6th Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Back (l-r): Dennis Alvey, Scott Christensen, Terry Vinson, Curtis Smith, Doug White, Oral Ballam; Middle: Tommy Johnson, Dennis Cartwright, Doug Jonas, James Miller, Garry Bowles, Dell Bair, Robert Randal, David Traveller; Front: Shannon Ryan, Debbie Baird, Janet Bright, Joy Bair, Sandra Small, Nancy Johnson, Maxine Housley, Christie Buttars.

This is the first class picture I have for my Uncle Doug.  This his is 6th Grade year at Park Elementary, Richmond, Cache, Utah.  This is probably the 1962-1963 school year.  The year of the famous Richmond earthquake (30 August 1962).

If anyone has any updates, I am happy to include them.  Doug told me that Robert Randal’s family moved to town to tear down the Benson Stake Tabernacle and to rebuild the new Stake Center in Richmond.

Mr. Oral Lynn Ballam (1901 – 1993). He was both the Principal and 6th Grade Teacher. He has appeared in other posts as teacher and also as student!

Dennis F Alvey (1952 – living)

Dell Bair (? – living)

Joy Bair (? – living)

Debbie Baird (? – living)

Gary Bowles (? – living)

Janet Bright (? – living)

Christie Buttars married Giles (? – living)

Dennis G Cartwright (? – living)

Scott M Christensen (1952 – living)

Maxine Housley married Farnsworth (1952 – 2000)

Nancy Johnson (? – living)

Thomas Melvin Johnson (? – living)

Douglas Norwood Jonas (1952 – living)

James Miller (? – living)

Robert Randal (? – living)

Shannon Ryan (? – living)

Sandra Small (? – living)

Curtis Smith (? – living)

David M Traveller (1952 – living)

Terry Vinson (? – living)

Doug White (? – living)

28 July 2018

Aliza, Hiram, and I went to Preston, Idaho at the end of July.  If anyone knows me, I like to stop and visit people, family, and cemeteries.  While we were out visiting, we made a few stops at some cemeteries.  I thought I would share these couple of photos with Aliza and Hiram with the tombstones of a few of their ancestors.  All on the same date!

This is the grave of Wilburn Norwood Jonas, 15 May 1924 – 14 March 1975, who is their Great Grandfather, my Grandfather. There are other posts on Norwood.  This grave is in Richmond, Utah.

Hiram and Aliza at Wilburn Norwood Jonas’ grave.

These are the graves of Joseph Nelson Jonas, 19 March 1893 – 6 September 1932, and Lillian Coley, 26 August 1898 – 11 February 1987, who are their Great Great Grandparents, father of Wilburn Norwood Jonas, whose grave you can see right behind Hiram.  I have also previously written about Joseph and Lillian.

Hiram and Aliza at Joseph and Lillian Jonas’ graves.

These are the graves of Hannah Maria Rogers, 4 June 1932 – 22 October 1894, and Stephen Coley, 28 January 1830 – 22 October 1913, who are their Great Great Great Great Grandparents.  This is the grandparents for Lillian Coley above.  For whatever reason I didn’t get a picture with Herbert and Martha Coley’s grave, the link between.  These graves are in Lewiston, Utah.  I have written of Hannah and Stephen also.

Hiram and Aliza at Hannah and Stephen Coley’s graves.

These are the graves of Mary Louise Wanner, 5 March 1901 – 30 August 1991, and William Fredrick Andra, 11 February 1898 – 13 March 1990, who are their Great Great Grandparents, parents of Colleen Mary Andra, wife of Wilburn Norwood Jonas.  I need to write a biography yet of Mary and William but have been overwhelmed by it in the past and just need to work on it some day.  These graves are in Whitney, Idaho.

Hiram and Aliza at Mary and William Andra’s graves.

These are the graves of John George (Johann Georg) Wanner, 29 October 1870 – 5 January 1947, and Regina Friederike Nuffer, 26 January 1869 – 10 March 1942, who are their Great Great Grandparents, parents of Mary Louise Wanner, whose photo is above, but also the tombstone to the left of Aliza’s head.  I have written of John and Regina in the past.

Aliza and Hiram at John and Regina Wanner’s graves.

These are the graves of Ezra Taft Benson, 4 August 1899 – 30 May 1994, and Flora Smith Amussen, 1 July 1901 – 14 August 1992.  There is no relationship with the Bensons, but it is the same cemetery as Wanners and Andras.  He was the 13th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  As such, the kids know him as a previous prophet of the Lord.  They were happy to make the visit.

Aliza and Hiram at Ezra and Flora Benson’s graves.

 

 

 

 

Spring City, Utah

Manti Temple, Paul & Amanda Ross

Last weekend was Amanda’s sister’s wedding in Manti, Sanpete, Utah.  We went down to attend the wedding for Zachary & Alyssa Smart.  It was a wonderful trip, time to get away, celebrate the wedding and reception, and enjoy ourselves.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at Manti Temple

I have done enough family history that I knew my 4th Great Grandmother is buried in Spring City.  Like other locations, if I am in Sanpete County, I make an effort to stop and visit her grave.  I think the last time I was able to stop was about 2003, so it had been about 15 years.

Paul, Aliza, Hiram, and Lillian Ross at the grave of Johanna Johannsson Benson (Bengtsson)

Here is how we are related.

My mother’s name is Sandra Jonas.

Her father was Wilburn Norwood Jonas (1924 – 1975).

His father was Joseph Nelson Jonas (1893 – 1932).

His mother was Annetta Josephine Nelson (she went by Annie) (1864 – 1907).

Her mother was Agnetta Benson (she went by Annie) (anglicized from Bengtsson) (1832 – 1873).

Her mother was Johanna Johansdotter (which shows up on the tombstone as Johansson) (1813 – 1897), who was married to Nils Benson (anglicized from Bengtsson).

I really don’t know tons about Johanna.  Nels August Nelson makes only passing reference to his grandmother.  I have been unable to find when she immigrated to the United States.

Hiram and Aliza Ross waiting for a hummingbird to land on them

Johanna Johansdotter was born 15 February 1813 in Öringe, Veinge, Halland, Sweden.  She met and married Nils Bengtsson on 4 July 1830 in Veinge, Halland, Sweden.  Nils was born 1 August 1802 in Brunskog, Tönnersjö, Halland, Sweden.  Together they had 8 children together.

Agnetta Nilsdotter born 9 Dec 1832.

Lars Nilsson born 11 May 1835.

Ingjard Nilsdotter born 17 February 1839.

Christina Nilsdotter born 21 June 1841.

Bengta Nilsdotter born 19 March 1843.

Nils (Nels) Nilsson born 23 August 1846.

Borta Nilsdotter born 6 April 1849.

Johan Petter Nilsson born 31 August 1855.

Nils passed away 12 March 1859.

Johanna was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 11 May 1861.  Agnetta was baptized 10 November 1863, Lars 5 May 1860, Ingjard 5 May 1861, Christina 4 February 1866, and Nils Jr 5 May 1860.  Johann joined 7 September 1893 after immigration to Utah.  The other two were after their deaths.  Bengta and Borta did not join or immigrate to Utah.

Johanna’s daughter Agnetta (Annie) traveled with her husband Johan Nilsson from Halmstadt, Sweden through Liverpool, England docking in New York City, New York on 3 June 1864.  I cannot tell that Johanna traveled with Johan and Agnetta.

Most of the children upon traveling to the United States were given the last name of Benson instead of Nilsson.

The children spread.  Agnetta went with her husband to Logan, Utah.  Lars went with his family to what is now Sandy, Utah.  Ingjard to what is now Sandy.  Christina to Vernon, Utah.  Nils to Spring City, Utah.  John also to Sandy.  For whatever reason Johanna went with Nils to Spring City and remained there the rest of her days.  She passed away May 1897, we do not have an exact date.  Nils served a mission from 1892 to 1894 back to the Scandinavia mission.

Manti Temple 2018

An interesting tidbit about our trip to Manti.  We stayed in a restored home of James Marks Works.  He was the brother-in-law to Brigham Young.  It was an early home with various additions, modifications, and ultimate restoration.  James Marks Works and Phebe Jones had a daughter named Mary Ann Angel Works.  Mary Ann is the second wife to Nils Benson and they had 9 children together.  The home in Manti we stayed may very well have been visited by my 3rd Great Grand Uncle and his 9 children, all of which were grandchildren of James Marks Works.  James Marks Works died in 1889 and the first of the 9 children were born in 1892, but James’ son James Marks Works (Jr) kept the home and continued working the sawmill behind the home.

Here is a picture of the Manti Temple from James Marks Works’ home.

Manti Temple from James Marks Works’ home

Another interesting side note that I remembered from the last time I walked around the Spring City Cemetery.  Orson Hyde is also buried there.  I walked the kids over to Elder Hyde’s grave and we snapped a picture there as well.  I explained his role as an Apostle, President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Dedication of Palestine for the return of the Jews, clerk to Joseph Smith, lawyer, Justice on Utah Supreme Court.  The kids didn’t seem to care much…

Hiram, Lillian, and Aliza Ross at the grave of Orson Hyde

Here is Orson’s short biography from the Joseph Smith papers.

8 Jan. 1805 – 28 Nov. 1878.  Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge.  Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut.  Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe.  Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812.  Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1819.  Joined Methodist church, ca. 1827.  Later affiliated with reformed Baptists (later Disciples of Christ or Campbellites).  Baptized into LDS church by Sidney Rigdon and ordained an elder by JS and Sidney Rigdon, Oct. 1831, at Kirtland.  Ordained a high priest by Oliver Cowdery, 26 Oct. 1831.  Appointed to serve mission to Ohio, Nov. 1831, in Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio.  Baptized many during proselytizing mission with Samuel H. Smith to eastern U.S., 1832.  Attended organizational meeting of School of the Prophets, 22–23 Jan. 1833, in Kirtland.  Appointed clerk to church presidency, 1833.  Appointed to serve mission to Jackson Co., Missouri, summer 1833.  Served mission to Pennsylvania and New York, winter and spring 1834.  Member of Kirtland high council, 1834.  Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834.  Married to Marinda Nancy Johnson by Sidney Rigdon, 4 Sept. 1834, at Kirtland.  Ordained member of Quorum of the Twelve by Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer, and Martin Harris, 15 Feb. 1835, in Kirtland.  Served mission to western New York and Upper Canada, 1836.  Served mission to England with Heber C. Kimball, 1837–1838.  Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri, summer 1838.  Sided with dissenters against JS, 1838.  Lived in Missouri, winter 1838–1839.  Removed from Quorum of the Twelve, 4 May 1839.  Restored to Quorum of the Twelve, 27 June 1839, at Commerce (later Nauvoo), Hancock Co., Illinois.  Served mission to Palestine to dedicate land for gathering of the Jews, 1840–1842.  Member of Nauvoo Masonic Lodge, 1842.  Member of Nauvoo City Council, 1843–1845.  Admitted to Council of Fifty, 13 Mar. 1844.  Presented petition from JS to U.S. Congress, 1844.  Participated in plural marriage during JS’s lifetime.  Departed Nauvoo during exodus to the West, mid-May 1846.  Served mission to Great Britain, 1846–1847.  Presided over Latter-day Saints in Iowa before migrating to Utah Territory.  Appointed president of Quorum of the Twelve, 1847.  Published Frontier Guardian at Kanesville (later Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie Co., Iowa, 1849–1852.  Appointed to preside over church east of Rocky Mountains, 20 Apr. 1851, at Kanesville.  Migrated to Utah Territory, 1852.  Appointed associate judge of U.S. Supreme Court for Utah Territory, 1852.  Elected to Utah territorial legislature, 27 Nov. 1852, 1858.  Presided over church in Carson Co., Utah Territory (later the Nevada Territory), 1855–1856.  Served colonizing mission to Sanpete Co., Utah Territory, by 1860; presided as ecclesiastical authority there, beginning 1860.  Died at Spring City, Sanpete Co.

 

Personal Memories of my Grandmother (Regina Friederike Nuffer)

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

“PERSONAL MEMORIES OF MY GRANDMOTHER by Delores N. Anderson.

“I feel my little grandmother Regina along with my mother Kate were two of God’s choice spirits he placed on this earth.  When I think of the trials and tribulations she bore, it breaks my heart.  She lost 4 sons, 2 on missions and 2 in the war.  Oh, how my heart ached for her.

“When we used to go to grandma and grandpa’s, pa would drive along the country roads, and we’d pick up sugar beets and put (them) in the car.  At home grandma would clean them up, slice them, boil them, and use the syrup made from them as she would (use) sugar.

“Always in the corner of the cupboard were two crock jars with a lid or a plate over the top.  When she was setting the table for dinner she would get two small bowls, and we would be able to enjoy her green tomato preserved and peach or some other kind of preserves with our meal.

“My mother told us that her mother Regina worked for Harold B. Lee’s and Ezra Taft Benson’s mothers.  I remember how she revived dry bread for eating when the last batch was dry.  She sewed and kept a lovely home.

“As her health was failing and she couldn’t communicate with people very much.  I was one of them that could understand and figure out what she was trying to say or tell us.

“Several time Grandpa brought her up to her daughter Kates to stay when he had to be away on business.

“At one time I went down to Preston and stayed for a couple of weeks so I could hold the window frames up when grandpa was building a new house.  I new grandpa George was short tempered.  I told him, ‘If he said one cross word to me, I would go home to Downey if I had to walk every step of the way.’  Needless to say we got along fine.  Grandma Regina got quite a chuckle out of that.

Regina, Kate Naef, Carmen Cole, and Ladean Cole

I have written about Regina before.  Regina Friederike Nuffer was born 26 January 1869 in Neuffen, Esslingen, Wuerttemberg and died 10 March 1942 in Preston, Franklin, Idaho.  She married Scheibel and then Wanner.  Her daughter mentioned above is Alma Katherine Scheibel born 27 September 1889 in Pleasant Valley, Carbon, Utah and died 30 March 1969 in Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho.  She married Naef.

 

Wanner-Nuffer Wedding

John and Eva Nuffer are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Regina Friederike to John George, son of John and Anna Wanner.  John and Regina were married 31 August 1898 in the Logan LDS Temple, Logan, Cache, Utah.

John & Regina Wanner

John & Regina Wanner

Regina Friederike Nuffer was the first child of four born to the marriage of John Christoph Nuffer and Eva Katharina Greiner on 26 January 1869 in Neuffen, Esslingen, Wurttemberg.  John was a widower when he married Eva endowing Regina with two older half brothers and sister, John (1862), Georg Friedrich (1864, Fred), and Christiane (1865, who lived less than a year).  John and Eva were married 25 July 1867 in Neuffen.  Regina had three younger siblings, Charles August (1871), Adolph (1875), and Mary (1881).  Regina was christened 7 February 1869 in Evangelische Kirche, Neuffen.

Neuffen Church and Paul Ross

Evangelische Kirche, Neuffen and Paul Ross.  The Nuffer family attended this church and Regina was christened here.

When Regina was about 9 years old, she heard the Mormon Elders preach in town.  One of those Elders was John Jacob Theurer (1837 – 1914) of Providence, Cache, Utah.  She was converted to the LDS church and was baptized 1 January 1880.  Her parents were baptized 12 April 1880 in the mill race behind their home in the very early morning to avoid others in the community knowing.  Other siblings followed later.

Overlooking Neuffen

Overlooking Neuffen, 2008

The family applied to immigrate to North America in April 1880. They left for Stuttgart, then to Mannheim on a boat to Holland, over the North Sea to Hull, England where they left on the Wisconsin for New York.  From Castle Garden they went by train to Utah, finally arriving in Logan.  The family moved to Providence, Cache, Utah where Elder Theurer had connections.  Mary, Regina’s sister, was born in Providence in 1881.  John Jr worked in Montana, Salt Lake, and on the Logan Temple.  After the Logan Temple stonework was completed, the Nuffers sold their home in Providence and moved in 1883 to Preston, Franklin (then Oneida), Idaho.  Eventually they moved around until John and Eva purchased property up Cub River near Mapleton (then St. Joseph), Franklin (then Oneida), Idaho.

Regina Nuffer

Regina Nuffer

I don’t know the details of how or when, but Regina met Jacob Scheibel and married him 15 July 1889 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  Alma Katherine (“Kate”) Scheibel was born 27 September 1889 in Pleasant Valley, Carbon, Utah to Jacob and Regina.  In 1890, Jacob and Regina separated and she moved back to Mapleton.  She helped as a nurse and midwife while her mom helped tend little Kate.  It was during this time she met a young man named John George Wanner Jr who was working for her brother Fred Nuffer, also in Mapleton.

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

John George (anglicized from Johann Georg but called George by the family) was the first child born to the marriage of John George (also anglicized from Johann Georg) and Anna Maria Schmid on 29 October 1870 in Holzgerlingen, Böblingen, Württemberg.  To keep them separate, younger John George went by George.  He was christened 30 October 1870 in Holzgerlingen.  He grew up in Holzgerlingen and during the summer of 1890 met the LDS missionaries.  He was the first of the family to join the new church on 11 July 1891 and was baptized by Jacob Zollinger (1845 – 1942) of Providence, Utah.

St. Mauritius Church in Holzgerlingen where the Schmid family were christened

St. Mauritius Church in Holzgerlingen, the church where the Wanner’s attended and where John was christened.

George apparently emigrated to America with an Elder Theurer in 1891.  We don’t know who Elder Theurer is, but he was also from Providence although likely a relative of John Theurer who converted the Nuffer family.  The LDS missionary records do not show an Elder Theurer out in 1890 – 1892.  I wonder if this wasn’t meant to be Elder Zollinger in the family histories.  But this Elder helped John find employment with Fred Nuffer.  The rest of the Wanner family followed to Mapleton in 1893.  Mary, George’s daughter, indicates it was an Elder Terrell who brought John to America (Theurer sounds like Tire, and Terrell isn’t that far off, so maybe a misspelling?)

george-wanner-about-1895

George met Eliza Stirland of Providence and married her 14 November 1894 in the Logan LDS Temple.  Two children were born, Earl Wayne Wanner born 31 October 1895 in Providence and George Phineas Wanner on 22 September 1897 in Glendale.  The unhappy marriage ended in divorce.  Nobody seems to know what happened to these two sons either.

Regina received her Patriarchal Blessing 13 September 1897 from John Smith.

George and Regina fell in love and married in the Logan Temple 13 August 1898.

William Christoph and Willard John were born 9 November 1899 in Mapleton.

Mary Louise was born 5 March 1901 in Mapleton.

George was called and set apart as a missionary to Germany on 1 October 1901 .

Acceptance Letter from John to President Snow

Acceptance Letter from John to Lorenzo Snow, President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Golden was born 4 September 1902 in Mapleton while John was on his mission to Germany.

George safely arrived home 7 October 1903.

Eva Virtue was born 24 February 1904 in Mapleton.

Rulon was born 6 November 1905 in Mapleton.

About this time, George Wanner had John Nuffer build him a home on East Oneida Street in Preston.

George was then called to serve a second mission in the fall of 1907, again leaving pregnant Regina and six children.  He was set apart by Orson F. Whitney on 29 October 1907 to serve in the Swiss and German mission.  Interestingly, the missionary record says he was plurally married, but no records or history show another marriage.  I suspect it is a mistake.

Serge Nuffer was born 8 March 1908 in Preston.  Again, another child born while John was on a mission.

Regina with William and Willard in the back and then Golden, Mary in the middle, holding Serge, then Rulon, then Eva.  This picture was taken and sent to George on his mission.

George left Europe sailing on the Southwark from Liverpool, England on 9 December 1909.

1909 Southwark Manifest

1909 Southwark Manifest

George returned home on Christmas day 1909.  It was during this mission that George taught the Christiana Wilhelmina Andra family.  The Andras immigrated to Preston.  William Andra, Christiana’s daughter, would later marry George’s daughter, Mary.

In 1910, George and Regina purchased the Wanner farm (John’s parents) in Whitney (which the Wanners had purchased from the Nuffer family).  His parents moved to Logan.

1910 Whitney Census

1910 Whitney Census, Dursteller, Handy, Beckstead, Foster, Cardon, Wanner, Oliverson, Moser, Benson

About 1912, this picture was taken on the farm.

l-r: Eva, William, Golden, Serge (sitting), George, Regina, Rulon, Willard, Mary Wanner

l-r: Eva, William, Golden, Serge (sitting), George, Regina, Rulon, Willard, Mary Wanner

Another photo from about 1917.

l-r: Golden, Mary, Regina, George, William, Willard. Sitting: Eva, Serge, Rulon

l-r: Golden, Mary, Regina, George, William, Willard. Sitting: Eva, Serge, Rulon

Sadly, things started to change their idyllic world.

Golden died 26 November 1918 in Salt Lake City at age 16.   His death certificate says he was a student, Regina is the informant, but I don’t know where he was going to school.  I was told he died from influenza, but the death certificate just says natural death.

William died 1 December 1918 at Camp Genicart, Gironde, France from influenza.  He enlisted with the army 5 August 1917.  I don’t have anything to back it up, but I suspect the photo above is in preparation for his enlistment.  He left Salt Lake City for Camp Kearney on October 11, 1917.  He served in the Supply Company, 145th Field Artillery, American Expeditionary Forces.  The war did not kill him, disease did (as was common then with influenza).  His body was brought home 11 November 1920, and interred in the Whitney Idaho Cemetery.

Mary married William Andra 10 March 1920 in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple.

Willard was set apart as a missionary 7 January 1921 to New Zealand by Melvin J Ballard and left for the mission 8 January 1921.  He successfully completed his mission and ended his service 18 October 1922.

Willard John Wanner

Mary Andra, Regina Wanner, holding William Andra Jr in 1921

Willard married Gladys Laverna Thompson 15 November 1923 in the Logan LDS Temple.

Rulon was a student in Logan when he caught a cold.  It developed into acute meningitus caused by acute otitis media.  He died 25 February 1924 at the age of 18.  George is the informant.

George was called to serve a third mission to the Southern States Mission.  He was set apart 15 December 1925 by Joseph Fielding Smith and departed 16 December 1925.  He returned home 8 June 1926.

On 4 July 1926, George received his Patriarchal Blessing under the hand of William M Daines.

Serge was set apart as a missionary 24 April 1928 to New Zealand by Orson F Whitney and left for the mission on 28 April 1928.  He arrived in New Zealand 20 May 1928.  He served in the Bay, of Island, Whangerei, and Wellington districts, and on the South Island.  He cut himself while shaving and died from blood poisoning 4 October 1929.  His body was brought home for burial in Whitney with the funeral held in the Preston opera house.  Four sons were now deceased.

Eva was set apart as a missionary 16 April 1930 to California by George F Richards and left for the mission 17 April 1930.  She completed her service 6 June 1932.

George was called to serve a fourth mission to California.  He was set apart by Reed Schmid on 1 December 1933 and left for the mission the same day.  He arrived back home 6 April 1934.

Eva married Adolf Ernest Spatig 29 January 1936 in the Logan LDS Temple.

Regina, Kate Naef, Carmen Cole, and Ladean Cole

George was known for his ability to work hard.  He worked hard, raised his crops, and took exceptional care of his farm animals.  He took great price in having things looking neat and clean around the farm and yard.

George usually was out working when the sun came up.  The story is told that he was usually the first to get to the beet dump in the morning.  Apparently one morning some of the neighbors decided to beat him to the dump.  They got up early to get a head start.  Before they got to the dump, the could hear George Wanner already going down the road ahead of them.  It was still dark but they could tell it was him by the way he was talking to his horses, “Gid up – gid up – gid up.”

George and Regina sold the Whitney farm and purchased 40 acres nearer to Preston and built a home on it.  Oakwood Elementary and Preston Junior High sit on what was part of this farm.  When he retired, it was this farm he sold to William and Mary Andra.

George had a knack for being successful in the various undertakings he engaged in.  He was one of the first in Preston to have an automobile.  When he brought it home he hadn’t quite got the knack of stopping it.  He yelled “whoa” when he got in the garage, but before he got it stopped he had gone through the end of the garage.

Grandma Wanner

Regina Wanner

George built two little homes on the west side of 2nd east and 1st south in Preston.  He also built three homes on 1st south and the south side of the street in Preston.  George and Regina lived in one of those homes until she died.  Regina passed away 10 March 1942 in Preston.  She was buried in Whitney.

She was ill for quite a while before she passed away.  George would care for her the best he could and regularly took her for rides in the car.  She was unable to walk and George would carry her on his back from place to place as they went visiting.

George remarried a few months later Grace Irene Frasure (1893 – 1980) on 3 Jun 1942 in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple.  Their marriage dissolved in divorce.

John George Wanner Jr

George was having a number of health issues and had heard that Florida would help him.  He moved to Florida.  It was there he met Annie Jane Metts (1873 – 1961).  They were married 4 May 1945 in Fort Myers, Lee, Florida.  This marriage also dissolved in divorce.

George and Annie Metts Wanner in Florida

George remained in Florida until he became ill enough that he knew the end was coming.  His daughter, Mary, sent her son, William Andra, out to Florida to bring George back by train.  When William and George arrived in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, he was quite ill and taken to the hospital.  It was there that George passed away 5 January 1947.  William brought George’s body back to Preston.  George was buried beside Regina in Whitney.

Mary Louise Wanner Andra Autobiography

Phyllis, Utahna, Sergene, Mary, Colleen, Millie, Edith

Phyllis Andra, Utahna Andra, Sergene Sorenson, Mary Andra, Colleen Jonas, Millie Beck, Edith Andra

Autobiography given Nov 1961
I, Mary Louise Wanner Andra was born the 5th of March 1901 in Cub River, Idaho.  My father is John George Wanner, Jr. and my mother is Regina Nuffer.  I have five brothers and one sister, Eva.  The oldest were twin boys: William C. and Willard.  The other three boys were Golden, Rulon, and Serge.  I came sixteen months later after the twins, so Mother had three in diapers.
In the fall of 1907 my father was called on a two year mission to Germany because he spoke the German language.  We didn’t have much while father was gone, but we were happy.
He returned in the fall of 1909 and we moved back to Cub River and in the spring of 1910 we moved to Whitney, Idaho where my father bought an eighty acre irrigated farm and a one-hundred-sixty-nine acre dry farm.  This farm was owned by my Grandfather Wanner.  My father planted beets, potatoes, grain and hay.  He also had a herd of cows and there was plenty to do!  Father was very strict and we all had to toe the mark.  I remember the twin boys and Golden, just younger than myself, and I had to thin the beets.  The first two or three years the mustard weeds were so thick you could hardly see the beets.
We kids went to grade school and had to walk three miles.  Sometimes we would ride horseback in the winter when the snow was so deep.  When it got cold enough to freeze a crust on the snow, we would walk on top and cut through the fields because the snow was above the fences.  We sure thought that was a lot of fun.
Our farm was just across the road from George Benson and their daughter, Margaret was in the same grade as myself.
In the 8th grade, I was chosen to take the part of Snow White in the school play.  In school, during the recess, we would jump the rope.  There was no one who could turn it fast enough for me.  I could outrun all my girl friends.  I even used to catch the boys and wash their faces with snow.
We also had a girl’s baseball team.  We would play Franklin and the surrounding little towns.
In the summer after school was out, I would ride horses.  I would go up to the dry farm and get the cows.  One time I took my little sister, Eva and as we passed a brush, Eva fell off and broke her arm.
After I graduated from the 8th grade, I wanted to take sewing course in Logan at the A.C. (Agricultural College).  After coaxing my father for several days, he finally decided to let me go.  Inez Wallace and I went to Logan on the train.  I had been down to Logan for three days when my father came and got me to work on the dry farm, getting the land ready to plant.
In 1918, my brother, William C. died in France.  He was in the 145th infantry.  Three days later, my brother, Golden died in Salt Lake with double leakage of the heart.  Soon after, my father sold the farm and we moved to Preston, Idaho.  My father bought the Parkinson Farm (4th South and 4th East).  Then my father planted beets again and I still had a job of thinning beets.  We lived in an old home while my father was having the new one built.
In the early fall and winter of 1918, I went around to different homes taking care of the sick.  There was a flu epidemic at that time.  I was taking care of my cousin, Emma Nelson (George Nelson’s wife).  He was a wrestler.  Emma died of the flu.
In the spring of 1918, I went to work for Roy and Alabell Hull.  I cared for the twins, did the washing, ironing, and all the cooking.  They had seven in their family and three hired men.
At that time I was going with a young man by the name of William Andra.  He was born in Germany.  While my father was on his mission, he used to go to the Andra home.  My father baptized his oldest sister, Frieda.
I met William and his mother while living in Whitney.  I was still going to school.  He and his mother came by train and my father met them at the train.  After a few days, William’s mother went back to Salt Lake and William started working for my father on the farm.  I guess that is when the romance began.  I was 16 years old.
While working at the Hull’s, William would come and get me with his new buggy and horse.  We would to go Preston to a show.  At this time William was working for Jim Bodily.  Jim Bodily was the man who bought my father’s farm.  I worked all that summer for Roy Hull for $6.00 per week.
That fall of 1919, I went to Logan to the County Fair and rode race horses for Joe Perkins.  I was offered a job of being a jockey, but I didn’t desire that kind of a career, although I loved to ride horses.
In March 1920, William and I were married in the Salt Lake Temple.  We made our home in Whitney, Idaho on the Jim Bodily farm (where Lorin Bodily lives, only north in an old house).  I even helped thin some of Jim Bodily’s beets.  Our closest neighbors were George & Kate Poole.  Kate and I spent many hours together sewing.
I joined the Relief Society right after I was married.  I was asked to lead the singing.  Sister Barbara Ballif was the President at the time.
We lived there a few months, then we moved to the home where Bishop Morris Poole now lives.  My husband quit Bodily’s and he and his brother, Otto thinned beets for different farmers.  In the fall, these two would top beets at the sugar factory.  I would go out and hitch up the horses in the morning while they ate their breakfast.
November 25th, Thanksgiving, our first son was born.  My husband thought he had more time before the baby came.  He didn’t have the stove put up in the front room.  He got all excited and really sweat trying to get that stove up.  Will and Laura Dunkley were our closest neighbors.  Laura was with me when the baby was born.  Dr. Bland delivered the baby.  We named him William, Jr..  After William Jr. was about six months old, each Sunday when we went to church, as we got out of the buggy, all the young girls would come running to take little Jr.. They called him the ward baby.
Towards fall, we moved again down in the Joe Dunkley home, back of where the store now stands.  My husband got the janitor job for the church and the school house.  He was getting $30.00 a month and we were paying $18.00 in rent.  In the spring of 1922 we moved to Preston on my father’s farm.  William helped my father with the crops and after the crops were up, in the fall, we moved to Salt Lake City, out in Sugarhouse.  My husband got a job at the Royal Bakery hauling bread to the little adjoining towns.
On the 22nd of June 1923 our second child was born.  She was an eight month baby, only weighed 4 1/2 pounds.  We named her June.  Mrs. Hymas came down from Preston to take care of me.  Brother LeGrand Richards was the Bishop of Sugarhouse Ward where we lived, so we had him bless our baby.
The next fall, my husband’s brother, Walt coaxed him to go into the cafe business at Preston, so we moved back to Preston.  They had a good business.  In fact, the business picked up after my husband started working there.  The young folks as well as the older ones took to him.  I didn’t like the cafe business because the children’s father seldom saw the children with their eyes open.  William was always used to the outdoors.  He was really a farmer at heart.
On February 6th, 1925 our third child came along.  Another little girl and we named her Mildred.
In the fall of the second year in the cafe, my father wanted to sell his farm, and we bought all the land on the south and my brother, Willard bought the land on the north of the road.  There wasn’t much money in raising beets, and it was hard for us to make payments on the farm with the interest being so high the first few years.  My husband had to do extra work outside the farm work.  He dug basements for new homes, hauled sand, gravel, also beets from the beet pile to the sugar factory, any job he could get to make the payments on the farm.
On August 5, 1926 another son came along.  We named him Golden Rulon after my two brothers.  When he was two and a half years old, Golden fell out of a swing and was paralyzed (all of his right side except his arm).  At that time we had a Dr. Milford who brought him into the world.  For one whole year, every day, except Sunday, I took him to town to Dr. Milford’s for treatment.  His office was upstairs in the old Greaves building.
On the 27th of May 1928 I had a little red headed girl and we named her Colleen Mary after me.
Later on, after a few years, we started to raise peas and the pea crops were real good.  One year the peas went to four tons per acre.  No farmer beat that crop.  I helped in the fields all I could.  We couldn’t afford to hire anyone.  We didn’t have tractors at that time.  This was the year we bought our first car, a Ford.  The Doctor said it was too far to walk to town.
In the year of 1932 another little blond girl joined our family.  We named her Sergene.  I guess I wanted her to be a boy so I could name him Serge after my youngest brother who died in New Zealand on a mission.  Dr.Orvid Cutler brought her into the world.  When she was six months old, they were having a contest at the Grand Theatre for the healthiest baby.  Out of one-hundred-ninety babies, little Sergene took the first prize and we were surely proud of her.
On July 15, 1933 another son came along.  We named him Donald Wanner after my maiden name.  Seemed like all the boys had curly hair and they would pass for girls.  I had a niece from Downey, Idaho who came to help do the house work.  She was crazy about Donald and I heard her say many times that he was the cutest thing this side of heaven.
In 1934 I was six and one-half months along, but just didn’t have the strength to carry my baby the nine months.  The doctor said he wouldn’t live and for us to give him a name, so we named him Robert Lee.  He lived four hours.  By this time I was plenty busy with taking care of the children, but the older ones were big enough to help.
On the 2nd of December 1936 another son came along.  We named him Ross Leslie after Dr. L.V. Merrill.  I was also made Relief Society Visiting teacher that year.
On the 28th of February 1940 another son joined our family circle and we called him Dale.  I used to take these last two little boys, hook the team to the beet puller and put one on each horse.  They thought it was fun.
My husband would do the hauling, the older boys and girls would do the topping.  We all had to get out and work hard.  We still didn’t have a tractor at this time, but got one shortly after.  My husband used the tractor to harvest the potato crop.
In June 1942 another little fellow came along.  We named him Dennis Willard, after my brother, and April 9, 1943 our number twelve, a son was born.  His name was Larry.  When you would see these three little boys in the yard, you could hardly tell which was who, they looked so much alike.
William Jr. was in the Spanish American Mission when Dennis was born.  Dennis died when three years old.  Since this time I was put in as Relief Society Chorister.
It is 1961 and they have divided the ward and put me in as Secretary of the Young Ladies Mutual.  Our second missionary, Ross filled a mission in Brazil and the third son to go on a mission ins in the Western States.  His name is Dale and he has one more year to serve.
I am proud of my husband, sons, and daughters.
This is a story of my life and I would like to pass it on to my posterity.
Prepared and arranged November 25, 1961
Mary W. Andra

Enoch and William Ashcraft

Enoch (L) and William Thomas (R) Ashcraft

Enoch (L) and William Thomas (R) Ashcraft

Here is a picture of two brothers, Enoch and William Thomas Ashcraft.  William Thomas was born 11 February 1864 in Dresden, Greene, Indiana and died 2 November 1935 in Adrian, Malheur, Oregon.  Enoch Ashcraft was born 11 January 1868 in Greene County, Indiana and died 4 December 1938 in Nampa, Canyon, Idaho.

The two brothers were born to Jacob Ashcraft and Elizabeth Page Ashcraft.  Jacob was born 10 April 1827 in Bladensburg, Knox, Ohio and died 2 May 1915 in Benson, Cache, Utah.  Elizabeth was born 9 April 1829 in East Union, Coshocton, Ohio and died 15 July 1905 in Hyde Park, Cache, Utah.