Plain City Junior High School Play

Back (l-r): John Reese, Eugene Maw, Van Eliot Heninger, Milo Ross, Eric Rauzi.  Middle: Dorothy Richardson, June Wayment, LauRene Thompson, Margaurite Maw, Ruth Carver.  Front: Rex McIntire, Keith Hodson, Ray Charlton.

This is a photograph taken of the individuals who put on a play in April 1936 at Plain City Junior High School in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  The play was “The Girl Who Forgot”.  The Ogden Standard Examiner announced the play 3 April 1936.

Here are the people who in the photo with a little more information.

John Major Reese (1898-1976)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Van Eliot Heninger (1909-1989)

Milo James Ross (1921-Alive)

Americo Rauzi (1910-1998)

Dorothy Richardson (?-Alive)

June Ellen Wayment (1920-2012)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Marguerite Maw (1921-2009)

Ruth Carver (1922-2007)

Rex Lee McIntire (1922-2003)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Ray S Charlton (1920-1991)

Calvin and Fanny Phibbs

Calvin and Fanny Phibbs with (l-r) Evelyn, Florence, and Catherine in Idaho in 1912.

I had heard a rumor a couple of years ago that Calvin Phibbs had committed suicide but could not confirm the story.  Now that I am back in Idaho, I stopped by the Rupert Library to see if they had some old newspapers.  Sure enough, I found the following obituary which reads more like the local gossip column.  I will include some of the family history after the obituary.

“Judge Phibbs Ends Life; Ill Health Cause
“Well Known Rupert Attorney Meets Instant Death By Own Hand at Home Thursday.
“Four months of sleeplessness, a body racked with pain and mind grown despondent through belief of the utter hopelessness of physical recovery, led to the tragic, but carefully planned suicide of Judge C. D. Phibbs, well known Rupert attorney who ended his life at his home Thursday.
Seated before a mirror in his bedroom at three o’clock in the afternoon, when no one was in the house but his wife and himself, the distraught man placed the muzzle of a 22-caliber hammerless revolver to his right temple, and with a firm unswerving hand sent a bullet through his brain, death being instantaneous.  The leaden missile passed through the head and lodged in the wall, near the ceiling.
“Startled by the sharp explosion of the gun, Mrs. Phibbs rushed in from an adjoining room to find her husband’s body crumpled on the floor with his life extinct.
“That the rash act was premeditated and carried out as planned is shown by excerpts from a letter written the previous Saturday, addressed to his wife and left where she could not fail to find it.
“I do not feel that I can get well.  I have suffered for four months.  So much that I cannot endure it.  If anything happens to me, know that I love you and have never loved anyone but you.  Tell the children to be good children, as it is best for them.  It is the only way to be happy.  I have failed to do as much for them as I wanted to but have not been able.”
“Following the introductory explanation foreshadowing the tragedy that was to take place, the letter continued with detailed instructions of what to do in regard to business that would arise, told where his life insurance policies were, how to plan the funeral, left words of encouragement to the children to continue their education and even advised about planting a garden.
“After a farewell sent the children and the brief words of assurance for their future, the final paragraph concludes: “God bless you all till we meet again.  I do not believe God will blame me for what I am doing for there is no other way.”
“The letter was found by Mrs. Phibbs soon after the tragic shooting occurred.  It was dated March 20.  Although she knew he suffered much from stomach trouble for many weeks and was discouraged over his health, no hint of self-destruction was ever suggested by her husband, she said, and in the past week it seemed to be somewhat improved, and had been to his office only a few days before the appalling act.  He had suffered intensely from stomach trouble and it is thought he believed himself a victim of cancer.
“When a youth of 13 years, while in the mountains of Virginia, at Fancy Gap, Carroll county where he was reared, in 1899 Calvin D. Phibbs, whose father worked in the mines there, hopped on a coal car and received injury to his left leg that later caused infection, making amputation necessary and left him crippled for life.
“In 1906 when twenty years of age he married Fanny Elizabeth Ross in Welch, West Virginia, and on March 21, 1913, they came to Idaho and to Rupert, making there (sic) home here since then.
“Although he had little opportunity for attending school, he received his education by private study.  Securing books and texts of the International Correspondence school he studied law and was admitted to the Idaho state bar in 1919.
“For ten years he held the position of probate judge of Minidoka county, being elected on the Republican ticket and served in that capacity until four years ago.  He served also as justice of the peace for two years and in 1918 was city clerk of Rupert.
“His friends and business associates, of whom he had many, were shocked and grieved at his tragic act.  He had a kindly disposition and a cheerfulness of manner that in no way can be reconciled with his fatal deed.  At the time of his death he was engaged in the practice of law but since last November had been unable to be in his office much of the time.
“Besides his grief-stricken wife he is survived by eleven children, five boys and six girls, their father being the first of the family to pass away.  The children in order of their ages are Mrs. Florence Biles, 23, of Gridley, California; Mrs. Evelyn Collier, Rupert; Mrs. Catherine Beachel, of Filer, Idaho; Virginia, James, Viola, William, Orville, Arthur, Albert and Phyllis, the youngest, age three, all of whom live at home.
Three brothers, Frank Phibbs of Twin Falls, Robert of Oakland, California, and John of Salt Lake City, and twin sisters, Mrs. Ardena Christensen, San Francisco and Mrs. Mary Hiatt of Paul, also survive.
“Largely attended funeral service were conducted Monday at one o’clock in the Second ward L.D.S. church with Albert Harrison, first counselor to Bishop O. J. Bateman in charge.
“Speakers included David J Borup, former bishop of the Second ward, who came from Boise where he now resides to be present at the funeral.  Judge Hugh A. Baker, an attorney friend, and David Hyde and A. H. Jensen, churchmen and friends of the deceased.
“Music was rendered by a chorus of nine voices under direction of Arthur Humphries, singing three selections “I Need Thee Every Hour,” “Sometime We’ll Understand” and “Oh, My Father.”
“Prayers were offered by L.D. Hyde and R.C. May.  Interment was in Rupert cemetery with Goodman Mortuary in charge.

Here is a biography of Judge Phibbs from an old Idaho directory of prominent people.

“Judge Calvin Dickerson Phibbs. since 1912 a resident of Rupert, where in 1918 he was elected judge of the probate court of Minidoka county, was born at Hillsville, Virginia, June 12, 1886, a son of James and Elizabeth (Bolt) Phibbs. The parents are also natives of the Old Dominion, where they were reared and educated. Subsequent to his marriage the father there followed farming and stock raising and during his early life also engaged in the profession of teaching. In 1910 he removed westward to Rupert, Idaho, and purchased a farm northeast of the town, becoming owner of eighty acres. At times he has owned various farms, but his holdings at the present time embrace just eighty acres. He and his wife have become members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and in his political views Mr. Phibbs is a republican.

“Calvin D. Phibbs spent his boyhood in his native state and pursued his education in Fairview Academy. He was reared to the occupation of farming, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. Later he took up electrical engineering and worked along that line until he came to Rupert, Idaho, in 1912. Here he entered the real estate field and after a time he was called upon for public service, being made city clerk of Rupert, which position he filled for a brief period. In 1918 he was elected to the office of probate judge of Minidoka county, which position he is now acceptably filling, being most careful, prompt, systematic and accurate in the discharge of his official duties. On the 15th of December, 1919, he was admitted as an attorney at law in the supreme court of the state of Idaho.

“In 1907 Judge Phibbs was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Ross, a native of Pulaski, Virginia, and a daughter of J. T. and Catherine (Graham) Ross, the former a farmer and stockman. Judge and Mrs. Phibbs have become parents of six children: Florence, Evelyn, Catherine, Virginia, James and Viola. The religious belief of the family is that of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and in politics Judge Phibbs is a stalwart republican, giving unfaltering allegiance to the party and its principles. He stands for advancement and improvement in all things that have to do with citizenship and is among that class who are putting forth every effort to spread the principles of true democracy and make one hundred per cent Americanism the rule of this land.

I do not usually place that much quoted material in my histories, but there is so much extra information I probably would not otherwise include, I thought I better just leave them how they were printed.

Calvin Dickerson Phibbs was born 12 June 1886 in Hillsville, Carroll, Virginia.  He died 30 March 1933 in Rupert, Minidoka, Idaho.  He was buried 4 days later on 3 April 1933 in the Rupert Cemetery.

Now that I have given so much on Calvin, I probably should fill out the life of Fanny a little more, my Great Great Aunt.

Fanny Elizabeth Ross was born 18 November 1893 in Reed Island, Pulaski, Virginia to James Thomas and Damey Catherine Graham Ross.  Read more about here parents and family here.  She married Calvin Phibbs 22 December 1906 in Welch, McDowell, West Virginia.  As mentioned 11 children were born to the marriage.  I believe she moved fairly quickly to California after Calvin’s death.  While in Rupert, the Phibbs family lived at 96 B Street (unless the streets have been renumbered, this home does not exist any more.  Grandpa, Milo Ross, visited her in Salt Lake City before World War II.  I do not know if she was living there or just visiting, he does not remember either.  She died 23 January 1943 in Daly City, San Francisco, California.  She is buried at Cypress Law in Colma, San Francisco, California in an unmarked grave.

Calvin and Fanny’s children are as follows, without spouses.

Florence Geneva Phibbs born 21 June 1907 in Gary, McDowell, West Virginia and died 9 February 1987 in Gridley, Butte, California.

Evelyn Adaway Phibbs born 8 October 1909 in Eckman, McDowell, West Virginia and died 7 January 1961 in San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Catherine Elizabeth Phibbs born 1 January 1912 in Thorpe, McDowell, West Virginia and died 7 September 1989 in Fall River Mills, Shasta, California.

Virginia Ardena Phibbs born 3 March 1914 in Rupert and died 25 September 1969 in San Francisco County, California.

James Calvin Phibbs born 22 April 1916 in Rupert and died 10 July 1977 in San Francisco.

Viola Belle Phibbs born 21 July 1918 in Rupert and died 11 June 2008.

William Robert Phibbs born 3 October 1920 in Rupert and died 16 September 2010 in Redding, Shasta, California.

Orville Leonard Phibbs born 20 October 1922 in Rupert and died 25 December 1985 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California.

Arthur Lee Phibbs born 15 October 1925 in Rupert and died 22 June 1983 in San Francisco.

Richard Albert Phibbs born 25 December 1927 in Rupert and died 27 January 1983 in Clearlake, Lake, California.

Phyllis Elaine Phibbs born 24 February 1930 in Rupert and died 6 July 1972 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Of course I am always looking for more information on the family since we do not have contact with any of the descendants.

Plain City Clubbers

Back (l-r):William Freestone (manager), Norman Carver, Glen Charlton, Fred Singleton, and Elmer Singleton. Middle: Clair Folkman, Dick Skeen, Albert Sharp, Abe Maw, Milo Ross. Front: F. Skeen, Walt Moyes, Arnold Taylor, Lynn Stewart, Theron Rhead.

The caption to this newspaper clipping read as follows: “Favored by Many…Plain City’s hustling ball club has many of the bleacherites at the 1938 Utah farm bureau tournament picking it to walk off with the state title before the joust closes.”  The caption goes on to list the names of the individuals included in the photograph which I reproduced as the caption to the photo above.  I list the names just as they were listed in the caption for the photo.  The title of the article was “Plain City Clubbers Show Ability.”  The clipping is included in Grandpa’s clippings but we do not know exactly when it was published.  The team did end up going to Lagoon and playing Sandy for the state championship, but lost.

This team obviously played and practiced in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  Grandpa has told me numerous times how he used to play baseball.  With Grandpa just past 90, it is a bit hard to imagine him hustling after anything, let alone after a ball.  The other thing that struck me about this team is I expected them to all be much closer in age.

William Sessions Freestone (1901-1998)  Manager.

Norman Elmer Carver (1919-2001)

Alfred Glen Charlton (1919-1974)

Fred Singleton (?-Alive?)

Bert Elmer Singleton (1918-1996)  For those baseball fans out there, Elmer went on to play 24 seasons in his career.  He played for teams like Boston Braves, Chicago Clubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Washington Senators.

Clair Marcus Folkman (1910-1975)

Elwood “Dick” Francis Skeen (1908-1977)

Albert Sharp (1909-1984)

Abraham “Abe” Edward Maw (1906-1985)

Milo James Ross (1921-Alive)

Elwood “F” Skeen (1908-1977)

Walter “Walt” Jeremiah Moyes (1907-1983)

George Arnold Taylor (1911-2000)

Lynn William Stewart (1916-2011)

William Theron Rhead (1914-1999)

John Reese’s 10th Grade Class

Top (l-r): John Reese, Ray Charlton, Earl Hipwell, Miriam Weatherston, Delmar White, Owen Wayment, Neta England.  Second: Orlo Maw, Warren Williams, Jean Etherington, Junior Taylor, Eugene Maw, Cleone Carver, Howard Hunt.  Third: Ellis Lund, Vera Wayment, Keith Hodson, Ted Christensen, Ruth Wade, Wayne Taylor, Milo Ross.  Bottom: LauRene Thompson, Frank Poulsen, Margaret Freestone, Ezma Musgrave.

This is the fourth of the class photos.  I believe this is actually the 1936-1937 year (Grandpa says in his writing it his his 10th Grade year).  This class attended Weber High School located in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  These students graduated in 1939.  Nearly all these students came from Warren, Plain City, West Weber, and those parts of the county for school.  Out of the whole picture, only one passed away in World War II (as far as I can tell, ALL the men served).

John Major Reese (1896-1976)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Delmar White (1921-2008)

Owen Urry Wayment (1921-2008)

Neta Elizabeth England (1920-2006)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

Elmer Taylor Jr. (1921-1985)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Vera Mary Wayment (1921-1989)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Ruth Wade (1921-Alive)

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Milo James Ross (1921-Alive)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Frank Dee Poulsen (1920-2010)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Ezma Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

John Reese’s 9th Grade Class

Back (l-r): Cleone Carver, Vera Wayment, Margaret Freestone, Emza Musgrave, Jean Etherington, LauRene Thompson.  Third: June Wayment, Miriam Weatherston, Ellis Lund, Ray Charlton, Ivan Hodson, Warren Williams, Ruth Wade, Tamara East, John Reese.  Second: Lyle Thompson, Milo Ross, Eugene Maw, Earl Hipwell, Bill Hill, Keith Hodson.  Front: Ted Christensen, Wayne Rose, Howard Hunt, Orlo Maw, Owen Wayment, Ellis Stewart, Delmar White.

Since I am on a kick of pictures from my Grandpa’s collection, here is the third of the four.  This is the 9th Grade class my Grandpa was in.  Mr. John Reece would be this class’s teacher the next year too.  I am pretty sure the 9th Grade was at Weber High School, but I have been unable to confirm what year switched between Plain City School and Weber High School in Ogden.  Several of these boys died in World War II. The ones with question marks are likely still alive.

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Vera Mary Wayment (1921-1989)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Emza Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

June Ellen Wayment (1920-2012)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Ruth Wade (1921-Alive)

Tamara East (?-Alive)

John Major Reese (1896-1976)

James Lyle Thompson (1921-1999)

Milo James Ross (1921-Alive)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

William Stanley Hill (1919-1945)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Wayne East Rose (1921-Alive)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

Owen Urry Wayment (1921-2008)

Ellis Wayment Stewart (1921-1940)

Delmar White (1921-2008)

Van Eliot Heninger’s Class

Back (l-r): Wayne Taylor, Frank Poulsen, Miriam Weatherston, Margaret Freestone, Emza Musgrave, Dorothy Richardson, Milo Ross, Earl Hipwell. Middle: Ray Charlton, Junior Taylor, LauRene Thompson, Jean Etherington, Cleone Carver, Myrtle Hampton, Eugene Maw, Van Eliot Heninger. Front: Keith Hodson, Orlo Maw, Howard Hunt, Ellis Lund, Delmar White, Ted Christensen, Lyle Thompson, Ivan Hodson.

Here is another photo, the second of the four, but from Grandpa’s 8th Grade year.  This was taken outside the old Plain City School in Plain City, Weber, Utah. The question marks probably mean they are still alive.

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Frank Dee Poulsen (1920-2010)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Emza Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

Dorothy Richardson (?-?)

Milo James Ross (1921-Alive)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Elmer Taylor Jr. (1921-1985)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Myrtle Hampton (?-?)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Van Eliot Heninger (1909-1989)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Delmar White (1921-2008)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Lyle Thompson (?-?)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

Gwendolyn Stewart’s Class

Back (l-r): Delmar White, Earl Hipwell, Harold Hunt, Ellis Lund, Milo Ross, Ray Charlton, Ted Christensen. Middle: Lyle Thompson, Ivan Hodson, Wayne Taylor, Jack Wood, ? Singleton, Weldon Heslop, Warren Williams, Arthur Hunter, Gwendolyn Stewart. Front: Ruby Illium, Miriam Weatherston, Margaret Freestone, Jean Etherington, LauRene Thompson, Neta England.

This is the first of four photos from Grandpa Milo Ross’ class pictures.  This photo is of the 1st Grade class for the school in Plain City, Weber, Utah for the year 1927-1928.  You may find it interesting to see how the individuals grow up over the next 10 years or so (through the four class photos).  Here is some biography on the individuals in the photo.  I started with spouses, but some married multiple times and it just became messy, sorry.

Delmar White (1921-2008)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Harold Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Milo James Ross (1921-Alive)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

James Lyle Thompson (1921-1999)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Jack Oliver Wood (1921-1961)

? Singleton (?-?)

Weldon Andrew Heslop (1919-1995)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Arthur Ralph Hunter (1921-1997)

Gwendolyn Stewart (1907-1998)

Ruby Illum (?-Alive)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Neta Elizabeth England (1920-2006)

Ode to Grandma Ross

Gladys and Maxine; ages 5 and 3 (1927)

Since Grandma would have been 90 today, I thought I would put together a couple of memories of her to commemorate her birthday.  Not so much a biography, just more of my personal memories and a couple of pictures through the decades of her life.  Gladys Maxine Donaldson was born 20 September 1921 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  I have written of her parents, David and Dena Donaldson, previously.

1939

Grandma married Milo James Ross 4 April 1942 in Ogden.  I have written some of their history at the following link: Ross-Donaldson Wedding.  Milo and Gladys had three children; Milo in 1943 (my father), Judy in 1946, and Caroline in 1948.

Milo and Gladys, 1943

I think the following photo was taken on the steps of Grandma’s parent’s home on Wall Avenue in Ogden.  I believe this photograph was taken the day of Glady’s father’s funeral.  The little girls are Caroline (left) and Judy (right).

Caroline, Gladys, and Judy about 1953

Here is a picture of Grandpa and Grandma in front of their home (built by Grandpa in 1955).  If you look closely, you can see the back of them in the window.

1961

Here is a more formal photograph of Grandpa and Grandma.  I do not know the occasion.

Milo and Gladys in the 1960′s

Another one.

Abt 1976

I think this is the first photo I have with my Grandma.  I do not know exactly how old I am, but I am most likely under 2 years old.  Since I grew up in Idaho, I only got to see my Grandparents once or twice a year.  In this picture, I do not seem too sure of the lady on the bike!

Paul and Gladys, about 1981

I do not recall what the occasion was for this picture but we were dressed up for something.  I do not recognize the building.

Paul, Gladys, and Andra in 1985

In 1992 when I received my Eagle Scout, my mom refused to step into an LDS church where the Court of Honor was held.  Dad invited Grandma to stand in for my Mom.  Mom arrived around the time of this photo in her thermal overalls and was royally upset and offended not only that my Grandparents were there, but that Grandma took her place.  Either way, it was a great honour to my Grandparents, especially in light of the history between my Grandparents and Mom.

Paul, Gladys, Milo (Jr) in 1992

In 1997, I moved to Logan, Utah to attend Utah State University.  Since I lived so much closer, I made an effort to visit my Grandparents at least once a month or so.  Typically it was not hard as I could catch a ride with someone passing through to another location.  Grandma was always very kind and would repeatedly remind me how much she loved me and that there was always a bed for me to sleep in if I wished to spend the night.  As her mind started to slip after Aunt Judy’s death the next year, she would often repeat the same two phrases at least every 15 minutes.  While they were the repetitions of an old lady, I still recognized that they came from the heart of my Grandmother who dearly loved me.  She knew me, loved me, and only had two phrases in which to express that in her mental infirmity.  I now feel her love over and over again with the phrases, although at the time they were sometimes annoyances.

I have to share a quick story at this point.  I had just come home my mission in England in December 2000.  I had not been home very long when I visited Utah again with my friend Dustin McClellan.  I was given some gifts and homemade soap to drop off at Grandpa and Grandma’s in Plain City.  Dustin and I stopped and we were visiting when Grandma left the room announcing she would cut up some fudge and bring it out.  Grandma came into the room and I turned down the fudge (I try to avoid sweets).  Grandpa took a piece and Dustin took a healthy portion.  Dustin put most of it in his mouth and when Grandpa took a bite he exclaimed that the fudge was soap.  Grandma had cut up the soap we brought as a gift thinking it was fudge!  The look on Dustin’s face was clearly a man who had taken a mouth of fudge and was completely disgusted and deceived but did not want to let anyone know lest he offend my Grandma.  Grandpa had to take the soap from Grandma who was about to eat a piece despite the warning.  Dustin who was nearly foaming at the mouth from the soap excused himself to wash out his mouth.  We still laugh about this episode now, 10 years on.

Another episode occurred in 2001, probably around September.  I was driving through with a friend, Kevin Orton, for business and I convinced him to pay a stop on my Grandparents.  It was a fairly routine visit and Grandpa invited Kevin and me to go out back to visit his large garden.  Grandma walked with us and after a while we all retired to the back porch to sit a while.  Grandma went in to the house after offering us all a drink.  Grandpa went after her because she was so forgetful (to the point that he was concerned about her safety when cooking).  She opened the door, walked in, and Grandpa caught the screen door as it was closing.  Grandma turned and exclaimed, “Don’t touch my damn door!”  Grandpa jumped back, let the door close, and Grandma closed the door behind.  Right before she closed the door all the way though, she spoke softly, “I love you honey.”  She then closed the door and we heard it lock!  Kevin and I laughed and laughed about the whole scene.  Even years later he will randomly reference this experience.

Here is a great picture of Grandma at her 60th wedding anniversary.  She looked great but her memory was pretty much gone and I think she was lost half the time she was there.

2002

Jennie Britzman, Grandma’s first cousin, came to visit and this picture was snapped.  Grandpa was Grandma’s full-time caretaker by this point (Grandpa and Grandma were both about 82) and they rarely strayed far from home.

Jennie Britzman and Gladys, 2003

I believe this is the last photograph I have taken of Grandma before she passed away.  Grandpa looks younger and Grandma looks happy.

Grandpa and Grandma in 2004

Grandma died 25 August 2004 in the new McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden.  Her funeral and burial took place in Plain City on 25 August 2004.  Happy Birthday Grandma, I look forward to seeing you again.