Paul Hotel

Paul Hotel, Paul, Idaho

This is a photo of the Paul Hotel in Paul, Minidoka County, Idaho.

Paul was platted in 1905 as part of the Minidoka Reclamation Project.  The town was named after Charles H. Paul, the Minidoka Dam’s chief engineer.

By 1907 the Minidoka and Southwestern Railroad Company, acquired by Oregon Short Line Railroad in 1910, completed a 75 mile spur from Minidoka through Rupert, Paul, Twin Falls, Filer, and ending at Buhl.

The railroad crossed the land belonging in Paul by the name of James Ellis.

James donated land generously for the new little city.

Frank A Grimm and Ludwig Alexander Grimm are the two brothers credited with building the Paul Hotel for $70,000.  He started as a photographer and opened a gallery in Mount Angel, Oregon.  He later moved to Portland and became a motorman for the for the city railroad.  He moved to Paul in 1916 and then assisted in building the Hotel Paul.  He managed the Hotel until 1 June 1919 when he leased it.

The Hotel was a popular location as it had indoor plumbing, which was a novel idea for a hotel at that time.

Here is a picture of Paul from the water tower.  You can see the writing on the photo of the hotel and at the end of Idaho Street the school that burned in 1977.

Paul, Idaho from water tower

I don’t know why, but eventually the entire second story was removed from the building.  It remains that way to today, February 2018.

The windows in the front of the building are now all bricked.  Mustang Sally’s, a club, was located in the right side of the building and now has a painting of “Sinister” as a DJ on the end.  I am not aware of a business operating int he building right now.  It does appear that a family are living in at least part of the building.

As a kid I remember being intrigued by the bank drop-box that was on the east end of the building.  That box has been removed and the hole bricked in.  I have never been in any part of the building.  Since it is beside the Post Office, I am around the building on a regular basis.

A relic of the times, I doubt we will see any renovation or reinvention of the building.  But it will probably eventually be demolished and lost to time.



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