Maria Christina Jacobsen Housley

I stumbled upon this history of one of Amanda’s ancestors and I thought I would make it available.  Maria is Amanda’s 4th Great Grandmother.  This was compiled by Emma Housley Auger (1895-1969), Maria’s granddaughter.

George and Maria Housley

George and Maria Housley

Maria Christina Jacobsen Housley was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on April 6, 1845.  She was the daughter of Jorgen Jacobsen, )born in Svrrup Mill (Feyn) Odense Co. Denmark, on January 20, 1815) and Bertha Kristine Petersen, (born in Vedberks, District of Sol and Copenhagen Amt. Denmark, in the September 16, 1821, the daughter of Hans Petersen and Ellen Catherine Strom).

Grandmother had one older brother, Hans, (born April 18, 1844) and two younger brothers Christian (born November 30, 1846) and Ferdinand (born December 28, 1848).  Two younger sisters Athalie Hedevine (born March 21, 1851) and Rastime Willardine (born December 22, 1853).  All her brothers and sisters were born in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Her parents were married April 9, 1843.  They joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on September 28, 1851.  Her father was ordained to the office of a teacher on May 2, 1853, and a priest on August 22 of the same year.

Her father was an orchardist and rented the place that he lived on.  This place contained a very comfortable house with several rooms, a yard with outbuildings, a good orchard and gardens.

In the year of 1854 with many of their friends, they started their journey Zionward.  My grandmother, who was nine years old at that time.  She remembered the day they left their dearly beloved home forever.  On reaching the beach, a man came to the carriage side and tried his utmost to induce their father to leave his children in Denmark, even if he had to go to Utah himself.  The children were not able to describe their feelings, as the man stood and pleaded with their father on the subject.  The very though of any one wanting to separate them from their parents was very exasperating.

It was only a short time until they boarded the ship (that was an old vessel).  A few minutes into their journey the people began to be sick.  This family was no exception.  After going part of the way, the ship rocked so hard that it dipped water on the dock.  This kept the men working very hard to keep the water pumped off.  There was a great deal of sickness among the people on the vessel and a number of deaths.

After a long, tiresome journey over the ocean, across the Gulf of Mexico and then up the Mississippi River in a steam boat, this large group of Danish people landed in Kansas.  Food had been scarce and they were very hungry.  A man who lived there was very anxious to sell them some meat, so they bought some, cooked it.  And ate it.  Being weak, all the people of the company got sick and many of them died.  Among the dead were my grandmother’s father, two brothers, and two sisters.  After they had eaten and became ill, they learned that the pigs had had cholera so the meat was poison.  They could not buy coffins, so they sewed sheets around their dead and buried them the best they could under the circumstances.  This left my grandmother, Maria, Christian, and their mother to continue the trip across the plains.  My grandmother, Maria, was very sick, nigh unto death, and her mother almost lost her mind.  These were sorrowful days.

After a few days delay (for this is all it took for the deaths and burials to take place), they were fitted out with oxen and cow teams.  Several yoke of oxen and two cows lead each wagon in an independent company.

There were generally two families to each wagon.  Two men would get on each side of the team and try to lead them on the road.  They had several stampedes, for the Daines were not used to driving oxen and the oxen were not used to the Daines.  Not many of the, if any, had ever seen an ox until now.

They saw a great many Indians and buffalo on their way.  They got along nicely with the Indians, and killed some of the buffalo as they came along.  They arrived in Salt Lake City in the fall of 1854.  They managed to get some potatoes, which tasted better to them than anything they had ever eaten in their whole life.

This family has a hard time making a living.  Christian went to work for a man named Jackson Allen in Spanish Fork, Utah.  My grandmother lived with an English family who had recently come from England, by the name of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shipley.  She was taken in by this family to be raised as one of their own.  She remained with them for about three years.  During this time they taught her to read, write, and to speak the English language.  They also taught her to do house work and to care for the family.  Their children made all manner of fun of her peculiar language.  She felt so badly about this hat she prayed to the Lord, asked him to help her forget the Danish language, and she did forget it.

She met a young Englishman by the name of George Fredrick Housley.  He also lived in Draper and occasionally worked for the Shipley Family.  When she was about 14 years old they were married in Salt Lake City.  They continued to live in Draper for about six years. On February 22, 1862, they were sealed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.  Four children were born to them in Draper, two boys and two girls.

From Draper they moved to Paradise, Cache, Utah, where they purchased a small farm.  Eight more children were born to them, one boy and seven girls.  They were very poor financially and their children had but very little schooling.  Most of them went to work while young to help provide a livelihood.  The boys worked in the canyon cutting logs and hauling lumber.

She was a very good cook, some of her specialties, which her family enjoyed most, were “Nofat Dumplings” which were made from veal, pork, beef, and onions chopped together then seasoned with salt and pepper.  The dough was made with suet and wrapped around the meat and boiled.

“Danish Dumplings” – Heat one quart of milk in a skillet or heavy pan. Stir, while sifting in the flour, until thick.  Remove from heat, cool, add two eggs, and a little baking powder.  Dip by spoonfuls into boiling broth, cover, and continue to boil for about fifteen minutes.

She also made some little cakes out of liver which she called “Faggots”.  It was slightly boiled; ground liver with onions, seasoned with salt and sage.  Make into little cakes by taking a spoonful and wrapping it in a square of leaf lard or lacy lard which comes from the inside of the pig.  Fry just until the lacy lard is golden brown.  “Yorkshire Pudding” – which was just eggs, milk, and flour stirred up together and baked in piping hot grease.

Grandmother was as active in the church as her health would permit.  For some time while her husband was away from home, she went without shoes.  They think this was the cause of her having rheumatic fever.  She went to the Bishop and told him of the condition, he gave her a pair of men’s shoes which she was unable to wear.  From this time on she had a weak heart and then dropsy.  A lot of the time after her sixth or seventh child was born, she was unable to walk, nevertheless, she was quite cheerful and taught her children from a bed or a chair.

She passed away in March, 1896, of dropsy at the age of fifty-one.  After she was placed in the coffin, she continued to bloat until her body burst.  The undertaker tapped the coffin and set a bucket under it to catch the water.  The bucket had to be emptied a time or two during the funeral.

Burial was in the Paradise Cemetery beside her infant daughter, who preceded her in death.

Adam Smith

Sitting and watching the current world in which I live, I find it interesting that our society and government seem to think that the world revolves around it.  Not that we are beholden to overarching set of laws, but that they ignore those laws and do their own thing.

I found myself reverting back to ideas of Adam Smith in his The Theory of Moral Sentiments and An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations.  It has been at least 7 years since the last time I read either and I need to check them again, but I cannot help but wonder how we floated so far adrift without anyone knowing.  Then again, we live in a world where relativism seems to rule and I should not be surprised.  Just ignore it and gravity will cease to exist.

Unfortunately, I do not have a better picture than these two we took in 2008.  But at least we stood outside the gate of Panmure Close in Edinburgh, Scotland.  It was at this site Adam Smith had lived for over a decade and died.  I seem to recall that his books were published before living here though.

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Random Richmond Pictures

I have made a number of photos available that were in my Great Grandma’s (Lillian Coley Jonas) photo albums.  As I mentioned, these photos seem to come from a collection of her own photos, photos that belonged to her mother (Martha Christiansen Coley), and photos that belonged to husband (Joseph Nelson Jonas).  Unfortunately, these are unnamed so we do not know who the individuals are or where the photos were taken.  I am fairly certain these are Coley or Jonas relatives though.  Plus, there is a very good chance these photos were taken in Cache County, Utah.  Any photos with writing, I have made the writing available in the caption area.

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I believe this is one of Matha’s sisters

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Do take good care of this

This was written on the back of this one: Hug and Kiss and now I am going to propose to you dear.  To Lillian from Olof and Edna.  Wishing you many a Happy Birthdays.  Haha

This was written on the back of this one: Hug and Kiss and now I am going to propose to you dear. To Lillian from Olof and Edna. Wishing you many a Happy Birthdays. Haha

 

This photo was taken at Electric Photo Shop in Logan, Utah

This photo was taken at Electric Photo Shop in Logan, Utah

 

This photo also taken in Electric Photo Shop, Logan, Utah

This photo also taken in Electric Photo Shop, Logan, Utah

 

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Give this picture to Lillian of the baby as she acted like she thought so much of Karen she has a spit bubble in her mouth and you can sure see it plain

“Give this picture to Lillian of the baby as she acted like she thought so much of Karen she has a spit bubble in her mouth and you can sure see it plain”

"Give to Lillian to"

“Give to Lillian to”

 

 

 

 

The Bridges

I would like to introduce you to William Weir Bridges and his new bride, Lenna May White.  As I continue to scan photos for others, this one caught my attention for some reason and I wanted to make it available here.

Will & Lena Bridges at Thomas Studios in Salt Lake City

Will & Lena Bridges at Thomas Studios in Salt Lake City

I really do not know anything about them other than their names.  Some quick research tells me William Weir Bridges was born 15 April 1891 in Ogden, Weber, Utah and died 9 May 1959 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  He is buried in Sandy, Salt Lake, Utah although I do not know which cemetery.  This photo is likely in the collection because Will’s mother is Janet Fyfe (aka Fife)(1873-1953), half-sister to Agnes Fyfe (1903-1994) as referenced by Dale Vern Ashcraft.  I have also written of another sister, Charlotte Fyfe.

Lenna “Lena” May White was born 30 March 1898 in Salt Lake City and died 7 June 1974 in Murray, Salt Lake, Utah.  She is also buried in Sandy.  The two married 1 July 1915 in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple.  This photo was likely taken near their wedding date.

Holiness to the Lord

Monogram on the Salt Lake Temple

This is a repost, but I added another photo below to the shot.

In honor of the Christmas Season, I thought I would share this photo as it seems to describe how I feel about Christmas more than anything else associated with the holiday.

We remember the Savior of the world who came to Earth.  He lived and died for us.  Through the Atonement we find ourselves resurrected.  For those who are willing, we find ourselves back into the presence of God forever.  It is this time of year we celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.

Celebration in my mind of something so sacred and holy seems to conjure images of reverence and quiet joy rather than exultation that rattles the stars.  It seems the humble words of Holiness to the Lord written on the life of an individual are more appropriate than what our traditions might have become in our nation.  These words written on the life of a soul seem to portray themselves at this time of the year in smiles and service springing from wells of everlasting life within the breast.

In Old Testament times, writing Holiness to the Lord on something indicated the item was set apart from the world, it was for some solemn trust before the Lord (see Exodus 28:36, 39:30).  My love of God and of his noble Son, seem to require a reverence and deep-abiding love for others and their lives.  Which would require the true meaning of Christmas to be in service of one another, especially our family, friends, and those in need.  This seems to be what Christmas is about.  We share gifts for their needs, enjoy food and time, and set aside our family.  We declare our most precious gifts of time, love, and family as Holiness to the Lord.

The temple represents worship of God and family.  It is there we look to the gifts of the Atonement for the physical and spiritual manifestations in our daily living.

It seems fitting that written on the door, here in monograph, we should find the phrase Holiness to the Lord.  We do not write Holiness to the Lord on objects or buildings to hope God will descend to touch them and make them his.  We write it to ascribe to whom the object or building already belongs.  This is a matter of perspective.

Hence, if we hope God will reach out and touch our lives, we are not in tune.  It is when we look up in gratitude that God has touched our lives, that we find the joy of the season.  If we hope our gift will be touched by God, we have missed the point.  It is in the giving of the gift that we seek to emulate God, and we find the words Holiness to the Lord written all over the item.

Christmas is when we take a moment to again realize that Holiness to the Lord is written all over our lives and world.  That we seek to give something back in return.  Not to another person, even though they may receive the gift, but to God in whose name all things really already have written, “Holiness to the Lord.”  Thanks be to God and his Son this time of year.

Door Knobs of the Salt Lake Temple with the inscription

Door Knobs of the Salt Lake Temple with the inscription

Leaving your mark

For this week, I thought I would share a photo of me in Chorley, Lancashire, England.  We had gathered for a Zone Conference and were waiting for the chapel doors to open.  At the time I thought it was a great idea to write something in the dew on the grass.  I guess something akin to writing something in the sand on the beach.  “Elder Ross was here.”  I hope my mark in England and Wales is a bit deeper than this jolly picture though.  The Preston England LDS Temple stands in the background behind me pointing to my handiwork.

Elder Ross written in dew on Preston Temple Grounds

Berendena Van Leeuwen Donaldson Funeral

Sitting (l-r) Dora, Betty, Gladys, Maxine.  Standing: Unknown woman, back of man, back of man, Eddie Telford (in front of wheel of car)

Dena Donaldson graveside service.  Sitting (l-r) Dora Birch, Betty Donaldson, Gladys Ross, Maxine Telford. Standing: (l-r) Unknown woman, back of man, back of man, Eddie Telford (in front of wheel of car), Jan Birch, Richard Michaelson, Johnny Telford, Unknown man, Les Collins, Unknown man reaching out, Mary Hewitt, Andy Hewitt (face behind Mary’s head), Dena Michaelson, Mike Michaelson, Unknown man’s head, Minnie Berglund.

Here is a photo from the graveside service of Berendena “Dena” Van Leeuwen Donaldson in the Ogden, Weber, Utah Cemetery.  I have previously shared Dena’s life story.  But I thought I would make this photo available and hope maybe we can find a few more people in the photo.  My father says he was present, but did not make it into the photo.  He seemed to think he was standing with Jan, Richard, and Johnny, he may very well be the hidden person under the bough of the tree.  He provided me the names of the people in the photo, but I do not have a second confirmation for the names, so if you can confirm or correct, I would appreciate your help.

Dena died 5 March 1959 in Ogden.  This picture was taken 9 March 1959, the date of her funeral and this graveside service.  Three of Dena’s children are seated (Dora, Gladys, and Maxine).  Betty is Dena’s daughter-in-law.  Dena, Dena’s daughter, is standing also beside her husband Chauncey Michaelson.  Dad seems to remember Grandpa (Milo Ross) and Dave Donaldson are blocked by the tombstone on the right of the photo.  Two of Dena’s sisters are visible (Mary and Kate).  Dad could not identify any of the other people as they were either not family or distant enough he cannot recall them.  I think the man to the right of Johnny Telford and the man to the left of Mary Hewitt are Dena’s brother-in-laws, but I do not know which (only four were still living; George, Ellis, Ed, and Alvin), but they have Donaldson traits.

Milo Riley and Mary Ann Sharp

After many years, I finally obtained a better photo of my Great, Great Grandparents.  I only had a photocopy of their photographs and longed for something much clearer.  Since I had the photocopy, I knew the original photos had to be out there somewhere.  Finally, alas, a cousin has made these two photos available to me.  Having said that, the photo of Milo Riley is only a portion of the photocopy I have, at least it is the head shot!  I have also updated the original post (with the lesser quality full photo of Milo) regarding Milo and Mary Ann.

Milo Riley Sharp

Milo Riley Sharp

Mary Ann Stoker Sharp

Mary Ann Stoker Sharp