Baby Milo Paul Ross

Since I am on the baby kick lately, I thought I might post some other baby pictures.  (This is a repost from 2010, but due to Grandpa’s passing, I am reposting it)  With the latest posts of myself and little Aliza as a baby, I thought I would add the two oldest pictures I have of my father (showing him at his youngest recorded images).

Milo Paul Ross born on Independence Day in 1943 in Ogden, Utah.  He weighed in at a flat 8 pounds, 22 inches.  He was discharged at 7 pounds, 10.5 ounces.  His parents were Milo James Ross and Gladys Donaldson Ross.  They resided at 829 8th Street in Ogden, Utah.  Well, Grandma did.

Grandpa had just landed in Hawaii with the Army.  A biography at the University of Utah said, “Ross soon shipped out to the Hawaiian Islands, leaving behind his young pregnant wife. As his unit landed on the big island of Hawaii on July 4, 1943, a voice on the loud speaker said, “Sergeant Ross, congratulations. Your wife and son are doing well, and, one more thing, before you get off the ship you and your men have guard duty for the next four hours. Welcome to Hawaii.”

Grandma told the story how every night before going to bed Grandma showed Dad a picture of Grandpa and told him to kiss it goodnight.  When Grandpa stepped off the train years later, Dad knew who is father was at sight.  I doubt Dad remembers much at such an early age.  It would be interesting to know his recollections.

Grandpa told me that when he left Grandma they made an agreement that no matter where they were, both would kneel and pray at 9:00 PM at night for family prayer.  Even though they were miles apart, this was a way of maintaining their relationship despite distance and not knowing whether letters would arrive at the other end.  Grandpa said there were nights he felt his family very close, especially in a lonely foxhole with people dying around him.

Anyhow, more about the photos of the little boy above.  The top photo was taken in July 1943, which means it was within 3-4 weeks of his birth.  He is held in the photo by his grandmother, my Great Grandmother, Berendena Van Leeuwen Donaldson.  She went by Dena her whole life.  I cropped the photo down just to show Dad.  My first impression of this picture is how much he looks like my Aunt Caroline in this photo.  If it wasn’t for the written date on the photo, I would think it was her.

The second photo is also cropped.  This will probably be the closest I get to nudity on this little blog.  This photograph indicates it was taken at 8 weeks, putting us at the end of August or beginning of September 1943.  Perhaps he needed a little help with Bilirubin, hence sitting out in the sun with all exposed.  Either way, he does not look entirely pleased with the situation.

Looking at the two photographs, I can see a slight expression from the second photo in little Aliza.  Amanda and I see quite a bit of me in little Aliza, and we see more of the Jonas/Coley brow and facial features, at least at this stage.  We all know how children move through different looks as they grow up.  We shall keep a keen eye out for intimations of Dad.  But here are two photos of him.

Irwin John Jonas

With the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the events that occurred on that date, I thought I would make a special tribute to my Grand Uncle Irwin John Jonas.  He participated in D-Day and lost his life on 11 July 1944, just over 70 years ago, near Saint-Lô, France.

Irwin John was born the third child to the marriage of Lillian Coley and Joseph Nelson Jonas.  He was born on Friday 2 September 1921 in Thatcher, Franklin, Idaho, at 6:30 PM, although likely born in Cleveland, Franklin, Idaho, while the family made a go of farming.  The family could not make farming work and moved to Lewiston, Cache, Utah as his father took a job with the Utah-Idaho Central Railroad.  When Irwin was about 6, the family moved to Uintah, Weber, Utah.  Joseph was promoted to Section Foreman and the family moved to Ogden, Weber, Utah.  It was in this place that Joseph was accidentally electrocuted in 1932.  Afterward the family moved back to Richmond, Cache, Utah, Lillian’s hometown.

Irwin Primary Graduation Certificate

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The family moved around quite a bit and some of the children struggled with the moves and changes in homes.  The family lived in everything from a boxcar to a nice home in Ogden.  Joseph and Lillian were stern but loving parents, dealing with their own issues as well as with the children.

Irwin John Jonas

Irwin John Jonas

Lillian purchased a small home in Richmond with the funds from Joseph’s life insurance.  Lillian’s family helped raise the rowdy six boys, including Irwin, and youngest two girls.

Irwin Boy

Irwin continued through school.  He did not graduate high school, but at least made it a few years into North Cache.

Irwin High School Certificate

Here is a picture of Irwin at North Cache with Glacus Godfrey Merrill’s class.  Irwin is on the back row, third from the right, fifth from the left.  His brother, Norwood, my grandfather, is on the far right of the third row from the front.  You can see the other names for this photo here.

Glacius Merrill's Class about 1938 or 1939

Irwin Receipt

Shortly before his 18 birthday, 6 July 1939, Irwin enlisted with the Army.  He departed shortly afterward for training.

Irwin Jonas Departure

Unfortunately, the Army had a massive fire that destroyed most of the military records for World War II in 1973.

Irwin Jonas Guitar and FriendFamily recollect that he trained in the southwest as this picture also seems to show with the large cactus.

Irwin Jonas Target

He did make it to the rank of Sergeant in the Army.

Irwin Jonas Military

Irwin met Mary Elizabeth Popwitz at a dance at Camp McCoy, Sparta, Wisconsin.  They were later married 21 June 1943 in Winona, Winona, Minnesota.

Mary Popwitz and Winifred Perley

Mary Popwitz and Winifred Perley (Mary was Winifred’s Nanny)

Irwin wrote a Christmas Card home in December 1943 with the following photograph.

Irwin Jonas Christmas Card

Irwin was then sent to go overseas.  Irwin sent Mary to live with his mother in Richmond.  Mary gave birth to Robert Irwin Jonas in February 1944.  Irwin went to New York City in preparation for the D-Day Invasion.  At least that is the story told by family.

This following envelopes show Irwin was still in New York City in May and July of 1944.

Irwin Envelope 1944 May

 

Irwin Envelope 1944 Jul 8

An explanation could be the preparation for D-Day and not wanting to give anything away so they made it appear like it was in New York City.  Or it could very well be that he did not take part of D-Day and arrived after that date.  However, since he died on the 11th of July in Saint-Lô, it is unlikely he was in New York City on 8 July 1944.  Further that letter was dated 6 July 1944.  It was likely he was writing from France but marking the envelopes New York City.  At any rate, here is the single page of the postmarked 8 July 1944 letter.  You will have to click on it to read it properly, the pencil is hard to scan.  One of Irwin’s obituaries indicates he was sent to Europe in October 1943.

Irwin Jonas Letter 1944 Jul 6

Lillian received the dreaded personal visit from the Army in August 1944.  She received the following letter in September.

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The US Army determined to bring Irwin’s body home to the United States rather than bury him in France.   Lillian and Mary finally received Irwin’s body in late January 1948.  His burial took place 6 February 1944 in Richmond.

Irwin Jonas Obituary

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Robert Irwin Jonas continued to grow under the love and care of his mother and grandmother.

Bob Jonas Baby

After Irwin passed away, Mary moved to Preston, Franklin, Idaho near her close friend Colleen Andra who would later marry Irwin’s brother, Norwood.

Bob Jonas Young Boy

Through the family, Mary and Bob moved to Ogden to work.  There, Mary, Irwin’s widow, met Irwin’s uncle Art Coley.  Irwin and Art were born the same year, even though Uncle and Nephew.  Arthur “Art” Christiansen Coley and Mary were married 3 May 1946 in Evanston, Uinta, Wyoming.

Art and Mary continued to raise Bob as their own.  Two additional sons joined the marriage, Stephen “Steve” G and Ronald Gary.

Steve, Bob, Gary

Steve, Bob, Gary

 

Steve, Mary, Gary, Bob

Steve, Mary, Gary, Bob

 

Bob Jonas Boy

 

Bob Jonas

Bob, Janet, and Bobby Jonas

Bob, Janet, and Bobby Jonas

As of my writing today, Mary is still alive.  She lives in an assisted living home in South Ogden, Utah.

Bob and Janet Jonas, Mary Coley, Steve and Julie Coley

Bob and Janet Jonas, Mary Coley, Steve and Julie Coley in 2004

Richmond, Utah Cemetery

I am writing some history on my Grand Uncle Irwin Jonas who gave his life shortly after D-Day.  I do not have a picture of his tombstone and I hoped to grab one this past weekend.  Let me tell you how disgusted I am with the condition of his tombstone!  This is in the Richmond, Cache, Utah city cemetery.

Here is a picture from 2009 of his tombstone.  Even the markings on the stone at that time show a complete disregard by the caretakers regarding driving over the stone and scratching it, very likely with their mower.  Notice how the top right corner is chipped and I am willing to bet it is from the same activity that marked it.  This grave stone was in good shape only a few years before this photo was taken and these were new markings at the time.  Unfortunately I cannot find that circa 2004 photo at this time.  Of course I complained to city offices.

2009 condition

2009 condition

It is quite apparent my complaint to the city offices fell on deaf ears.  Here is a picture of the same grave in 2014!

2014

2014 condition

Notice that the top of the stone is nearly all chipped away!  It is bad enough that portions of the cross on his stone have also chipped away.  Also, look at the nice king/bend in the American Legion marker on the top left of the picture.  This shows a complete disregard for the property of another and a disrespect for the dead and their family for which the stone represents.  This is a man who fought to protect Americans and died in France about a month after D-Day.  He was not buried until February 1948, nearly four years after he died in battle.  This is the grave of a veteran who gave the ultimate sacrifice.  Richmond is a fiduciary, a trustee, of these stones and must treat them with full respect and accord.  I cannot imagine this is allowed in many other cities in Cache County, not from my personal experience in most of the other cemeteries.  Somebody needs be held accountable for this damage.

I walked through the cemetery quickly in the space of about an hour and documented many more failures by Richmond in their care and maintenance of this grave.  It extends beyond just markings and chipping of markers which I will document at another post.  The members of the cemetery district should be held accountable.  The City of Richmond should hold them accountable, the taxpayers in this cemetery district should hold them accountable, and someone should put together a class action lawsuit to pay for these damages.  I would happily sign on.  Does the City of Richmond not see what is going on in their own cemetery district?  Inasmuch as the City of Richmond is condoning this activity, the mayor and council-members should also be held accountable.  Not only should anyone responsible be voted out or removed from office, there should be personal liability for the damages.  This is quite frankly disgusting.  Shame on Richmond City.

 

Bernard & Mary Schneider

Mary and Bernard Schneider

Mary and Bernard Schneider

I have uploaded many of my photographs to FamilySearch.  I am about half way through all my photos that are family history related.  It is more time-consuming than I thought it would be.

This photo was provided to me by a distant cousin.  Knowing I am distantly related to their Jonas relatives, I appreciate having a copy.  Unfortunately I know little beyond the basic life facts of these people.

Mary Jonas is my third cousin three times removed.  She was born 8 June 1869 in Richfield, Washington, Wisconsin and died 14 November 1951 in Neenah, Winnebago, Wisconsin.  She was buried 17 November 1951 in Oshkosh, Winnebago, Wisconsin.  Her parents are John Jonas (1845-1928) and Margaret Mary Voss (1849-1929).

Mary married Bernard Bruno Schneider on 2 May 1893 in Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  He was born 11 December 1872 in Berlin, Germany and died 22 June 1927 in Oshkosh.

Together Bernard and Mary had 8 children.

Margaret Schneider born 26 May 1894 in Milwaukee and died 31 July 1986.

Bernard John Schneider born 6 June 1896 in Oshkosh and died 19 December 1986 in Neenah.

Appolonia A Schneider born 12 May 1898 in Oshkosh and died 12 December 1980 in Oshkosh.

Eleanor Schneider born 6 May 1901 in Oshkosh and died 5 February 1983 in Neenah.

Maria Schneider born 20 January 1903 in Oshkosh and died 29 November 1991 in Manitowoc, Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

Francis Schneider born 1905 in Oshkosh and died 1908 in Oshkosh.

Catherine Schneider born 29 January 1909 in Oshkosh and died 28 December 2002.

Ralph John Schneider born 18 August 1910 in Oshkosh and died 1 June 1977 in Oshkosh.

Fairmont

With the new purchase of our home on Fairmont Drive in Burley, Cassia, Idaho, I thought I would throw out a strange connection I have to the street.  Fairmont Drive turns into Fairmont Avenue at a 90 degree turn just a block or two east of our home.  Within a long stone-throw of our present house sits the home my grandparents, Norwood & Colleen Jonas, lived in when they moved to Burley in 1968 from Richmond, Cache, Utah.  In all my photos, I happen to have some pictures of that home.

2652 Fairmont Ave

2652 Fairmont Ave

2652 Fairmont Avenue

2652 Fairmont Avenue

I am not clear if they had the home built or if it was newly built when they arrived and purchased it.  It is my understanding the home was completed in 1969, which is supposedly the year after they moved to Burley.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Sandy Jonas on the driveway of Fairmont Ave

Sandy Jonas on the driveway of Fairmont Ave

Looking up and down the street in 1972, they year Mom graduated from Burley High School

Looking up and down the street in 1972, they year Mom graduated from Burley High School

Graduation Day, 1972

Graduation Day, 1972

Jackie Jonas dancing on Fairmont Ave

Jackie Jonas dancing on Fairmont Ave

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Lastly, I will wrap up with a family portrait taken in the front room of the home.  This one was in an album and the quality is low, hopefully some day I can find a higher quality photo.

Back(l-r): Sandy and Doug; Sitting: Colleen and Norwood Jonas; Floor: Jackie.

Back(l-r): Sandy and Doug; Sitting: Colleen and Norwood Jonas; Floor: Jackie.

The coincidental aspect of this whole post is that a Jonas relative now lives in the home, some 45 years later.  Denise Andersen Olsen, niece to my Grandfather (my first cousin, once removed), now lives in the home.  Maybe if she will give me permission, I can take a current photo or two of the home.  Maybe I can do a then and now post of the photos I have.  Maybe even one day, I can get the people in the photos for a then and now too…

Random Richmond Pictures

I have made a number of photos available that were in my Great Grandma’s (Lillian Coley Jonas) photo albums.  As I mentioned, these photos seem to come from a collection of her own photos, photos that belonged to her mother (Martha Christiansen Coley), and photos that belonged to husband (Joseph Nelson Jonas).  Unfortunately, these are unnamed so we do not know who the individuals are or where the photos were taken.  I am fairly certain these are Coley or Jonas relatives though.  Plus, there is a very good chance these photos were taken in Cache County, Utah.  Any photos with writing, I have made the writing available in the caption area.

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I believe this is one of Matha’s sisters

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Do take good care of this

This was written on the back of this one: Hug and Kiss and now I am going to propose to you dear.  To Lillian from Olof and Edna.  Wishing you many a Happy Birthdays.  Haha

This was written on the back of this one: Hug and Kiss and now I am going to propose to you dear. To Lillian from Olof and Edna. Wishing you many a Happy Birthdays. Haha

 

This photo was taken at Electric Photo Shop in Logan, Utah

This photo was taken at Electric Photo Shop in Logan, Utah

 

This photo also taken in Electric Photo Shop, Logan, Utah

This photo also taken in Electric Photo Shop, Logan, Utah

 

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Give this picture to Lillian of the baby as she acted like she thought so much of Karen she has a spit bubble in her mouth and you can sure see it plain

“Give this picture to Lillian of the baby as she acted like she thought so much of Karen she has a spit bubble in her mouth and you can sure see it plain”

"Give to Lillian to"

“Give to Lillian to”

 

 

 

 

John Nelson Jonas

I thought I would write on my Great Grandfather’s brother in anticipation of his birthday, he would be 125 this year.  Growing up, I never knew of Uncle John Nelson Jonas likely because nobody in my family ever knew him.  He passed away at the ripe age of 30 in 1918, a victim of Influenza.  The family knew of his widow as she lived on Main Street in Richmond, Cache, Utah and associated with their children.  Since I have some pictures of his family, I thought I would make them available.  My Great Grandfather Joseph Nelson Jonas did not live to be much older and so personal memories of him were lost many decades ago as well.

John Nelson Jonas was the fourth of seven children born in the marriage of Annetta Josephine Nelson and Joseph Jonas 14 August 1888 in or near Ellensburg, Kittitas, Washington.  He was christened 10 September 1888 at St. Andrews in Ellensburg.  About 1896, John’s mother, Annie, went to the Eastern Washington Hospital for the Insane in Fancher, Spokane, Washington (she is listed as Ann J Jonas).  She was in and out of hospitals throughout her life but as John was one of the older children, he would have known his mother a little better.

Annie got out of the Eastern Washington Hospital 31 October 1899 and went home to Ellensburg and continued to be a handful for the family.  The family on the 1900 Census was in Cle Elum, Kittitias, Washington.  Although that census does not include Annie and the census that year has Joseph Sr in both Cle Elum and Spokane about two weeks apart in June 1900.  Annie must have been back in Fancher.  Annie’s sister, Charlotte, visited in 1901.  Due to Annie’s mental and emotional state, and with Joseph’s approval, the Jonas family went to Utah to stay temporarily with Annie’s brother, Nels August Nelson.  Uncle August lived in Crescent, Salt Lake, Utah and the Jonas party arrived 3 July 1901 from Washington.

John, Joseph, and William Jonas probably right before moving to Utah in 1901.  The photo is stamped with Ellensburg on the matting.

John, Joseph, and William Jonas probably right before moving to Utah in 1901. The photo is stamped with Ellensburg on the matting.

Joseph for one reason or another went back to Washington with the oldest child Margaret.  Nels suggested it was legal issues; it might have just been the farm that needed attention.  Annie’s issues were such that Nels and his wife, Fidelia, signed an affidavit of insanity and had her admitted to the Utah State Hospital 1 November 1901.

Joseph had been raised as a Catholic and Annie Nelson had been raised LDS.  Annie decided she did not like LDS men and wanted to marry a Gentile and did so.  The children were raised Catholic in Washington.  Now in Utah, Uncle August made sure the children learned about the LDS faith.  The three boys, John, William, and Joseph, elected to be baptized LDS on 10 January 1902 in Crescent by their Uncle August in an ice-covered Jordan River.  All three were confirmed 12 January 1902 by Jaime P Jensen.  Rosa joined 6 February 1902, also in Crescent under the hand of Uncle August in a hole chipped in the Jordan River.  Margaret did not join as she stayed near her father in Washington.

In 1904, Rosa married a boy, Christian Andersen, from Richmond.  They married in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  They moved to 137 E 100 S in Richmond.  John and his brothers resided with Uncle August until after their mother passed in 1907, then they would regularly and for prolonged periods stay with Rosa in Richmond.  William and John were both ordained Elders 6 January 1908 in Crescent.  In Richmond, both were again ordained Seventies 19 September 1909 by Charles Hart (1866 – 1934, 1st Council of Seventy).  John was endowed in the Logan LDS Temple 1 October 1909 and left to serve in the Southern States Mission.  He left 10 October 1909, arrived at Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee 18 Oct, Montgomery, Montgomery, Alabama 21 Oct, and formally starting 25 October 1909.  The 1910 Census lists John at home in Crescent.

I understand John attended Brigham Young College in Logan but I don’t know any of the details of when or if he graduated.  Nellie told her nephew, Ellis Jonas, that John was the only one of the brothers who could keep a level head.  Just remember the source of that compliment – his wife.

John met Nellie Armina Andersen, a cousin of Rosa’s husband Christian, while staying in Richmond.  Nellie and John fell in love and were married 5 June 1912 in the Logan, Cache, Utah at the LDS Temple.

John and Nellie (Andersen) Jonas

John and Nellie (Andersen) Jonas

The above photo indicates it was taken in Salt Lake City at Cusworth’s Studio.  We don’t know the occasion, but it must have been something to dress up for, or just a sitting for a portrait.  Either way, the photo was shared with my Great Grandmother.

The wedding announcement in the Logan Republican on 25 June 1925, “On June 5th Mr. John Jonas and Miss Nellie Anderson of this place were married in the Logan Temple.  Mr. Jonas is managing his Uncle’s farm at Murray, Utah.  After a family reception at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Armina Anderson, the couple departed for Murray where they will make their future home.”

John and Nellie had three children.

Calvin Andersen Jonas born 6 August 1913 and died 17 June 1991 both in Richmond.  He married Viola Florence Chapman (1921 – 2006) on 30 March 1957 in Elko, Elko, Nevada.  Calvin lived in his mother’s home until he passed away and then Viola remained in the same home until her passing.  It was Calvin who took the land and created a trailer park on the rest of the property to the welcome or chagrin of Richmond.  Calvin and Viola did not have any children, although Viola brought children to the marriage from her previous marriage.  I last visited Viola about 2005 and Viola had her daughter Dixie living with her to take care of her, the trailer park, and their ceramic store.

Melvin Andersen Jonas born 13 March 1917 in Richmond and drowned 16 Jul 1944 in San Marcos, Hays, Texas while he was in training at San Marcos Army Air Field.  Apparently he had just married Doris Everts on 17 March 1944 somewhere in Texas.  It is not believed they had any children.  Melvin was a lieutenant in the Army.

Melvin Portrait

Melvin’s Portrait before leaving for the war

John and Nellie purchased a home 3 April 1917 on the corner of Main and 200 E in Richmond (now 195 E Main).  The entire lot one, block 25 of Richmond City came with the home for $1,200.00.  They moved in when Melvin was only a few days old.  When John registered for the World War I Draft, he indicated he was a laborer at Utah Condensed Milk Company in Richmond.

WWI Draft Registration

I have included a copy of the full Draft Registration.  It is interesting to note John’s signature on the first page.

Nellie became pregnant and while with their third children tragedy struck.  John caught the spreading Influenza virus in the epidemic of 1918 and passed away shortly before Christmas on 19 December 1918 at home in Richmond.  Nellie gave birth to their last child months later.

Our cousin, Carvel Jonas wrote of John’s death, “‘Prior to 1974, 38 major flu outbreaks had been recorded, including the disastrous pandemic in 1918 which attached an estimated 500 million people, leaving 20 million dead,’ according to Science Digest March 1975.  The severity of the 1918 pandemic was due to the fact that it lasted for more than 14 months; ordinary epidemics in the average community last no more than six weeks before running their course,’ quoted from ‘The Encyclopedia of Common Diseases, p 722; by the Staff of Prevention Magazine, co 1976′.  Unfortunately John was one of the estimated 20 million who died.”

Carvel also writes, “Before John died he would play hide and seek with his two boys.  After John died the boys thought that their father was still playing the game and would try to find him when Nellie would come home.”

His obituary in the Deseret News stated, “Funeral of John Jonas.  Richmond, Dec 30 – Funeral services were held Sunday for John Jonas who died of Pneumonia, following influenza.  Mrs. A. A. Thomas and W.J. Thomas of Salt Lake furnished music.  The speakers were Bishop P.N. Nelson, Bishop J.L. McCarrey, and A.S. Schow.  The deceased is survived by a wife and two small children and several brothers and sisters.  The flu conditions have so well improved that the local health board has permitted the opening of places of amusement.”

Armina Andersen Jonas was born 5 March 1919 in Richmond and died 30 March 2011 in St. George, Washington, Utah.  She married Don Farnes (1916 – 1978) 10 March 1937 in Logan.  Don was gone by the time I was born, but I remember stopping to visit Armina at her home in Kimberly, Twin Falls, Idaho with my Grandma in the late 1980’s.  I stopped the last time in Kimberly about 2008 shortly before she moved to live with her daughter in Southern Utah.

Calvin, Armina, Nellie, and Melvin Jonas about 1925

Calvin, Armina, Nellie, and Melvin Jonas about 1925

Nellie remarried to Arnold Thornley (1893 – 1969) on 14 April 1926 in Logan.  It must not have been a very long marriage as very few seemed to remember him.

Nellie continued to live in their home until she passed away 11 December 1953 in Salt Lake City of myocarditis.

Her obituary stated, “Nellie A. Jonas – Richmond, Cache County – Mrs. Nellie Andersen Jonas, 64, died Friday night in a Salt Lake hospital after an operation.  Born July 26, 1889 at Richmond, daughter of George and Armina Carson Andersen.  Resident in Richmond entire life.  Married to John N. Jonas in 1912, in Logan L.D.S. Temple.  He died in 1918.  Active in L.D.S. Church…”  I need to get a copy of the full obituary to share it.

John and Nellie are buried together in the Richmond Cemetery.  All three children are buried within a stone’s throw.  John’s father and Nellie’s parents are also a stone’s throw away.