Paul from water tower

Paul, Idaho from the water tower

Some of you may have seen this photo around.  There is a copy of this photo at Paul City Hall and in Les Schwab/Magic Valley Tire in Paul.  Even when I was a kid I remember seeing this photo.  This isn’t a great copy of the photo, but you take what I can get…

I previously wrote about the Paul Hotel, the first building with its name etched in the photo.  As I mentioned in that post, the second story is now missing from the Paul Hotel.  Notice all the cars parked along Idaho street and then the lone horseman in front of the Paul Hotel.

The next block down on the left side is the Paul State Bank.  Later known as Mikey’s bar, it sits empty.  I believe I mentioned earlier this is the building I wanted to buy and put my law practice, but I couldn’t even find the owners.  But, here is a check from the bank from my Great Grandmother’s confectionery that was drawn on the Paul State Bank.

The next block down on the left side corner is the Adams Block, which I have also previously written.  It was torn down in the 1990s, I found out by Garey McManus.

Then the next block down at the end of Idaho Street, you see the Paul School.  I haven’t written on the school yet, still organizing some of my photos for that post.  If I remember correctly, it burned down by an arson in 1977.

The Streeter Confectionery was the south half of Lot 2, Block 1, which puts it on the right side of Idaho street (the main street to the school from this vantage point) nearing Main Street, which is the intersection with the Adams Block building.  Most of the entire block is owned by Magic Valley Produce now.

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Burley Aerial Photo

Burley, Idaho about

I stumbled upon this photo last weekend.  Thought I would make it available to more.

I tried to find what year this photo is from and make these observations after closely reviewing the photo.

The large field on the east of Overland is where Dworshak Elementary is now.  I believe Dworshak opened in 1962, and there isn’t any construction, so that probably makes this photo at the latest about 1960.

Burley Stake Center to the lower right of the photo has small trees.  I do not know when the building was built, but this photo is after it was built.  The building now has an addition on the south side, I don’t know when that addition was built.

A house is in this picture where First Federal is now on Overland Avenue.  I don’t know when the First Federal bank building was built, this photo predates it.

A church appears to be about where Mr. Gas is on Overland, just south of First Federal.  I don’t know when the old Mr. Gas was built on that place, but this photo predates it.

None of the homes on the south of 16th between Elba and Hiland are present, the photo predates that neighborhood.

Burley Junior High is in the photo across the grass to the east of the Cassia County Courthouse.  The Courthouse was built in 1937, so I know we are after that date!  Burley Junior High School burned down 29 October 1973.  The photo is obviously before that date.  Burley Junior High, which was Burley High School before that, was built in 1915.

The Burley Masonic Hall is present and it appears homes are on the northeast corner of 16th and Overland which were replaced by Safeways, now the Burley Judicial Center.  I don’t know when Safeways was built, but this predates it.

Amalgamated Sugar still has its chimney, I don’t know when it was removed.

Burley Flour Mill is still present.  I don’t know when it was torn down.

Idaho Bank & Trust Building on the southwest corner of Overland and Main is still there.  I seem to remember it coming down in the mid 1980s.

Thriftway Drug is still present and it came down in the 1990s.

Sprague Sports is still present along with the National Bank Building on the north-west and north-east corners of Main and Overland.  I believe they both came down in the early 1980s.

Most telling to me is what is across the Snake River.  NOTHING exists in Minidoka County from Burley.  The first Overland Bridge over the Snake was built in 1947.  Interstate 84 appears to have not been constructed just south of 300 South in Minidoka County.  Everything North of the Snake on Overland is post-interstate.  In fact, it seems you would still drive to 400 South, now called Alfresco, and drive to the east to 600 West to drive to Paul.  If you follow Overland straight, you can see the canal, which Overland now diagonally goes to the east to attach to 600 West, which none of which is clear in this photo.  I believe the Interstate 84 came through the Burley area in the late 1960s.

Only a vague outline of a much smaller Paul, Idaho is in the distance, although fuzzy.

Therefore, this image appears to be late 1950’s or early 1960’s.  If anyone has clarifications, I am happy to update this post.

 

 

 

The Story of My Life by Anna Elizabeth Rinderknecht Nuffer

Anna Rinderknecht Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

“Written October 17, 1933.

“I will begin with my grandmother on my mother’s side, what I remember my mother telling us as children.  My grandmother was a lover of music and she became acquainted with a young man who was very good looking a good singer with curly hair.  He was a poor boy and my grandmother’s parents were well to do.  It seems that they opposed their marriage for that reason.  But they were married anyway.  I do not remember his given name (Ulrich Ramp) but my grandmother’s name was Ann Elizabeth Bauman Ramp.  They lived very happy although they were poor, and for disobeying her parents she was disinherited which made it very hard for them.  In due time, they had a baby boy, and then a baby girl, who was my mother.  I do not remember what became of the boy but they made a great deal of the baby girl.  The father did work whenever he could.  It seems like there always has been hard times for some from the very beginning.

“Everything was going as well as might be expected until father died very suddenly, which caused the mother to go to work in some kind of a mill.  She was unable to take care of the children and, as is the custom in some countries, she let some well to do people take the little girl and raise her.  They sent her to school where she had a good education.  Her name was Anna Barbara Ramp.  She lived with those people for many years.  Her mother would come to see her whenever she could.  She was a great lover of all children and when Easter time came she would get eggs and color them as nice as she could just for the pleasure of giving them to children that she knew.  She was yet a young woman when she died.

“Then my mother, when she was a grown woman, worked in a tred mill which belonged to the people she lived with.  They also had children, some her own age.  They thought a great deal of each other.

“In due time, she met some Mormon missionaries and became very interested in their talks, after which she became a member of the church.  During this time she became acquainted with Jacob Rinderknecht, who later became my father, but she didn’t come to America for a number of years after that.

“Jacob Rinderknecht had a family when my mother first met him which he brought to America in the early sixties.  They lived in New York for a while, then came to Utah.  The family consisted of Father, Mother, a daughter and a son (some children having died in Switzerland where they all came from).  They settled in Providence on the very spot where my brother Jake Rinderknecht now lives.

“All this time my mother was working in her country trying to save enough money to come to America.  Finally the time came when she landed in New York.  Then she came across the plaints with ox teams and walked much of the way.  When she arrived in Salt Lake City, the missionary that she was so good to over in Switzerland was to meet her and take her to Southern Utah.  This he never did.

“Jacob Rinderknecht happened to be there at the time, having had a chance to go to Salt Lake City with someone that drove an ox team there from Providence.  So he got her to go home with him.  Later they made a trip to Salt Lake and were married in the Endowment House.  She was then 36 years old and one of Utah’s Pioneers.  She was the second wife.  I have heard her tell what a terrible, hard life she lived.  At that time she lived in a dugout in a bank, or hollow, that used to run through the lot which is now filled in.  I think that was where I was born.  The first family had a log house and after the first wife died, my mother moved in.

“When I was 4 years old my father gave me away.  Not long after that he died.  I don’t remember him very well.  He was 62 and very poor.  He may have done this and meant it for my good, but my poor mother fought hard for me.  I was older than my brother, Jake, and then a pair of twins; one, my sister, still lives.

“My father gave me to some English people of Providence who adopted me.  They were well to do for those times.  They had buried all their children while babies, and they seemed to take a liking to me.  They said I was so pretty, and I guess they were right as I can remember that I had long ringlets, my hair being curly and how hard it was to comb.  Once, when I played with the neighbor’s children, I got lice in my hair.  My hair had to but cut off close to my head and I was glad because then it was easy to comb.

“At first I rather liked my new home but when I wanted to go back to my mother they said no.  As I got older I would run away and go home, then they would take me back and I would cry for days.  I wanted to go home and my mother did everything she could to get me back, bu no, they watched me so close that I didn’t get a chance very often.  I always had the feeling that I would get back sometime.  They would lock me in a room and if my mother came to see me they would say I had gone somewhere.  Many a time they would see her coming, then they would take me out the back door and hide me somewhere.

“As I grew older, they gave me all kinds of hard jobs to do such as going after the cows that had strayed through town and if I didn’t find them or came home without them they would send me to bed without supper in a dark room, or would lock me in a dark cellar for an hour or so.  They had so many ways of punishing me that I couldn’t them all.  One time, I was trying to jump a ditch of water and fell in backward.  I was scared to go home so I sat around in my wet clothes.  One of the neighbors told on me, then they took my clothes off, got a gunny sack, cut a whole for my head and some for my arms, then put that on and locked me in a small closet that I couldn’t stand up in, and without any dinner.  They left me there all afternoon while they went away.

“I had about 4 years of this life which was anything but a happy one.  It was the rule those days that the ones that could afford it should go to conference either in April or October.  At one of those times, the only man that I can remember calling father, the one who had adopted me, went to Salt Lake.  His wife and myself stayed home and did all the work about the place.  In due time, he came back and I suppose he was very happy although his wife did a lot of crying and was very unhappy.  At the time I didn’t quite grasp the thing or what it was all about but at last it came out.  He had married another woman while he was in the city and she was soon to come and live with us.  Can you imagine what a trick to play on his first wife?  So one fine day she came.  She had not been in this country very long.  She had come from London and rather a nice lady, a dressmaker, I think and as soon as she found out about me she wanted them to let me go to my mother, but I did not for a long time.

“So they finally got things settled and the house was divided and each woman had her half.  Then I had more chores to do.  And in due time there came a baby son which was the king of the house.  When he got old enough I would take him out in his carriage as they called it.  One day one of the wheels came off.  Then I was scared and ran back to the house to get help.  I really was expecting a whipping, but not that time and soon everything was all right again.

“One Sunday all the children in the neighborhood were in the street playing.  I was inside my fence looking on.  I wanted to go out with them so bad that I got up enough courage to go to the house and ask if I could go and play.  Then the second wife said, yes, you can go home to your mother if you want to.  It surprised me so I couldn’t believe they meant it, so I went out and when I got int he street, which was a straight line and in the third block was my mother’s place, I just ran every bit of the way.

“I was, at this time, about nine years old and had started to school.  My mother was so glad and yet she was afraid to believe it.  I had quite a time trying to make her understand as I couldn’t talk German anymore, but I soon learned.  I stayed but I was always on the watch.  If any of them had come after me I couldn’t have been found.  I was very happy at home again.  But one evening here came my adopted mother with an interpreter to talk to mother and try to get me back.  She cried and begged me to come.  I wouldn’t go near her for fear she wouldn’t let me loose.  She promised me things but it did no good.  I wanted to stay with my mother, brother and sister.

“I was so poor and thin that my mother would cry when she saw my thin little body, but I soon grew big and strong and was large for my age.  In due time, I used to go back and see my adopted parents.  As I got older I went back and worked for them.  They were candy makers and sold candy to the stores in Logan.

The book then seems to transfer from the autobiography to the biography of Anna Rinderknecht Nuffer by an unknown person.

“In Hedingen, Zurich, Switzerland lived a girl Elizabeth Bauman.  She was a jolly happy girl with a good home and many friends.  She kept company with Ulrich Ramp, a young man with pretty curly hair.  He was a fine singer.  These two people were very much in love with each other but Elizabeth’s parents who were well to do disapproved of their marriage and threatened to disinherit her if she married Ulrich, but this made no difference.  They were married and lived happily together in spite of being very poor.

“A baby girl was born, which they named Barbara.  When she was two years old, her father died suddenly.  This was a terrible blow to this young mother.  Her parents were bitter and did not help her, so she had someone take care of her baby and went out to work.  When Barbara became of school age her mother had her put into a home of well to do people who put her through school.  Her mother died shortly after and these people cared for her until she was grown.  They treated her kindly and she loved them very much, (and later had Temple work done for them).  These people owned a threat factory and Barbara worked there along time.  She had many friends.  She heard of the Mormon Elders and went to their meetings which seemed to impress her greatly.  She would walk many miles to go to their meetings and would give the Elders all the money she could spare to get food.  She was insulted by her friends when she joined the Mormon Church, but she saved her money to go to Zion.  One missionary from Southern Utah fell in love with her and promised to meet her when she arrived in Salt Lake City.

“She crossed the ocean in an old Sailing Vessel.  There were many bad storms which kept them back.  After eight weeks they landed and crossed the plains with ox-teams in the year 1866.  Grandmother walked most of the way, she being young and strong.  I remember her telling of her breaking her garnet beads, which she prized very highly, on the yoke of the oxen.

“After the long walk across the plains with all the hardships of those Pioneer days, scarcity of food, sickness and death, their faith still unfaltering, they finally reach Salt Lake Valley.  But in her sorrow the good Mormon Elder sweetheart was not there to meet her as promised.  Imagine a young girl here along without relatives.  She did get disappointed badly but not discouraged.  She worked for other Pioneers for her food.

“Jacob Rinderknecht, a pioneer living in the little town of Providence, along with other men, went to Salt Lake City looking for a young wife.  He saw Barbara a fine rosy cheeked strong young lady and decided she would be just what he wanted so he persuaded her to go back with him, offering her a home, so she married him in the Endowment House in 1868 and walked back to Providence with him.  Here she was introduced to his first wife and family.

“Jacob Rinderknecht was in his sixties and Barbara 36.  She lived in a dug-out and his first wife was in a log cabin on the old Rinderknecht lot at Providence, Utah.  There were four children, one died when very young.  When Emma was quite young, her father died, his first wife died several years before.  This left the mother to care for the children.  She had a garden which supplied her with vegetables, a few hens, and a cow which kept the family.  She had a churn which the whole settlement borrowed, and she was noted for her good yeast.  She wanted her girls dressed as fine as she could so she hired Sister Campbell to crochet lace for their petticoats and pants, as father (Jacob Rinderknecht Jr.) told me for he would take the eggs to pay for the lace.

“She was a real tithe payer, always went to church, although she understood very little English.  She taught her children high ideals, love of music, honesty, industry and faith in God.  She was fond of her Grandchildren and went to see them at least once a year.

“She endured many hardships but she never lost her faith.  She said many times she thought God was her only friend.  When her children were sick she went for the Elders.

“After her husband’s death, Jacob, a small boy, took the responsibility of caring for the family.  The girls worked hard.  Annie worked for Frank Madison.  Emma worked hard, she went to wash for people in Logan so Jacob could buy horses to run a small piece of land.  He went up Logan Canyon when 14 years of age all alone and got enough lumber to build the frame house for his mother.

1st Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Top (l-r): Oral L Ballam, Flora Allen, Leslie Smith, Barbara Housley, Kirt Hatch, Ann Bair, Shanna Bullen, Jimmy Johnson; 2nd Row: Zan Christensen, Jane Robinson, Sandra Jonas, Jeffery Theurer; 3rd Row: Barbara Watts, Reed Webb, Susan Jones, Faye Housley, Molly Lulwyler, Beth Cartwright, Gary Andersen, Johnny Durney; Bottom Row: Peggy Plant, Kim Christensen, Fern Housley, Pamela Bun, Roland Hobbs, Debbie Day

This picture is from the 1960 – 1961 school year at Richmond Grade School (the name given in the photo). I only knew it as Park Elementary.

Playground to the North of Park Elementary, see the Benson Stake Tabernacle on the far left.

I had to do some research and talk to a few people.  Originally the site of Park Elementary was the old Richmond High School.  Richmond High School was built in 1911-12.  North Cache High School was built in 1920.  Richmond High then became Richmond Grade School.  In 1939 an addition was built and it was named Park Auditorium.  Richmond Grade School was always called Park Elementary, but nobody knows when it formally changed or adopted the name.  Cache County School District just recently abandoned the buildings and donated it to Richmond City.  The students now attend White Pine which is now an elementary school.

I understand the 1911-1912 high school portion has been torn down with the 1939 Park Auditorium addition the oldest portion of the complex.  The Auditorium and other newer additions are still present, but will now house Richmond City offices.

1959 Jonas Reunion with Park Elementary in the background with the auditorium addition.

Mr. Oral Lynn Ballam (1901 – 1993).  He was both the Principal and 1st Grade Teacher.  He has appeared in other posts as teacher and also as student!
Flora Greene married Allen (1906 – 1996)
Gary Anderson (? – living)

Ann Bair married Downs (1954 – living)

Shanna Bullen married Gibbons (? – living)

Pamela Bun (? – ?)

Beth Cartwright (1954 – 2018)

Kim Christensen (? – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Debra Lynn Day married Pursuer (1954 – 2010)

Johnny Durney (? – ?)

Kirt Hatch (? – living)

Roland Hobbs (? – ?)

Barbara Housley married Sharp (? – living)

Fay Housley married Purser (? – living)

Jimmy Johnson (? – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Susan Jones (? – ?)

Molly Lulwyler (? – ?)

Peggy Anne Plant married Ivanyo (? – living)

Jane Robinson married Larsen (? – living)

Leslie Smith (? – living)

Jeffery Theurer (? – living)

Barbara Watts (? – ?)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

(l-r): Reed Webb, Kim Christensen, Jeff Theurer, Zan Christensen, Sandra Jonas, Beth Ann Miller, and Barbara Housley

Here is another photo shared with me a few years ago.  I believe this photo is another from from Park Elementary School in Richmond, Cache, Utah.  Not sure of the class subject.  Radios?  Soldiering?  Electrics?  It is interesting whatever it is.  The pictures, chalkboard, and school are all familiar to me, even though this was 30 years before I was in school.  Has it changed much to today?

I understand this is Oral Ballam’s classroom on the upper southwest corner of Park Elementary.  The alphabet, maps, turkey are all indicators and reminders of his classroom.

Kim Christensen ( – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Barbara Housley married Sharp ( – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Beth Ann Miller (1954 – 1974)

Jeffery Theurer ( – living)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

South Park Trapper Cabin

A few weeks ago, Aliza, Ted Tateoka, and I made a visit to the Laidlaw Kipuka.  We made a stop at the South Park Well near the south central part of the Kipuka.

Here is a picture of the sign (in the middle of nowhere!)

Sign at South Park Well

The sign is titled, “South Park Well Trapper’s Cabin”

It reads, “This humble cabin was built in 1940’s to house coyote trappers hired by the U.S. Government to aid local sheep ranchers.  Coyotes were much more plentiful in those days and did serious damage to the many sheep herds that grazed in Laidlaw Park.  There were several trapper’s cabins built in various locations across the desert, but this is the only one remaining within Laidlaw Park.  Please help us preserve it by taking only photos and leaving only footprints.”

Here is a picture of Aliza on the west side of the cabin.

Aliza Ross at South Park Well Trapper Cabin

A little later I stood Lava Point and took this picture looking south to give some idea of the size of the Laidlaw Kipuka.  Lava Point juts down into the kipuka about 2/3 of the way down.  Which means, this is only about the bottom 1/3 of the Laidlaw Kipuka.

Laidlaw Kipuka to the south from Lava Point

A while later to the east of Lava Point I took this picture to the north.

Laidlaw Park with the jutting lava flow and the remaining portion of Laidlaw beyond

Last, here is a picture of Aliza playing in a small lava bubble.

Aliza Ross playing in a lava bubble

 

 

Written by Fred Nuffer for 1938 Cornerstone at USU

Old Main at Utah State Agricultural College (USU now), Logan, Utah, about 1900. The iconic front and tower were build in 1902.  Fred Nuffer provided 3,000 feet of cut stone for the construction of the south wing.

From Utah State’s Facility Planning.

“Old Main is the landmark of Utah State University and remains the oldest academic building still in use in the state of Utah.  In 1889, plans for “The College Building” by C. L. Thompson were selected by the Board of Trustees just two weeks after the land for the Logan campus was secured. The site was chosen the next day so that the main tower would be due east of the end of Logan’s Seventh Street —Today’s Fifth North.  Construction began immediately on the south wing of the three -part building and was completed in 1890.

“With more money appropriated in 1892 than anticipated, the Trustees hired [K]arl C. Schaub to redesign an enlarged structure and the construction began for the east part of the central section and the north wing.  It wasn’t until 1901 that the money was assured for the completion of the building. The front portion along with the tower was completed in 1902 with the design of H. H. Mahler.

Fred Nuffer provided his own contribution to the construction of the south wing of Utah State’s Old Main.  Another interesting side link, Karl Conrad Schaub’s widowed mother married Fred’s father, John Christoph Nuffer.  She was Anna Maria Alker who married him Conrad Schaub who left her widowed in 1894.  Fred Nuffer provided stone, Karl provided design.  Karl and Fred’s brother, John were friends and worked on buildings together.

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The full title of this article from the book was named, “WRITTEN BY FRED NUFFER AT REQUEST OF OFFICIALS OF UTAH STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE TO BE ENCLOSED IN CORNER STONE LAID IN 1938, TO BE OPENED IN 1988, THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THE COLLEGE.”

Utah State was founded in 1888.  It appears that the cornerstone was opened at 50 years in 1938 and a new cornerstone was sealed to be opened in 1988.  As Fred Nuffer was involved with some of the construction of the campus, he was requested to write for the cornerstone.  This was the original part of Old Main, south wing, of what is now Utah State University in Logan, Utah.

“I will recount in detail, as I remember it, the work done by myself and others in supplying stone for the construction of the Utah State Agricultural College buildings in Logan, Utah.

“In the year of 1891-1892, I made contract with Mr. Venables of Ogden to deliver about 3,000 cubic feet of cut stone.  Mr. Venables had previously tried to get the stone somewhere south of the valley, but found the stone unsuitable, and the party could not fill the order.  As I had furnished stone for several buildings in Logan, Mr. Venables came up to see me.  I lived near the quarry at that time.  He inspected the quarry and pronounced the stone suitable and gave me a contract to fill the order.  The quarry was located about ten miles up Cub River Canyon from Franklin, Idaho, on the left side slope going up the river, on a small tributary creek of Cub River called Sheep Creek.

“All work was done by hand.  The main ledge was about 20 feet above ground and about 20 feet wide and 400 to 500 feet long.  We used 12 foot churn drills and blasted large black loose from the main ledge.  We had to be careful how much powder we used so as not to shatter or cause seams in the stone.  We usually had to put a second charge in the opening made by the first charge to dislodge the block from the main ledge.  The block so dislodged was from 6 to 7 feet thick and about 20 feet long.  From then on, all tools used were hammers, axes, wedges, and squares.  Grooves were cut with axes wherever we desired to split the block, then wedges were set in the grooves about ten inches apart and driven in with hammers.  Then we dressed them down to the right measurement allowing one half inch for the stone cutters to take out all the tool marks we made.  Mr. Venables furnished bills for stone in dimension sizes as needed in the building.

“My brother, C[harles]. A[ugust]. Nuffer, worked on the job the whole time it lasted.  I also had a man by the name of Ed Hollingsworth of Preston, also Mr. A. Merrill and Mr. Abel Smart of Cub River, and Mr. Robert Weber of Providence.

“It took part of two years for the job, 1891-1892.  The hauling was all done with wagons and horses: 30 to 35 cubic feet was a good load for two horses.  The following names were the men doing the hauling: John McDonald of Smithfield, Jean Weber of Providence, and Jake Rinderknecht of Providence hauled more than any other.  He used to leave home at 3 a.m., load up the same day and get back to Logan by 3 p.m. the next day.  It was very hard on the horses.  I also hauled a good many loads with my own team.  All loading was done by hand on skids.

“I got 40¢ per cubic foot, of which 20¢ was paid for hauling.  We had a hard time handling the name stone to go on the front of the building.  When it was ordered it had 30 cubic feet in it and only one foot thick.  When the stonecutters got through with it they had found it too big to be hoisted in place so they made it smaller until there wasn’t much left.

“The most difficulty I had was in not getting my pay from Mr. Venables.  We overlooked a large 4-horse load at the final settlement.  A few minutes after I had signed the receipt for the final payment in full I discovered my mistake.  Mr. Venables refused to pay for it, although I produced the bill of lading signed by him.  He didn’t dispute the debt, but said he had a receipt paid in full.  He didn’t have anything, and the government property couldn’t be attached, so I was the loser of about $15, which seemed a lot of money to me at that time.

“by Fred Nuffer, Sr.

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