Racing Father Time

2017 is now ending.  Where in the world has it gone?  Here is a photo that I think more or less sums up the entire year.

Hiram, Lillian, Amanda, Paul, James, and Aliza Ross in 2017!

Ms. Brandi Teuscher took that photo and deserves the credit.  She had some difficult subjects to work with under the circumstances.

A 1956 Dodge Coronet with plenty of blemishes due to age.  She turned 61 this year.  Hopefully we can get her better looking in the future.

One of my favorite things in the photo, beyond the family and car, are the dandelions.  They make my heart happy.

Aliza turned 7, Hiram turned 5, Lillie turned 2, and James was born in March.  Amanda and I continue to mature in age and demeanor.  Our little family continues to grow.

In March we saw the raging Snake River over Shoshone Falls.

Hiram and Aliza at Shoshone Falls 19 March 2017

In April, the Snake River continued to rage so we took a picture at Minidoka Dam.

23 April at Minidoka Dam spillway

Our grass greened up and was beautiful and the kids enjoyed a new Radio Flyer wagon.

Lillie 23 April 2017

We attended the Open House and Rededication of the Idaho Falls Temple.

Idaho Falls Temple during the Open House

Hiram was antsy to start farming in June.

Hiram on Grandpa’s 1948 Ford 8N

During most of the summer, the kids loved to go for walks or bike rides in the evening.

30 July trip around Fairmont Street

We traveled to Rexburg for the 2017 Great American Eclipse!

Amanda during the Total Eclipse 21 August 2017

We enjoyed some hot miniture golfing in Twin Falls in September.

Twin Falls Miniture Golfing

The Annual Hemsley Camp Out also took place in September in Soda Springs.  We not only enjoyed the carbonated springs, we felt a few earthquakes too.

2017 Hemsley Reunion: Front kids (l-r) Aliza Ross, Lillie Ross, Olivia Hemsley, Hiram Ross; Second row Jill Hemsley, Amanda Ross, Derek Hemsley, Jordan Hemsley holding Jack Hemsley, Bryan Hemsley holding Red Solo Cup, with Zack Smart and Alyssa Hemsley behind; James Ross sitting in car seat

James grew up enough to look around, crawl, and Lillie grew enough to pull him in a wagon by September.

Lillie pulling happy James

Made a trip to Cedar City for the Cedar City Open House by November.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at the Cedar City Temple Open House

And Cove Fort.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross with Jill Hemsley recreating a 1939 photo of David and Dave Donaldson.

What shall 2018 bring with it?

I find myself echoing Jacob.  “And it came to pass that I, Paul, began to be old… the time passed away with us, and also our lives passed away like as it were unto us a dream.”  It passes too quickly.  We could make more memories, but health and money are limited.  Hopefully more memories and life in the upcoming year.

 

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Beulah Duncan and Damey Ross

Beulah and Damey Ross

I received this photo a few years ago.  It just has “Beulah” written on the back of it.  I asked the person who provided it to see if they could get a higher resolution scan of the photo.  I don’t have one yet, but I can always hope.

There is really only on Beulah Ross in the entire extended family I am aware.  That is Beulah Estell Ross.  She was born 26 March 1908 in Twin Branch, McDowell, West Virginia.  She was born to Robert Leonard Ross (1888-1944) and Minnie Belle Hambrick (1889-abt 1985).  There are many questions about her father Robert.  I have heard stories from West Virginia family that he was running from the law when he visited them in the 1930s.  Which might lead to some explanation on why he is hard to track and records seem to be scant.

We believe Robert and Minnie had 6 children, but only 3 of them have we really been able to find or track.  Beulah Estell Ross is one of those children.  She met and married William Jackson “Jack” Duncan on 20 September 1922 in Burley, Cassia, Idaho.  He was born 26 September 1901 in Clinton, Van Buren, Arkansas.  That would put her at 14 years of age when she married in Burley to Bill, who was 21.

I have written of her grandparents, James & Damey Ross, before.  They lived in and near Paul, Minidoka, Idaho until the late 1920s.  The 1930 census found them in Bend, Deschutes, Oregon.

Looking at the photo, I am guessing Beulah is about 12-14, which puts us in the early 1920s and in southern Idaho.

Beulah and Jack had 4 children that we know.  Jack died 11 July 1977 in Sunnyside, Yakima, Washington.  Beulah remarried to a Kenneth K Marshall.  She then passed away 5 March 2002 in Toppenish, Yakima, Washington.  Jack and Beulah are both buried in Zillah.

Read her obituary here.

I found this note from a 2007 post.  I recorded these notes from a conversation with granddaughter Carol Ann Stone.

“We visited for a few minutes; she told me what she knew of her grandmother, Beulah.  Their story goes something like this.  Robert was an alcoholic and his wife Minnie had some sort of Drug addiction.  All the children were farmed out to others.  Beulah was taken in by her grandparents, my great great grandparents James Thomas Meredith Ross and Damey Catherine Graham.  She was taken and raised near Rupert, Idaho.  But her strict Mormon grandparents was a bit much for her so she was anxious to get out.  That came when she met a Jack or Mack Duncan.  She was 14 and married him.  They moved to Zillah, Washington and lived out the remainder of their days.  He died in the late 70’s and she died in 2002 at about 96 years of age.  They had four children, two of which are deceased.”

The more I looked at the photo, it dawned on me that the lady was her grandmother, Damey Catherine Graham Ross.

Damey Catherine Graham Ross

Here is a photo of James Thomas and Damey Catherine Ross.

James & Damey Ross

Robert, Beulah’s father, is brother to my John “Jack” William Ross.

After I realized that this photograph was another of my Great Great Grandmother, I was pretty excited.  It makes me want to be more diligent in chasing down a better scan of the photo.

Here are a couple of other photos with Beulah and Jack in them.  I don’t know the other individuals.  Some day….

Jack and Beulah Duncan

 

Beulah and Jack Duncan with unknown

 

Beulah’s Son

 

Beulah’s Son Bob

 

Jack and family 1

 

Jack and family 2

 

Jack and Beulah Duncan Family

 

John “Jack” Ross and Beulah Duncan

Adams Block

Adams Block, Paul, Idaho

I came across some pictures of Paul, Minidoka County, Idaho recently.  Thank you to the City of Paul for making them available.

I remember this building as a kid.  Somehow the alley immediately behind this building I seemed to get puncture weeds that would flatten my tire and then I had to walk over to the tire store to get it fixed.  I felt an attachment to the building even though I never entered that I recollect.  I was saddened when they tore the building down in the late 1980’s or early 1990’s.

The photo says it was the Paul Store Co. on Idaho Street and Main Street in Paul.  Just behind the building away further to the right is Paul Elementary.  I don’t know anything about Paul Store Co. but this photo has K & C Auction written on the front of the building.

I think the Adams Block at the top of the façade is more interesting.

J. E. Earley and Frank Adams were the founders of the Southern Idaho Review, a newspaper that was established in Heyburn, not far from Paul.

Francis “Frank” Henry Adams was born 18 September 1880 in London, Middlesex, Ontario, Canada.  I am not sure exactly why he came to the Minidoka Project, but he was involved with the Heyburn newspaper very early on.  The Heyburn website indicates the newspaper started publishing in 1905.

Frank then went on to marry Clara Louise Schodde, son of the well-known rancher Henry & Minnie Schodde whose homestead is located about 3.5 miles west of Heyburn, about 2.5 west of Paul and about 3 miles to the south.  Clara, born 1 August 1884, is claimed the first baby born in the area north of the Snake in what is now Minidoka County.  Frank and Clara married 10 June 1908 in Heyburn by Rev. Merkins.

I don’t know what the Adams Building was originally built for.  All I know is that it was a stately building that eventually lost usefulness and was demolished for storage units.  When I was looking for somewhere to locate my law office when I came to Idaho, I did reminisce about the Adams Building wishing it was still there as I was trying to locate the owner of the old Paul State Bank.  The owner was not interested in selling and the Adams Building was only a memory.

I remember walking along Main Street when the building was being demolished.  I saw the old Adams Block blocks sitting in the rubble and wanting to climb the fence to grab them and take them home.  Funny what memories we recall.

Life History of Louisa Zollinger

 

Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman, Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes, Karl, Athene Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The full title reads, “LIFE HISTORY OF LOUISA ZOLLINGER sketch written by JENNIE S. NUFFER early details furnished by MARY Z. BULLOCK and EDWIN J. NUFFER Written November, 20, 1952”

“Louisa Zollinger was born 24 January 1864, at Providence, Utah, the daughter of Ferdinand Zollinger and Louisa Meyer.  She was the eldest of five children, her brothers and sisters being Ferdinand (born 24 January 1866), Bertha (born 3 August 1867), Mary Elizabeth (born 3 March 1870), and Sarah (born 26 July 1875).  Two children died in infancy.

“Living in a pioneer community, Louisa was subjected to all the hardships and trials of her day.  She has related many incidents concerning Indians in the early days of Providence.  She received her education in the district school, having gone through the 8th reader.

“Louisa loved to sew, and before she was fifteen she took a dressmaking course from a lady by the name of Maggie Hyrion.  She learned to cut patterns to fit them to a model.

“She was a very spirited and independent girl, and being the eldest she enjoyed telling her brother and sisters what to do.  She did what she could to help with making a living.  When she was fifteen she worked for a time in the Blanchard Hotel in Logan.  One summer she spent working at the Box Elder dairy at two dollars per week.  She helped milk eighteen to twenty cows.  The next summer she worked at a Logan dairy where she helped with the milking and cheese making.

“Louisa was quite popular with the young people and attended the dances in the community.  One dress she used to wear is still remembered by her sister Mary.  A seamstress came to the home and remained one week to sew the dress, which was of black wool trimmed with heavy black satin.  The young crowd also enjoyed house parties, candy pulls, and sleight (sic) riding parties.

“September 18, 1884, she was married to .John Nuffer at Providence, Utah, and they were sealed in the Logan Temple 15 July 1891.  They then moved to Glendale, Idaho, where her husband had homesteaded and built a small rock house.  Here she made a home for her beautiful flowers.  Snakes were very numerous, and she often told how she would send the dog into the garden first to flush out the snakes before she went into pick vegetables.

“She returned to her mother’s home at Providence for the birth of her first son, Luther Jacob.  Her next two sons, John Willard and Louis Ferdinand, were born at Glendale.

“In the fall of 1890 the family moved to Preston, where her husband had been called by the Church to take charge and superintend the building of the Oneida Stake Academy.  They rented a home on State Street for about one year until John could get a home built for them, which was a four room frame house.  Two more sons were born here, Herman Christopher and Austin Eckertt.

“In the spring of 1895 her husband was called by the Church to go on a mission to Germany, his native land.  Although Louisa had five small sons and was expecting another child, she encouraged him to fulfill the call.  A few months after her husband’s departure, her sixth son, Karl Aaron, was born.  Louisa accepted her responsibilities gladly and cared for her little family.  They did not suffer for the necessities of life, as her husband had left her provided for, and they had two cows to provided (sic) them with milk.  She was also able to knit and sew for herself and children.

“Following her husband’s return her first daughter, Agnes Louisa, was born.  Shortly thereafter John built a larger house of rock for his family.  Myron David, Florence Myrtle, Edwin Joseph, and Athene Barbara were born in this home.  Louisa also raised her grandson Karl Luther, following the death of his mother [Luther’s son].

Karl Nuffer

“Two more lovely homes were built for her by her husband, one a red brick and the other a cement block, where she lived until her death.

“Louisa was very active in the Relief Society, and served as a visiting teacher for many years.  She was very outspoken in defending the things she believed in.  She encouraged her children to seek a higher education.  Seen have attended college, two have fulfilled missions, one son has served as a bishop of his ward, and all her children have gladly accepted positions in the various auxiliaries of the church.

“She taught her children industry and thrift.  She was generous in giving to the poor, and at the same time gave encouragement to all to better their lot.  She was a good cook and neat housekeeper, and her love of sewing was evidenced in the living clothes she made for herself and children.

“The first great sorrow in her life was the death of her son, Karl Aaron on 7 February 1905, at the age of ten years.  Herman Christopher died 23 August 1940, and Austin Eckertt 2 March 1944.

“During the latter part of her life her health was very poor, but with a strong will and determination she carried on her household duties.  Her last illness (cancer) was very painful, and she spent several weeks at the L.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, and the Preston Memorial Hospital in Preston.  She was released to her home few days before her death on Thursday, 25 October 1945.  Besides her husband she was survived by eight of her children, all whom were at her bedside, also 30 grandchildren, and 22 great grandchildren.

“Beautiful and impressive funeral services were held the following Monday at 2 o’clock in the Preston First Ward Chapel.  Burial was in the Preston Cemetery on 29 October 1945.

“THE ZOLLINGER NAME

“Zollo was an old Teutonic name appearing in documents of the 9th century.  The story goes that the Zollingers operating a ferry across the Rhine River near the Lake Constance and charged a toll.  From this trade or occupation came the name Zoll, meaning toll collectors.  They were not the only ones engaged in this profession, for the Romans, prior to this time, had officials appointed to supervise river traffic and collect tolls.

“Farmers by trade, the Zollingers called their settlements Zollinc-hoven, meaning the farms of the Zolling clan.  In that day Zollic-hoven was the name of two different places, Zollikon and Zollikofen.  The present cities, Zollikon near Zurich and Zollikofen near Bern are ample evidences of the settlements and estates once occupied by the Zollingers centuries ago.

“In a manuscript appearing in the periodical of the Swiss Genealogical Society “Der Schweizer Sammler und Familienforscher” in 1935, page 57-58 and 84-85, is an essay with the title “Uber Namesforschung: Der name Zollinger”.  Its author, Gustav Zollinger, Dr. Dentist and member of the Swiss Genealogical Society brings to light in a very comprehensive way, the history and movements of our people in their many places and occupations, from which has evolved the name Zollinger in its many variable spellings.  His work is well documented with sources from court, land, census, death, parish, and tithing records.

Cove Fort

Having taken work all over the western United States during the great depression, David Delos Donaldson finally landed employment at the Ogden Depot in 1937 as Supervisor of Maintenance.  In 1939, he took his wife, Berendena Van Leeuwen Donaldson, back to California for an extended trip to visit family on both the Donaldson and Van Leeuwen family lines.

David and Dena hit the 1939 San Francisco World Fair and then wound their way over to Phoenix and up through Utah back home to Ogden.  A number of photos exist from this trip, including these two from Cove Fort, Utah.

David and Dena Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

 

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

On 4 November 2017, our little Ross family traveled to Cedar City, Utah for the Cedar City Temple Open House.

We immensely enjoyed our visit.  Well worth the trip.  Beautiful temple in every regard.

Cedar City Temple

 

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at the Cedar City Temple Open House

 

Jill Hemsley with Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at Cedar City Temple Open House

After we drove past Cove Fort on the way down, I kept thinking of the picture of my Great Grandfather David Donaldson and Grand Uncle Dave Donaldson from 1939.  I knew on the way back I wanted to stop and see if I could find the same site.

We stopped and had a great visit with the missionaries who serve at the site.  They also helped us find the spot of the picture from 1939 and we took the following picture.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross with Jill Hemsley recreating a 1939 photo of David and Dave Donaldson.

Here is the photo again for comparison.  The door behind Uncle Dave is the one behind Aliza and Jill.  The grey rock at the right of the bottom window behind me is the same to the right of Dave.

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

The missionaries had to visit with others about the history of Cove Fort.  The large tree in the old picture was only removed a few years ago, along with the well that David and Dave are standing in front.  We were able to figure out which side of the fort from the shadows (both sides look the same).  The fort was restored in the 1990s, so you can see the improvements in the windows, mortar, and the top of the walls above the roof.    But the photo is roughly the same area and vicinity.

I literally stood on the ground where my Great Grandfather David Donaldson walked some 78 years earlier.  Thanks to my family for indulging me.

The fort was an interesting place to learn and stop as well.  I recommend any passing through to stop.

Blessing of Elder John Nuffer

Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman, Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes, Karl, Athene Nuffer

This is an entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.

I have shared John’s biography previously.

“By Apostle George Teasdale (mouth) and Presidents Seymour B. Young and George Reynolds, in ordaining him a Seventy and setting him apart to the Swiss & German Mission, Salt Lake City, Apr 12, 1895.

Letter accepting mission call

“Reported by F. E. Parker:

“Brother John Nuffer, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, and virtue of the authority and power of the Holy Priesthood, we lay our hands upon your head, and ordain you a Seventy in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and we seal upon you every gift and grace and qualification pertaining unto this high and holy calling in the Melchizedek Priesthood, that thou mayst be a preacher of righteousness, and have authority to win people to repentance, to baptize by immersion for the remission of sins, to lay on hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost, and to officiate in the ordinances of the House of God.

“We say unto thee, that inasmuch as thou shalt go forth humbly before the Lord, seeking for the spirit of this mission and called unto which you are ordained, that you shall be a preacher of righteousness in very deed, remembering that it is not by the wisdom of men that souls are converted unto Him, but by the revelations and gift of God.  Remember that thou art a servant of God, sent forth to call the people to repentance and to warn them of judgments to come, and will be necessary for you to seek the guidance and direction of the Almighty in all things, so that you may be led to the honest in heart, so that you may be enabled to act in wisdom every day of your life, that you may accomplish the purposes unto which you are ordained.

“We re-seal and confirm upon thee all they former blessing, and set thee apart to a mission to the Swiss & German Mission, to labor under the president thereof, wherever thou shalt be directed.  And in as much as thou shalt seek for it, the Lord will guide and direct thee to the honest in heart, and will give thee the convincing power to His spirit; out of thy weakness thou shalt be made strong.  Thy tongue shall be loosed, and thou shalt preach the gospel in the power and demonstration of the spirit of God, and your testimony shall be powerful to the convincing of the honest in heart.

“We seal these blessing upon thee, and dedicate thee to the service of God, praying unto Him that thou mayst go in peace and return in safety, that thy life may be precious on the seas or on the land, that no accident of any name or nature may befall thee, but when thou hast finished thy mission, thou mayst return in peace and safety to thy home, bearing many sheaves with thee which blessing we seal upon thee in the name of Jesus Christ.  Amen.

John ended his mission 3 July 1897.

Johann Christoph Nuffer

John Christoph Nuffer

This is an entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.  The book does not give a source, but reads as an obituary, but I cannot tell which newspaper or publication.  Some of the mistakes in it seem to show it was not written by a family member.  May actually be more of a quick biography than an obituary.  Some day I may know the source.  I have kept the capitalization and spellings as in the article.

You can find the biography of Johann as written by his granddaughter Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef.

“JOHANN CHRISTOPH NUFFER, Pioneer was born at the City of NEUFFEN State of Wurtemberg, Germany on the 6th of March 1835.  His parents were JOHAN JACOB NUFFER and MARIE MAGDALENA KIRNER NUFFER: his grandfather JOHAN CHRISTOPHER NUFFER, his wife CHRISTINA KATHARINA PFEIFFER died and he married his second wife MARIE KATHARINA KLEIN.  His great grandparents wher JOHAN JACOB NUFFER and ANNA MARIE SCHWINDLIN.  She and their ancestors were living in the City of Neuffen, a small city at the foot of the Schwabisen Alb in Southern Germany.  JOHAN CHRISTOPH NUFFER, the Pioneer was married to Agnes BARBARA SPRING, who died Feb. 29, 1867.  He had two sons with her, JOHN NUFFER born Dec. 4, 1862 and FRED NUFFER born Jan. 20, 1864.  He married EVA KATHARINA GREINER who with him and the family consisting of JOHN and FRED NUFFER of his first wife and REGINA, KARL AUGUST & ADOLF, his second wife, emigrated to the United States in May 1880 and came to Logan, Utah in June 1880.  In the year 1879 he with his wife had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints.

“In the Fall of 1880 he moved with his family to Providence in 1883 they again moved to Worm Creek, then belonging to the Franklin Ward, later the Preston Ward.  His son John homesteaded 160 Acres at that place at the divide between Worm Creek & Cub River.  They lived at that place until the Spring of 1884, when he homesteaded 160 acres on the Cub River side of the divide, now belonging to the Mapleton Ward.  Feb. 26, 1893 his wife EVA KATHARINA died; with her he had the following children, REGINA, KARL AUGUST, ADOLF, and MARIE who died Oct. 5, 1900, at the age of 9 years.  In the year 1895 he again married, to ANNA ELIZABETH REBER, she died Dec. 1, 1901.  In 1903 he again married MARIE ALKER, SCHAUB.  He died Apr. 12, 1908.