Kindergarten, Kiddie Kollege, Paul, Idaho

Back row (l-r): Sandra Berg, Danny Wright, Jim Cueva, Jared Fairchild, Bobie Jones, Erin Zemke, Jodie Larson, Hazel Patterson, Keri Jo King, Judy Moller; Middle row: Marshall Neilson, Deanne Williams, Bayden Neilson, Brandon Rogers, Logan Schenk, Desirae Paoli, Charlyn Maughan, Charlyn Robertson, Robyn Olson; Front row: Jacob Timmons, Benjamin Wilcher, Jesse Jensen, Michael Jurgensmeier, Paul Ross, Jedediah Lewis.

 

I mentioned this before, Bobie (Jones) Story let me scan some of our common school pictures.  All mine were lost in a flood of our basement. I am happy to have copies again.  (I am still missing Ms. Suhr for 3rd grade and Mr. Mendenhall for 6th grade.  If you have a copy, please let me scan!)

This is our Kindergarten class picture from the Kiddie Kollege, Paul, Idaho.  This was the 1984 – 1985 school year.

The Kiddie Kollege building is still there, northwest corner of N Main Street and W Idaho Street in Paul.  It was converted to a laundromat for quite a few years, now being repurposed into some other building.

Normally I organize photos with married names and dates.  Since all are still alive (as far as I know), I will forgo any of the dates.  I have added the married last name for the ones I know.  If you have corrections, please let me know.

Mrs. Sandra Berg

Mrs. Judy Moller

Jim Cueva

Jared Fairchild

Jesse Jensen

Bobie Jones married Story

Michael Jurgensmeier

Keri Jo King

Jodie Larson married Brunson

Jedediah Lewis

Charlyn Maughan (not on the class list but I am pretty sure I recognize her in the photo, an extra girl, missing a boy)

Bayden Neilson

Marshall Neilson

Robyn Olson married Powell

Hazel Patterson

Desirae Paoli

Charlyn Robertson married Darrington

Brandon Rogers

Paul Ross

Logan Schenk

Scott Spaulding (apparently in the picture, but I don’t have an unnamed boy)

Jacob Timmons

Benjamin Wilcher

Deanne Williams married Kennett

Danny Wright

Erin Zemke married McKindree

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Oneida County Courthouse

Oneida County Courthouse, 2 February 2019

I took this picture of the Oneida County Courthouse when I went over to do a signing of some estate planning documents in Malad, Idaho on 2 February 2019.

When I sprayed lawns in Malad I used to admire the design of the building.  There have been updates that have not held true to the character of the building.  But as a student of art deco, it was always a happy sight.  The above picture was a Saturday so the building was not open.

This is another example of a WPA and is a sister building to another building I used to frequent, the Jerome County Courthouse.  Now the Jerome County Administration Building.

I did spray the lawn of the First Presbyterian Church next door.  Since there is snow on the ground, you cannot see the grass.

First Presbyterian Church, Malad, Idaho

Goodbye Manti Pageant

Ross Clan at the last Manti Pageant

After the church announced that 2019 would be the last year of the Manti Pageant, at least sponsored by the church generally, we decided we wanted to make sure we made it down with the kids.

I have written about my previous experience with the Manti Pageant and the unfortunate crossing paths with roadkill on the trek home to Logan that night.  While I enjoyed the pageant in 2004, some of the parts were not well done and became distracting.  But the overall spirit of the Pageant was one that I wanted my children to experience.

We went down and attended on Thursday 13 June 2019.  I am glad we went down on a Thursday, we hoped the crowds would be a little less, and they were.  We arrived plenty in advance, got seats, as you can see above, about half way back in the seating.  It was a great location, we got to know our neighbors for the show and I made three trips back to the van to change dirty diapers before the show started.  A good bus driver from Salt Lake City took this photo of us while we waited for the festivities.

The show went on and I was impressed with Aliza and Hiram, they paid particular attention through the entire show.  Most of it is a great review of church history, the restoration, and particular moments the writer thought important to include.  Even afterward Hiram said to me he felt drawn to the pageant and learned some things.  I hope they will never forget we attended the Mormon Miracle Pageant.

One part of the show that struck me was the interaction between Brigham Young and James Allen and the recruiting process.  The Saints were fleeing the country that refused to protect them.  There had even been some suggestions that the Saints would side with a nation willing to defend them.  But President Polk became convinced to try and use some of the Saints to build relationships between the Saints and the United States.  Young quickly jumped on board and sought a battalion to defend the United States and help preserve the moving church.  It proved to be very inspired, not only in the basic enlistment, but in all Young’s promises to the battalion.

As I sat there watching that scene, I was again reminded of our duty to not only build the church and the kingdom, but also of supporting and sustaining the United States.  As I drove home, I once again evaluated whether I could enlist and serve my nation yet.  I am not sure I am in a position to do so, but I am certainly happy to encourage my own children to serve their nation as well as their church.  I am also reminded of James’ baby blessing where he was given certain promises that would seem to include military service.

I am sad the Mormon Miracle Pageant will not occur at least every couple of years.  Even more sad that The Man Who Knew is already gone and that my children will not get to experience the powerful Clarkston Pageant telling the story of Martin Harris.  Even now I get chills when the Spirit confirms to me my witness of the Restoration.

The other powerful part of the Manti Pageant is the testimony of the temple watching over the pageant and the audience in attendance.  The two seem to go well together.  Just like Clarkston is powerful for Martin’s grave nearby, or Hill Cumorah Pageant for the location.

I snapped this photo as we were leaving.  Future visits to Manti will likely be confined to temple attendance for special events.  I wonder how Manti will do losing a major event each year.  Like most towns, they will revamp, revisit, and move forward.  I wonder how I can find other ways as powerful as this to help my children gain testimonies of the Restoration, Revelation, and the beautiful world and plan in which we live.

Manti Temple, Jun 2019, after the Manti Pageant

2019 Ross Patriotism

Ross children on 2019 July 4th

This picture seemed to capture our 4th of July for this year.  A great day to spend time together, with friends, enjoy a good parade with family, and this was in anticipation of going to see the fireworks when the sun went down.

Aliza with her smile, Lillian happy to have caught the flag, and Hiram playing with a ball bug (pill bug, rollie pollie, or Armadillidiidae, whatever you prefer).  Happy 243rd Birthday!

 

Young Family Picture

Colleen, Norwood, Doug Jonas

In honor of my Uncle Doug’s 67th birthday this July, I thought I would share this photo I came upon.

This photo is likely taken in 1953.  This is in front of the home my Grandparents built at 142 N State Street in Richmond Utah.  Today from the same vantage point you cannot see the valley floor like you can in this photo.  Many homes and trees have been planted to block most of this view.

I think this is the youngest picture I have of this young family.  I have couple pictures of Norwood and Colleen, those probably predate Doug.  But here is the young family.  I wonder who took the photo?

Grandpa was 29 in this photo, and Grandma 25, if this photo was taken after May.

Jacob Friedrich Wanner

I received this history a few years ago.  I will provide it as it is written (only minor edits).  I have written before regarding Fred’s parents Johann George (John George) Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.

Back(l-r): Eva, Carma, Bert Wanner; Front: Lyman, Fred, Eva, Stanley Wanner

“(This History is written by Jacob’s daughter – Eva June Wanner Lewis – with the information sent in by Brother Fred, and Sister Mary Ann, and  her own sweet memories as well as information from Histories of Brothers and Sisters.)

“Jacob Friedrich Wanner was born January 14, 1881, in Gruenkraut, Germany, the 7th child of Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  They had a large family consisting of five boys and five girls.  They were quite poor so Grandfather went to work as a road overseer.  This left the farm work to Grandmother and the children.  They used the milk cows to do the farm work and then would milk them morning and night.  They also got wood from the forest for fuel.

Back(l-r): Mary, Christina, George, Pauline; Front: Anna, Fred, Louisa, Wilhelmina, Gottlop, John Wanner

“It rained a lot in Germany so the out buildings were connected to the house.  One time Grandma went downstairs to get some fruit.  She reached over and touched something hairy – she thought it was the devil!  It was a cow that had wandered down from the barn.

“Dad didn’t talk much about his life as a child but he did say he got a drum for Christmas and then it would disappear about New Year’s Day and he would get it for Christmas again the next year.  He may have been joking.

“The family belonged to the Lutheran Church and was very religious.

“In the summer of 1890 the Lord sent a man along the street in Gruenkraut where Grandpa worked.  He was a missionary from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.  He talked to Grandpa a long time and showed him the Book of Mormon.  He spoke in German.  When it came dinner time Grandpa took the missionary home and said,  “We’ll see Mother.”  From that day the missionaries stayed in their home and the family was soon converted.  They joined the church in 1891.

“Uncle George was baptized in July 1891 and went to America with one of the missionaries, Brother Terrell from Providence, Utah.  Brother Terrell helped him find a job to provide for himself.  He got a job with Fred Nuffer in Glendale.  Grandfather and Grandmother and the three oldest girls were baptized in October 1891.  Louise and Pauline were baptized in June 1894, Gottlob in June 1895 and Wilhelmina in August 1896.  Dad was baptized in Preston or Franklin, Idaho, on June 7, 1894, by Lars C. Larsen and confirmed a member of the church by Austin I. Merrill on June 7, 1894.  He was ordained an Elder by George C. Parkinson on September 27, 1903, and was married by Thos Morgan on September 30, 1903, at the Logan Temple.

“The family left Germany to come to America so they could worship the way the pleased.  It was a long, uncomfortable trip.  They took the train to the Rhine River and then boarded a boat and traveled up the Rhine, a journey of about 3 or 4 days.  Then another train took them to the North Sea where a ship sailed them to Amsterdam, Holland, and then on to England.  At Liverpool they boarded a ship and were on the ocean for 13 days.  Dad was 12 years old when they crossed the ocean and told us of the rough sea.  He had to hang on to his bunk with both hands to keep from being thrown to the floor.  He said he sure got sick of eggs.

“They arrived in New York and stayed there for 2 days.  Then they went to Chicago for a day and a night.  They then rode a train straight through to Franklin, Idaho, which took six days.  They arrived the 18th day of June, 1893.

“Uncle George and Fred Nuffer (the man he worked for) met them with a buggy and wagon and took them to Fred Nuffer’s place in Cub River.  They stayed for a while with the Nuffers and purchased a farm from John Nuffer in Glendale.

Gpa Wanner

“When Grandpa and Grandma moved to Whitney they sold the farm to Dad.  I don’t know if Dad or Grandpa build the sandstone house.  It had a kitchen, two bedrooms and a pantry.  It had a hand pump that pumped water from a spring.  Mary Ann and some of the children were born there.

“Dad met and married a lovely young girl, Mary Elizabeth Carter on September 30, 1903, in the Logan Temple.  They lived in Whitney, Idaho, until they bought the farm.  They worked hard to improve their farm and many times she helped him in the fields.  They built a three bedroom brick house that stood for many years until fire destroyed it years later.  Dad had a Delco generator in the garage so we had our own electricity.

Fred and Mary Elizabeth Wanner

“They had a lovely family, five girls and three boys:  Laverna C., Fredrick D., Lorin C., Florence E., Joseph J., Erma C., Mary Ann and Grace C.

“IN 1923 – Elizabeth died leaving seven children.  The youngest was almost 2 years old.  Laverna got married so that left Erma and MaryAnn to take care of the baby.  Erma would go to school one day and MaryAnn the next.  It was hard.  They tried to leave her with Aunt Ethel Barrington in Riverdale, but she got so lonely and cried all day so they went and got her.  Then Dad hired Eva Christensen to come and work as a housekeeper.  As time went on Dad and Eva (my mother) fell in love and was married June 26, 1925, in the Logan Temple. They had five children:  Carma C., L. Bertus, Eva June, Lyman G., and Stanley C.  We had a happy family life and dad always saw to it that we went to church and did what we were suppose to do.  He went when he could.  He always paid his tithing and other offerings.  He was honest in all his dealings.

Fred and Mary with (l-r) Laverna, Fred, Lorin.

“Dad was the first one in Glendale to buy a car.  We children were used to horses so we would say,  “Gid up, Gid up” when we got in the car.  About this time Dad was struck by lightening but was not harmed.

“Dad owned or had a share in the thrashing machine.  They would go around to all the farmers in Glendale and thrash the grain.  Then we would fix a big meal for all the men.   It was a real fun time for the children but a lot of work for the adults.  Dad worked as an oiler or on the thresher and had part of his finger taken off.  When we were little he told us a fox bit it off!

“Dad was a good farmer.  He took pride in all his work.  He raised hay, barley and wheat.  He always had 10 or 12 dairy cows.  He also had horses, pigs and chickens.  For many years we separated the cream from the milk in the old separator.  Then Dad took the cream to Preston to sell it along with the eggs.  In later years we had the milk truck come and pick up the milk so we didn’t use the separator anymore.  He also bought a grain chopper and prepared his own feed for the animals.  We had a big raspberry patch and used to sell raspberries for 8 quarts for a dollar.  Dad always had a big garden and a big potato patch.  He had a root cellar to keep potatoes, carrots, squash and apples over the winter.

“In the early 1930’s Dad bought silver foxes.  He built a high fence so they couldn’t get out.  He took great pride in his fox furs.  They were always excellent quality!  I remember watching him cure the furs and he took great care to make sure they were done right.  Dad always kept his barnyard as well as the rest of the farm in good repair and very neat.  His fences were always mended.

“Dad always took time out of his farm work to go to Franklin to celebrate Idaho Day on the 15th of June.  We would take a big picnic lunch and spend the day.  We rode the carnival rides and had a good time.  He always took us kids to Downata to go swimming when we finished first crop of hay.

“Dad liked a good joke… I remember how he would laugh.  He loved the radio and his favorite programs were Gang Busters, The Old Ranger and of course the news!  We all had to be quiet when the news came on.

“Dad was very active and was always working except on Sunday – there was never any work done on Sunday except chores.  He loved the Sunday paper.  He always bought the Denver Post.  It was a real shock to us when he had his heart attack because he was so active.  It happened one day when he was working in the barn.  We were all frightened and I called the neighbors to help us get him to the house.

“After that he had to be very careful so he sold the farm and moved to Preston.  They lived just down the street from MaryAnn.  He seemed to miss the farm and would putter around the yard.

“He died at the age of 74 on August 25, 1955.  He was buried in the Preston Cemetery.

Mom at Poolside

Millie Beck, Colleen Jonas, Sandy Jonas

In the photos scanned earlier this year, this is another one that stood out to me and seemed to catch a glimpse of life.  Most photos are staged and seem to capture less of actual life or living.

Here is a picture of my mother, Sandy Jonas, with her Mom (my Grandma), Colleen Andra Jonas, and to the right of Colleen’s sister, Mildred (Millie) Andra Beck.

I love the fact that there is a guy, unknown, floating in the water in the background.  Just soaking in the water and the sun.

The photo is obviously captured through a fence, something else that tells me it is an impromptu photo.

Aunt Millie looks like I always remember.  Age would give her a few wrinkles, but the facial expression is the same.

Then there is Grandma looking at the picture.  Water on the concrete, big earrings.  I remember Grandma wearing many earrings, Millie also has in a pair for the day at the pool.  The curl in her hair.

I am guessing the photo is the late 1950’s.  Mom looks like she is about 4 or 5 years old, so 1958 or 1959.  Mom tries to block the sun, almost looking like a whine on her face.  Necklace around her neck.  Obvious light blond hair.  She still appears to have her ring finger in the photo.

Here is another one from probably the same date, just with the people more blurry.

Millie, Colleen, Sandy