Dresden Frauenkirche

Yesterday President Dieter F Uchtdorf mentioned Dresden, the ancestral home of my Knauke family and ancestors.  President Uchtdorf talked about the rebuilding of the Frauenkirche.  He recalled a haunting childhood memory of dashing to a bomb shelter near Dresden when explosives dropped on his hometown.

He then spoke of Dresden which was almost entirely destroyed by carpet bombing in World War II.  One of the losses was the historic Lutheran Frauenkirche.  The building was left in a pile of rubble from 1945 until the time for its reconstruction arrived in the early 1990s.  The building was completed in about 2005.

President Uchtdorf’s stated, “As I pondered the history of Dresden and marveled at the ingenuity and resolve of those who restored what had been so completely destroyed, I felt the sweet influence of the Holy Spirit.”

“Surely, I thought, if man can take the ruins, rubble, and remains of a broken city and rebuild an awe-inspiring structure that rises toward the heavens, how much more capable is our Almighty Father to restore His children who have fallen, struggled, or become lost?”

Rubble

Frauenkirche in rubble and ruin after 1945

Amanda and I visited Dresden and only spent about a day there.  I remembered hearing stories of the beauty of Dresden told by my Grandmother she had heard from her Grandmother, Christiana Wilhelmina Knauke Andra.  This Frauenkirche’s restoration was a highlight and the major must see site when we visited.  Here is a picture of the Frauenkirche provided to me by my sister Becky after her visit there in 2004.

Rebuilding Frauenkirche in 2004

Rebuilding Frauenkirche in 2004

Amanda created this panorama from the other side of the River Elbe.  You will have to click on it to really see it very well.

Dresden river pan

The Frauenkirche is one of the two main churches visible in this picture.  Lutheran on the left, the Katholische Hofkirche on the right.

Here is my mug shot with Frauenkirche.

Paul Ross with Frauenkirche

Paul Ross with Frauenkirche

Two more pictures we took that day.

DSCN2580

Amanda and I attended an organ concert in the building 11 June 2008.  I don’t know what we were thinking, but we did not get a single picture inside of the building.  We were up in one of the balconies, it was amazing.  Some day I hope we are able to return.  The beauty and architecture inside the building were beyond what I could have imagined.

DSCN2579

We also saw other rebuilt buildings in Dresden.  I quite liked the Zwinger Palace with its reconstruction completed about 1965.  The Phoenix story of Dresden is moving in most of its details and timeline.

 

 

Memories of Theodor & Christiana Andra

Friedrich Theodor Andra

Friedrich Theodor Andra

Memories of our Parents: Friedrich Theodor and Christiana Wilhelmina Knauke Andra

NOTE: I have tried to put together facts about the Andra family and especially things relating to Otto Andra in both Germany and Utah.  I used excerpts from stories by Otto’s sisters Frieda and Clara.  Therefore, when I refer specifically to Otto, it also pertains to each of the other children: Frieda, Walter, William, and Clara.

Excerpts from Life Story of Otto Andra, compiled by Deanne Yancey Driscoll.

Otto Carl Andra was born 15 May 1902 in Meissen, Saxony (Sachsen) Germany.  He died 20 Jun 1987 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA.  His mother was Wilhelmina Christina Knauke.  His father was Fredrich Theodor Andra and was born January 3, 1867 at Rosswein, Chmntz, Saxony.  Fredrich’s mother was Auguste Wilhelmine Andra and she was not married at the time of his birth.  She was 23 at the time.  He probably was close to his grandparents Karl August Andra and Johanne Christiana Ritter Andra.  His grandparents lived in Rosswein.  Two years later, his mother married Fredrich August Schneider, who was also born in Rosswein, Saxony (Germany).  However, Theodor always kept the name Andra.

Clara Andra Blanke wrote: “Wilhelmina was (living) in Rosswein when she and her girl friend decided to go to a dance.  It was there she met Theodor Andra.  I don’t know how long they went together, but they were married June 1892 (At Radebuel, Germany).  Then later in Sept. (8th) they were married in a church wedding.  They had a very happy life together.  Father worked hard and he made a good living.  He worked hard as a stone cutter and one day he and another man had to lift a large stone down from somewhere.  Father was at the bottom and this other man at the top.  The stone slipped and Father, not wanting it to fall and break, held it with his chest, it must have pushed real hard to the inside of his chest.  He started to have pains in his chest.  They got worse so they decided to operate but somehow it didn’t work right.  Food couldn’t go down in his stomach.  He died Nov 23, 1902, leaving Mother with a small family to raise.  She was only 33 years old and a widow.”

Clara concluded with: “He was a good husband and a good Father.”  At the time of his death, his children were the following ages: Frieda, 9 years old, Walter age 6, William (Bill) age 4, Clara age 3, Otto age 6 months (Otto was not old enough to remember his father.)

Frieda Andra was the oldest child and she wrote, “My childhood, I don’t remember too much of it actually. I do remember, however, when my Dad and Mother went to town on one Sunday.  We went window shopping and I saw a beautiful green dress in the window of the store.  How I wished I had one like it.  I begged my Dad for it, but Mother was not for it, so my Dad got it for me.  You better believe it.  I was the proudest girl in town.  The dress was green with red trim.”

“My Father Theodor was a good father.  He used to take me sleigh-riding.  One time he went so fast around the corner by Demlers, he dropped me and ran half a block before he found it out.  I was sitting on the corner crying.  I loved my Father very much but we didn’t have him very long.  He died when he was only 33 years old.  I was only nine years old then.”

Freida Andra wrote the following, “While Dad was in the hospital, I called every day to see how he was, and one day my Mother was crying and she said, “Daddy Died.”  Grandmother came, Father’s mother, and it was the saddest thing that could have happened to Mother.  My father Theodor Andra died November 23, 1902, in Meissen, Sashsen, Germany.”

“My poor mother had to struggle to support us.  She did small jobs and we children helped.  I worked here and there to help along.  At the time Father died, we were living at Kuhn’s in Hinder House.  They had an apartment in the back and the rent was high there.  Anyway, Mother used to deliver rolls to people every morning for the Bakery.  Three stories high: That’s the way buildings were built then.  They left a note and the money in a little basket, sweets in one and the others in another.  I had to get up at 4:30 or 5:00 every day to do it.  I loved to help Mother with this.  I had to help a lot.  I had a job at Tinkers at The Villa, washing the steps, cleaning the knives and forks, going to the store and in the summer picked carrots and did odd jobs.  They had a big orchard and Mother moved out to Dom Shulas’ and she brought all kinds of work home from the Tinker’s Factory and I had to help.  There were hundreds of papers that we had to fold then put a label in the middle.  Then Mother got a job in the Factory.”

Clara Andra wrote, “When I was eight years old in 1905, Mother was a widow with five children.  My sister Frieda the oldest was fifteen (This was three years after their father’s death).  She was working in a home for some rich people.  Mother worked in a factory.  The rest of us children went to school.  My oldest brother (Walter) who was twelve worked where ever he could to earn money to help mother, caring for us and trying to raise us right.”

Clara added, “I guess it was pretty hard for Mother.  She was sick a lot.  She would sew all day and half the night.  Grandmother would come and stay with us once in a while.  Then Mother would go to a home where she would rest for a week or so.  It was a place for the poor and sick.  I guess it was terrible for a young woman like her to lose her beloved husband and then to make it on her own.  She was a very proud woman, even at that time they had organizations where the widows were helped.  I think the state paid the rent, and I remember going someplace each evening and getting 2 quarts of milk and sometimes we would get meat and vegetables, out in the country.  We would go to the farmers and get eggs and butter.  When we all went to school, Mother got a job at a factory.  Mother worked hard, she was very strict with us children.  She was Father and Mother.  She taught us well.  I never heard that my brothers got into any trouble.  We worked, all of us, whenever we could earn some money, and were so happy to give it to her.  She was a kind and loving Mother.  She took good care of us. All of us children loved her dearly.”

 

Finding Willie

Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke Andra Wendel

Christiana Wilhelmina Knauke Andra Wendel

A continuation of the compilation by Deanne Driscoll.

Frieda Andra continues her story: “After we arrived in Salt Lake City, we hired a hack, which is like a buggy but much nicer.  The driver sits up very high.  We couldn’t locate the Boettcher’s so we went to the L.D.S. President’s residence (Joseph F. Smith) where their daughter Ida worked.  Ida was so happy to see us.  She sent us to her sister Clara’s.  After visiting there, she gave us her mother’s address and we left to look for it as it was getting late.”

“Although we had come to America in hopes of finding my brother, Willie, whom the lady had reported as lost, I know that coming to America was God’s plan.  Our Father in Heaven works in a mysterious way His wonders to perform.  Our driver kept driving towards the address we had given him.  As we came to 9 West and 4 North, he turned.  This country was so different to us.  Then Mother saw a little boy coming down the street and we stopped to ask him directions.  Then Mother shouted, “That is my boy! My Willie!”  And sure enough it was our brother.  He couldn’t speak German.  He just stood there trembling and pointing to where the place was.  We all jumped out and hugged him.  He had been on his way to the depot to meet our train.  Mrs. Boettcher had told him we were coming when he had returned from Fairview where he had been working for that man.”

“Two blocks away lived the lady we had been hunting.  So we paid the driver $3 for driving us around all day.  When we knocked at the lady’s house, she refused to let us in.  For her excuse she said, “Keep your things out there.  I don’t want any lice in my house.”  Of course we knew we didn’t have lice, but we sat out doors on some lumber and she brought us a piece of bread and a drink of water.  Her home was filthy.  There was a pig in her house and the chickens were running in and out.  What an awful place!  When Mr. Boettcher came home, he invited us in and fed us.”

“Then a sister Rigler came and said, ‘Come.  There is an empty house you may stay in.  I will give you a couple of blankets and a lantern.’  It was about eleven o’clock by now and we were all very sleepy.  We were even too tired to look around the house.  We all slept soundly, grateful to have our brother Willie with us again.  His lips were bleeding and his feet were sore and bleeding, also.  He had not been cared for, only given a lot of cussing and lickings.”

“In the morning we looked around the house.  This house had been flooded during the time that the Jordan River had flooded this area.  It had left dirt throughout the house.  There were no windows.  Outside there was a big barn, a flowing well, and four large trees (Poplars).  It was a beautiful day.  Everything looked green.  Mother called us together to have our morning prayer.  She thanked our Father in Heaven for all his goodness and for providing us with this house, which would be our paradise.  We were so thankful to be in America.  I have never heard a more inspiring prayer in my life.  The next day Mr. Rigler came back and told Mother who owned the house.  We made arrangements to rent the house for $2.50 a month.  Then Mr Rigler took Mother to town on a streetcar to buy a stove, washtub, dishes, food, pans, and a dishpan.  While Mother was gone, we scraped the dirt out.  Sister Rigler bought glass for the windows and even helped Mother put them in.  Walter made a cupboard from some lumber he had found.  We used orange crates for chairs.  We were very busy that Saturday.  Then on Sunday we attended Sunday School.  People were very kind to us.”

“We had arrived on June 3.  On June 5, I got a job for $5 a week plus room and boarding at the boarding house.  On June 6, Walter found a job at the floor mill (Hastler’s).  He boarded with Mother.  Willie worked at a slaughter house, so we were able to get meat to eat – tails, liver, etc.  It was very good.  Mother bought Willie a small red wagon which he took to market and brought home food we had never seen before.  The cantaloupes made us sick.  We ate the corn raw, which didn’t make us feel any better.  It wasn’t long before we learned which foods to cook.” (Clara and Otto would have still been in school during the early years in Salt Lake)

Frieda continues: “Well, it wasn’t long before our little house was a cute little dream house, complete with furniture and curtains.  Soon we had some baby chicks, a dog, and a cat.  Oh, those wonderful days in a very wonderful country which was given to us by God.  God bless America!”

Written by Frieda Minna Andra Clara added the following memories: “We missed our friends and relatives and everyone dear to us. Mother was so homesick for a long time, we used to talk about Germany and cry and cry, Mother and I.  But time heals all sorrow.  We had a new life here, and new friends to make, go to school and learn a new language.  Mother got work, so did my sister, Frieda, and Walter.  Willie was our spokesman when we couldn’t make someone understand, he would help us.  He was such a help to Mother.  He worked at the slaughterhouse and got meat for it.  Then he would go to the market place and help the men there, and get fruits and vegetables for it.  Then he went to the railroad tracks and picked up coal.  So Mother was able to save the money and pay back the money she had borrowed for us to come to America.”

“It was so different here.  In Germany we lived in an apartment with lots of people around.  I had a cousin Elsa, we were such pals, but here we were so alone.  We moved into a little old house no one had lived in for a long time.  We cleaned it good and Mother bought second hand furniture and beds, and a stove that we could bake in.  There was a well by the back door so we had to bring all the water in.  Mother had brought dishes and some pots and pans, bedding, and the curtains.  My brother Walter bought some lumber and made a nice kitchen table and benches, built a cupboard so we had something to put our dishes on.  This place had a big yard, so we cleared the weeds away, and dug a large space for a garden.  Mother bought all kinds of seeds.  It was Otto’s and my job to keep the garden watered every day.  It turned out to be a beautiful vegetable garden.  We bought some chickens, the boys got a dog, I got a kitten.  It was the first time in our lives we could have them.”

NOTE: Otto Andra was baptized on 31, Dec 1910. He was living in Salt Lake City, Utah with his mother and family at that time.  The 1940 Census states that Otto had a fourth-grade education.  It was difficult for the family because they arrived only speaking the German language.  However, Otto seemed to learn fast as did the others in his family.  On 22 May 1914 his mother married John Wendel and they would eventually move to his farm.  Otto listed on a passport that he was a farmer and I assume he worked on the family farm. John Wendel would be the only father he actually would know.

 

1909 & 1910, Coming to America

Bill, Frieda, Otto, Christiana, and Walter Andra

Bill, Frieda, Otto, Christiana, and Walter Andra

1910 -COMING TO AMERICA, written by Frieda and Clara Andra

The story of the Andra Family Coming to America written by sisters Frieda and Clara Andra, compiled by Deanne Yancey Driscoll.

Frieda begins: “My story begins in the Old Country – in Germany.   My father, Friedrich Theodor Andra, died November 23, 1902 in Meissen, Sachsen, Germany.  Mother, Wilhelmine Christina Knauke Andra, was left with five children, ranging in age from six months to nine years.  The children’s names were: Frieda Minna, Walter Theodor, William Friedrich, Clara Anna and Otto Carl.  My poor Mother had to struggle to support us.  She did small jobs at home and we children helped.  I worked here and there to help along.

Clara wrote, “In 1905, my oldest brother (Walter) who was twelve worked where ever he could to earn some money to help mother.”

Clara wrote the following about their conversion to the Mormon Church, “The blueberries were ripening, and we always picked buckets of them to sell.  So, on one of these outings, mother met a family by the name of Boettcher, she started to tell Mother about a new religion they had joined.  She invited Mother to one of the meetings.  It was the beginning of a wonderful new life for Mother and us children, as the next year we met many new friends.  Mother loved this new church and its teachings.  It was a wonderful good way to live.”

Frieda also wrote her memories of their conversion: “Three years later, while we were in the forest picking berries, Mother met a lady named Mrs. Boettcher.  Mrs Boettcher told her about some Mormon Missionaries who were holding some meetings.  So Mother began attending the meetings.  One by one we all joined the church.  Years later, after we were all baptized, Mother invited the missionaries to our house.  She fed them and let them hold their meetings there.  However, the Lutheran pastor didn’t like it, particularly because Mother was a widow and he gave her a very hard time.”

Frieda continues her story: “In 1909, the Boettcher family decided to go to America.  Mother asked them if they would take her son, Willie. (Bill was young and he could go for a cheaper fare.)  They agreed to do this.  Mother gave them the money for Willie.  When they arrived in Salt Lake City, they attended the German Meeting in the Assembly Hall.  After they had been in America half a year, they sent Willie to do farm work for a man they had met at the German meeting.  They didn’t even know where the farm was nor did they care.”

“When they wrote to Mother, they said Willie was lost.  When Mother told the people in Germany that her son was lost in America, they called her names and told her she was wicked to have let him go.  But all the time God knew where Willie was.  He was opening the way for us to go America.  Mother prayed to our Father in Heaven for her son’s safety and that she might be able to find him again.  Her boss, Conrad Zinke, sent telegrams trying to locate Willie but was unsuccessful.  One morning Mother was on her way to work when a light shone about her and she heard a voice say, “Go to America.”  When she told her boss, he said he would be glad to help her all he could.  When he asked her if she had any money, she answered ‘Very little.’  He was so kind.  He sent a man over to help pack, and get the tickets, and get the money he’d given them exchanged for American currency.  They gave us a big going away party in their villa.  The farewell dinner was held in the most beautiful room.  They cried and hugged us as they said good-by.  Our friends gave Mother the rest of the money she needed to make the trip.  Even my boyfriend Paul contributed.  Grandmother Wilhelmine Richter Knauke and Aunt Augusta were at the depot to bid us farewell.  They really thought Mother was foolish for going to America.  They didn’t realize my Mother had been inspired to go.  She knew God would guide her if she was faithful.  God in Heaven surely did guide us all the way to America.  Glory be to him in the highest for all the wonderful blessings we have enjoyed.”  (Otto left for America on the 5th of May in 1910. He was 7 years old and would turn 8 on the voyage.)

William Fredrick Andra wrote: “I was born on Feb 11, 1898, in Meissen, Saxony, Germany to Wilhelmina and Theodor F. Andra.  My father died when I was about four years old.  I was baptized in the Elbe River in April 1909 and came to the United States the following month of May.  I left at the age of eleven, one year ahead of the same boat, but were for some reason delayed a month.  The boat that they (his family) had intended to take sank in mid-ocean.“The Lord moves in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform!”

Frieda continued: “We left for America on the 5th of May in 1910.  We traveled by train to Bremerhaven, Germany.  There we boarded a steamer: The North Deutcher Loyd.  For two weeks I was terribly seasick.  When we reached Philadelphia, the rock salt was unloaded.  Everybody was very kind to us there and people gave us money.  The cook, who had become a good friend of mine, bought me a ring but my sister Clara insisted she wanted it, so I got the locket he had bought for her.  Then we traveled to Galveston, Texas.  When we arrived there, we freshened up and my friend, the cook, showed us the town.  He bought us some bananas, which we had never eaten before.  We swallowed the chewing gum whole, as it was also strange to us, and then we all got stomach aches.  We certainly enjoyed the cook.  He was always kind to us and saw that we had good food to eat.  Another fellow gave us a cake.  When our train was due, we had to say good-bye to these fine friends.  It was quite rough on the train.  We couldn’t talk much so we enjoyed the scenery.  Many funny things happened.“

Mary Louise Wanner Andra Autobiography

Phyllis, Utahna, Sergene, Mary, Colleen, Millie, Edith

Phyllis Andra, Utahna Andra, Sergene Sorenson, Mary Andra, Colleen Jonas, Millie Beck, Edith Andra

Autobiography given Nov 1961
I, Mary Louise Wanner Andra was born the 5th of March 1901 in Cub River, Idaho.  My father is John George Wanner, Jr. and my mother is Regina Nuffer.  I have five brothers and one sister, Eva.  The oldest were twin boys: William C. and Willard.  The other three boys were Golden, Rulon, and Serge.  I came sixteen months later after the twins, so Mother had three in diapers.
In the fall of 1907 my father was called on a two year mission to Germany because he spoke the German language.  We didn’t have much while father was gone, but we were happy.
He returned in the fall of 1909 and we moved back to Cub River and in the spring of 1910 we moved to Whitney, Idaho where my father bought an eighty acre irrigated farm and a one-hundred-sixty-nine acre dry farm.  This farm was owned by my Grandfather Wanner.  My father planted beets, potatoes, grain and hay.  He also had a herd of cows and there was plenty to do!  Father was very strict and we all had to toe the mark.  I remember the twin boys and Golden, just younger than myself, and I had to thin the beets.  The first two or three years the mustard weeds were so thick you could hardly see the beets.
We kids went to grade school and had to walk three miles.  Sometimes we would ride horseback in the winter when the snow was so deep.  When it got cold enough to freeze a crust on the snow, we would walk on top and cut through the fields because the snow was above the fences.  We sure thought that was a lot of fun.
Our farm was just across the road from George Benson and their daughter, Margaret was in the same grade as myself.
In the 8th grade, I was chosen to take the part of Snow White in the school play.  In school, during the recess, we would jump the rope.  There was no one who could turn it fast enough for me.  I could outrun all my girl friends.  I even used to catch the boys and wash their faces with snow.
We also had a girl’s baseball team.  We would play Franklin and the surrounding little towns.
In the summer after school was out, I would ride horses.  I would go up to the dry farm and get the cows.  One time I took my little sister, Eva and as we passed a brush, Eva fell off and broke her arm.
After I graduated from the 8th grade, I wanted to take sewing course in Logan at the A.C. (Agricultural College).  After coaxing my father for several days, he finally decided to let me go.  Inez Wallace and I went to Logan on the train.  I had been down to Logan for three days when my father came and got me to work on the dry farm, getting the land ready to plant.
In 1918, my brother, William C. died in France.  He was in the 145th infantry.  Three days later, my brother, Golden died in Salt Lake with double leakage of the heart.  Soon after, my father sold the farm and we moved to Preston, Idaho.  My father bought the Parkinson Farm (4th South and 4th East).  Then my father planted beets again and I still had a job of thinning beets.  We lived in an old home while my father was having the new one built.
In the early fall and winter of 1918, I went around to different homes taking care of the sick.  There was a flu epidemic at that time.  I was taking care of my cousin, Emma Nelson (George Nelson’s wife).  He was a wrestler.  Emma died of the flu.
In the spring of 1918, I went to work for Roy and Alabell Hull.  I cared for the twins, did the washing, ironing, and all the cooking.  They had seven in their family and three hired men.
At that time I was going with a young man by the name of William Andra.  He was born in Germany.  While my father was on his mission, he used to go to the Andra home.  My father baptized his oldest sister, Frieda.
I met William and his mother while living in Whitney.  I was still going to school.  He and his mother came by train and my father met them at the train.  After a few days, William’s mother went back to Salt Lake and William started working for my father on the farm.  I guess that is when the romance began.  I was 16 years old.
While working at the Hull’s, William would come and get me with his new buggy and horse.  We would to go Preston to a show.  At this time William was working for Jim Bodily.  Jim Bodily was the man who bought my father’s farm.  I worked all that summer for Roy Hull for $6.00 per week.
That fall of 1919, I went to Logan to the County Fair and rode race horses for Joe Perkins.  I was offered a job of being a jockey, but I didn’t desire that kind of a career, although I loved to ride horses.
In March 1920, William and I were married in the Salt Lake Temple.  We made our home in Whitney, Idaho on the Jim Bodily farm (where Lorin Bodily lives, only north in an old house).  I even helped thin some of Jim Bodily’s beets.  Our closest neighbors were George & Kate Poole.  Kate and I spent many hours together sewing.
I joined the Relief Society right after I was married.  I was asked to lead the singing.  Sister Barbara Ballif was the President at the time.
We lived there a few months, then we moved to the home where Bishop Morris Poole now lives.  My husband quit Bodily’s and he and his brother, Otto thinned beets for different farmers.  In the fall, these two would top beets at the sugar factory.  I would go out and hitch up the horses in the morning while they ate their breakfast.
November 25th, Thanksgiving, our first son was born.  My husband thought he had more time before the baby came.  He didn’t have the stove put up in the front room.  He got all excited and really sweat trying to get that stove up.  Will and Laura Dunkley were our closest neighbors.  Laura was with me when the baby was born.  Dr. Bland delivered the baby.  We named him William, Jr..  After William Jr. was about six months old, each Sunday when we went to church, as we got out of the buggy, all the young girls would come running to take little Jr.. They called him the ward baby.
Towards fall, we moved again down in the Joe Dunkley home, back of where the store now stands.  My husband got the janitor job for the church and the school house.  He was getting $30.00 a month and we were paying $18.00 in rent.  In the spring of 1922 we moved to Preston on my father’s farm.  William helped my father with the crops and after the crops were up, in the fall, we moved to Salt Lake City, out in Sugarhouse.  My husband got a job at the Royal Bakery hauling bread to the little adjoining towns.
On the 22nd of June 1923 our second child was born.  She was an eight month baby, only weighed 4 1/2 pounds.  We named her June.  Mrs. Hymas came down from Preston to take care of me.  Brother LeGrand Richards was the Bishop of Sugarhouse Ward where we lived, so we had him bless our baby.
The next fall, my husband’s brother, Walt coaxed him to go into the cafe business at Preston, so we moved back to Preston.  They had a good business.  In fact, the business picked up after my husband started working there.  The young folks as well as the older ones took to him.  I didn’t like the cafe business because the children’s father seldom saw the children with their eyes open.  William was always used to the outdoors.  He was really a farmer at heart.
On February 6th, 1925 our third child came along.  Another little girl and we named her Mildred.
In the fall of the second year in the cafe, my father wanted to sell his farm, and we bought all the land on the south and my brother, Willard bought the land on the north of the road.  There wasn’t much money in raising beets, and it was hard for us to make payments on the farm with the interest being so high the first few years.  My husband had to do extra work outside the farm work.  He dug basements for new homes, hauled sand, gravel, also beets from the beet pile to the sugar factory, any job he could get to make the payments on the farm.
On August 5, 1926 another son came along.  We named him Golden Rulon after my two brothers.  When he was two and a half years old, Golden fell out of a swing and was paralyzed (all of his right side except his arm).  At that time we had a Dr. Milford who brought him into the world.  For one whole year, every day, except Sunday, I took him to town to Dr. Milford’s for treatment.  His office was upstairs in the old Greaves building.
On the 27th of May 1928 I had a little red headed girl and we named her Colleen Mary after me.
Later on, after a few years, we started to raise peas and the pea crops were real good.  One year the peas went to four tons per acre.  No farmer beat that crop.  I helped in the fields all I could.  We couldn’t afford to hire anyone.  We didn’t have tractors at that time.  This was the year we bought our first car, a Ford.  The Doctor said it was too far to walk to town.
In the year of 1932 another little blond girl joined our family.  We named her Sergene.  I guess I wanted her to be a boy so I could name him Serge after my youngest brother who died in New Zealand on a mission.  Dr.Orvid Cutler brought her into the world.  When she was six months old, they were having a contest at the Grand Theatre for the healthiest baby.  Out of one-hundred-ninety babies, little Sergene took the first prize and we were surely proud of her.
On July 15, 1933 another son came along.  We named him Donald Wanner after my maiden name.  Seemed like all the boys had curly hair and they would pass for girls.  I had a niece from Downey, Idaho who came to help do the house work.  She was crazy about Donald and I heard her say many times that he was the cutest thing this side of heaven.
In 1934 I was six and one-half months along, but just didn’t have the strength to carry my baby the nine months.  The doctor said he wouldn’t live and for us to give him a name, so we named him Robert Lee.  He lived four hours.  By this time I was plenty busy with taking care of the children, but the older ones were big enough to help.
On the 2nd of December 1936 another son came along.  We named him Ross Leslie after Dr. L.V. Merrill.  I was also made Relief Society Visiting teacher that year.
On the 28th of February 1940 another son joined our family circle and we called him Dale.  I used to take these last two little boys, hook the team to the beet puller and put one on each horse.  They thought it was fun.
My husband would do the hauling, the older boys and girls would do the topping.  We all had to get out and work hard.  We still didn’t have a tractor at this time, but got one shortly after.  My husband used the tractor to harvest the potato crop.
In June 1942 another little fellow came along.  We named him Dennis Willard, after my brother, and April 9, 1943 our number twelve, a son was born.  His name was Larry.  When you would see these three little boys in the yard, you could hardly tell which was who, they looked so much alike.
William Jr. was in the Spanish American Mission when Dennis was born.  Dennis died when three years old.  Since this time I was put in as Relief Society Chorister.
It is 1961 and they have divided the ward and put me in as Secretary of the Young Ladies Mutual.  Our second missionary, Ross filled a mission in Brazil and the third son to go on a mission ins in the Western States.  His name is Dale and he has one more year to serve.
I am proud of my husband, sons, and daughters.
This is a story of my life and I would like to pass it on to my posterity.
Prepared and arranged November 25, 1961
Mary W. Andra

William Fredrick Andra Autobiography

Andra Boys: William, Donald, Larry, Bill, Golden, Dale, Ross

Andra Boys: William, Donald, Larry, Bill, Golden, Dale, Ross

A copy of this autobiography of my Great Grandfather was given to me years ago.  I wanted to make it more widely available.  I will insert clarification or other information in brackets [].

The Life Story of William Fredrick Andra Sr
I was born on February 11, 1898 in Meissen, Saxony, Germany to Wilhimina [Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke] and Theodor F. [Fredrick] Andra.  My father died when I was about four years old [23 November 1902].
I was baptized in the Elbe River in [16] April 1909; came to the United States in the following month of May.  I left at the age of eleven, one year ahead of the same boat, but were for some reason delayed a month.  The boat that they had intended to take sank in mid-ocean.  “The Lord moves in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform!”
Upon arriving here, I went to Fairview, Utah to work out my board and room from John R. Anderson, who was a former missionary in Germany.  After being in Fairview for one year, I went back to Salt Lake to meet the rest of the family when they arrived.  We had quite a struggle at first, but we made out when the rest had learned the language.
At the age of fourteen, my Mother took me to Preston, Idaho to the home of a former missionary [George Wanner] who had helped convert my mother in Germany.  I thinned, hoed and topped beets; worked in the potatoes; and did many other things around the farm.  There were about 24 head of cows to be milked.  For my work, I got $18.00 a month.  The next summer I got $25.00 and then $30.00 per month.  In the winter I went back to Salt Lake City because there wasn’t any work left on the farm.
I worked in the Apex Mine in Bingham at the same time Jack Dempsey was a diamond drill sharpener.
The next winter, I worked in the coal mine at Wattis in Carbon County during the flu epidemic in 1918.  My future father-in-law [George Wanner] took the flu and was in the hospital in Salt Lake City.  Shortly after, his boy, Golden also caught the flu and died.  I took the body home to Whitney, Idaho on the train.
I did the chores for the family because they all had the flu.  After working for George Wanner for seven years on and off, I married at the age of 22 his daughter, Mary Louise Wanner, in the Salt Lake Temple on March 10,1920.
At a time when things were tough, I worked on the farm for James R. Bodily and in the winter I did janitor work at the Whitney School and meeting house for $30.00 a month.  Then our son, William Junior was born.  During this time, I helped build the sugar factory in Whitney.
In 1922, we moved to Salt Lake City and I worked for the Royal Bakery for one year and then we moved back to Preston and went into the café business with my brother Walter.  We stayed in the café business until the end of 1925.  We then bought the Wanner farm in Preston during depression times.
I used to dig basements, haul gravel and sand and haul sugar beets from the beet piles to the sugar factory for $4.00 a ton.  It was hard making this $1000.00 principal and $500.00 interest, but with the Lord’s help and a good wife and children, we paid for the farm.  In 1937 we bought nine more acres on the east side of our farm, making forty-four acres.
In 1937 I was made a High Priest.  I have been a ward teacher for thirty-six years, ward teaching supervisor for seven years, and a group leader for the High Priests Quorum for twelve years.  I am at present a director of the Mink Creek-Riverdale Canal Company.
Our main crops on this farm have been sugar beets and potatoes.  We have raised peas and corn for many years.  Our present family consists of twelve children; eight boys and four girls (of which two of the boys have passed on).
In 1947 I had a back fusion operation.  It was very successful.
Seven of our children are married and we have twenty-eight grandchildren and two great grandchildren.  One of the boys is in the Western States Mission now.  We have had two on missions previously.
I would like to pass this biography on to my son.
Prepared and arranged November 28, 1961 by William F. Andra, Sr.  (Age sixty-three)

Theodore Bourls Stem

Diploma of Theodore Stem

Diploma of Theodore Stem

Dad continues to go through more items he has from Grandpa’s death (Milo James Ross).  One of the seemingly random items is this diploma for Theodore Bourls Stem.  It is a high school Diploma for him from DuBois High School in DuBois, Clearfield, Pennsylvania.  Dad does not have any idea why Grandpa would have this Diploma, if he knew Theodore Stem, or just picked it up at a yard sale or somewhere else.  We will not likely ever know.  I have tried reaching out to some Stem’s across the country.  Hopefully we can track down some of Theodore’s family.  I believe this Theodore Stem went on to become a Doctor but am struggling to find some definitive answers.  It may be that his son has the same name and is also a doctor.  Hopefully I can update this post later with some updates.