Milo, Gladys, and Milo Ross

Here are two photos I stumbled on the other day I have not made available previously.  Enjoy!

This first one is interesting because it is dated as 30 May 1942.  Milo and Gladys Ross, Grandpa and Grandma, had only been married about two months.  Less than six months later Grandpa would be serving in the Army.  I have written more about their life here.  This is likely outside the Donaldson home at 629 8th Street in Ogden, Weber, Utah, with the Wasatch Mountains in the background.  This is where Gladys’ parents lived at the time.

Milo and Gladys Ross, 30 May 1942

Milo and Gladys Ross, 30 May 1942

Here is a picture of Milo Paul Ross at the old home in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  The interesting thing about this home is that Milo James Ross was born in this home in 1921.  There is a log cabin behind the clapboard.  I don’t know the exact years while they lived here, I don’t even know if they were living in it when this photo was taken.  At first the home was located just to the north of 2963 N 4200 W in Plain City when Milo was born in it in 1921.  At some point, it was dragged to a place on North Plain City Road.  I don’t believe it had been moved yet when this picture was taken.  It was tore down in the past decade.

Milo in front of

Milo in front of their home

Here is another picture of the home taken by Dad in the past 15 years or so.

Sharp Log Home

Van Eliot Heninger’s Class

Back (l-r): Wayne Taylor, Frank Poulsen, Miriam Weatherston, Margaret Freestone, Emza Musgrave, Dorothy Richardson, Milo Ross, Earl Hipwell.  Middle: Ray Charlton, Junior Taylor, LauRene Thompson, Jean Etherington, Cleone Carver, Myrtle Hampton, Eugene Maw, Van Eliot Heninger.  Front: Keith Hodson, Orlo Maw, Howard Hunt, Ellis Lund, Delmar White, Ted Christensen, Lyle Thompson, Ivan Hodson.

Here is another photo, the second of the four, but from Grandpa’s 8th Grade year.  This was taken outside the old Plain City School in Plain City, Weber, Utah. The question marks probably mean they are still alive.

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Frank Dee Poulsen (1920-2010)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Emza Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

Dorothy Richardson (?-?)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Elmer Taylor Jr. (1921-1985)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Myrtle Hampton (?-?)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Van Eliot Heninger (1909-1989)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Delmar White (1921-2008)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Lyle Thompson (?-?)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

Gwendolyn Stewart’s Class

Back (l-r): Delmar White, Earl Hipwell, Harold Hunt, Ellis Lund, Milo Ross, Ray Charlton, Ted Christensen.  Middle: Lyle Thompson, Ivan Hodson, Wayne Taylor, Jack Wood, ? Singleton, Weldon Heslop, Warren Williams, Arthur Hunter, Gwendolyn Stewart.  Front: Ruby Illium, Miriam Weatherston, Margaret Freestone, Jean Etherington, LauRene Thompson, Neta England.

This is the first of four photos from Grandpa Milo Ross’ class pictures.  This photo is of the 1st Grade class for the school in Plain City, Weber, Utah for the year 1927-1928.  You may find it interesting to see how the individuals grow up over the next 10 years or so (through the four class photos).  Here is some biography on the individuals in the photo.  I started with spouses, but some married multiple times and it just became messy, sorry.

Delmar White (1921-2008)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Harold Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

James Lyle Thompson (1921-1999)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Jack Oliver Wood (1921-1961)

? Singleton (?-?)

Weldon Andrew Heslop (1919-1995)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Arthur Ralph Hunter (1921-1997)

Gwendolyn Stewart (1907-1998)

Ruby Illum (?-Alive)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Neta Elizabeth England (1920-2006)

Ethelyn June Streeter

With the recent passing of Aunt June Stout, I thought I would dedicate a post to her.  (This is a repost due to Grandpa’s passing of a 2012 post)

Ethelyn June Streeter was born 4 June 1918 in Paul, Minidoka, Idaho to Mark Lewis and Ethel Sharp Streeter.  She was the only child born to this union as her parents soon separated.  Mark Lewis Streeter was born 11 May 1898 in Hooper, Weber, Utah and died 21 March 1986 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  Ethel Sharp was born 9 April 1898 in Plain City, Weber, Utah and died 6 August 1925 in Plain City shortly after giving birth to her fifth child.  Mark and Ethel were married 7 May 1917 in Ogden.

Mark and Ethel Streeter

Ethel was in a train accident in Plain City.  After marrying Mark, she received a settlement from the railroad.  With their new wealth they moved to Paul and built a confectionery.  Paul was the location of a new sugar factory built by Amalgamated Sugar Company.  Further the farm land was continuing to open and expand and Paul was a promising boom town.  Many families moved from the Ogden area to Minidoka and Cassia counties.

It was here, not long after the confectionery was built, Ethelyn June Streeter was born.  She went by June all her days.  On 3 March 1919 Mark enlisted in the Army.  We do not know the reasons for his enlistment; enlist and not be drafted, drafted, or marital issues.  All we know is that Mark and Ethel divorced during 1919.  Ethel remarried 11 January 1920 to John “Jack” William Ross.

Ethel Ross and little June Streeter

Jack and Ethel Ross with young June Streeter

June spent a several years growing up with three younger siblings.  Milo Paul was born in 1921, Paul was born in 1922, and John Harold was born in 1924.  Jack worked for Amalgamated Sugar Company most of the time and worked at the Ogden, Burley, and Paul plants.  Hence, Milo was born in Plain City, Paul was born in Paul, and Harold in Burley, Cassia, Idaho.  I have written more extensively about the family elsewhere.

(l-r) Harold, Milo, and Paul Ross with June Streeter

Sadly, Ethel gave birth to Ernest Jackson Ross in 1925 and she shortly passed away afterward.  Little Ernest passed away about two months later.  Jack’s parents, James and Damey Ross, took the four children in over the winter of 1925-26.  Jack’s parents were struggling financially and Jack was not able to properly tend to the children so the children were taken to northern Utah and farmed out to different family members.  June went to live with her Streeter grandparents, George Clark and Jane Ann Wilson Streeter.  They raised her in Ogden until she left home.

Paul, June, and Harold

Paul, Harold, and Milo Ross with June Streeter behind.

She married Dominic Anthony Corsaro and had two children; Franklin George in 1936 and Josephine Ina in 1943.  The Corsaro marriage ended in divorce.  She then married an A H Ballard, which also ended in divorce.  Lastly, she married Jack Stout.

Her obituary mentions that she was an Arthur Murray dance instructor.

I have tried to find out more information about these marriages but nobody has responded to my letters or e-mails for further information.  Some day I hope to flesh it out some more.

Jack and June Stout about 1960

June spent her remaining years living with her daughter and son-in-law, Merk and Ina French.  It was in Southern California she passed away, I do not know the exact location yet.  She passed away 24 June 2012 and was buried 30 June 2012.

Plain City Junior High School Play

Back (l-r): John Reese, Eugene Maw, Van Eliot Heninger, Milo Ross, Eric Rauzi.  Middle: Dorothy Richardson, June Wayment, LauRene Thompson, Margaurite Maw, Ruth Carver.  Front: Rex McIntire, Keith Hodson, Ray Charlton.

This is a photograph taken of the individuals who put on a play in April 1936 at Plain City Junior High School in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  The play was “The Girl Who Forgot”.  The Ogden Standard Examiner announced the play 3 April 1936.

Here are the people who in the photo with a little more information.

John Major Reese (1898-1976)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Van Eliot Heninger (1909-1989)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

Americo Rauzi (1910-1998)

Dorothy Richardson (?-Alive)

June Ellen Wayment (1920-2012)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Marguerite Maw (1921-2009)

Ruth Carver (1922-2007)

Rex Lee McIntire (1922-2003)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Ray S Charlton (1920-1991)

Milo James Ross Obituary

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

Milo James Ross, 93, peacefully slipped out of mortality in the comfort of his own bed in Plain City on 17 July 2014.

Milo was born 4 February 1921 in a log cabin north of Plain City to John “Jack” William Ross and Ethel (Sharp) Ross. His mother tragically died from childbirth in 1925. Milo and his siblings lived with his Ross grandparents until the costs proved too great and his Uncle Edward Sharp raised Milo in Plain City until adulthood.

He grew up tending to his Grandmother Sharp and spending most of his time farming with his many Sharp cousins and his siblings. He attended schools in Plain City and graduated from Weber High in 1939.

Milo met Gladys Maxine Donaldson at a Plain City celebration in 1940. They would meet from time to time for dancing at the Berthana in Ogden. Milo and Gladys married 4 April 1942 in her parent’s home on 8th Street in Ogden.

Milo enlisted in the Army in October 1942. He served in the 33rd Infantry Division, 130th Regiment, Company C. He trained in weapons and earned his expert ranking. He arrived in Hawaii in July 1943 and received the announcement that his son, Milo Paul, had been born. He served as part of the Philippine invasion force and they fought through the jungles and liberated Baguio City. He was injured five times, one while tending to other soldiers awaiting medical attention.

He was present at the Japanese surrender at Luzon as a Technical Sergeant in June 1945. He received two purple hearts and the Silver Star for his service at the end of World War II. His Company received a Presidential Citation for outstanding performance during armed conflict with the enemy in efforts to seize Hill X in Bilbil Mountain Province. At the time of Milo’s death, the military was preparing to award him another Purple Heart, another Silver Star, Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal & Bronze Star, World War II Victory Medal, Combat Infantry Badge 1st Award, Philippine Liberation Ribbon and Bronze Star, Honorable Service Button for World War II. He was also to be awarded the Philippine Liberation Medal and Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation Badge from the Philippine Government.

He returned home in 1945 and began working with his father-in-law. He eventually began building or remodeling homes. He estimated he had built over 120 homes and remodeled another 50 homes or buildings in his lifetime. Two more children joined Milo and Gladys in 1946 and 1948, Judy Ethel and Caroline. Milo and Gladys dedicated their lives to raising their three children and tenderly caring for Judy’s needs until she passed away in 1998.

Milo and Gladys solemnized their marriage 2 July 1976 in the Ogden LDS Temple with their daughter Judy by their side. Milo served in various callings as a humble servant favoring their time as temple workers in the Ogden Temple for almost a decade. Milo and Gladys also relished their time in raising their garden and providing its fruits to friends, family, the temple, and local hospitals.

Milo is survived by his son Milo (Janice) Ross of Hazelton, Idaho and daughter Caroline (Abram) Gallegos of Plain City. Eight grandchildren, Scott (Robyn) Ross of Kimberly, Idaho; Jeffrey (Holly) Ross of Jerome, Idaho; Becky (Joseph) Patterson of Portland, Oregon; Paul (Amanda) Ross of Burley, Idaho; Andra Ross of Heyburn, Idaho; Christy (Sterling) Neilson of Rupert, Idaho; Cindy (Steve) Pease of Albion, Idaho; and Lonny (Amy) Taylor of Declo, Idaho; seventeen great grandchildren; and eleven great great grandchildren.

Milo was preceded in death by his parents; his wife Gladys; all five siblings Hobart Day, June Stout, Paul Ross, Harold Ross, and Earnest Ross; daughter Judy Ross; grandson-in-law Bret Adams, and two great grandchildren.

The funeral will be held Tuesday 22 July 2014 at the Plain City 7th Ward Building, 2952 N 4200 W, a building he helped organize its construction, at 11:00 AM with Bishop Tom Matthews officiating.

Friends may call at Lindquist Mortuary in North Ogden at 2140 N 400 E (Washington Blvd) from 6 until 8 PM on Monday 21 July 2014. Friends may also call from 10:00 until 10:45 AM prior to the service at the church. Burial will be in the Plain City Cemetery beside his beloved Gladys and Judy.

Milo J Ross in army uniform squat

Ross-Donaldson Wedding

David and Dena Donaldson are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Gladys Maxine to Milo James Ross, son of Jack Ross and the late Ethel Ross.  They were married in the Donaldson home on 8th Street in Ogden, Utah on 4 April 1942.  (This post originally appeared in 2010 and is reposed due to Grandpa’s death)

Gladys is a 1940 graduate of Ogden High School.

Milo is a 1939 graduate of Weber High School.  He is currently employed with American Packing and Provisioning Company as a supervisor in Ogden.

The couple will make their home in Plain City.

While short and sweet, there is much more of a story behind those words.  Milo and Gladys met  in 1940 when Gladys and her sisters rode their bikes all the way to a celebration in Plain City.  Later they would meet at the Berthana, which included a dance hall on the second floor (built in Ogden about 1914).  The Berthana later converted to a roller skating rink before closing in the 1970’s.  The building is still there although I do not know what the use for the building is currently.

David Delos Donaldson and Berendena Van Leeuwen are Gladys’ parents.  Read more of her parents at this link: Donaldson-Van Leeuwen Family.  David was a plumber by trade who had lung problems from being gassed in the Argonne of France in World War I.  He suffered from lung ailments the rest of his life.  He mostly worked in the Ogden area but worked prior to marriage in Phoenix, Arizona and Twin Falls, Idaho.  He also sought work in Boulder City, Nevada during the depression and as a steam and pipe fitter during World War II in Napa, California.  Apparently during World War II he worked almost exclusively in submarines.  You can read more of their marriage and family at the link above.  She went by the name of Dena her entire life.

Gladys and Maxine Donaldson ages 5 and 3.

Dena grew up LDS and David did not.  David’s parents were not active LDS and most of David’s siblings joined the LDS church between the ages of 10 and 22.  David and one brother did not.  Dena saw that all her children were raised LDS with little difficulty from David.  Apparently smoking is what kept him from being baptized (he picked up smoking after being gassed because he said it soothed his lungs).  When the time would come for Milo and Gladys to marry, they wished to be married in the temple.   For whatever reason, the Bishop determined that he was not going to allow them to be sealed without David being a member.  I do not know which Bishop, but I have a suspicion it was Gladys’ Bishop and that he knew the Donaldson family.  He probably hoped to bring errant David around so his daughter could get married.  The plan backfired.  It would not have worked anyhow because David was pretty set on Gladys marrying a wealthy man and would not have minded if the wedding had not gone through.  Milo said they wanted to get married and were not interested in waiting around for a Bishop to figure out what he was doing.  A week before they were actually married, they decided to elope.  They packed up and drove to Evanston, Wyoming on snow covered roads.  They arrived and decided they better do it proper with family around.  They enjoyed a meal and drove back to Ogden on a very snowy set of roads.  Leading them to get married in the Donaldson home the next week or so.  It would take them another 34 years before they finally made it to the temple to get sealed.  Perhaps the Bishop was inspired.

They married in April and World War II was in full swing.  They rented a place in Ogden for a few weeks until moving to Plain City and rented there (on 4700?) until they built a home after the war.  Milo and a group of buddies then went off to Fort Douglas to enlist in October 1942 rather than wait until they were drafted.  They anticipated at least a few more days or weeks in Utah before being shipped off.  However, Milo was put on a train that same day to Camp Lewis in Washington.  He spent the next two to four months there, he cannot remember for sure.  Gladys would move to Camp Lewis to be with him through basic training.  By this point the two knew they were expecting a baby.

Milo shipped out for Needles, California to Camp Ibis.  Due to his experience with building, he was one of the men asked to lay out some of the buildings for the latrines and then helped in starting the construction of those buildings.  Their division stayed there a few months before heading off to San Francisco from which he was put on a boat and headed to Hawaii.  He landed in Hawaii on the 4th of July 1943 with the loudspeaker welcoming the men to Hawaii and announcing the birth of a son to Sergeant Ross.  I have written of that baby at this link: Baby Milo Ross.

Gladys would live with her parents in Ogden until Milo returned from the rigors of war.  Her parents moved from their address on 8th Street down to Washington Boulevard during this time.

Milo worked for American Packing and Provisioning Company some in high school and on afterward until he went into the service.  American Pack would be sold to Swift & Company in 1949.  This packing plant would remain in use until the 1970’s when it was closed.

I have written previously about Milo’s loss of his mother in 1925 and her family keeping him from having contact with his father, John William Ross.  Here is the link: Ross-Sharp Wedding.  He was raised by his Uncle Edward William Sharp in Plain City.

Anyhow, the family would go on to have 2 more children in 1946 and 1948.  Milo received a homestead in Washington State in the late 1940’s, early 1950’s, but I do not know more about it.  The homestead is believed to have been abandoned because of medical needs of Judy and the family returned to a newly built home in Plain City around 1948 or 1949.  The family then built the current home at 2532 N. 4100 W. in 1955 and have resided there since.