Jim & Ko Tateoka

Jim & Ko Tateoka

Scanning photos for a friend, I stumbled upon this photo in a set of pictures that seem to be an Emerson Ward party likely in the early 1980s.  Since I recognized these two, I thought I would share.  Rather than write a history of them, I will share their detailed obituaries.  Jim & Ko lived not too far from me when growing up.  I remember meeting Ko on several occasions at Brucia Crane’s home as a young kid.  Jim sometimes would help move water for the Werners who lived near us.  A couple of times while we swam in canals, he would pull up and visit with us and tell us to be careful.  Later, I come to know their children, and Ted has become a very good friend of mine.  Interesting who comes in and out of our lives.

Jim Suyetaka Tateoka Hazelton, Idaho Jim Suyetaka Tateoka of Hazelton, Idaho was called back to his heavenly home on November 1, 2006, at the age of 83. He died of complications related to Alzheimer’s disease. Jim was born on February 20, 1923, in Garfield, Utah to Tokizo and Natsuko Tateoka. When he was a young child, the family moved to Ogden, Utah. He was fourth in a family of five children. Jim grew up and acquired his love of farming on the small truck farming operation the family ran. Jim graduated from Ogden High School in 1941. He excelled in his studies maintaining excellent marks throughout his formal school years. Jim served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He saw action in Italy. Jim was a member of the highly decorated 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Many of his army buddies were Japanese Americans from Hawaii. They taught him to speak “Pigeon English” and to play the ukulele. He would sing Hawaiian songs to his family. Some of the songs included, “Don’t Say Aloha When I Go,” “Sweet Leilani” and “Hula Oni Oni E.” This provided many hours of enjoyment to his children. Jim was a quiet person and yet he had a quick wit and a “fun” side. After he was discharged from the Army, he and his brother Matt purchased a farm in South Jordan, Utah. On Febrary 11, 1956, Jim married Ko Takeuchi in Salt Lake City, Utah. They recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with all their family in attendance. He continued to farm in South Jordon and with Ko began to raise a family of four sons and one daughter. In 1969, Jim took a “leap of faith” and moved his family to farm in Hazelton, Idaho. The family has received many blessings from this move. He was a member of the LDS Church and served as a home teacher and membership clerk to four bishoprics. Jim and his family were sealed and his marriage solemnized in the Ogden Temple May 25, 1976. He is survived by his wife Ko, and children, Mark (Itsuko), Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, Paul (Nadine), Hazelton, ID, Penny, Portland, OR, Ted (Rebecca), Hazelton, Idaho, Tom (Jami), Waukesha, Wis.; grandchildren, Luke, Charlotte, Joseph, Elise, Benjamin, Claire, Olivia, Sophia, Amelia, Julia, Grace, Mae and Tak; his brother; Tom of Riverton; and sister, Momoko of Salt Lake City. He was preceded in death by his parents and brothers, Sam and Matt. The funeral will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006, at the Emerson LDS 1st Ward Church, 127 S. 950 W. in Paul, ID, with Bishop Ted Tateoka officiating. A viewing will be held Friday, November 3, 2006 from 7-9 p.m. at the Hansen Mortuary Burley Chapel, 321 E. Main St. and one hour prior to the service from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. at the church. Interment will be at the Paul Cemetery with military rites. The family would like to express their gratitude and heartfelt thanks to Dr. Richard Sandison for his faithful and tireless service, and to the staff of the Cassia Regional Medical Center and Hospice for the loving care that was extended to Jim and his family during his stay. The family would especially like to thank Barbara West his attending nurse for her kindness and excellent care she gave to Jim.

Ko Takeuchi Tateoka died peacefully in her home on April 14, 2013. Her loving family surrounded her, as did the soft light of the late afternoon sun, fresh flowers in colorful bunches, and Luna, the new family cat. Ko was 80 years old.
The Tateoka family will receive friends on Friday, April 19, 2013 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in the viewing room at the Morrison Payne Funeral Home on 321 E Main St. Burley, Idaho. Funeral services for Ko will be held on Saturday, April 20, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the Emerson 1st Ward LDS Church located at 127 South 950 West, Paul, Idaho. (Bishop Burt Belliston officiating). Prior to the funeral, a viewing will take place in the Relief Society room of the Emerson LDS Church from 10:00 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Burial services will be held immediately following the funeral at the Paul Cemetery on 550 W 100 N Paul, Idaho.
Ko was born in the Sugar House area of Salt Lake City, Utah on May 25, 1932. Her parents, Seiichi and Tsune Takeuchi had immigrated to the U.S. from the coastal city of Mikawa, Ishikawa, Japan 14 years earlier in 1918. Ko was the third and last of three daughters born to the Takeuchis. Older sisters, Kimi and Fumi were ages 12 and seven at the time of Ko’s birth.
In 1935, Ko’s family moved from the Sugar House area to a home and small truck farm on 2213 South 4th East in Salt Lake City. Ko entered first grade at Madison School on State Street and 24th South and continued attending the school through the ninth grade. She then attended Granite High School on 3303 South 500 East and graduated in 1949. Ko earned her teaching degree in Business Education in 1954 from the University of Utah. She took a teaching position at Olympus High School where she taught typing and shorthand from 1954-1956. Throughout her life, Ko gave much credit to her father Seiichi who had always stressed the importance of education. Despite the many hardships and barriers of those times and as a result of his influence, Ko and her two sisters received their college educations.
In February of 1956, Ko married Jim Tateoka, a farmer from Garfield, Utah and moved to South Jordan Utah. Jim and his brothers farmed ground on 10000 South 2700. It was there that four sons and a daughter where born to Ko and Jim. In 1969, they moved their young family to a farm in Southern Idaho’s Magic Valley off of Kasota Road in the Emerson area. Ko was a fulltime homemaker and mom until 1980 when she re entered the teaching ranks. She taught 3rd grade at Eden Elementary School in Eden, Idaho and later took a teaching position in the business department at Minidoka County High School in Rupert, Idaho. Ko retired from teaching in 1993. She found teaching to be a very rewarding and fun profession.
Ko enjoyed membership in various community organizations including the Kasota Sagehens, the Delta Kappa Gamma Society, The Mini Cassia Retired Teachers Association and the area “Nisei” Club. She was a strong member of the LDS Church, serving in many positions in the Emerson 1st Ward and Paul Stake. Ko enjoyed gardening, traveling, movie going, watching football and visiting with her kids, grandkids, and many friends. She loved the holiday season and the cheer, lights, gifts and joy it always brings.
In her later years, Ko cared faithfully for husband Jim who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. He passed away in the fall of 2006. In October of 2010, Ko began her extended stay at Parke View Rehabilitation and Care Center in Burley, Idaho. She resided there until returning to her own home on Kasota Rd. in recent weeks.
Ko is survived by her five children, 13 grandchildren, and three great grandchildren. They are: son Mark and his wife Itsuko of Miliani Hawaii and their two children, Luke, also of Miliani, and Charlotte of Salt Lake City, son Paul and his wife Nadine of Hazelton, Idaho and their three children, Joseph of Chicago, Illinois (wife Alison, son, Parker), Elise Mongillo, from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, (husband, Anthony, sons, Oliver, and Nikolas) and Benjamin of Provo, Utah (wife, Alexa), daughter Penny from Portland, Oregon, and her daughter, Claire from Brooklyn, New York, son Ted and his wife Becca from the Emerson Area, and their four daughters, Olivia Brown of Provo, Utah, (husband, Braeden Brown), Sister Sophia Tateoka ( currently serving in the Honolulu, Hawaii Mission) and Emi and Ju Ju (Emerson Area) and son Tom and his wife Jamie of Waukesha, Wisconsin and their three children, Grace, Mae and Takeuchi. (Ko’s parents and sisters, Kimi and Fumi are deceased.)
Many many sincere thanks are due the following individuals and groups: The wonderful staff at Parke View Rehabilitation and Care Center, Dr. Glen Page, Deanna, Pam and Amanda of Horizon Hospice, Bishop Burt Belliston, Dustin McCurdy and family, Loa Maxwell and Margaret Merrill, The Emerson 1st Ward Relief Society, Jan Allen, Mildred Whitesides, and Ralph, Ben and Kristie. Thanks also to the many friends who called, stopped by, and brought in meals, sweet eats, cheer, and support during Ko’s time at home. We appreciate you!
Services are under the direction of Morrison Payne Funeral Home, in Burley.

Advertisements

Brigham Young College 1915 Crimson Yearbook

I am a member of a Cache Valley Group on Facebook.  After some people posted a number of old photos, I asked if anyone knew if Brigham Young College had yearbooks and if someone had one for roughly 1915.  Within a day, Jennifer Johnson, a cousin of mine had found a copy of the Brigham Young College Crimson yearbook and made it available to me.  Here is a copy of the full 1915 Brigham Young College Crimson Annual if you are interested.

Sure enough, there on page 31 is my great-grandfather, Joseph Nelson Jonas (1893 – 1932).

Joseph Nelson Jonas’ Brigham Young College yearbook picture

Here is the full-page.  This is page 31 of the pdf.  The front of the yearbook says Crimson Annual 1915.  Page 4 shows that it includes the classes of 1915, 1916, 1917, and 1918.

Brigham Young College Crimson yearbook, page 31

Here are two copies of his diploma.

Joseph Jonas graduation diploma from Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah

 

I also found Joseph’s 1st cousin, once removed, Paul Ernest Nelson (1888-1970), was one of the teachers at BYC.  An interesting side note is that the page below states he, “Likes his Ensign.”  He and Martha Eunice Ensign were married 19 August 1914 in the Salt Lake Temple.  It also states he “[e]xpects to be a professor in psychology.”  Their first son, Paul Ensign Nelson, was born 26 June 1916 in Berkeley, California while he was attending school.

Brigham Young College yearbook, page 26

Here is a dedication to the Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Charles Winder Nibley (1849-1931).

Dedication in 1915 Brigham Young College Crimson Annual to Charles Winder Nibley

Charles W Nibley was the Presiding Bishop from 1907 to 1925.  He was a kind benefactor to Brigham Young College and as Presiding Bishop was involved with the school.  Bishop Nibley was released in 1925 and became a counselor to Heber Jeddy Grant until his death in 1931.  He is one of the few people to serve in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who was not an Apostle.

Charles Winder Nibley (1849-1931)

Brigham Young College was located in Logan, Utah.  It was founded by Brigham Young shortly before his death.  The college was meant for individuals from Northern Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming.  When The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints closed all its academy’s in 1926, except Brigham Young University, it suffered the same fate.  The buildings were sold and became Logan High School.

As records become more and more available, who knows what else we may find of our ancestors.

 

 

Headed West on Main Street in Burley, Idaho

On Main Street at Overland Avenue in Burley, Idaho late 1950’s.

I stumbled upon this photo on a postcard.  Fascinating picture likely from the late 1950’s.  None of the cars are from the 1960’s.  All the more interesting are the buildings in the photo.

On the left, the first is Boyd’s Cafe, then the Oregon Trail Cafe.  About where Shon Hing is now.  Thriftway Drug is on the corner, which is now a parking lot.  Idaho Bank & Trust is on the far left intersection corner, which is now where the Keystone Realty Group and Fletcher Law Offices building is located.  You can see the old sign for Nelson’s Cafe which is still there.

On the right corner, you can see Sprague’s Sport Shop with the Sportsman’s Cafe to their right.  This is the location of the current US Bank.

On the far right corner, the Burley National Bank building is still present.  This is where Zions Bank is located now.  You can also see the Burley Theater down the block with their marquee.  I cannot recognize the tall building beyond the theater, I don’t know what that building is.  You can also see the Simplot Factory Building that used to be much farther down Main Street and the Texaco between the two, about where B&K Auto is now.

This is when there were more individuals living downtown with the apartments and restaurants emblematic of a more vibrant downtown.  Main Street was also the main highway through southern Idaho which means this was a thoroughfare.  The construction of the Interstate pulled all traffic just traveling through several miles to the north.  None of these restaurants moved north, it was just Connors moving from downtown Paul that moved to be near the Interstate exit.

2nd Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Back (l-r): Reed Webb, Roland Hobbs, Jeff Theurer, Kirt Hatch, Zan Christensen, Gary Andersen, Flora Allen; 3rd Row: Susan Jones, Peggy Plant, Ann Bair, Jane Robinson, Molly Lulwyler, Debbie Day, Barbara Housley; 2nd Row: Shanna Bullen, Pamela Bun, Beth Cartwright, Sherry Bundy, Fern Housley, Faye Housley, Sandra Jonas, Barbara Watts; Front: Jay Purser, Michael Smith, Brent Haslam, Tommy Hatch, Jimmy Johnson, Kim Christensen, Leslie Smith

This picture is from the 1961 – 1962 school year at Park Elementary in Richmond, Utah.

Mrs. Flora Greene Allen (1906 – 1996)

Gary Andersen (? – living)

Ann Bair married Downs (1954 – living)

Shanna Bullen married Gibbons (? – living)

Pamela Bun (? – ?)

Sherry Bundy (? – ?)

Beth Cartwright (1954 – 2018)

Kim Christensen (? – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Debra Lynn Day married Pursuer (1954 – 2010)

Brent Haslam (? – living)

Kirt Hatch (? – living)

Tommy Hatch (? – ?)

Roland Hobbs (? – ?)

Barbara Housley married Sharp (? – living)

Fay Housley married Purser (? – living)

Fern Housley married Taylor (? – living)

Jimmy Johnson (? – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Susan Jones (? – ?)

Molly Lulwyler (? – ?)

Peggy Anne Plant married Ivanyo (? – living)

Jay Purser (? – living)

Jane Robinson married Larsen ( – living)

Leslie Smith (? – living)

Michael Smith (? – ?)

Jeff Theurer (? – living)

Barbara Watts (? – ?)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

Paul from water tower

Paul, Idaho from the water tower

Some of you may have seen this photo around.  There is a copy of this photo at Paul City Hall and in Les Schwab/Magic Valley Tire in Paul.  Even when I was a kid I remember seeing this photo.  This isn’t a great copy of the photo, but you take what I can get…

I previously wrote about the Paul Hotel, the first building with its name etched in the photo.  As I mentioned in that post, the second story is now missing from the Paul Hotel.  Notice all the cars parked along Idaho street and then the lone horseman in front of the Paul Hotel.

The next block down on the left side is the Paul State Bank.  Later known as Mikey’s bar, it sits empty.  I believe I mentioned earlier this is the building I wanted to buy and put my law practice, but I couldn’t even find the owners.  But, here is a check from the bank from my Great Grandmother’s confectionery that was drawn on the Paul State Bank.

The next block down on the left side corner is the Adams Block, which I have also previously written.  It was torn down in the 1990s, I found out by Garey McManus.

Then the next block down at the end of Idaho Street, you see the Paul School.  I haven’t written on the school yet, still organizing some of my photos for that post.  If I remember correctly, it burned down by an arson in 1977.

The Streeter Confectionery was the south half of Lot 2, Block 1, which puts it on the right side of Idaho street (the main street to the school from this vantage point) nearing Main Street, which is the intersection with the Adams Block building.  Most of the entire block is owned by Magic Valley Produce now.

Burley Aerial Photo

Burley, Idaho about

I stumbled upon this photo last weekend.  Thought I would make it available to more.

I tried to find what year this photo is from and make these observations after closely reviewing the photo.

The large field on the east of Overland is where Dworshak Elementary is now.  I believe Dworshak opened in 1962, and there isn’t any construction, so that probably makes this photo at the latest about 1960.

Burley Stake Center to the lower right of the photo has small trees.  I do not know when the building was built, but this photo is after it was built.  The building now has an addition on the south side, I don’t know when that addition was built.

A house is in this picture where First Federal is now on Overland Avenue.  I don’t know when the First Federal bank building was built, this photo predates it.

A church appears to be about where Mr. Gas is on Overland, just south of First Federal.  I don’t know when the old Mr. Gas was built on that place, but this photo predates it.

None of the homes on the south of 16th between Elba and Hiland are present, the photo predates that neighborhood.

Burley Junior High is in the photo across the grass to the east of the Cassia County Courthouse.  The Courthouse was built in 1937, so I know we are after that date!  Burley Junior High School burned down 29 October 1973.  The photo is obviously before that date.  Burley Junior High, which was Burley High School before that, was built in 1915.

The Burley Masonic Hall is present and it appears homes are on the northeast corner of 16th and Overland which were replaced by Safeways, now the Burley Judicial Center.  I don’t know when Safeways was built, but this predates it.

Amalgamated Sugar still has its chimney, I don’t know when it was removed.

Burley Flour Mill is still present.  I don’t know when it was torn down.

Idaho Bank & Trust Building on the southwest corner of Overland and Main is still there.  I seem to remember it coming down in the mid 1980s.

Thriftway Drug is still present and it came down in the 1990s.

Sprague Sports is still present along with the National Bank Building on the north-west and north-east corners of Main and Overland.  I believe they both came down in the early 1980s.

Most telling to me is what is across the Snake River.  NOTHING exists in Minidoka County from Burley.  The first Overland Bridge over the Snake was built in 1947.  Interstate 84 appears to have not been constructed just south of 300 South in Minidoka County.  Everything North of the Snake on Overland is post-interstate.  In fact, it seems you would still drive to 400 South, now called Alfresco, and drive to the east to 600 West to drive to Paul.  If you follow Overland straight, you can see the canal, which Overland now diagonally goes to the east to attach to 600 West, which none of which is clear in this photo.  I believe the Interstate 84 came through the Burley area in the late 1960s.

Only a vague outline of a much smaller Paul, Idaho is in the distance, although fuzzy.

Therefore, this image appears to be late 1950’s or early 1960’s.  If anyone has clarifications, I am happy to update this post.

 

 

 

The Story of My Life by Anna Elizabeth Rinderknecht Nuffer

Anna Rinderknecht Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

“Written October 17, 1933.

“I will begin with my grandmother on my mother’s side, what I remember my mother telling us as children.  My grandmother was a lover of music and she became acquainted with a young man who was very good looking a good singer with curly hair.  He was a poor boy and my grandmother’s parents were well to do.  It seems that they opposed their marriage for that reason.  But they were married anyway.  I do not remember his given name (Ulrich Ramp) but my grandmother’s name was Ann Elizabeth Bauman Ramp.  They lived very happy although they were poor, and for disobeying her parents she was disinherited which made it very hard for them.  In due time, they had a baby boy, and then a baby girl, who was my mother.  I do not remember what became of the boy but they made a great deal of the baby girl.  The father did work whenever he could.  It seems like there always has been hard times for some from the very beginning.

“Everything was going as well as might be expected until father died very suddenly, which caused the mother to go to work in some kind of a mill.  She was unable to take care of the children and, as is the custom in some countries, she let some well to do people take the little girl and raise her.  They sent her to school where she had a good education.  Her name was Anna Barbara Ramp.  She lived with those people for many years.  Her mother would come to see her whenever she could.  She was a great lover of all children and when Easter time came she would get eggs and color them as nice as she could just for the pleasure of giving them to children that she knew.  She was yet a young woman when she died.

“Then my mother, when she was a grown woman, worked in a tred mill which belonged to the people she lived with.  They also had children, some her own age.  They thought a great deal of each other.

“In due time, she met some Mormon missionaries and became very interested in their talks, after which she became a member of the church.  During this time she became acquainted with Jacob Rinderknecht, who later became my father, but she didn’t come to America for a number of years after that.

“Jacob Rinderknecht had a family when my mother first met him which he brought to America in the early sixties.  They lived in New York for a while, then came to Utah.  The family consisted of Father, Mother, a daughter and a son (some children having died in Switzerland where they all came from).  They settled in Providence on the very spot where my brother Jake Rinderknecht now lives.

“All this time my mother was working in her country trying to save enough money to come to America.  Finally the time came when she landed in New York.  Then she came across the plaints with ox teams and walked much of the way.  When she arrived in Salt Lake City, the missionary that she was so good to over in Switzerland was to meet her and take her to Southern Utah.  This he never did.

“Jacob Rinderknecht happened to be there at the time, having had a chance to go to Salt Lake City with someone that drove an ox team there from Providence.  So he got her to go home with him.  Later they made a trip to Salt Lake and were married in the Endowment House.  She was then 36 years old and one of Utah’s Pioneers.  She was the second wife.  I have heard her tell what a terrible, hard life she lived.  At that time she lived in a dugout in a bank, or hollow, that used to run through the lot which is now filled in.  I think that was where I was born.  The first family had a log house and after the first wife died, my mother moved in.

“When I was 4 years old my father gave me away.  Not long after that he died.  I don’t remember him very well.  He was 62 and very poor.  He may have done this and meant it for my good, but my poor mother fought hard for me.  I was older than my brother, Jake, and then a pair of twins; one, my sister, still lives.

“My father gave me to some English people of Providence who adopted me.  They were well to do for those times.  They had buried all their children while babies, and they seemed to take a liking to me.  They said I was so pretty, and I guess they were right as I can remember that I had long ringlets, my hair being curly and how hard it was to comb.  Once, when I played with the neighbor’s children, I got lice in my hair.  My hair had to but cut off close to my head and I was glad because then it was easy to comb.

“At first I rather liked my new home but when I wanted to go back to my mother they said no.  As I got older I would run away and go home, then they would take me back and I would cry for days.  I wanted to go home and my mother did everything she could to get me back, bu no, they watched me so close that I didn’t get a chance very often.  I always had the feeling that I would get back sometime.  They would lock me in a room and if my mother came to see me they would say I had gone somewhere.  Many a time they would see her coming, then they would take me out the back door and hide me somewhere.

“As I grew older, they gave me all kinds of hard jobs to do such as going after the cows that had strayed through town and if I didn’t find them or came home without them they would send me to bed without supper in a dark room, or would lock me in a dark cellar for an hour or so.  They had so many ways of punishing me that I couldn’t them all.  One time, I was trying to jump a ditch of water and fell in backward.  I was scared to go home so I sat around in my wet clothes.  One of the neighbors told on me, then they took my clothes off, got a gunny sack, cut a whole for my head and some for my arms, then put that on and locked me in a small closet that I couldn’t stand up in, and without any dinner.  They left me there all afternoon while they went away.

“I had about 4 years of this life which was anything but a happy one.  It was the rule those days that the ones that could afford it should go to conference either in April or October.  At one of those times, the only man that I can remember calling father, the one who had adopted me, went to Salt Lake.  His wife and myself stayed home and did all the work about the place.  In due time, he came back and I suppose he was very happy although his wife did a lot of crying and was very unhappy.  At the time I didn’t quite grasp the thing or what it was all about but at last it came out.  He had married another woman while he was in the city and she was soon to come and live with us.  Can you imagine what a trick to play on his first wife?  So one fine day she came.  She had not been in this country very long.  She had come from London and rather a nice lady, a dressmaker, I think and as soon as she found out about me she wanted them to let me go to my mother, but I did not for a long time.

“So they finally got things settled and the house was divided and each woman had her half.  Then I had more chores to do.  And in due time there came a baby son which was the king of the house.  When he got old enough I would take him out in his carriage as they called it.  One day one of the wheels came off.  Then I was scared and ran back to the house to get help.  I really was expecting a whipping, but not that time and soon everything was all right again.

“One Sunday all the children in the neighborhood were in the street playing.  I was inside my fence looking on.  I wanted to go out with them so bad that I got up enough courage to go to the house and ask if I could go and play.  Then the second wife said, yes, you can go home to your mother if you want to.  It surprised me so I couldn’t believe they meant it, so I went out and when I got int he street, which was a straight line and in the third block was my mother’s place, I just ran every bit of the way.

“I was, at this time, about nine years old and had started to school.  My mother was so glad and yet she was afraid to believe it.  I had quite a time trying to make her understand as I couldn’t talk German anymore, but I soon learned.  I stayed but I was always on the watch.  If any of them had come after me I couldn’t have been found.  I was very happy at home again.  But one evening here came my adopted mother with an interpreter to talk to mother and try to get me back.  She cried and begged me to come.  I wouldn’t go near her for fear she wouldn’t let me loose.  She promised me things but it did no good.  I wanted to stay with my mother, brother and sister.

“I was so poor and thin that my mother would cry when she saw my thin little body, but I soon grew big and strong and was large for my age.  In due time, I used to go back and see my adopted parents.  As I got older I went back and worked for them.  They were candy makers and sold candy to the stores in Logan.

The book then seems to transfer from the autobiography to the biography of Anna Rinderknecht Nuffer by an unknown person.

“In Hedingen, Zurich, Switzerland lived a girl Elizabeth Bauman.  She was a jolly happy girl with a good home and many friends.  She kept company with Ulrich Ramp, a young man with pretty curly hair.  He was a fine singer.  These two people were very much in love with each other but Elizabeth’s parents who were well to do disapproved of their marriage and threatened to disinherit her if she married Ulrich, but this made no difference.  They were married and lived happily together in spite of being very poor.

“A baby girl was born, which they named Barbara.  When she was two years old, her father died suddenly.  This was a terrible blow to this young mother.  Her parents were bitter and did not help her, so she had someone take care of her baby and went out to work.  When Barbara became of school age her mother had her put into a home of well to do people who put her through school.  Her mother died shortly after and these people cared for her until she was grown.  They treated her kindly and she loved them very much, (and later had Temple work done for them).  These people owned a threat factory and Barbara worked there along time.  She had many friends.  She heard of the Mormon Elders and went to their meetings which seemed to impress her greatly.  She would walk many miles to go to their meetings and would give the Elders all the money she could spare to get food.  She was insulted by her friends when she joined the Mormon Church, but she saved her money to go to Zion.  One missionary from Southern Utah fell in love with her and promised to meet her when she arrived in Salt Lake City.

“She crossed the ocean in an old Sailing Vessel.  There were many bad storms which kept them back.  After eight weeks they landed and crossed the plains with ox-teams in the year 1866.  Grandmother walked most of the way, she being young and strong.  I remember her telling of her breaking her garnet beads, which she prized very highly, on the yoke of the oxen.

“After the long walk across the plains with all the hardships of those Pioneer days, scarcity of food, sickness and death, their faith still unfaltering, they finally reach Salt Lake Valley.  But in her sorrow the good Mormon Elder sweetheart was not there to meet her as promised.  Imagine a young girl here along without relatives.  She did get disappointed badly but not discouraged.  She worked for other Pioneers for her food.

“Jacob Rinderknecht, a pioneer living in the little town of Providence, along with other men, went to Salt Lake City looking for a young wife.  He saw Barbara a fine rosy cheeked strong young lady and decided she would be just what he wanted so he persuaded her to go back with him, offering her a home, so she married him in the Endowment House in 1868 and walked back to Providence with him.  Here she was introduced to his first wife and family.

“Jacob Rinderknecht was in his sixties and Barbara 36.  She lived in a dug-out and his first wife was in a log cabin on the old Rinderknecht lot at Providence, Utah.  There were four children, one died when very young.  When Emma was quite young, her father died, his first wife died several years before.  This left the mother to care for the children.  She had a garden which supplied her with vegetables, a few hens, and a cow which kept the family.  She had a churn which the whole settlement borrowed, and she was noted for her good yeast.  She wanted her girls dressed as fine as she could so she hired Sister Campbell to crochet lace for their petticoats and pants, as father (Jacob Rinderknecht Jr.) told me for he would take the eggs to pay for the lace.

“She was a real tithe payer, always went to church, although she understood very little English.  She taught her children high ideals, love of music, honesty, industry and faith in God.  She was fond of her Grandchildren and went to see them at least once a year.

“She endured many hardships but she never lost her faith.  She said many times she thought God was her only friend.  When her children were sick she went for the Elders.

“After her husband’s death, Jacob, a small boy, took the responsibility of caring for the family.  The girls worked hard.  Annie worked for Frank Madison.  Emma worked hard, she went to wash for people in Logan so Jacob could buy horses to run a small piece of land.  He went up Logan Canyon when 14 years of age all alone and got enough lumber to build the frame house for his mother.