a bicycle many years ago.  Looking at the sidewalk, I would be willing to venture that it is the same concrete.  Indeed, up ahead at the end of the cinderblocks on the right, you can see part of the foundation for the old Adams Building that used to stand here.  I found myself remembering that building and what a sad day it was when it had to come down (the easy route is to always tear them down).  Interestingly enough, Mr. Adams was the son-in-law of Henry Schodde whose name is well-known in the area and whose family still haunts this town with its presence.

Immediately across the street to the left is the building that I attended Kindergarten (not in the picture).  The tiny building is now a self-serve laundromat.  Who would have thought a Kindergarten would become a laundromat.  For the most part, the building is just as it was when I was there.

Across the street behind the stop sign is an old gasoline, service/repair station that has been there since the 1920’s, 1930’s.  Only in the last 10 years did they remove the old gasoline pumps I remember being there as a kid.  The other buildings part of the lot are newer, probably of 1940’s vintage, but one of them still reads “Alignment” on the back with an old tire stand remaining.  Even as a kid I imagined what it must have looked like in its heyday.  I do not know the last time the building ever was used for commercial use, but I see a door open once in a while, or that at least someone is doing something within.  What secrets might still be locked in there?

Across the intersection diagonally is an empty lot.  But I know there used to be a lumber yard there at one point, and then some type of granary at another.  It was this lumber yard that my Great Grandmother Ethel Sharp Ross (previously Streeter) purchased the lumber to build her confectionery that was located, I believe, within the same block just beyond the water tower (which is in the picture).  Just beyond the now solitary light pole on the left side of the road was a butcher shop.  I still remember the iron beam that hung out the front of the building for bringing in of the beef.  I must have been 4 or 5 the first time I remember being inside and seeing the meat hanging from hooks, the coldness of the freezer, and the sound of the saw slicing through the flesh and bone of an animal.

Streeter Lumber Invoice

I remember the cat/monkey woman who supposedly lived in one of the old buildings between what was then the vacant lot in my youth of the lumber yard on the corner and the butcher shop.  I do not recall seeing any cats or monkeys, but I remember her and the smell that came with her.  There was a building that was missing somewhere in the row, supposedly from a fire.  That building had previously been the Post Office.

The first building on the other side of the street now used to be the Paul City Offices.  I remember going in with my mother to pay our city bill.  I remember attending City Hall Meetings there as part of school and Cub/Boy Scouts.  I even remember help organizing the Christmas Light drive, sale, and auction where the City of Paul replaced its Christmas lights with the now present fixtures, the old ones now relegated to the very street in this picture.  The two-story building beside it used to house the firehouse, now a car repair and auto-body shop.  In there I learned first aid and CPR for the first time.  In there we met firefighters, learned safety, and helped prepare for charity drives.  We also got the tours of the firetrucks which any boy loved.  Just beyond the old firehouse is the Masonic Lodge which must still have the same sign it did 30 years ago, it has not aged well.

On the same side of the street beyond the old garage mentioned above is what has been a bar as long as I could remember.  Beyond it is the Old Paul Grange, whose use I am still not certain.  The old writing of the Grange still shows and the building does not seem to have been used beyond the 1940’s.  I don’t know who owns it, but that would certainly be a building that would be a time warp to enter.  Some of the front reminds me of pictures of my Great Grandmother’s store, Streeter’s Confectionery and I wonder if I might not have its place mistaken.  I am certain, but it is probably just a wish that something of her past remains on the street that Paul seems to have so fully discarded.

Just beyond the Grange and on the corner of the same block stands the old Paul State Bank.  It was Mikey’s Bar while I grew up but the monogram in the brick work leaves no mistake, it was once a bank.  It is this building that I wanted to buy to open my law practice.  Restore the building, set to building a practice, and leave behind a preserved part of Paul’s quickly dwindling architectural past.  The owners were not interested and so I watch the building hoping it does not age beyond repair.  I look at it every time I enter or leave the Post Office.  Maybe some day, but then again it is probably for the best.  Burley is likely a better place for a law practice.

Paul State Bank Receipt

The post office stands where it does today having been dedicated about 1962.  I mentioned the missing building between the butcher and the monkey woman where the Post Office used to stand.  Anyhow, President Kennedy was still President and J. Edward Day was Postmaster General when the new building was dedicated, the plaque says so.  This is of interest only because he served such a short time and it was during his tenure that the zip codes were established, giving Paul its 83347.  Inside this post office I remember going to our PO Box 12 and turning the knob for the combination and retrieving the mail.  Mom had to hold me up because it was near the top.  We eventually discarded our PO Box at our new house about 1984 and then the Post Office got the now present key boxes.  It was also this Post Office that the swinging door took two of my fingers clear down the bone.  When I walk in the Post Office and sometimes I can remember the horror as I watched the lady cutting away some of the mangled skin with scissors and the sewing it back together with some of her hair.  How many people do that today?  The scar is still there.

I remember being told that Connor’s used to be in the space between the now present Post Office and the old Hotel, of which only the first floor remains.  Connors of course moved out near the interstate in the 1960’s and I believe their present building indicates its construction decade.  Then of course the old Hotel Building which in its day claimed full plumbing, something that was very new about 1920.  The second story has been removed, the first floor looking very enclosed and lost since its long past heyday.  There was a safe/bank deposit on the east side only about 15 years ago, even now it has been removed and bricks fill the void.  Pictures of the building show that it was once lined by large window stores that opened out to Idaho Street.  Now it is just a brick building, its façade completely lost to time.  It is my understanding that the now present Idaho Street was once Main Street.  Now it is Idaho Street, Main Street intersects it at the intersection immediately in front of the picture (also 600 west of Minidoka County).

Like many historical towns the relied on the railroad to such a degree, this town apparently also had shops and buildings that faced the railroad.  I do not believe any still exist, or at least if they did, not in my lifetime.  One thing is for certain, what was once a bustling town center has now turned into a blight.  I am not sure Paul will ever recover any of its lost past or achieve much of the character it has lost, but I can hope.

This street continues down through a part of Paul that once contained many houses built and provided by Amalgamated Sugar.  I do not know if any of those homes remain after relocation.  I tend to believe the one I once lived in the first few years of my life was one of those homes.  I doubt we will ever know.

Looking at this picture it seems inconceivable that Paul once contended to become the County Seat.  The vote if I recall was somewhat close but eventually lost out to its then slightly larger neighbor to the east, Rupert.  Contrasting the two towns now is somewhat embarrassing but both have their difficulties.  Rupert has maintained its identity through the decades and seems determined to keep it.  Paul seems to just let the winds of change sweep in whatever they bring.

Funny enough, behind me in this picture stands Paul Elementary.  The current building replaced the earlier building which was once Paul High School.  Minidoka County in an ingenious move consolidated all the high schools in the County to form one high school, Minidoka County High School (known as Minico).  By doing so they promoted efficiency and order that has carried them now well for over 50 years.  Cassia County has debated the same and still deals with the costs and difficulties of four separate high schools.  While a larger county, I have to tip my hat to Minidoka County for their foresight and planning.  It just seems a bit sad that Paul and Minidoka County seem to have lost some of that vision they once had.

Then again, I am only young.  I don’t know anything beyond my experience.  But I hope Paul will improve and focus on important things for the future.  A new city park certain improves the feeling of community, builds the common good, and helps build a city from the ashes of its past.  I hope it will continue to improve and not neglect its past.  Indeed, I hope the letterhead from my Great Grandmother’s store will someday again be true.  Notice the monogram of the bank and go check out the building.

Check to Scoville Paper

Streeter Envelope

American Falls, Idaho

American Falls

I stumbled upon this postcard from a friend’s artifacts and thought I would make it available.  This post card was written and mailed 11 March 1924.

The thing I found interesting about the photo is that I had always understood that when the original American Falls Dam was completed in 1926, that it was the first dam on the Snake River in the area.  Looking closer at the photo, you can see that is not the case.  There is the weir across the back of the picture likely for the power plant you can see in the picture in front of the train bridge (which is still there).  You can also see the Oneida Milling and Elevator Company’s grain elevator in the background above the train bridge, which elevator today stands completely surrounded by water.  The current water level is somewhere near the height of the train bridge in the picture.  The power house and weir are also still there today but both have seriously deteriorated since this picture.  The rest of the town you can see in the picture was moved up the hill so as to not be flooded.  The postcard mentions the move of the town before the completion of the dam.  The other thing that is curious is the date stamp for the 7th, which means this letter was likely mailed on the 7th (Friday) at some other location and made its way to the formal post office in American Falls, Power, Idaho on the 11th (Tuesday) to be properly stamped.  Where was this card mailed from, or is there another explanation?

Postcard back

The back of the postcard is address to “Miss Agnes Fyfe” in “St anthony Ida.”  The writing says, “Please excuse this and Ill write against soon.  Dearest Friend will drop you a card to let you know I am still alive would have wrote sooner but this is the first time I have stopped long enough Landed in american falls yesterday and I guess Bob will get a job here They are starting to move the town but are not doing a whole lot yet with Love DVA”

Some background on the sender and recipient of the postcard.  Agnes Fyfe was born 25 April 1903 in Archer, Madison, Idaho and died 9 May 1994 in Rupert, Minidoka, Idaho.  Dale Vern Ashcraft was born 19 February 1899 in Lagos, Caribou, Idaho and died 4 August 1975 in Rupert.  These two lovebirds married 23 December of 1924, later the year from this postcard.  Were they engaged by this point?  Both of them were buried in the Hilltop Cemetery in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon.  The other interesting part of this postcard is it provides the handwriting of Mr. Ashcraft.

Rupert 4th of July Parade

We attended the Rupert 4th of July Parade this year and enjoyed it.  I thought it was interesting to attend the Minidoka County Centennial Celebration in conjunction with the festivities this year.  I wonder what Aunt Fanny Ross Phibbs and Calvin Dickerson Phibbs thought when they arrived in the area on 21 March 1913 and witnessed the creation of Minidoka County that same year.  Calvin would go on to become a Judge in Minidoka County in 1918 and served for over 10 years.

While the Ross Clan has been in and out of Minidoka County for the past 100 years, we have left our mark for good or ill.

My thoughts turned to my own involvement in the Rupert 4th of July parade.  Here are a couple of the photos I could find.

Riding my trusty horse Mack, probably around 1991, for 4-H

Riding my trusty horse Mack, probably around 1991, for 4-H

Marching with the Minico Spartans Marching Bank, probably in 1996

Marching with the Minico Spartans Marching Band probably in 1996

Riding Dad's 1948 Ford 8N about 2001

Riding Dad’s 1948 Ford 8N about 2002

1948 Ford 8N about 2001

1948 Ford 8N about 2002

Just for fun because I do not know when else I would share them, a couple of pictures from the old Paul, Idaho parade.  I can still remember climbing up the ladder on the back of the pup to get into the trailer filled with gravel for us to stand on.  I remember looking down out of the trailer for the photo below.  This first photo has the Fenton Apartments in the back (still there and improved).

Circle A Construction Truck in Paul Parade about 1985

Circle A Construction Truck in Paul Parade about 1985

Andra and me with Grandma (Colleen Andra Elliott) in Paul Parade about 1985

Andra and me with Grandma (Colleen Andra Elliott at the time) in Paul Parade about 1985