Biography of John Christoph Nuffer

This is the biography of John Christoph Nuffer written by Alma Katherine (Kate) Scheibel Naef, granddaughter of John Christoph Nuffer.  Kate’s parents are Jacob Schiebel and Regina Friederike Nuffer.  I will type it exactly as it is found in the book, “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,”  The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.

Johann Christoph Nuffer

When grandfather Nuffer was still in Germany, he was a dress goods weaver, did truck gardening, and also had a grave vineyard.

At that time his family consisted of my grandmother, Eva Katherina Griner Nuffer, his second wife, my mother, Frederika (Regina), her two brothers Charles August and Adolph, and two sons, Fred and John, from his first wife, Agnas Barbara Spring Nuffer, who died in Germany.

Their home was on Main Street and was made of lumber and rock.

They belonged to the Germany Lutheren Church, and were visited by mormon missionaries who came from America to preach the Gospel to them.  This made their hearts rejoice and in 1879 they were converted to the mormon church or Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  Elder John Theurer of Providence, Utah, U.S.A. was the Elder that preached the gospel to them and later baptized them.

At the time there was a canal or mill race that ran close to the back row of houses.  They had planned to do the baptizing at night so they would ot cause any disturbance around the neighborhood.

At the time there was a family who had an upstairs in their house and they watched through the upstairs window and saw grandfathers family go out the back way into the canal.  As soon as this family saw them, they rumored it around the neighborhood, and before morning the whole neighborhood knew that the Nuffer family had been baptized into the mormon church and of course, persecusion started.

After having been baptized, they had the desire to come to America, the promised land, to be with the main body of Saints.

My grandmother, Eva Katherina Griner Nuffer, was a woman of great faith as I have heard my mother and Uncle John Nuffer speak of many times.  Uncle Fred said in his history that she was a good woman as well as a good mother.

Eva Kathrina Greiner

They left Germany in 1880.  While coming across the ocean, the children had the measles so it was not a very pleasant journey.

They arrived in Providence, Utah about 15, May, 1880 where they lived for three years.  It was while here that Mary (Maria) was born.

Grandfather and family left Providence and moved to Mapleton or Cub River, which at that time was called St. Joseph.  At the time they put the Post Office in, there was already a St. Joseph in Idaho, so they had to give it a new name.  They named it Mapleton and it could well be called such for it was in the mist of so many beautiful maples.  The hills and canyons were loaded with these maples.

The Nuffer ranch or homestead was located on the north-west of Mapleton which the Lord had well provided for the pioneers with black, furtile soil.

Grandfather’s farm was cut in half by the main traveled road.

On the east side was the land where his homes, stables, and orchards were located.

The orchard was on a hill side a little north-west of the second house.  The orchard contained applies, different kinds of plums and prunes, cherries, pears, peaches, grapes, strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, and currents.

On the side there were also many shade trees which furnished shade in the summer months for the buildings.  Some of those trees are still standing and are about 80 years old or more.

On the west side of the road was a meadow.  A creek ran through this area.  The creek was loaded with bushes and willows which were used in making the fence which surrounded the homestead.  Uncle Charles August ad Adolph helped Grandfather make these fences.  Also they would help Grandfather with his farming.

Also on both sides of the creek grew Timothy and Red Top which Grandfather used for hay.

On a steep hill side to the west of this hay was a grove of Quaken-asp trees which were used for making fence posts.

To the south of this meadow land was a pasture.  Besides being covered with short meadow grass, it had many wild violets and Johnny Jumpups.

The many colors of violets resembled a beautifully spread carpet.

This farm from one end to the other was a beautiful place, but, as time went on the hand of man destroyed this beauty.

The first winter they lived in an unfinished log house.  The floor joist was in the floor, but winter came before they could get the lumber to finish it.  This was a very uncomfortable winter, and they were snowed in many months at a time and could not get to town for supplies, so they had to live on what they raised on the farm.

Many times when sugar was not available, Grandmother would roast sugar beets in the oven and squeeze the joice out of them for sugar to keep her yeast alive and also for other sweetening purposes.

When flour was scarce, they would grind wheat in the coffee mills to make their bread.

The Germany people liked hot drinks, so they would roast barley or wheat and grind it to use for hot drinks.

Since bottles and sugar were so difficult to get, they would dry many of the fruits and vegetables which they raised and also wild fruits such as Chokecherries and Serviceberries.

They would also use wild gooseberries which grew along the creek and sweet them with honey when they were in season.

When coal oil was not available for lights, they would make a wick out of cloth and soak it up with grease and let it burn.

Grandmother would catch rain water in a barrel and put wood ashes in it to make the water soft when ther wasn’t any soap for washing.

They made brooms out of fine willows to clean their shoes off with.

I remember seeing these willow brooms leaning against the door.

They also made baskets from small willows for cloths baskets or for whatever the need would be.

It was in the house by the orchard on 20, February, 1893, that my grandmother, Eva Katherine Griner Nuffer died of pneumonia.

I don’t know just how long Grandfather lived in this house when he married his third wife, Anna Elisabeth Weirman Nuffer.  She had three children, Fred, Ida, and Jake Weirman.

Later they moved back to the first house they built in Mapleton.

Later Grandfather built a one room log house a few rods west of the first house.

Grandfather sold his ranch to the Hull Brothers of Whitney and moved to Preston.

The home in Preston was a two-room frame house west of Uncle John’s rock house which was located in the south-east part of town.  That house is still there, but has had more rooms built on to it.

The next place he moved to was Logan, Utah.  It was here, 1, December, 1901, that his third wife, Anna Elisabeth Weirman Nuffer died.

While still living in Logan, Grandfather married his fourth wife, Maria Alker Nuffer.

After living in Logan for some time, they moved back to Mapleton where Uncle Charles August Nuffer built them a one-room log house in his orchard.

Uncle Charles August’s house was just over the ridge and not far from the old Nuffer home.  His house could be seen from Grandfather’s orchard.

I don’t remember just how long they lived there before they moved back to Preston.

Uncle John Nuffer and some of his boys built them a two-room rock (or cement) house.  It was across the street, south, and a little east of Uncle John’s old frame house.

It was here in this house that Grandfather died 12, April, 1908.

Grandfather had poor health the later fifteen or more years of his life.  He had terrible headaches, kidney trouble, and other such ailments as stomach and liver.  All these and more made him suffer a great deal.  Just before his death, he was nearly blind.

I am grateful for my pioneer grandparents and the heritage they have given me.

Prepared and arranged June 1961 by Laurine and LaNada Hancock daughter and granddaughter of Katherine (Kate) Naef

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I wanted to add a couple of notes.

There appears some debate who had the middle name of Christoph, some believe it was only Sr, others only Jr.

Eva Katherine Greiner is the proper spelling.

Anna Elizabeth Weirman is Anna Elizabeth Reber who was a widow of Gottfried Weierman (some sourches Weiermann).

Maria Alker is Maria Anna Alker who was a widow of Conrad Schaub.

William Mills

William Mills 1839 - 1910

William Mills 1839 – 1910

This is another photo that was recently provided to me by a cousin.  She did not know if we are related to him or not.  Here is the photo and I can indicate I am not related, and I do not believe she is directly either.  Since I did not see the photo available elsewhere, I thought I would make it available just in case it is a one of a kind.

William Mills was born 4 November 1839 in Spurstow, Cheshire, England.  The back of the photo has “Wm Mills 4 Nov 1839″ written on the back.  He married Margaret Ann Hawkey on 1 June 1867 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  After she died, he married Caroline Virginia Hughes 13 December 1883 in Salt Lake City.  He died 10 November 1910 in Paradise, Cache, Utah.  He was buried 14 November 1910 in the Paradise City Cemetery.

Wanner, John George, Jr. and Eliza Sterling/Regina Nuffer

I found this biography written by Mary Louise Wanner Andra of her parents.  I will write a separate history for them in the future, but I thought I would make this one available unadulterated by me (typed completely as written in the book, although I added the photo).

This biography was published in Whitney Centennial 1889-1989: Whitney’s First 100 Years.  It was published in 1991 by the Whitney Ward, written and edited by the Whitney Ward Centennial Book Committee.

John George Wanner Jr Family abt 1912. (l-r): Eva, William, Golden, Serge (sitting), John, Regina, Rulon, Willard, Mary.

Our father, John George Wanner, Jr., was born in Holzgerlingen, Neckarkreis, Wuerttemberg 29 October, 1870.  His parents were John George Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  He was the oldest in the family of five boys and five girls.

His father had a small farm and some cattle.  He was also a road overseer.  So dad, his mother and brother and sisters did most of the farm work.  They also got wood from the forest for winter fuel.

Dad’s parents were very religious people and belonged to the Lutheran church.  They were very hard workers and tried to teach their children correct principles.  Dad tried hard to follow in their footsteps.

His parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1891.  They made sure all their children were baptized as they became of age.  His parents could see that it was the only true church on the earth, and they wanted to go to America, where they could worship as they wished.  They also felt it would give their children a better opportunity in life.

His parents were the only ones in their respective families who joined the LDS church.  Our dad was baptized in July in 1891, and came to America with one of the missionaries – a brother Terrell who was from Providence, Utah.  Brother Terrell took good care of him and helped find work for him to do and provide for himself.

Dad got a job working for brother Fred Nuffer in Glendale, Oneida County (now Franklin County), Idaho.  In 1893 his father, mother, and his brothers and sisters came to Cache Valley from Germany.  Dad and brother Nuffer met them with a wagon and buggy in Franklin, Oneida County, Idaho, June 18, 1893.  I am sure he was happy to see his family again, as it had been almost two years since he had seen any of them.

Dad met a lovely girl from Providence, Utah, by the name of Eliza Sterling, and this relationship blossomed into marriage in 1894.  They were blessed with two sons, George and Earl Wayne.  This marriage was not a very happy one and they were divorced.

On the 31st of August 1898, dad married Regina Nuffer who was a sister of our uncle Charles August Nuffer.  [Daughter of the marriage of Eva Katherine Greiner and Johann Christopher Nuffer]  On 9 November 1899, they were blessed with twin boys, William and Willard.  As time went on they were blessed with more children, a total of five boys and two girls.

Dad went on a mission to Germany in the fall of 1907, leaving a wife and six children.  On March 8, 1908, their son Serge was born.  Mother and the family were living in a home John Nuffer built for dad.  It is a rock house on East Oneida Street in Preston, Idaho.  This house is still standing and is in good condition at this writing – June 1979.

When Serge was a few months old, mother took all the children and had a picture taken and sent it to dad so he could see the new baby.

While Dad was in Germany, he met William Andra’s mother and family and baptized the eldest daughter Freda.

In 1910, Dad’s mother and father sold their home and farm in Whitney to Dad.  This is the farm Lawrence Bodily now has.  Dad built a red barn that is still in use on the farm.  After grandpa and grandma sold their farm to dad, they moved to Logan, Utah.

In 1913 dad’s parents, brothers and sisters had a family reunion at their home in Whitney.  There was a large crowd and we all had a good time.

We all had to work hard and dad relied on his daughter Mary for many hard farm jobs.  However, on Saturday nights he would take us to the picture show and give us each 25¢ to spend on the show and treats.

In 1917, I begged to take the sewing class at the USAC in Logan, as I wanted to learn to sew.  However, I was only there a short time when dad brought me home to work on the dry farm.  I have always felt bad about this as I wanted to learn to sew.

My brother, William, enlisted in the Army on August 5, 1917.  He was with the 145th Light Field Artillery, Battery C.  He left Salt Lake City for Camp Kearney on October 11, 1917.  He left for France August 2, 1918.  William contracted the influenza and died December 1, 1918.  His body was brought home November 11, 1920, and interred in the Whitney Idaho Cemetery.

Just a few days before they got the sad news of William’s death, their son, Golden, died November 26, 1918 in Salt Lake City from influenza.

On January 8, 1921, dad sent his son Willard on a mission to New Zealand.

Dad and mother were to face still more sorrow when their son Rulon died February 26, 1924, in the Logan hospital.

Dad believed in missionary work with all his heart and soul and on December 15, 1925, he went to Tennessee on a six month mission.

In 1928, Serge went to New Zealand on a mission and died there October 5, 1929.  His body was brought home for burial.  The funeral was held in the old opera house in Preston, Idaho.  These were trying times for our parents.  Losing four sons, and all their bodies returned home in a box.  This left them with only one son and two daughters.

On April 7, 1930, dad sent Eva on a mission to California.  Dad was not a stranger to hard work.  He raised crops and took good care of his farm animals.  He took pride in having things looking neat and clean around the farm and yard.

When Dad operated his farm in Whitney, he was always up early in the morning and usually was the first to get to the beet dump in the morning.  The story is told about some of his neighbors who decided to beat him to the dump.  They got up extra early to get a head start.  Before they got to the beet dump, they could hear George Wanner going down the rad ahead of them.  They could hear him saying to his horses, “Gid up–gid up–gid up.”

When dad sold his farm in Whitney, he purchased 40 acres nearer to Preston and built a beautiful home on it.  Part of it is where the Oakwood School is now located.  When he retired he sold his farm and home to his daughter Mary and her husband William Andra.

Dad was successful in the various undertakings he engaged in.  He was one of the first in Preston to have an automobile.  When he brought it home he did not know how to stop it.  He yelled “whoa” when he got in the garage, but before he got it stopped he had gone through the end of the garage.

Dad built the two little homes on the west side of second east and first south in Preston, Idaho.  He also built three homes on first south and the south side of the street in Preston.  Dad and mother lived in one of them until she died in 1942.  Mother was ill for quite a while before she passed away.  Dad cared for her the best he could and would take her for little rides in the car.  She was unable to walk and dad would carry her on his back from place to place as they went visiting.

As many of you will remember, there was a humble side to dad.  I have seen him cry when bearing his testimony and when he was grieved over the death of a loved one, a relative, or friend.  He wanted to leave this world a better place than he found it, and I feel sure he made some contributions and brought this desire to fulfillment.

After mother died, dad remarried and went to live in Salt Lake City, Utah.  This marriage was not successful and they were divorced.  Later on he remarried again and was living in Florida.  He became ill and wanted to get back to Preston.  My son William went to Florida to bring him home, but when they got to Chicago, he was too ill to go on.  So, William put him in the hospital where he passed away on January 5, 1947.

Regina Nuffer was born January 26, 1869 at Neuffen, Germany, a daughter of Johann Cristoph and Eva Katharina Greiner, she came to Utah with her family after they were converted to the gospel.  She married Jacob Scheibel July 15, 1889, in Pleasant Valley, Carbon County, Utah.  Her first child, Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef, was born, September 27, 1889.  When her child was six months old, she and her husband separated and she moved back to Mapleton, Idaho, where she stayed with her parents on their farm.  During this period, she would help people when they were sick, and her mother would take care of her child.

In about 1893, after the death of her mother, she moved to Weber County, Utah, and worked for the Will Taylor family in Farr West and the Bowman family in Ogden.  She again returned to her father’s farm.  On her way home, she stopped in Logan and walked out to Providence to visit a friend.  While eating lunch, she happened to think that she had left her new coat on the train.  She went back to Logan to the train station and they sent out a tracer.  In a few days she got her coat back.  After returning to Idaho, she worked for several people in Franklin and Preston.  She lived in one room of her brother John’s home in Preston.  Her brother was on a mission in Germany at the time.

On August 31, 1898, she married John George Wanner in Logan, Utah.  That winter she lived on his ranch in Worm Creek or Glendale, Idaho.  In April she moved with her husband, daughter, and step son, Wayne, to the Bancroft flat, a little west of where Grace is now.

She was known as a fine, well mannered woman.  Her niece, Athene Hampton, said that toward the end of her life her health was not very good and she had a hard time speaking.  When Athene and Louisa Nuffer would visit, they would converse by writing notes to each other.  She died on March 10, 1942, in Preston, Idaho.  Her funeral in Preston was very well attended.

Bruderer

With a third photo identified with a Bruderer in it, I thought I would make these photos available.  From my understanding, the Bruderers were good friends of my grandparents, Norwood and Colleen (Andra) Jonas, when they lived in Richmond, Cache, Utah.  When my grandparents moved to Burley, Cassia, Idaho in 1968 the friends did not see each other as much.  Leonard and Donna (Andrus) Bruderer also eventually moved to Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah.  Leonard and Donna also lived next door to my Great Grandma Lillian Coley Jonas (Edna’s sister)(and across the street from the Dorney family).

I visited with Donna in 2007.  She is an Andrus and her father is Gerald Andrus(1903-1984).  Gerald married my Great Grand Aunt Edna Coley(1900-1983) on 17 April 1921 and had a son, Harold Christian Andrus(1921-1966).  Harold is my cousin and is an Andrus although raised as a Neilson.  Gerald and Edna were married less than a year or so and he remarried to Donna’s mother, Ida Christena Smith, in 1923.  Harold is Donna’s half-brother and I called to visit with her more regarding Harold than the Bruderer line.  I did mention I had a photo of Leonard and Donna from many years ago as well as a photo of their daughter Lola.  Leonard Bruderer passed away in 2006 (born in 1922).

(l-r): Sandy Jonas, Lola Bruderer, and Jane Robinson in August 1958

(l-r): Sandy Jonas, Lola Bruderer, and Jane Robinson in August 1958

Leonard Bruderer and Norwood Jonas

Leonard Bruderer and Norwood Jonas

Donna and Leonard Bruderer

Donna and Leonard Bruderer

Clara McMurdie Coley

With the passing of Clara Coley this week, I thought I would put together a quick little history with the photos I have of her.  A good portion of this is written around Clara’s obituary.  I have an autobiography of Ivan so I will create a separate post for him in the future.

Clara McMurdie was born 26 January 1914 in Paradise, Cache, Utah with a twin brother Clarance (1914-1919).  She was one of 11 children born to Sarah Amelia Checketts and Joseph Kay McMurdie.  She grew up in Cache Valley and her family moved to Richmond, Cache, Utah when she was a few years old.  It was while they lived in Richmond that she met Ivan Coley who was a few years older than her.  Clarance died and is buried in Richmond.  Her family moved to Buhl, Twin Falls, Idaho in 1928.

Joseph and Sarah McMurdie in 1960

Joseph and Sarah McMurdie in 1960

Ivan hitchhiked all the way from Utah to Idaho to be with Clara after her family moved to Buhl.  They were married 22 October 1930 in Buhl.  After marriage, they moved and lived at the Coley Ranch in Richmond.  They were later sealed 10 February 1932 in the Logan LDS Temple.  An interesting side note, the great grandson of the Bishop who married them presided as the Bishop over Clara’s funeral.

Ivan Coley and dog

Ivan Coley and dog

Ivan and Clara moved back to Buhl and survived the Great Depression there.  They purchased a 160 acre farm in Melon Valley in Buhl.  That farm was sold in 1961 and they purchased five acres just outside of Buhl and kept that property for 36 years.

Joseph McMurdie, Clara, RaNae (Cookie), and Ivan Coley about about 1964

Joseph McMurdie, Clara, RaNae (Cookie), and Ivan Coley about about 1964

I have in my records that there were five children born to Ivan and Clara although the obituary only has 4 listed.  I will have to determine which is correct.

Sarah Colleen Coley born in 1932 in Richmond.

An unnamed son was born 12 February 1934 in Buhl.  He died the same day.  If I understood it correctly, this little boy was stillborn.  Apparently he is buried on the McMurdie Farm in Buhl.  I wonder if the present owner is aware of the grave or if it is marked?

Lorus Ivan Coley (“Bud) was born 1 August 1936 in Buhl.  He died 23 October 1962 while on a hunting trip down near the Nevada border.  Initially reported to me as an hunting accident, I later learned it appears to have been a murder framed to appear as a suicide.  Apparently there is an open investigation ongoing at this time on this matter.  I will be interested to learn the outcome of the matter.

Clara, Colleen, and Bud

Clara, Colleen, and Bud

I was told there was an unnamed son born in 1938 who also died the same day who was stillborn.  I do not have an exact date for this one so I suppose what makes me question it is that Clara’s obituary does not mention him.  I will have to find out more from the family.

In 1942, Ivan’s father Herbert came to visit for part of the summer.  At Ivan and Clara’s home near the well, he fell and broke his hip.  This injury would lead to his death in September.

Lastly, Clarene RaNae Coley born in 1947 in Buhl.

Bud and RaNae

Bud and RaNae

Danny Todd, Ivan, Bud, and RaNae Coley

Danny Todd, Ivan, Bud, and RaNae Coley

Clara at a Coley Reunion in 1955

Clara at a Coley Reunion in 1955

Clara dedicated her life to love and care for her family and friends.  Even into her late 60′s she was known to outrun her grandchildren.  Ivan and Clara dedicated their lives to their grandchildren.  Grandchildren often spent many nights, or even weeks, on the farm.  Clara loved to quilt and made beautiful blankets.  She also made rugs from all the fabric scraps.  She was left-handed.  She worked at a number of jobs including bus driver.

Ivan and Art Coley (brothers) with Clara and Mary (Art's wife) in the mid 80's

Ivan and Art Coley (brothers) with Clara and Mary (Art’s wife) in the mid 80′s

Clara and Ivan in the early 80's

Clara and Ivan in the early 80′s

Ivan and Clara celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in 1990.  It is about this time that I have my first memory visiting Ivan and Clara with my grandmother Colleen Jonas (technically a niece-in-law).

60th Wedding Announcement

60th Wedding Announcement

Cutting the cake at their 60th anniversary party

Cutting the cake at their 60th anniversary party

Here is a photo from May 2012.  She was 98 years old and looked to be in great shape and pretty classy.  I visited with her about this same time and she identified a number of individuals in photographs for me and still had a sense of humor.

Clara Coley May 2012

Clara Coley May 2012

Clara passed away on Christmas Day 2012 at the St. Lukes Regional Hospital in Twin Falls.  Her funeral was held 4 January 2012 in Buhl with the burial between her husband and son in the West End, Buhl, Idaho cemetery.

Clara Coley Funeral Program

Clara Coley Funeral Program

1952, 1957 Utah American Legion State Champions

1957 Utah State Baseball Champions

1957 Utah American Legion Baseball Champions. Back(l-r): Ellis Jonas, Lionel Benson, Jed Pitcher, Ken Chambers, Larry Federico, Bruce Pitcher, R.L. Pitcher, Joe Watts, Richard Lamb, George “Dutch” Reese. Front: John Hale, Glade Mather, Robert Eliason, Jim Mack, Doug Brinley, Vernon Rice, Brian Thornley, Lee Burke.

This is a photo that was handed out at Uncle Ellis Jonas‘ funeral.  I thought I would make it available.  The photo is of the 1957 Smithfield American Legion Team.  This photo was taken at the Regional Tournament in Winslow, Arizona. The 1957 Smithfield American Legion Team had won the Utah State Championship.

Ellis Jonas is listed as the manager and George Reese is the American Legion Representative.

Absent from the photo are Terry Griffen, Brian Toolson, Todd Peterson, Ferris Groll, Charles Wood, Mark McCraken, Ned Gylenskog, and Claire Nielsen.

The following photo is of the 1952 Smithfield American Legion Team.  This photo was taken at the National Tournament in Wichita, Kansas.  The 1952 Smithfield American Legion Team had won the Utah State Championship as well as the Regional Tournament.

L-R

1952 Utah American Legion Baseball Champions.  Back(l-r): DeVon Britenbeeker, Royce Lumberg, Jon Hyde, Erle Reese, Reese Naegle, Jerry Hansen, Richard Hodges, Hal Jensen, Ellis Jonas.  Front: Darold Whatcott, Ralph Tresedor, Cleon Hodges, Ross Godderidge, Jerry Coleman, Ferrell Karren, Ralph Roylance, Kay Inglet, Jack Reese.

Ellis Jonas is listed as the manager and Jerry Coleman as the bat boy.

Lastly, here is a little insert regarding Ellis as the coach.  I think it speaks for itself and his regard in Smithfield.

Ellis Commendation

Postcard from Howard Bair

0025

Another of those random posts.  To anyone who is not family of Lillian Coley or Howard Bair, this would be something worth throwing in the garbage.  But to the Coley and Bair families, it adds an interesting twist to the life of these individuals.  A sort of voice from the dust.

I have written of Lillian Coley elsewhere and of her life.  Howard Francis Bair was born 25 June 1898 in Richmond, Cache, Utah and died 9 March 1974 in San Diego, San Diego, California.  They were probably the same year in school growing up.

The card is posted 11 September 1915 in Willard, Box Elder, Utah and says the following: “Miss Lillian Colley (sic), Richmond, Utah.  Well Kid How is the world treating you By this time.  I am working in Willard or you going to school this year.  This rain is shore hell I dont think you can read this.  But you can try this is all for this one from Howard Bair.”

On the side above the pre-printed “N. Lovers Series” Howard writes “am soon”  It may just be coincidence it is written above the writing, but I have no idea what it would mean otherwise, but who really knows what this meant 100 years ago.

Postcard from Thatcher

This post card has no value to anyone besides family, but because it has Joseph Jonas’ signature and handwriting I thought I would make it available.  Some of the information I referenced in the article I wrote on Joseph and Lillian Jonas.

Joseph and two siblings had just purchased some land near Thatcher, Idaho in Cleveland, Idaho.  While they got the farm up and running his wife, Lillian Coley Jonas, stayed behind in Richmond, Utah to deliver a son.  She joined him that fall in Cleveland.

Postcard from Joseph Jonas to his wife, Lillian Coley Jonas.

Postcard from Joseph Jonas to his wife, Lillian Coley Jonas.

“I reached Thatcher Monday 4 o’clock, 2 hrs. ago.  Cows stood it fine.  Write to tell me how you are making it.  From your liveing husband Jos. Jonas.”