Johann Christoph Nuffer

John Christoph Nuffer

This is an entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.  The book does not give a source, but reads as an obituary, but I cannot tell which newspaper or publication.  Some of the mistakes in it seem to show it was not written by a family member.  May actually be more of a quick biography than an obituary.  Some day I may know the source.  I have kept the capitalization and spellings as in the article.

You can find the biography of Johann as written by his granddaughter Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef.

“JOHANN CHRISTOPH NUFFER, Pioneer was born at the City of NEUFFEN State of Wurtemberg, Germany on the 6th of March 1835.  His parents were JOHAN JACOB NUFFER and MARIE MAGDALENA KIRNER NUFFER: his grandfather JOHAN CHRISTOPHER NUFFER, his wife CHRISTINA KATHARINA PFEIFFER died and he married his second wife MARIE KATHARINA KLEIN.  His great grandparents wher JOHAN JACOB NUFFER and ANNA MARIE SCHWINDLIN.  She and their ancestors were living in the City of Neuffen, a small city at the foot of the Schwabisen Alb in Southern Germany.  JOHAN CHRISTOPH NUFFER, the Pioneer was married to Agnes BARBARA SPRING, who died Feb. 29, 1867.  He had two sons with her, JOHN NUFFER born Dec. 4, 1862 and FRED NUFFER born Jan. 20, 1864.  He married EVA KATHARINA GREINER who with him and the family consisting of JOHN and FRED NUFFER of his first wife and REGINA, KARL AUGUST & ADOLF, his second wife, emigrated to the United States in May 1880 and came to Logan, Utah in June 1880.  In the year 1879 he with his wife had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints.

“In the Fall of 1880 he moved with his family to Providence in 1883 they again moved to Worm Creek, then belonging to the Franklin Ward, later the Preston Ward.  His son John homesteaded 160 Acres at that place at the divide between Worm Creek & Cub River.  They lived at that place until the Spring of 1884, when he homesteaded 160 acres on the Cub River side of the divide, now belonging to the Mapleton Ward.  Feb. 26, 1893 his wife EVA KATHARINA died; with her he had the following children, REGINA, KARL AUGUST, ADOLF, and MARIE who died Oct. 5, 1900, at the age of 9 years.  In the year 1895 he again married, to ANNA ELIZABETH REBER, she died Dec. 1, 1901.  In 1903 he again married MARIE ALKER, SCHAUB.  He died Apr. 12, 1908.

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Flanders

John William Ross tombstone

(I originally published this in 2008.  I edited it and updated it with pictures for today.)

I thought I would write a little in relation to Veteran’s Day.  For the most part, it seems this holiday is somewhat forgotten in the United States.  Really, American’s celebrate the same day on Memorial Day in May.  I can understand the European View of holding it on the 11th of November.  It is the day WWI ended.

I remember well the time I first experienced Veteran’s Day.  I sat in the Eccles Ward Chapel in Patricroft, England.  I sat there on 11 November 1999.  The services started at 11 AM.  We had the hymn, opening prayer, and a few comments by the Bishop until 11:11 arrived.  It was then we took two minutes to remember what was done.

Growing up in Idaho means we had little or no realization of any war.  There are small war memorials inside of cemeteries to commemorate.  No war in modern days has taken place anywhere near Idaho.  Even the American Civil War means little to Idahoans.  My grandfather served in the Philippines during WWII but he spoke so little of it.  I had Uncles and Great Uncles who perished in WWI and WWII.  I had been to their graves but they were the dead, just like the other dead in the cemetery.  The idea of dying for one’s country meant very little to me.

Irwin John Jonas

One of my first memories of England is the day after we arrived.  We were taken into Altrincham Town Centre and there we proselyted for an hour or two on the way to the mission office.  I did notice the cenotaph.  I thought how oddly placed it was.  It was something that we have relegated mostly to cemeteries in the US.  Once and a while you find one in front of a town or city hall.

While I served in Hyde, Cheshire once of the way we knew where to turn in town was at the cenotaphs.  The same in Dukinfield.  When we arrived early at one member’s house we would loiter at the cenotaph to street contact until time for dinner.  A number of times I thought how oddly placed these things were.  I knew they were naming those who died in the ‘Great War’.  For some reason or another I thought they doubled up on the names over the various cenotaphs.  It never occurred to me names are not typically duplicated on these things, or if they do, the intention is not to do so.

Ellis Seth Jonas

Suddenly I found myself sitting in a church meeting remembering.  These souls did not fight for my country.  However I felt come into my heart a gratitude for their sacrifice.  Could I do the same thing if called upon?  Somehow a dawning realization came upon me of the hundreds if not thousands of names I had seen on cenotaphs in my first year in England.  They were everywhere.  There were continuous reminders of the dead who fought for their country.

About a month later I found myself walking the streets of Runcorn, Cheshire.  There is a large cenotaph probably 15 feet tall.  The bus would drive by it every day.  I could not help but notice the little red, fake flowers on popsicle sticks stuck in the flower bed all around it.  The cenotaph meant more to me by this point but what were the little red flowers?  I noticed each of them had a name written on them and they appeared hand-made.

James William Ross

I asked what the little red flowers meant that were still scattered everywhere a month after the 11th of November.  I was then told about Flanders Fields and the poppies.  The poem was shared with me.  It made sense, I felt the poignancy of it.  I have a cousin, Harry Coley (1891 – 1917) who died in Broodseinde, Flanders, Belgium as part of the war.  His body was lost in the mud and potholes of the war and never recovered.

The imagery is intense while the poem isn’t all that catchy to me.  In fact, some of it still doesn’t make sense to me so I share only the first verse here:

In Flanders Fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

David Delos Donaldson (back), John Edmund Donaldson (left), and William George Donaldson

Would I have this type of courage?  Would I be willing to go and serve my country so willingly?  Even if I was drafted, unwillingly?  To set aside all other hopes and aspirations to serve my country?  I did so to serve a mission for my church.  I would think I would be willing to for my nation.  While I am not entirely enamoured with my country at the present, would I still be willing to do it?  Probably.

In fact, I feel some desire to serve in the military.  My life hasn’t permitted the chance and my wife is against the idea.  I don’t think I will be making the decision to join.  But I wish to honour those who do and especially those who died in doing so.  Accordingly, when I saw my clock at 11:11 this morning, I stopped for 2 minutes to remember.  What does our future hold?  I don’t know.  But our past is nobler because of these good souls who gave all.  Not only to join, but they never returned.  We were on the side of right then, and our nation was preserved.  I hope and pray our nation continues on the side of right and we will yet be preserved.

An Wanner uncle of mine arrived in Whitney, Idaho a year after his death in WWI.  His remains arrived in a lead casket which was buried with great fanfare for the small community.  WWII repeated this scenario with another Uncle, another family line, buried in Richmond, Utah.  His body arrived months later and he was interred with great fanfare.  May we live our lives in such a way, regardless if dying for our nation, but let us die in such a way that the community wishes to come out and pay homage for your great sacrifice for the future of man, good, and our country.

Milo James Ross

The City of Neuffen

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

Neuffen train station – 2008

“Neuffen was the home city of our ancestors for at least the period of the early 1700’s to the late 1800’s.  It is the city in which the Mormon Missionaries converted Johann Christoph Nuffer and his family from which they left to come to America.

“Location: County of Swartzwald, State of Wurttemberg, West Germany, 18 miles SSE of Stuttgart.  In what is known as the Swabische Alb. (A high plateau that is deeply dissected by erosion making steep canyons and narrow valleys).  Because of the moist climate the hills are heavily forested.

Paul Ross at Neuffen train station – 2008

“Population: 1910 census, 19896 including 1,833 Protestants & 43 Catholics

“Altitude: 1,300 feet

“Climate: Moist and moderate, very similar to that of Western Oregon.  The countryside is very lush and green.  The principle forest tree is a form of Beech.

“Industry: Mainly farming and especially wine growing.  Neuffener wine is considered a very fine white wine.  At the time our ancestors lived there many of the residents and some of our ancestors were employed as weavers in a fabric mill.

Street cover – Neuffen in 2008

“A small stream runs through the town and at the time Johann Christoph Nuffer left there, it powered the local mill.  It was this stream that they damned up to be baptized in shortly before they left.

“The streets are narrow and all the businesses are on the main street which is the highway running through town.

“The valley is narrow so that most of the houses are on the slopes of the hills.

“The Hohen Neuffen stands prominently on the largest mountain to the West of the city.  This is less than a mile as the crow flies, but about 7 miles by car.

Paul Ross and Martinskirche – 2008, built in 1504

“The Evangelical (Lutheran) church, which our ancestors attended, is the only major church in town.  The parish records there contain the births and marriages of our people from the early 1700’s to present.  The church and City hall are still much the same as when our people were there.

Relief on Martinkirche, Neuffen – 2008, Christ in Gethsemane

“The house where Johann Christoph Nuffer lived faces on the main street and the stream runs by just a short distance behind it.

“The city was heavily damaged during the 30 year war and both world wars, but has been restored so that no damage can be detected.

“The cemetery is neat and well kept with many beautiful flowers in summer.  It is a nice setting overlook the city and with a good view of the Castle.  There are several Nuffers buried there, but they are all of recent times since the law in Germany only allows for a body to occupy a grave for 25 years after which it must be removed to make room for others.  Therefore, the cemetery is of little use in genealogical research.

“The town is typical of most of the small towns in that part of Germany in that most of the houses are stucco and the roofs are red tile.

“The beginnings of the town are not known, but it is known that it predates the castle which was built during or before the 1100’s.

Paul Ross with Neuffen behind – 2008

The Hohen – Neuffen

Neuffen Hohen – 2008

This is an entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.

“The castle ruins of Hohen-Neuffen are the largest in the Schwabian Alps and some of the most attractive.

“The approach to Hohen-Neuffen was still difficult up to 100 years ago, but this did not discourage romantic young people of the surrounding villages nor students from Teubingen from visiting the ruins.  In the 1860’s and 1870’s the authorities provided easier access to it.

“Because former residents of the villages had been carting away the stones in their oxcarts for cheap building material, the entire area is now protected as a memorial.

“The mighty corner towers of Hohen-Neuffen originated either under Duke Ulrich, who spent 10,700 guilder on the fortress between 1543 – 1550 or more probably were built by Duke Christoph who put 16,386 guilder into the project up to the year 1562.

“The towers served as protective towers flanking the outer walls and ramparts.

“At the foot of the hill are the villages of Neuffen, Linsenhofen and Frickenhausen.  In the distance is Nuertingen on the Neckar.  On a clear day the Katzenbuchel (200 ft mtn) is visible in the Odenwald (Oden forest), as are other landmarks.  From the bastion is a panorama of the surrounding scenes – Neuffen with the Martinskirche (St. Martins Church) and the quarry of the Nuertingen cement works.

Overlooking Neuffen

“Returning to the courtyard of the castle, next to the cistern on the east into which flowed the rain water from the roofs, is an embossed picture of Eduart Paulus who is credited with much of the research and preservation of the Hohen-Neuffen.  According to him, the Hohen-Neuffen was the residence of Theodorick the Great, but this is merely his opinion and has no basis in fact according to Dr. Weinland in his treatise about the area.

“It is known that Duke Ludwig (1568 – 1593) built the Ludwig’s bastion.

“Although it was besieged many times, it was never conquered.

“Earliest findings in the castle and surrounding areas include stone ax, skull and skeletal remains, shards, etc. of the stone age; and bronzes of swords, etc. of the bronze age.

“The first citadel or stronghold of the mountain above Neuffen was probably there about 1100.  The first authentic occupant or owner was Count Manegolt of Sulmetingen, County Biberach.  Presumably by the purchase from his father-in-law, Count Egino von Erach, he was able to acquire the surrounding villages of Balzholz, Beuren, Grossbettlingen and Linsenhofen.

“The first recorded mention of the Hohen-Neuffen is in 1198 in which the free nobles of Neuffen were named as occupants.  (There are detailed descriptions of their coats of arms.

“As lower adherents to the Kaiser of the house of Hohenstaufen, the Lords Neuffen played important political roles in the empire.  Heinrich I of Neuffen accompanied the 16 year old King Friederich II from Italy to Swabia.  Berthold II was the king’s councilor from 1212 to 1216 and from 1217 to 1224 he was Bishop von Brixon.  The brothers Heinrich and Albert von Neuffen took part in the crusade of Friederich II.

“The 13th century was an especially high point.  Gottfried von Neuffen was a noted Minnesinger (Minstrel) from 1230 – 1250.  The Neuffens were on the side of the younger King Heinrich IV on his revolt against his father Kaiser Friedrich II.  As his troops were first besieged in 1235, Heinrich von Neuffen and his son Gootfried the minnesinger were among the captives.

“By the end of the 13th century the entire domain had gone to the lords von Weinsburg through marriage and purchase.  In 1301 Konrad von Weinsberg, husband of Luitgard von Neuffen, (the last Neuffen heiress) sold it to Count Eberhard I of Wurttemberg for 8,500 marks.

“From 1361 to 1363 and from 1365 to 1366 Hohen-Neuffen was the home of Count Ulrich IV von Wurttemberg.  He named Sir Hans Spaeth von Salzburg as first commandant of Hohen-Neuffen.  In 1512 he attacked Abbon Georg Fischer von Zweifalten over a dispute.

“Because of his quarrel with the Confederation of Schwabia, Ulrich had to flee.  His wife Sabina, who had left him, received the Hohen-Neuffen for herself and her children Anna and Christoph, and through war debts of the Confederation the fortress because an Austrian possession.

“After a 15 year exile, Count Ulrich again succeeded in acquiring the Hohen-Neuffen which was the last stronghold to open its door to him.

“When in 1546 the Duke Alba, at the behest of the Kaiser, came to Wurttemberg, Count Ulrich once again had to flee, but he regained his property in 1547.  It met with disaster in 1549 when lightning struck the powder magazine and was again repaired.  His successor was Count Fredrich I.

“At the beginning of the 30 Years War in 1618 the business of reinforcing, provisioning and manning the fortress became vital.  After the defeat of Noerdlingen in 1634, Wurttemberg was overrun by the Kaiser’s troops.  Hohen-Neuffen was the last stronghold.  After some trickery, the fortress was given back in 1639 to Lord Eberhard III.  A salvo of cannons from the castle announced the close of the terrible war in 1648.  Repairs after the war were very slow.

“In 1730 King Friederich I of Prussia with his son the crown-prince visited the Hohen-Neuffen.  In 1733 Count Karl Alexander wanted to modernize it after the fashion of the French fortresses, with the help of engineering specialists.  After his death the work continued for a time, but was soon discontinued. The unfinished portions deteriorated rapidly because no one seemed to be concerned.  After Karl Alexander’s death his financier, the hated Jew Suess Oppenheimer, was apprehended.

Hohen-Neuffen

“Karl Alexander’s successor, Count Karl Eugen, showed some interest in rebuilding, but the work did not continue for long.  By 1741 the chapel fell in and was allowed to remain so, since the estimated cost of repairs of 2,374 guilder was not available.

“A number of political prisoners had been quartered in Hohen-Neuffen during Karl Eugen’s reign.  His successor, County Ludwig Eugen, received a report from his commandant in 1793 stating that nothing noteworthy had occurred in Hohen-Neuffen.  The county replied that he was happy to hear that nothing else had fallen in.

Neuffen with the Hohen on the hill

“Napoleon’s troops paid the fortress little attention.  In 1796 it was decided by the legislative assembly that because of more urgent need of funds, none was to be used for the maintenance of the Hohen-Neuffen.  The French congress ordered it to be demolished.  The villagers began to take away stones and tile with which entire houses were said to have been built.

“World War II saw the ruins used as an observation post by the air force and it was bombarded by American troops at their entry in 1945 and they in turn were fired upon by the town of Neuffen.  However, the hall and knights chamber were reconditioned.

“In 1948 at a meeting of the cabinet of South Baden, Wurttemberg-Baden, and Wurttemberg-Hoenzollern, the Hohen-Neuffen was declared to be a ruin.  Since 1957 American archaeologists have been interested in the Hohen-Neuffen.

Hohen-Neuffen from a vineyard below

“NOTE: The above is edited from a translation of “DER HOHEN-NEUFFEN Rundgang Durch Die Ruine Die Geschichte De Festung”

“There are many stories and legends about the Hohen-Neuffen most of which are untrue.  The above is probably the most authentic abridgement of the available written history.

“There are persistent stories of our ancestors, the Neuffers, occupying the castle, most of them arising from the fact that several occupants had the name or title of van Neuffen.  However, it should be noted that while von is a German title its derivation comes from its literal meaning “from”.  Therefore, von Neuffen is not necessarily a name but merely means “from Neuffen”.  It is possible that some of the occupants were related to us.  However, there is no direct evidence of this fact.

Hohen-Neuffen and Paul Ross in 2008

The Nuffer name

Coat of Arms for Martin Neuffer, 1594-1638

I had another person e-mail me this week attacking that I had the wrong spelling of my family line: Nuffer.  I am pretty sure I have my line correct because it shows on all legal documents, tombstones, and everything else I have seen.  I know some of the other family have changed their names to other variations thinking it is more correct.  I don’t really care to argue or dispute it, my direct line in the United States is not in question, nor is it in Germany for the first few generations before or after our family left.  Where the variations go before that are upon the spelling of an author and the spelling of names were not standardized.

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.  I will quote from the book itself.

“The name Neuffer, Nuffer and its many forms is of Celtic Origin and later became an Alemann surname.

“The Celt’s were barbarian tribes which occupied Southwestern Germany from at least the late 6th century B.C..  They were remarkable for their height, muscularity and fair coloring.  Their basic economy was mixed farming.  They were noted for their high spirits and love of war and excitement generally.  They were hospitable, fond of feasting, drinking and quarreling, and incapable of prolonged concerted action.  They loved art and greatly prized music and many forms of oral literary composition.  (Encyclopedia Britannica).

“Many Celtic villages have been uncovered in the area of Southwest Germany where our ancestors came from.)

“The Alemanni or Alamanni were a loosely knit confederation of Germany tribes who were first mentioned in connection with a Roman attack on them in 213 A.D..  They were originally composed of fragments of several Germanic peoples.  They had no central government and only joined forces when it was necessary for their defense.  Their language became the High German Dialects used in the Southwesternmost part of the German speech area.  Modern alemannic dialects include Swiss German, Alsatian and the German dialects spoken in Liechtenstein and the extreme western part of Austria.  (Encyclopedia Britannica).

“This is probably a major contributor of the Swabian dialect that our ancestors and the current population of Wurttemberg speak.  It is significantly different from the modern High German.

“Stawitz has stated that the meaning of the name refers to adjectives such as Awake, Springhtly, Merry, Gay, Chipper, Hale & Hearty, Vivacious, Full of Life, Ardent, Fervent, Lively.  (“Richard Stawitz “Die Neuffer aus Munsingen”)

“The name is part of a great group of original surnames in Southern Germany ending in er and one of the seven most prominent names in the region of the State of Wurttemberg.  (Die Nueffer aus Munsingen 1400-1900 by Richard Stawitz)

“The German pronunciation of the name is as follows:  Nuffer = Noofa oo as in book, short a.  The above is only an approximation of the u sound since there is no sound in the English language that exactly duplicates the German u in this case.  Neuffer = Noifa, oi as oy in boy, short a.  Nufer = Newfa.  When a name ends in er the r is dropped.

“The family name may have been taken from the town of Neuffen.  However, this is not certain as it appeared in several areas at about the same time.  This is about the time of the first written records in that part of Germany.  Since it is apparent that the name preceded the first records it becomes impossible to trace its exact origin.

“Today in Germany the Family Neuffer is the largest and most prominent of the different Neuffer, Nuffer, etc. families and Nuffer is the second.  There have been many other spellings of the name such as Nifer, Neifer, Neiffer, Nyfer, Neyfer, Neufer, Nufer, Nufer, Nuofer, Nuover, Nuber, Nuffer, and others.

“Our family came from Neuffen and spelled their name Nuffer for the last 2 generations prior to emigrating and Nufer for 3 generations before that.  Prior to the early 1700’s we have no positively accurate genealogical connections but it appears that we are connected to the Neuffer family.

“Since coming to America most of the family have kept the name as Nuffer but some members have changed it to Neuffer or Nufer.  Given the fact that the name has changed several times over the history in Germany it cannot be said that there is such a thing as “the” correct spelling.

“It is interesting to note that in Germany today if you find a community with Neuffers in it you will seldom find any Nuffers there and vs.  In the town of Neuffen which is supposedly the source of the Neuffer name there are no Neuffers living there, only Nuffers.  There is no record of any Neuffers having been born there.  There are records however of Neuffers having lived there for short periods as Government or Church officials.

“There is no doubt that we can bear this name with pride and dignity when we understand the noble origins and the distrinction with which our forbearers have carried it.

Included with this explanation regarding the Nuffer name, there is also a letter from W. Peter Nuffer of Richfield, Utah dated 4 January 1990 to Lloyd Neuffer of Ogden, Utah.  This letter included an editors note: “Because of Peter’s wide experience, while living and working in Germany, in searching original records and talking to many people carrying the different forms of the Neuffer name, he was appointed, at the Nuffer family reunion, in 1988, to determine the proper spelling of the name.  His opinion, contained in his letter, was that the spelling used during life should be used.  An attempt to follow this idea was used in compiling this family history.

Here are the contents of the letter.

“Dear Lloyd,

“After researching and thinking more about the subject I think it would be a mistake to spell Johann Christoph’s name Neuffer on the cover of the book.  I fear it would bring considerable criticism to you and may weaken the authenticity of the book.  Expecially since any serious researcher would not be able to find convincing evidence to favor the spelling Neuffer in relation to Johann Christoph.

“You say that you have seen the Neuffer spelling on Logan Temple records.  I have not been able to locate that, in fact enclosed you will find a copy of the Logan Temple Index card which shows the spelling as Nuffer.  On his birth and marriage records in Neuffen the name is spelled Nuffer.  (See enclosed copy of the Neuffer parish records).  On the U.S. immigration records and the Wurttemberg emigration records it is also shown as Nuffer.  (see enclosed emigration index).

“You mentioned that the researcher you hired spelled it Neuffer.  This is the case only on the pedigree chart.  On the family group sheets it is spelled Nuffer.  I asked some researchers in the Salt Lake Family History Center why a researcher would have done this when the parish records that they used were clearly Nuffer.  They said that sometimes a researcher will use the same spelling all through a pedigree chart to maintain consistency even if the spelling is different for some individuals.  They said that this is especially true if it is the way the patron spells their name and if they indicate some sensitivity about the spelling.  They said a pedigree chart is only for convenience and is not considered an official document as a family group sheet is.

“As I have said before I have no hang up as to how anyone spells their name.  But I do feel strongly that when you use an individuals name such as Johann Christoph Nuffer it should be spelled the way he spelled it in life.

“Enclosed are some additional and updated sheets and a map for the book.

“Best Regard

“W. P. Nuffer

Irwin Jonas Honored

Irwin Jonas Newspaper Article

This newspaper article regarding the funeral of Irwin Jonas was just shared with me.  I have wrote of Irwin’s life previously.  Family history is an ongoing endeavor with little nuggets appearing from time to time!

I don’t know which newspaper this article was published.  I do know that Irwin died 11 July 1944 in Saint-Lo, Normandy, France.  He was actually buried 6 February 1948 in Richmond, Cache, Utah, almost four years later.  But this article sounds like a memorial service held within weeks or months afterward, and not with Irwin’s body actually present.  It is my understanding he was buried for a time in France, then brought home years later.  I cannot imagine having to deal with this as his parent, widow, or family member.

“Memorial services will be held Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. in the Richmond South ward chapel for Sgt. Irwin Jonas who was killed in France on July 11.  Bishop E. M. Hicken will preside and Commander Neal Hillyard of the American Legion Post 33 will conduct the services.

“The program has been arranged as follows: Advance of colors; selection, The Lord’s Prayer, by the ladies’ chorus; invocation, Hyrum Hansen; solo, My Task, C. I. Stoddard; poem composed by Leona Carson and dedicated to the son of Sgt. Jonas will be read by Bishop E. M. Hicken; talk, Scoutmaster A. J. Mendenhall, Jr.; duet, Resignation, Florence and Rebecca Lewis; talk, O. L. Ballam; violin solo, J. W. Pulsipher; talk, William Jonas of Salt Lake City; and Lt. Commander G. Ellis Doty; selection, the Flag Without a Stain, Ladiers’ chorus; retiring of colors, taps, and benediction, J. W. Stoddard.

Isn’t it amazing where our society is now found?  Due to the sacrifice of people like Irwin, we have the right to fight over what we can see and how we can treat each other?  Without that freedom protected Irwin, we might all be dead, speaking another language, or without the rights of speech or equal protection.  Rather than defend those rights and use them, we would rather trample the symbol of them.  But that too is protected speech.  But let us be careful that we actually use the right so much that we divide and undermine and actually lose it in doing so.

William Fredrick Andra Jr

This past week Issiah and Jennifer Andra stopped by and visited our family with theirs.  We had a pleasant lunch, opportunity to talk, and rekindling of distant family relationships.  During that conversation, Issiah mentioned that he really did not have much information on his grandparents William and Edith Andra.  I told him I would give him some more information.  I wrote a short pictorial history of his grandmother Edith Maude Gudmundson Andra last year after her passing.  I thought I would do the same for his grandfather, William Fredrick Andra Jr.

William Fredrick Andra was born 25 November 1920 in Whitney, Franklin, Idaho to William Fredrick Andra and Mary Louise Wanner Andra.  He was the oldest of 12 children.

I tried to somewhat organized the photos in order, but some of them I just cannot tell.  But generally they should be close.

Mary and Bill, William standing holding June.

1926, Bill with his arm around Mary, William standing in front of Mary, June beside William, and holding Millie.

 

Edith and William Andra Marriage Portrait.  William and Edith married 13 June 1947

William and Edith married 13 June 1947 in the Logan, Utah LDS Temple.

Back: Colleen, Millie, June, William, Mary, Bill; Front: Larry, Ross, Donald, Sergene at Richmond, Utah

 

William Military Picture

 

Elder William F Andra Jr, 1941-1943.

William served a mission to Mexico, learned the language there, and converted many people.

Gracias for the nice xmas card and money dear Grandmother. William

 

1946, William and Golden in back, Sergene, Millie, Colleen, June standing, Donald, Larry, Bill, Dale, Mary, and Ross sitting.

 

Portrait

 

1960s Reunion: William, Donald, Larry, Bill, Golden, Dale, Ross

 

1984 Reunion: Ross, Colleen, June, Millie, William, Golden, Donald, Larry

 

1989 Reunion (b) June, Colleen, Mary, Sergene, William, Millie, Dale (f) Donald, Ross, Bill, Dale, Larry

William, Donald, Dale, Bill, Larry, Golden, Ross Andra

 

Bill & Edith in Richmond for an Andra Reunion

Edith and William at Colleen’s

 

William at Deer Creek Inn

 

You can read more on Edith’s page.  William died 22 August 1992 in Weaubleau, Hickory, Missouri.  He was buried 23 August 1992 in the Mormon Cemetery, Arnica, Cedar, Missouri.