Milo James Ross Obituary

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

Milo James Ross, 93, peacefully slipped out of mortality in the comfort of his own bed in Plain City on 17 July 2014.

Milo was born 4 February 1921 in a log cabin north of Plain City to John “Jack” William Ross and Ethel (Sharp) Ross. His mother tragically died from childbirth in 1925. Milo and his siblings lived with his Ross grandparents until the costs proved too great and his Uncle Edward Sharp raised Milo in Plain City until adulthood.

He grew up tending to his Grandmother Sharp and spending most of his time farming with his many Sharp cousins and his siblings. He attended schools in Plain City and graduated from Weber High in 1939.

Milo met Gladys Maxine Donaldson at a Plain City celebration in 1940. They would meet from time to time for dancing at the Berthana in Ogden. Milo and Gladys married 4 April 1942 in her parent’s home on 8th Street in Ogden.

Milo enlisted in the Army in October 1942. He served in the 33rd Infantry Division, 130th Regiment, Company C. He trained in weapons and earned his expert ranking. He arrived in Hawaii in July 1943 and received the announcement that his son, Milo Paul, had been born. He served as part of the Philippine invasion force and they fought through the jungles and liberated Baguio City. He was injured five times, one while tending to other soldiers awaiting medical attention.

He was present at the Japanese surrender at Luzon as a Technical Sergeant in June 1945. He received two purple hearts and the Silver Star for his service at the end of World War II. His Company received a Presidential Citation for outstanding performance during armed conflict with the enemy in efforts to seize Hill X in Bilbil Mountain Province. At the time of Milo’s death, the military was preparing to award him another Purple Heart, another Silver Star, Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal & Bronze Star, World War II Victory Medal, Combat Infantry Badge 1st Award, Philippine Liberation Ribbon and Bronze Star, Honorable Service Button for World War II. He was also to be awarded the Philippine Liberation Medal and Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation Badge from the Philippine Government.

He returned home in 1945 and began working with his father-in-law. He eventually began building or remodeling homes. He estimated he had built over 120 homes and remodeled another 50 homes or buildings in his lifetime. Two more children joined Milo and Gladys in 1946 and 1948, Judy Ethel and Caroline. Milo and Gladys dedicated their lives to raising their three children and tenderly caring for Judy’s needs until she passed away in 1998.

Milo and Gladys solemnized their marriage 2 July 1976 in the Ogden LDS Temple with their daughter Judy by their side. Milo served in various callings as a humble servant favoring their time as temple workers in the Ogden Temple for almost a decade. Milo and Gladys also relished their time in raising their garden and providing its fruits to friends, family, the temple, and local hospitals.

Milo is survived by his son Milo (Janice) Ross of Hazelton, Idaho and daughter Caroline (Abram) Gallegos of Plain City. Eight grandchildren, Scott (Robyn) Ross of Kimberly, Idaho; Jeffrey (Holly) Ross of Jerome, Idaho; Becky (Joseph) Patterson of Portland, Oregon; Paul (Amanda) Ross of Burley, Idaho; Andra Ross of Heyburn, Idaho; Christy (Sterling) Neilson of Rupert, Idaho; Cindy (Steve) Pease of Albion, Idaho; and Lonny (Amy) Taylor of Declo, Idaho; seventeen great grandchildren; and eleven great great grandchildren.

Milo was preceded in death by his parents; his wife Gladys; all five siblings Hobart Day, June Stout, Paul Ross, Harold Ross, and Earnest Ross; daughter Judy Ross; grandson-in-law Bret Adams, and two great grandchildren.

The funeral will be held Tuesday 22 July 2014 at the Plain City 7th Ward Building, 2952 N 4200 W, a building he helped organize its construction, at 11:00 AM with Bishop Tom Matthews officiating.

Friends may call at Lindquist Mortuary in North Ogden at 2140 N 400 E (Washington Blvd) from 6 until 8 PM on Monday 21 July 2014. Friends may also call from 10:00 until 10:45 AM prior to the service at the church. Burial will be in the Plain City Cemetery beside his beloved Gladys and Judy.

Milo J Ross in army uniform squat

Ides of July

There is not loads to report for this week.  I have applied for probably nearly 50 jobs online.  I have an interview tomorrow for a position with Combined Insurance.  Who would have thought?  What are the chances? Grandma worked for Combined for 30 years.  I have in essence sold Combined Insurance for 6 months of my life.  That is probably the equivalent that I spent with Grandma out on the road selling insurance.  I sure loved it.  Funny what we remember isn’t it. 
There was a couple of times we went to Soda Springs to sell.  I remember the Caribou Lodge.  It was my first time going over, I must have been about 4-6 years old.  We were in the old 1974 two door Mercury Cougar.  What a car.  As we came down the pass from Lava Hot Springs we hit a pheasant.  The old car took it in the headlight cover.  So when we needed the light, we were Popeye into Soda.  Grandma liked the Red Baron pizza and she promised that she would treat me.  Accordingly, we went and bought one and took it back to the Caribou Lodge.  It was only then we realized that we did not have an oven.  Grandma went down, and knowing the owners well, asked if they would cook it.  They agreed and we ate Red Baron Pizza.  It sure was good.
This was my first time on the road selling with Grandma.  She had taken me several times to other places close like Kimberly, Twin Falls, Wendell, and American Falls. I always felt so loved.  She would buy me clothes and completely dress me for the week.  This week, she bought this little red suit that had zippers over the pockets.  It was a short sleeved shirt with shorts.  She gave me the permission to carry the money if I promised not to lose it.  So I would zip it up in my little pockets and keep it safe all the time.  Made me feel like a million bucks. 
Every morning we would get up and she would make oatmeal out of the packets.  She had a little warmer that you put in the coffee cup and it would boil the water in the cup.  She would pour the water in with the oatmeal and we had the little feast every morning.  She would comb and part my hair with a duck’s tail in the back.  I felt like a little prized doll the way she took care of me.
It was this same week that we stopped at this home to visit some people.  That is one thing I remember, we always had leads.  Grandma never knocked not knowing who lived there.  This house was on a corner or curve in the highway.  I could probably take you there today, even though I was only about 5.  We were sitting in the front room of the home and the people kept commenting on how adorable I was.  Being a little bashful I asked to go in the backyard.  I went out and stood at the back fence watching a baseball game.  Never had seen a baseball game.  I was thrilled, it was warm, slight breeze, and the shining metal baseball bat.  Our visit came to a close and they were begging Grandma in front of me if they could keep me.  She asked me if they could keep me and I remember breaking out in tears. They thought I was so much more adorable.  It would be funny to know who lived there and see if they even remember this.  I very much doubt it.
One of the best parts about being with Grandma and doing this insurance business was that when we set out to drive there, she would give me all the lead cards.  Sometimes there would be up to 200 of them.  It was my job to take a look at the map and figure out where things were.  Then I would go through and organize the lead cards according to street, and then line the streets up to area.  This was a big job coming to towns like Idaho Falls/Rexburg.  I remembered I became quite the pro.  The entire week we came back to the car, I could tell her the house number of the next house, and then would direct her how to get there.  I became a master at map reading and directions.  Even to this day, I can look at a map, get a good feel for where anything is, and I can know how to get where I need to go.  Coming to Richmond, I think Amanda is constantly amazed that I already know where everything is.  I already know the main streets, where they are, and where they go.  Even in church today, changing our ward boundaries, I knew all the roads they talked about.  This has been a great blessing to me.  All thanks to my beloved Grandmother, and Combined Insurance.
It is funny how much we remember.  At least me.  I have noticed that others are not so fortunate.  I remember that same week going to the sulfur mines and Grandma showing me where the Circle A trucks were.  She took me and showed me where my Uncle Doug lived at the time.  (Uncle Doug moved from there about 1987, which means I was definitely younger than 8.  I remember going to Grace, Idaho and Grandma showing me where Evan was raised.  I cannot take you there now, even though I have tried to find it.  Evan and Grandma divorced in 1987 as well.  I remember her taking me to the Minne Tonka caves, Bennington, Georgetown, and even little Niter.  Oddly, driving through Chesterfield a few years ago, it seemed too hauntingly familiar.  I still don’t know if it was from an expedition with Grandma or if it was for family history purposes.  (I did later find family history links)
This weekend we went to Northern Virginia.  Amanda and I have made a commitment to keep President Kimball’s challenge to the Saints that if circumstances permit, members should attend the temple at least once a month.  I have done this ever since I came home from my mission.  I have done it pretty well since I was endowed, except for several months in the mission when missionaries were not allowed to attend the temple.  Accordingly, Amanda and I needed to attend for the month of July and thought now was as good time as any.  We went up Friday night, stayed with Dennis and Gwen Thompson, who I lived with when I worked in Washington, D.C..  We spent the evening, caught up, and planned out Saturday.  Saturday, we went to the temple, dropped Miss Mandy Lundstrom off at the Baltimore Washington International Airport, drove to Annapolis, Maryland; and then crashed back at the Thompson home.  I did 15 initiatory at the temple and Amanda/Mandy both did a session.  We got lost getting there as we talked and passed every single junction for a free way.  Mandy was staying with the Thompson’s.  Oddly, she was the old girlfriend of Brad Hales, my good friend and old roommate.  She was going to ride the train from Springfield clear to BWI with all her luggage. Knowing how horrible that is, how much I hate traveling with luggage, I offered our services.  Plus she got to go to the temple one last time.  Amanda and I then ran to Annapolis to see the historic downtown.  Sadly, we got there 5 minutes after they closed the statehouse.  But we drove around a little longer.  The Maryland Capitol is the longest used Capitol in the U.S..  It has also served at the United States Capitol while the current one was being built.  It was in this very building that General George Washington resigned his commission of the Continental Army.  Wonderful history.  The College of St. John is right by as is the United States Naval Academy.  The town reminds me so much of Britain.  I love it.  I recommend all pay a visit there.  Go to the Capitol when it is open. I did last year and enjoyed it.
Anyhow, we came back to Richmond this morning and got ready and went to church.  They reorganized our ward, but as we did not know anyone, it did not make much difference to us.  At least we don’t have to attend another ward.  It was a good day.  At least we got a new lesson, no more of that adultery lesson we had for the last 3 weeks. 

Back from Father’s Day

Another weekend with some visits to a far away land.  Well, at least another state.  We get around!  Colorado, Idaho, and Utah all in the last few weeks.  In the upcoming weeks, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, and Virginia.  We are looking forward to it.  It should all be an adventure.

We went up to Idaho for Father’s Day.  In typical Ross household fashion, they forgot we were coming.  A couple of grandchildren gave up their bed so we could have a bed to sleep in.  Jan had just returned from the hospital in the previous day from having a kidney infection.  I hope she improves quickly.

The next morning with nobody home, I left Amanda sleeping and went to a field out at Ridgeway.  I met Ted there and we ended up chatting for several hours.  The pump on his 4-wheeler died, so we ran to Murtaugh for parts.  They had what we needed, but we were hungry, so we ran to Kimberly.  The Maverick for some reason or another was not serving breakfast, so we ran to Eden for food.  They did not have anything desirable, so we headed to Burley.  We ended up settling for a breakfast at Burger King.  We enjoyed the time to chat.  He counseled me on my marriage, and I counseled him on his being Bishop.  It really weighs on him at the moment for a variety of reasons.  Some of which I hope no Bishop ever has to endure.  Our several hours were finally up with Amanda calling me.  She was finishing the laundry.  Ted really has some heavy burdens.  I hope I never am called to such a position.  He was curious what my ideas were on what he should do in a couple of scenarios.  The only thing I had to call on was mission experience, and they did not really seem to apply.

I went home, got ready for the day, and Amanda and I headed out.  We ran to visit some people, none of which it seemed were home.  Steve and Abby Whitesides, Dennis and Joan Isaak, Paul and Kathy Duncan, Warren and Sara Crane.  It was a good day.  We stopped for burgers at Burgers Ect.  Then we had to drive to Burley to pick up Jan’s granddaughter, Shyanne (spelling).  We picked her up and headed home.  We stopped at Andra’s and dropped off her wedding photo.  At home, I crashed for a couple of hours.  I had been fighting a cold since Friday afternoon.  The nap was great, and I think it was the breaking point.  I awoke and we met Kevin and Megan Orton for dinner at Perkins.  Dustin and Maren McClellan were to meet us, but I suppose they had more important things going on.  It was great to visit with Kevin and Megan again.  They seem like they are doing really well in their lives.  I am happy for them.  Ryan and Kegan were there, and they seem like good kids.  I hope they grow up to be good, faithful, diligent boys.

Sunday arrived and I slept in I think due to the cold.  We got ready and went to church.  I really enjoyed Elder’s Quorum, Sunday School, and Sacrament.  Sunday School was about David and how one little innocent thought can lead to a whole host of things.  A look, glance led to sin.  Not only that, the desire to hide sin led to greater iniquity.  It even cost someone their life.  They made the comment that the first sin was forgiven, but the second is what cost David his exaltation.  I had never heard this before and I have no idea where Brother Dibb got this from.  I e-mailed his Sister-in-Law and hope to find out.

After church, we ran to Andra’s house and picked up May and Andra.  It was great to see May for the first time in years.  She has matured and looks like a responsible young woman.  In visiting with her, it sounds like she truly has put her life on the right track.  I hope that is truly the case.

We drove to Darrel and Cindy Schmidt’s for Sunday Dinner.  There was quite the host there.  Cindy’s sister, Mary Lou, and brother, Lanny, were both there.  Lanny brought his son Jeremy, who seems to have pulled his life around as well.  I am glad to hear the family is progressing.  I hope many others will put there life in order.

Dinner was absolutely amazing.  I loved it.  I ate two full plates.  It was good to visit with the family and to see Cindy again.  Tia was there, but did not seem too interested in visiting.  I was told that she thinks the only time I call is when I want something.  Which is partially true.  She seems to have become so cynical and pessimistic, that it is hard to visit with her too often.  So I use my coming into town as an excuse to call, which means I also would like to get my car in for a service or something like that.  They go hand in hand.

Andra left with a friend and we headed back with May.  I forgot to go visit Armina Jonas Farnes in Kimberly.  We did visit Tuck and Kathy Taylor though.  That was fun.  I also got a bunch of temple cards back, most of which I will send to St. George to have the sealings to parents done.

We crashed and went to bed.  Monday morning dawned and again we were alone in the house.  I got to see Dad for a whole 15 minutes on Sunday.  We did give him his card and Father’s Day present, which was three photos from the reception.  He said he really liked them, especially the family portrait.  We got ready and headed out.  We met Brock for lunch at Perkins at 11:00.  We had a good visit with him.  He had to run off for an art teaching appointment.  It was good to visit with him.  I am glad he is doing good things with his life.

Afterward, we stopped to visit Ted and Becca Tateoka one last time.  We visited for probably about an hour.  Then went to pay a visit to Paul and Kathy Duncan.  We were there for about 2 hours.  We visited with Kathy and she updated on all the family and everything that was going on.

I was sad to realize that I was saying good bye to many of these people for the last time for several years.  Some of them possibly ever.  On the way back down, we stopped to see Grandpa.  He had left to go pick up his army buddy, Polke at the Greyhound Station.  We left him his two photos in a frame from the wedding.  I hope he appreciates them.  They were for Father’s Day as well.  We stopped to visit the Hemsley family, and they were happy and about the usual.  Jill has flown to Pennsylvania for a week of meetings.

Anyhow, that was the weekend.  Things are well here.  I worked yesterday and today.  People seems surprised that we are now in single digits for the amount of days I have left at work.  I am going to miss the painting and maintenance.