Unknown Pennsylvania Photo

Dad has continued to go through the items Grandpa and Grandma Ross left behind.  Here is a photo that unfortunately is likely lost to the past.  We are not sure why Grandpa and Grandma had it in their collection.  It could be an ancestor but it might simply be a flea market find.

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Frankly, I cannot even tell for certain what the top of the photo is supposed to say.  Either way, there is the lady and the child in the bottom right corner.

The back of the photograph has “L. Whittling, Photographer, Cochranton, PA.” written on the back.   It also indicates “Presented to A Sawford”  For those interested, the back of the photo is shared below.

I attempted to find an A Sawford in the Cochranton area but did not immediately turn up anything definitive.  The other thing is we do not know if this person is related to Mr. or Ms. Sawford.  There is nothing to link Sawford to Cochranton.

One thing I can say, I do not have an ancestral line that came through Pennsylvania.  I cannot even find a relative that went to live in Pennsylvania on the Ross, Sharp, Stoker, Donaldson, or Van Leeuwen lines.  Hopefully with the limited information, someone related might be able to find this relative.

doc20140807105320_001

 

Edward William Sharp

I thought I would write about Edward William Sharp today, known to the family as Uncle Ed.  He has a tender, yet thorny, position in the family.

Ed Sharp and Bob (?) 17 February 1949

Ed Sharp and Bob (?) 17 February 1949

Edward William Sharp was born 25 October 1887 in Plain City, Weber, Utah, the seventh child to Milo and Lilly Sharp.  My Great Grandmother, Ethel, was Ed’s younger sister, number 11 in line.  I have written more of Ethel’s marriage to Jack Ross.  Ed Sharp comes into the family line more closely when Ethel died in 1925.  She left behind five children, namely: June, Milo, Paul, Harold, and Earnest.  The four children were taken back to Paul, Minidoka, Idaho in 1925 to be raised by their Ross grandparents, James and Catherine Ross, while Jack got back on his feet.  As winter came and progressed the family struggled.  Earnest passed away the fall of 1925 in Rupert, Idaho.  Jack was gone for unknown reasons and James and Catherine called Ethel’s family to come get the four children.  Starting that winter of 1925-26, Milo Ross was raised by his Uncle Ed.  June went to live with her paternal grandparents, the Streeters in Ogden.  Paul and Harold were raised by Ed’s siblings, Vic Hunt and Del Sharp respectively.  Sadly, Paul fell from a loft in a barn in 1932 and broke his arm and suffered a concussion that would take his life in 1932.

Edward Sharp met and married Lillie Elva East 13 May 1909 in Plain City.  She was born 16 February 1888 in nearby Warren, Weber, Utah.  Together they had 10 children.

Edna Louise Sharp born 11 January 1910 in Plain City.

Florence Evelyn Sharp born 30 June 1911 in Plain City.

Marjorie Lillian Sharp born 23 June 1913 in Plain City.

Ethel Sharp born 8 July 1917 in Plain City.

Elmer George Sharp born 15 June 1919 in Plain City.

Ruby Elaine Sharp born 13 February 1922 in Plain City.

Ruby Sharp

Ruby Sharp

Milo Riley Sharp born 27 November 1927 in Ogden.

Milo Riley Sharp (1924 - 1955)

Milo Riley Sharp (1924 – 1955)

Josephine Sharp born 18 March 1927 in Ogden.

Edward Junior Sharp born 24 January 1930 in Ogden.

Dean Sharp born 28 April 1935 in Ogden.

As a reminder, Grandpa, Milo Ross, was born in 1921 in Plain City.  He falls right in the middle of the entire family and became one of the siblings.  To tell the difference between Milo Ross and Milo Sharp, I will use their last name.

Milo James Ross

Milo James Ross

Unfortunately, things were not quite that easy.  Ed farmed a nice little farm in Plain City.  He also had some cows, pigs, and other animals.  The family grew up in the Depression with all the anxieties and difficulties that came with it.  Fortunately the farm was mostly paid for and the farm provided for itself and the family.

Despite technically being blood to Ed, Milo Ross was treated differently than the other children.  Milo Ross was not allowed to eat with the rest of the family.  When the family was done with the meal, then Milo Ross could eat.  Often alone.  Milo Ross was expected to work longer than the rest of the family, into the time while the rest of them ate.  Milo Ross was also expected to arise earlier and get things in order for the day before the rest of the family.  He did not often get to eat with the rest of the family for breakfast and only got some bread and milk.  He was also given some of the more undesirable jobs around the farm.  For example, it was his job to tend the onions which often left him smelling of the onions.

L-R: Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp, Howard Hunt, Milo Sharp, Ruby Sharp

L-R: Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp, Howard Hunt, Milo Sharp, Ruby Sharp

Ed also had some drinking issues and had a certain temper.  Of course his family saw the issues that arose as part of the alcohol, but it was Milo Ross who felt it.  He was the one who suffered the wrath of Ed’s drinking bouts at the end of a belt or sometimes worse.  While Milo Ross loved his cousin-siblings, the relationship was not as kindred with Ed.

On Horse l-r: Harold Ross, Howard Hunt, Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp (arm only), Janelle England, Eddie Sharp.  In front l-r: Ruby Sharp, Lucille Maw, and Milo Riley Sharp.

On Horse l-r: Harold Ross, Howard Hunt, Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp (arm only), Janelle England, Eddie Sharp. In front l-r: Ruby Sharp, Lucille Maw, and Milo Riley Sharp.

Ruby Sharp, Lois Robbins, Milo Ross, Milo Sharp

Ruby Sharp, Lois Robbins, Milo Ross, Milo Sharp

Milo Ross was only one year in age from Ruby who he ran around the countryside with.  They were close enough that they would hold hands when nobody else was around.  They did quite a bit together.  He was also close to Milo Sharp, but he was still three years behind him in age.  The older siblings, Edna (who went by Louise), Florence, and Ethel were good to him, but were close to each other and did mostly their own thing.  Ed kept Milo Ross busy that he did not get as much time with the younger children but he grew close with Josephine and Edward (known as Eddie in the family).  Dean was young enough that he was around him some, but did not have as close of a relationship.

L-R: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp, and Bob Martin.

L-R: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp, and Bob Martin.

As I mentioned in the story of Ed’s grandparents William & Mary Ann Sharp, the Sharp and Stoker families came to Utah as converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  A number of issues arose in Plain City and families left the church.  Ed’s parents followed that suit remaining with the Episcopalian faith.  Ed and Lillie did as well, but were not very active.  The Mormons continued to work on bringing the families back to the church.  The Sharp family started to work through Delwin’s family first and the faith spread through Ed’s nieces and nephews and into his own family.  Only one of Ed’s siblings joined the LDS faith while alive, and that was Vic in 1975.

Edward Sharp, Delwin & Vilate Sharp, 13 August 1957

Edward Sharp, Delwin & Violet Sharp, 13 August 1957

Marjorie, Ethel, and Ruby all joined through the waters of baptism on 12 May 1939.  Milo Ross joined 2 July 1939 (only after 18 as Ed would not give consent otherwise).  Louise, Florence, Milo Sharp, Josephine, and Eddie all joined 3 January 1943.  Dean was the last on 31 October 1932, he was not 8 in January to join with the remainder of his siblings.

As soon as Milo was of age, he looked for opportunities to get out.  He eventually married, moved in with his in-laws, and then the impending war took his services abroad.

Lillie East Sharp died 4 September 1942 while separated from her husband.  She had started divorce proceedings but died before they completed.  She was buried in Plain City.

Ed died 24 August 1962 in Othello, Adams, Washington.  The family brought him home and buried him in Plain City too.

Separation Qualification Record

With the passing of my Grandfather, Milo James Ross, I have some documents available for me to scan and make available to others.  There is a heap of documents accumulated over 93 years to go through.  Nevertheless, I am happy to make this one available, and others in the future.

As this Separation Qualification Record indicates, “This record of job assignments and special training received in the Army is furnished to the soldier when he leaves the service.  In its preparation, information is taken from available Army records and supplemented by personal interview.  The information about civilian education and work experience is based on the individual’s own statements.  The veteran may present this document to former employers, prospective employers, representatives of schools or colleges, or use it in any other way that may prove beneficial to him.”

Separation Qualification Record page 1

Separation Qualification Record page 1

Separation Qualification Record page 2

Separation Qualification Record page 2

Old Ross/Sharp Photos

I thought some of you would like an update on a sort of miracle in the family.  Some old photos have surfaced in March and April of 2010 some of you will probably be very interested in.  (I republished this page because the links have all changed, so I just uploaded the pictures to avoid the link changes again.)  I also replaced the photos with fresh scans of the photos in February 2011.  If you downloaded the photos, you may want to download the newer scans.

Ethel Sharp was born in 1898 in Plain City, Utah to Milo Riley and Mary Ann Stoker Sharp.  Here is a photo of Ethel we found.

You can click on the photos for a closer look.

Another photo of Ethel and another friend, Gertrude Terry.  Ethel is on the right.

Gertrude Terry and Ethel Sharp

Another photo of Ethel and a cousin, Richard Thomas Stoker.

Ethel Sharp and Richard Stoker

Many of you are probably aware that Ethel Sharp was injured on the old electric train that went from Plain City in to Ogden.  After recuperating she took her insurance money, moved to Paul, Idaho, and opened a confectionery.  Here are two photos that recently surfaced of that little store in Paul, Idaho.  Obviously construction is not completed in this photo but the store was still open for business.


We don’t know the exact time frame when she purchased the confectionery, but some of the old checks, order sheets, and other paperwork call it the Streeter Confectionery.  We don’t know the location of this store, if she built it, or what happened to it afterward.

We do assume that she opened it while married to Mark Lewis Streeter who she married 7 May 1917 in Ogden, Utah.  We don’t know the exact date of the train wreck yet, but while in Paul she gave birth to a daughter 4 June 1918 named June Streeter.  Mark and Ethel couldn’t make things work and were divorced.  She remarried to Jack (John William) Ross 12 Jan 1920 at Fort Logan in Colorado.  Here is a photo of Jack and Ethel holding little June Streeter.

I have written more about Jack and Ethel at this link: Ross-Sharp Wedding.

4 Feb 1921, Milo James Ross was born in Plain City.

14 Feb 1922, Paul Ross was born in Paul, Idaho.  7 Nov 1923, John Harold Ross (Harold) was born in Burley, Idaho.

This is probably one of the last photos of Ethel Sharp Ross with baby Harold.

Here are some new photos of June, Milo, Paul, and Harold.  The first seems to be about 1925 and the later two around 1926 or 1927.

l-r: Harold, Milo, and Paul Ross with June Streeter

Ethel died of blood poisoning at 600 Cross Street in Ogden, Utah on 6 Aug 1925 after giving birth to Ernest Jackson on 16 Jul 1925 (he died 20 Sep 1925).  We don’t know why the family was in Plain City when she gave birth and passed away.  However, some time after the funeral Jack loaded up the children and took them to Rupert, Idaho to be with his parents for a time.  We don’t know where he went (find work, find a mother, who knows?).  However, after some time, we don’t know exactly how long, Jack’s parents could not take care of the 4 children anymore and asked the Sharp Family to come get them.

Os Richardson drove up to pick them up.  Eventually, June was raised by her Streeter grandparents; Milo was raised by Uncle Ed Sharp; Paul was raised by Aunt Vic Hunt; and Harold by Uncle Del Sharp.

Here is a picture of a bunch of Sharp cousins in a wagon in Plain City.

l-r: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp (cousin), and Bob Martin.

And another photo of Paul (R) and Harold (L).

Paul would die after falling out of a barn in 1932 just over 10 years old.

Now comes the story from the new photographs.  For reasons we do not know, the Sharp family did not like Jack Ross.  They did not allow him to visit his children.  All the mail received by any of the Sharp family for the Ross children was kept from them.  When Ethel’s mother (Mary Ann aka Lillie M Sharp) passed away, a photo album given to her passed to Vic Hunt.  Vic Hunt kept in her possession all the letters mailed from Jack Ross to the Ross boys as well as the photo album from which these photos come.  The photos and letters then passed to Vic Hunt’s son, Harold Hunt.  When Harold passed away in 2002, these passed to Harold’s nephew, Archie Hunt.  Archie just went through some of the stuff and found these items about March 2010 and gave them to Grandpa Milo Ross.

Milo James Ross went to visit Jack Ross in 1948 after receiving a telegram that Jack was dying in Livermore, California.  Jack mentioned to Grandpa that he had written after the boys went back to Utah, but Grandpa didn’t believe him.  Here we are, 70-80 years after the letters were written, and almost 90 years since some of the photos were taken.  Jack was vindicated to his own son 62 years later!  It was the first time Grandpa had seen the photos and letters he did not know existed.  How is that for a sort of miracle?  I hope at some point I can type up the letters and also make them available on here.  I know some of Grandpa’s family will have seen the photos, but know extended family will be interested in this find as well.

If anyone else has photos they would like to share, please let me know.  If you can fill any of the story, please let me know.

Oh, Grandpa finally answered one question he had when he visited his father in 1948.  One day working in the fields at Ed Sharp’s house as a kid, he saw a car at the end of the field.  The occupants did not leave the car but he could see a man watching him from the back window.  The car left and not until 1948 was it revealed to him that it was his own father looking at him across the field that day.  I can only guess what is going through Grandpa’s heart and mind as he reconciles his understanding of his own history in these letters.

l-r: Harold, Milo, Gladys, Milo, Caroline

Plain City Clubbers

Back (l-r):William Freestone (manager), Norman Carver, Glen Charlton, Fred Singleton, and Elmer Singleton.  Middle: Clair Folkman, Dick Skeen, Albert Sharp, Abe Maw, Milo Ross.  Front: F. Skeen, Walt Moyes, Arnold Taylor, Lynn Stewart, Theron Rhead.

The caption to this newspaper clipping read as follows: “Favored by Many…Plain City’s hustling ball club has many of the bleacherites at the 1938 Utah farm bureau tournament picking it to walk off with the state title before the joust closes.”  The caption goes on to list the names of the individuals included in the photograph which I reproduced as the caption to the photo above.  I list the names just as they were listed in the caption for the photo.  The title of the article was “Plain City Clubbers Show Ability.”  The clipping is included in Grandpa’s clippings but we do not know exactly when it was published.  The team did end up going to Lagoon and playing Sandy for the state championship, but lost.

This team obviously played and practiced in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  Grandpa has told me numerous times how he used to play baseball.  With Grandpa just past 90, it is a bit hard to imagine him hustling after anything, let alone after a ball.  The other thing that struck me about this team is I expected them to all be much closer in age.

William Sessions Freestone (1901-1998)  Manager.

Norman Elmer Carver (1919-2001)

Alfred Glen Charlton (1919-1974)

Fred Singleton (?-Alive?)

Bert Elmer Singleton (1918-1996)  For those baseball fans out there, Elmer went on to play 24 seasons in his career.  He played for teams like Boston Braves, Chicago Clubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Washington Senators.

Clair Marcus Folkman (1910-1975)

Elwood “Dick” Francis Skeen (1908-1977)

Albert Sharp (1909-1984)

Abraham “Abe” Edward Maw (1906-1985)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

Elwood “F” Skeen (1908-1977)

Walter “Walt” Jeremiah Moyes (1907-1983)

George Arnold Taylor (1911-2000)

Lynn William Stewart (1916-2011)

William Theron Rhead (1914-1999)

Ethelyn June Streeter

With the recent passing of Aunt June Stout, I thought I would dedicate a post to her.  (This is a repost due to Grandpa’s passing of a 2012 post)

Ethelyn June Streeter was born 4 June 1918 in Paul, Minidoka, Idaho to Mark Lewis and Ethel Sharp Streeter.  She was the only child born to this union as her parents soon separated.  Mark Lewis Streeter was born 11 May 1898 in Hooper, Weber, Utah and died 21 March 1986 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  Ethel Sharp was born 9 April 1898 in Plain City, Weber, Utah and died 6 August 1925 in Plain City shortly after giving birth to her fifth child.  Mark and Ethel were married 7 May 1917 in Ogden.

Mark and Ethel Streeter

Ethel was in a train accident in Plain City.  After marrying Mark, she received a settlement from the railroad.  With their new wealth they moved to Paul and built a confectionery.  Paul was the location of a new sugar factory built by Amalgamated Sugar Company.  Further the farm land was continuing to open and expand and Paul was a promising boom town.  Many families moved from the Ogden area to Minidoka and Cassia counties.

It was here, not long after the confectionery was built, Ethelyn June Streeter was born.  She went by June all her days.  On 3 March 1919 Mark enlisted in the Army.  We do not know the reasons for his enlistment; enlist and not be drafted, drafted, or marital issues.  All we know is that Mark and Ethel divorced during 1919.  Ethel remarried 11 January 1920 to John “Jack” William Ross.

Ethel Ross and little June Streeter

Jack and Ethel Ross with young June Streeter

June spent a several years growing up with three younger siblings.  Milo Paul was born in 1921, Paul was born in 1922, and John Harold was born in 1924.  Jack worked for Amalgamated Sugar Company most of the time and worked at the Ogden, Burley, and Paul plants.  Hence, Milo was born in Plain City, Paul was born in Paul, and Harold in Burley, Cassia, Idaho.  I have written more extensively about the family elsewhere.

(l-r) Harold, Milo, and Paul Ross with June Streeter

Sadly, Ethel gave birth to Ernest Jackson Ross in 1925 and she shortly passed away afterward.  Little Ernest passed away about two months later.  Jack’s parents, James and Damey Ross, took the four children in over the winter of 1925-26.  Jack’s parents were struggling financially and Jack was not able to properly tend to the children so the children were taken to northern Utah and farmed out to different family members.  June went to live with her Streeter grandparents, George Clark and Jane Ann Wilson Streeter.  They raised her in Ogden until she left home.

Paul, June, and Harold

Paul, Harold, and Milo Ross with June Streeter behind.

She married Dominic Anthony Corsaro and had two children; Franklin George in 1936 and Josephine Ina in 1943.  The Corsaro marriage ended in divorce.  She then married an A H Ballard, which also ended in divorce.  Lastly, she married Jack Stout.

Her obituary mentions that she was an Arthur Murray dance instructor.

I have tried to find out more information about these marriages but nobody has responded to my letters or e-mails for further information.  Some day I hope to flesh it out some more.

Jack and June Stout about 1960

June spent her remaining years living with her daughter and son-in-law, Merk and Ina French.  It was in Southern California she passed away, I do not know the exact location yet.  She passed away 24 June 2012 and was buried 30 June 2012.

Milo James Ross Obituary

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

Milo James Ross, 93, peacefully slipped out of mortality in the comfort of his own bed in Plain City on 17 July 2014.

Milo was born 4 February 1921 in a log cabin north of Plain City to John “Jack” William Ross and Ethel (Sharp) Ross. His mother tragically died from childbirth in 1925. Milo and his siblings lived with his Ross grandparents until the costs proved too great and his Uncle Edward Sharp raised Milo in Plain City until adulthood.

He grew up tending to his Grandmother Sharp and spending most of his time farming with his many Sharp cousins and his siblings. He attended schools in Plain City and graduated from Weber High in 1939.

Milo met Gladys Maxine Donaldson at a Plain City celebration in 1940. They would meet from time to time for dancing at the Berthana in Ogden. Milo and Gladys married 4 April 1942 in her parent’s home on 8th Street in Ogden.

Milo enlisted in the Army in October 1942. He served in the 33rd Infantry Division, 130th Regiment, Company C. He trained in weapons and earned his expert ranking. He arrived in Hawaii in July 1943 and received the announcement that his son, Milo Paul, had been born. He served as part of the Philippine invasion force and they fought through the jungles and liberated Baguio City. He was injured five times, one while tending to other soldiers awaiting medical attention.

He was present at the Japanese surrender at Luzon as a Technical Sergeant in June 1945. He received two purple hearts and the Silver Star for his service at the end of World War II. His Company received a Presidential Citation for outstanding performance during armed conflict with the enemy in efforts to seize Hill X in Bilbil Mountain Province. At the time of Milo’s death, the military was preparing to award him another Purple Heart, another Silver Star, Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal & Bronze Star, World War II Victory Medal, Combat Infantry Badge 1st Award, Philippine Liberation Ribbon and Bronze Star, Honorable Service Button for World War II. He was also to be awarded the Philippine Liberation Medal and Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation Badge from the Philippine Government.

He returned home in 1945 and began working with his father-in-law. He eventually began building or remodeling homes. He estimated he had built over 120 homes and remodeled another 50 homes or buildings in his lifetime. Two more children joined Milo and Gladys in 1946 and 1948, Judy Ethel and Caroline. Milo and Gladys dedicated their lives to raising their three children and tenderly caring for Judy’s needs until she passed away in 1998.

Milo and Gladys solemnized their marriage 2 July 1976 in the Ogden LDS Temple with their daughter Judy by their side. Milo served in various callings as a humble servant favoring their time as temple workers in the Ogden Temple for almost a decade. Milo and Gladys also relished their time in raising their garden and providing its fruits to friends, family, the temple, and local hospitals.

Milo is survived by his son Milo (Janice) Ross of Hazelton, Idaho and daughter Caroline (Abram) Gallegos of Plain City. Eight grandchildren, Scott (Robyn) Ross of Kimberly, Idaho; Jeffrey (Holly) Ross of Jerome, Idaho; Becky (Joseph) Patterson of Portland, Oregon; Paul (Amanda) Ross of Burley, Idaho; Andra Ross of Heyburn, Idaho; Christy (Sterling) Neilson of Rupert, Idaho; Cindy (Steve) Pease of Albion, Idaho; and Lonny (Amy) Taylor of Declo, Idaho; seventeen great grandchildren; and eleven great great grandchildren.

Milo was preceded in death by his parents; his wife Gladys; all five siblings Hobart Day, June Stout, Paul Ross, Harold Ross, and Earnest Ross; daughter Judy Ross; grandson-in-law Bret Adams, and two great grandchildren.

The funeral will be held Tuesday 22 July 2014 at the Plain City 7th Ward Building, 2952 N 4200 W, a building he helped organize its construction, at 11:00 AM with Bishop Tom Matthews officiating.

Friends may call at Lindquist Mortuary in North Ogden at 2140 N 400 E (Washington Blvd) from 6 until 8 PM on Monday 21 July 2014. Friends may also call from 10:00 until 10:45 AM prior to the service at the church. Burial will be in the Plain City Cemetery beside his beloved Gladys and Judy.

Milo J Ross in army uniform squat