Lillie, Dean, and Gary

This is another photo sent to me by Nelda Clontz Lemburg, whose mother is a Sharp.  This is a better copy of the photo than the one I had.

Lillie Sharp, Gary Blanch, and Dean Sharp

Gary Blanch, Lillie Sharp, and Dean Sharp

I have previously written of “Uncle Ed” and included this photo.

This is Lillie Elva East Sharp with her son, Dean Sharp, and grandson, Gary Eugene Blanch.

Lillie Elva East was born 16 February 1888 in Warren, Weber, Utah to Louisa Calder East and Joseph Uriah East.

She and Edward William Sharp married 19 May 1909 in Plain City, Weber, Utah.

As I mentioned in the article about Uncle Ed, together they had 10 children, nine of which lived to adulthood.

Grandpa, Milo James Ross, said that his Aunt Lillie, who quintessentially became his mother, was a beautiful woman.  He loved her but his life was dominated enough by Uncle Ed that he did not get to spend as much time with her as he wished.

Edward William Sharp

I thought I would write about Edward William Sharp today (some also list him as William Edward Sharp, I am not clear which is correct), known to the family as Uncle Ed.  He has a tender, yet thorny, position in the family.

Ed Sharp and Bob (?) 17 February 1949

Ed Sharp and Bob (?) 17 February 1949

Edward William Sharp was born 25 October 1887 in Plain City, Weber, Utah, the seventh child to Milo and Lilly Sharp.  My Great Grandmother, Ethel, was Ed’s younger sister, number 11 in line.  I have written more of Ethel’s marriage to Jack Ross.  Ed Sharp comes into the family line more closely when Ethel died in 1925.  She left behind five children, namely: June, Milo, Paul, Harold, and Earnest.  The four children were taken back to Paul, Minidoka, Idaho in 1925 to be raised by their Ross grandparents, James and Catherine Ross, while Jack got back on his feet.  As winter came and progressed the family struggled.  Earnest passed away the fall of 1925 in Rupert, Idaho.  Jack was gone for unknown reasons and James and Catherine called Ethel’s family to come get the four children.  Starting that winter of 1925-26, Milo Ross was raised by his Uncle Ed.  June went to live with her paternal grandparents, the Streeters in Ogden.  Paul and Harold were raised by Ed’s siblings, Vic Hunt and Del Sharp respectively.  Sadly, Paul fell from a loft in a barn in 1932, broke his arm, and suffered a concussion that would take his life in 1932.

Edward Sharp met and married Lillie Elva East 13 May 1909 in Plain City.  She was born 16 February 1888 in nearby Warren, Weber, Utah.  Together they had 10 children.

Lillie Elva East Sharp

Lillie Elva East Sharp

Edna Louise Sharp born 11 January 1910 in Plain City.

Florence Evelyn Sharp born 30 June 1911 in Plain City.

Marjorie Lillian Sharp born 23 June 1913 in Plain City.

Ethel Sharp born 8 July 1917 in Plain City.

Ethel Sharp and Wayne McCool

Ethel Sharp and Wayne McCool

Elmer George Sharp born 15 June 1919 in Plain City and died 12 November 1923 in Plain City.

Ruby Elaine Sharp born 13 February 1922 in Plain City.

Ruby Sharp

Ruby Sharp

Milo Riley Sharp born 27 November 1927 in Ogden.

Milo Riley Sharp (1924 - 1955)

Milo Riley Sharp (1924 – 1955)

Josephine Sharp born 18 March 1927 in Ogden.

Edward Junior Sharp born 24 January 1930 in Ogden.

Dean Sharp born 28 April 1935 in Ogden.

Lillie Sharp, Gary Blanch, and Dean Sharp

Lillie Sharp, Gary Blanch, and Dean Sharp

Back (l-r): Steven, Reed, Brent; Front: Lorraine, Lois, Dean, Teresa Sharp

Back (l-r): Steven, Reed, Brent; Front: Lorraine, Lois, Dean, Teresa Sharp

As a reminder, Grandpa, Milo Ross, was born in 1921 in Plain City.  He falls right in the middle of the entire family and became one of the siblings.  To tell the difference between Milo Ross and Milo Sharp, I will use their last name.

Milo James Ross

Milo James Ross

Unfortunately, things were not quite that easy.  Ed farmed a nice little farm in Plain City.  He also had some cows, pigs, and other animals.  The family grew up in the Depression with all the anxieties and difficulties that came with it.  Fortunately the farm was mostly paid for and the farm provided for itself and the family.

Despite technically being blood to Ed, Milo Ross was treated differently than the other children.  Milo Ross was not allowed to eat with the rest of the family.  When the family was done with the meal, then Milo Ross could eat.  Often alone.  Milo Ross was expected to work longer than the rest of the family, into the time while the rest of them ate.  Milo Ross was also expected to arise earlier and get things in order for the day before the rest of the family.  He did not often get to eat with the rest of the family for breakfast and often only got some bread and milk.  He was also given some of the more undesirable jobs around the farm.  For example, it was his job to tend the onions which often left him smelling of them and he found that embarrassing.

L-R: Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp, Howard Hunt, Milo Sharp, Ruby Sharp

L-R: Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp, Howard Hunt, Milo Sharp, Ruby Sharp

Ed also had some drinking issues and had a certain temper.  Of course his family saw the issues that arose as part of the alcohol, but it was Milo Ross who felt it.  He was the one who suffered the wrath of Ed’s drinking bouts at the end of a belt or sometimes worse.  While Milo Ross loved his cousin-siblings, the relationship was not as kindred with Ed.

On Horse l-r: Harold Ross, Howard Hunt, Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp (arm only), Janelle England, Eddie Sharp.  In front l-r: Ruby Sharp, Lucille Maw, and Milo Riley Sharp.

On Horse l-r: Harold Ross, Howard Hunt, Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp (arm only), Janelle England, Eddie Sharp. In front l-r: Ruby Sharp, Lucille Maw, and Milo Riley Sharp.

Ruby Sharp, Lois Robbins, Milo Ross, Milo Sharp

Ruby Sharp, Lois Robbins, Milo Ross, Milo Sharp

Milo Ross was only one year in age from Ruby who he ran around the countryside with.  They were close enough that they would hold hands.  They did quite a bit together.  He was also close to Milo Sharp, but he was still three years behind him in age.  The older siblings, Edna (who went by Louise), Florence, and Ethel were good to him, but were close to each other and did mostly their own thing.  Ed kept Milo Ross busy that he did not get as much time with the younger children but he grew close with Josephine and Edward (known as Eddie in the family).  Dean was young enough that he was around him some, but did not have as close of a relationship.

L-R: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp, and Bob Martin.

L-R: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp, and Bob Martin.

As I mentioned in the story of Ed’s parents William & Mary Ann Sharp, she also went by Lilly, the Sharp and Stoker families came to Utah as converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  A number of issues arose in Plain City and families left the church.  Ed’s parents followed that suit remaining with the Episcopalian faith.  Ed and Lillie did as well, but were not very active.  The Mormons continued to work on bringing the families back to the church.  The Sharp family started to work through Delwin’s family first and the faith spread through Ed’s nieces and nephews and into his own family.  Only one of Ed’s siblings joined the LDS faith while alive, and that was Vic in 1975.

Edward Sharp, Delwin & Vilate Sharp, 13 August 1957

Edward Sharp, Delwin & Violet Sharp, 13 August 1957

Marjorie, Ethel, and Ruby all joined through the waters of baptism on 12 May 1939.  Milo Ross joined 2 July 1939 (only after 18 as Ed would not give consent otherwise).  Louise, Florence, Milo Sharp, Josephine, and Eddie all joined 3 January 1943.  Dean was the last on 31 October 1943, he was not 8 in January to join with the remainder of his siblings.

As soon as Milo was of age, he looked for opportunities to get out.  He eventually married, moved in with his in-laws, and then the impending war took his services abroad.

Milo Ross did not tell only negative about Uncle Ed.  Grandpa regularly told of how he learned to work hard under Uncle Ed.  While somewhat an outsider, Ed kept in contact with the extended family and Grandpa’s position in the family meant he was regularly tending to his Grandmother, Lilly Sharp mentioned above.  While it was his strict duty to clean out his Grandma’s bedpan, keep the kitchen and house wood split and stocked, and whatever else she needed or wanted.  Grandpa relished those moments in her home and with her.

Lillie East Sharp died 4 September 1942 while separated from her husband.  She had started divorce proceedings but died before they completed.  She was buried in Plain City.  Milo Ross remembered her as a beautiful lady who he sometimes told his woes, but she acknowledged the issues but took no steps to resolve them.

Ed died 24 August 1962 in Othello, Adams, Washington.  The family brought him home and buried him in Plain City too.

William E Sharp Obit

My Handsome Father

Similar to what I did for my Mom’s birthday this year, I thought I would catalog some of Dad’s childhood through photos for his birthday.  I will only take him through about 1961 when he graduated from high school.

Happy Birthday Dad!

Dad was born in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  He and Grandma, Gladys Donaldson Ross, lived with her parents Dave and Dena Donaldson.  Milo and Gladys lived in Ogden until 1946 his father, Milo Ross, returned from World War II.

8 weeks old

Color photo of Baby Milo with Proud Mama, Gladys Ross

Milo with Grandma Donaldson in late 1943

Baby Milo and Gladys Ross

Color Portrait 1 in 1945

Color Portrait 2 in 1945


Milo with Aunt Dena Donaldson in 1944

Dad with Grandma

Milo Ross and Joan Stauffer in 1944


Dad and Grandma in 1944

Gladys and Milo with sled in 1944

Milo kissing his Mom

Milo with his Uncle Davie Donaldson

Winter 1944, notice the tribute to his father with the stripes on his arm

Dad with a wagon painted for him

The family then moved to Plain City and lived in a little log house (that Milo Sr was born inside in 1921) on 4200 West.  As you can see below, the house now had a clapboard outside.

Milo and Gladys in 1945

Mary Blanch and Milo Ross in 1946

Smiling in 1947

Milo, Gladys, and his tricycle

Milo with his Grandma, Dena Van Leeuwen Donaldson, and Great Grandma, Mary Elizabeth Williams Donaldson Stoker.

In 1948 the family moved into a new home on 4800 West in Plain City.

Milo and Judy Ross in 1948 on carousel

Gladys Ross holding Judy (left) and Caroline (right) and Milo standing in front in 1948

Caroline, Milo, and Judy Ross about 1950

Judy, Milo, and Caroline Ross with Santa about 1951

First day of school about 1953

Unknown, Unknown, Unknown, Milo, Gladys, and Judy Ross at Yellowstone in the mid 1950’s

School portrait about 1954

Milo in his scouting uniform about 1954

The Ross family moved to the current home on 4100 West in Plain City in 1955.  You can see the previous home in the photo above.

Yearbook picture about 1956

Eagle Award clipping in 1957

Eagle Scout

Duty to God Award clipping

Duty to God Award in 1959

Weber High School Graduation 1961 clipping

Parley & Eliza Wagstaff

This is a bit of a peripheral line for me, but since a cousin made the information available, I am happy to share it here.  All the credit goes to Julee Hicks for this post.  Nearly everything in this post will be from the biographies and photos she forwarded.

Eliza and Parley Wagstaff

From the Autobiography of Parley:

“I, Parley LeRoy Wagstaff was born April 9, 1903, in Glendale, Oneida (now Franklin) County, Idaho, to William Addison and Mary Magdalina Wanner Wagstaff.  The fifth child to join this union, I was blessed May 10, 1903.

“My earliest recollection was when I went to the Logan Temple to be baptized on April 18, 199 by Joseph M. Smith and confirmed April 18, 1911 by Thomas Morgan.  At the age of six I started school which was in a one-room building which served as a church and school with a black stove to keep it warm.  Father, being the custodial, it fell my lot and my brother Bill’s to go and build the fire in the mornings and at night we had to sweep and dust so it would be ready for school the next day.

“The school house being two and a half miles away we had to walk or ride a horse.  A horse fell on my leg and my Dad put a splint on it and I stayed in bed while it healed.

“At the age of 12, I was ordained a Deacon, May 3, 1914 by Joseph M. Smith.  I served as president for awhile.

“In the summers I worked for neighbors for very little money and my board.  In September 1919, we moved to West Weber; I and Bill drove a team of horses with our belongings from Idaho to West Weber.  In October or November, we were quarantined with a disease and didn’t start school until the first of 1920, then we went to Wilson, I graduated on May 29, 1920.

“I was ordained a priest March 1, 1925 by David Hancock.  I spent my time helping on the farm in the summer and running a grain binder all over Weber County.  In the winter I helped feed cattle for Lu Keller and helped Dad milk cows.

“On January 17, 1928, I was ordained an Elder by Francis F. Stratford Sr.

“On March 14, 1929, I was married to Eliza Blanch in the Salt Lake Temple.  We have been blessed with five children, two boys and three girls.  One passed away at birth.

“We have lived all our lives in West Weber, running a diary farm.  On January 5, 1964, I was ordained a Seventy by Spencer W. Kimball, and on August 9, 1970, I was ordained a High Priest by Francis E. Stratford Jr.”

This is all I have of Parley’s autobiography.  Here is his funeral program.

Here is the biography of Eliza:

“Eliza Dorthea Blanch Wagstaff was born August 2, 1908 in West Weber, Weber County, Utah.  She was one of nine children born to Joseph and Laura May Etherington Blanch.

“Like most young girls she attended school, participated in church activities and helped her parents on the farm.

“Eliza considered it a privilege to work in various homes before her marriage.  She says to know people is to love them.

“Her marriage to Parley L. Wagstaff took place in the Salt Lake Temple, March 14, 1929.  They moved several times; the last time into the old family home where she was born and reared.  They were the parents of five children, Duane LeRoy, Elelyn  W. (Purdy), LaNea W. (Rawson), Brent William and an infant daughter who died at birth.

“Before her marriage Eliza taught a Sunday School Class with Mary Penman for five years.  For 25 years she has been an ardent worker in the Primary; starting in 1933 as a teacher.  She was appointed second counselor to President Isabell Wagstaff in 1943.  Two years later she was released.  She held this same position twice under President Una C Greenwell; first, from March 1957 to August 1958 and from 1962 to 1964.  From 1949 to 1957 she helped the 11 year old Guide boys become second class scouts and graduate from Primary before they were ordained Deacons.  She was appointed by President Thomas O. Smith to work in the North Weber Stake Primary Board, February 3, 1958 and was assigned tot he Guide Patrol Department.  She was released August 20, 1962.

“Sister ELiza had the privilege of teaching Evelyn during her three years as Mother Bee Keeper, daughter Beehive girl.

“Sister Wagstaff was appointed second counselor to President Leila C. Heslop in the Ward Relief Socity January 3, 1965.  She was changed to first counselor September 12, 1965, and is currently working in this capacity.  She has been a visiting teacher for several years.

“Parley and Eliza were called to work on the Old Folks Committee in May 1955 and are still working on this assignment (1968).

“Eliza has been a member of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers since 1947 and has held the following positions in the organizations: Captain from 1953 to 1955 and Historial from 1961 to the present time (1968).

“The following quotation is from Sister Wagstaff:  “The crowning glory of my life came with motherhood.  Children of angels of God in disguise; they are idols of hearts and households.”

This photo was taken at a birthday party for Sarah Judkins in 1941.

Back (l-r): Eve Baxter Blanch(1904-1992), Voletta Belnap Blanch(1905-2000), Lee Stoker(1910-1998), Laura Blanch Hancock(1903-1963), Wilford Newell Judkins(1881-1956).  5th Row: Alta Bailey, Albert Bailey(1919-2009), Parley Wagstaff(1903-1996).  4th Row: Nina Judkins(1924-2010), Laura Mae Blanch(1873-1942), Eliza Blanch Wagstaff(1908-1992).  3rd Row: Lynn Judkins, Ruth Hancock(1922-1998), Ethel Blanch Stoker(1910-1987), Don Blanch(1913-1997), Heber Hancock(1902-1960).  2nd Row: Newell Judkins(1917-1979), Myreta Judkins, MaryBell Judkins(1919-2000), Sarah Judkins(1899-1974), Keith Stoker(1930-1990), Val Hancock(1929-2010), Gene Hancock.  Front: Bobbie Blanch, Jesse Stoker(1932-1997), Joyce Judkins, LaNae Wagstaff, Evelyn Wagstaff, Duane Wagstaff, Reed Hancock, Jerri Blanch.

Eliza died 12 March 1992 in West Weber.  She was buried 15 March 1992 in the West Weber Cemetery.  Parley died 18 January 1996 in Bountiful, Davis, Utah.  He was buried 22 January 1996 beside his wife.

William and Maria Wagstaff

Back row: Willard, William, Annie, Parley, Maria, Jesse. Front row: Elsie, Edna, Herbert.

Since this is another peripheral line, I will not get to write much on this family.  But this photo I thought deserved to be shared with others.

Maria Magdalena Wanner, the mother of this family in the photo, is the sister to my Johann Georg (John George) Wanner Jr.

William Addison Wagstaff was born 7 November 1860 in Kirstead, Pinxton, Derbyshire, England.  He passed away 31 May 1931 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.

Maria Magdalena Wanner was born 12 Sepember 1873 in Grünkraut, Tübingen, Württemberg to Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  Her whole family joined the LDS church in 1891 and immigrated to the US in 1892 settling in Logan, Cache, Utah.  She passed away 23 October 1952 in Ogden.

William and Maria were married 17 June 1896 in the Logan LDS Temple.  To this marriage were born 11 children.  All of which were born in Glendale, Franklin (then Oneida County), Idaho.

George William Wagstaff born 26 January 1897, died 4 February 1897.

James Addison Wagstaff born 24 June 1898, died 14 March 1913.

Annie Eliza Wagstaff born 27 December 1899, died 20 December 1940.  I do not think she married.

Wilford John Wagstaff born 28 August 1901, died 23 June 1903.

Parley Leroy Wagstaff born 9 April 1903, died 18 Jan 1996.  Married Eliza Dorothea Blanch 14 March 1929.

Willard Lesley Wagstaff born 3 March 1905, died 21 January 1973.  Married Mary Isabell Gibson 19 October 1927.

Jesse Olsen Wagstaff born 9 January 1907, died 27 October 1991.  Married Berta Edna Gibby 28 October 1936.

Herbert Spencer Wagstaff born 11 November 1908, died 19 March 1962.  I do not believe he married.

Edna Leona Wagstaff born 10 July 1910, died 11 January 1997 in Kaysville, Davis, Utah.  Married Horace Raymond Owen 10 March 1933.

Elsie Magdalena Wagstaff born 7 August 1912, died 4 December 1990.  Married William C Coleman 17 January 1974.  I do not know if she had a marriage before that.

Albert Wanner Wagstaff born 8 July1915, died 19 August 1970.  Married Marvel Irene Higley 2 October 1948.

The entire family moved to West Weber, Weber, Utah after the last child and before 1920 and remained there the rest of their lives.  Most of these children died in or near the Ogden area.  One or two returned to the Preston, Franklin, Idaho area, probably due to relationships from before the move.

The individuals in the photograph above are as follows from left to right, front row consists of the three children in front.  The photo above was taken about 1914 after James had died, but before Albert was born.  Aren’t they a cute little family?

If you have more information to add to this family, I would be happy to correct or add to it.

Sharp tragedies

It seems in order that I give some more stories I have found out recently concerning the Sharp Family History. 

Someday I will have to back up and do a history or outline for other family lines that I have learned so much about.

It is the stories that are most memorable, which are quickly passed down and remembered. Sadly though, they are the ones that are most traumatic. The Sharp line is one that certainly has not been immune to tragic tales.

Robert Ford Hunt, grandson of Victorine Mary Sharp and Robert Edward Maw; son of Ruby Ada Maw and Joseph Herbert Hunt is the first of our line. He was driving a farm truck when he failed to stop for a train near Marriott. He was 19 in 1931.

Paul Ross, the son of Ethel Sharp and John William Ross was taken to live with Victorine Sharp (Ethel’s sister) and Fred Hunt. In 1932, near the age of 10, he fell out of the loft of a barn in Plain City. He passed away three days later from a concussion. For an interesting note, he was born in Paul, Idaho.  To read more about this family, follow this link: Ross-Sharp Wedding.

Bert Fredrick Hunt, son of Fredrick Lawrence Hunt and Victorine Sharp, and Bert’s son Robert, were both electrocuted in 1960 in a Plain City dairy barn. Grandpa (son of Victorine’s sister, Ethel) told me that he was there that evening and helped them with their duties in the barn. When he grabbed the milk cooler it zapped him. It wasn’t very bad but he turned off the breakers and told Bert and Bob about it. We don’t know if they did not heed and turned it back on or what, but that same cooler would electrocute the two that evening. The milk man found them the next morning. Grandpa made the comment that it could very well have been him lying there. Grandma was apparently with him and both could have been part of the tragedy.

Edna Louise Sharp (she went by Louise) was the daughter of Edward and Lillie East Sharp. She married Ralph Anthony Blanch. They went to Othello, Washington for a missionary farewell in 1968.  In their rush of the morning, they were hit head on in an automobile crash. Both of them died in that automobile accident.

Florence Sharp, daughter of Edward and Lillie East Sharp, married Leonard Neilson. They had a son named Douglas Ray Neilson. Grandpa said they were going north through Willard in 1940 and there was a line of traffic. It was raining that day and the rains of previous days caused some washing out of the mountains. At this point in the road at Willard only a few cars were allowed to follow the grader as it would clean the mud and water off the road which kept reappearing from the rains. It was in this environment that Grandpa and Doug were in the back of the truck while Ed was driving. They finally started moving forward and Grandpa went to the passenger side of the vehicle. Doug went over to tell Ed something. When he leaned down towards the cab, putting his hand on the cab, he slipped (the old rounded top cabs). He slipped down between the cab and bed of the truck falling right in front of the wheels. It was the people in the car behind that flagged Ed down neither he nor Grandpa realizing Doug had fallen out. He was pronounced dead at Brigham City.

Marjorie Lillian Sharp married Farrell Clontz. His family had an old mine claim in Montana near the Canadian border. He was contacted at some point and told something along the lines that they needed to do some work on the mine or the claim would fall through and not be valid or something to that effect. So, that summer in 1955 he took his brother in law Milo Riley Sharp (differentiated from his grandfather by the same name) and they went to work the mine some. They took Farrell and Marjorie’s daughter, Nelda to help with the domestic side of life. Farrell was teaching Milo how to do the packing and loading of dynamite. We obviously don’t know what exactly happened. They did not come down for dinner so Nelda went up to find them. Calling out for them, nobody answered. Entering the mine, she found the lower portions of their bodies with nothing remaining of the rest.

Sherry Sharp, daughter of Edward Junior Sharp and Delores Salter, in a complete moment of irony, fell out of the car in the hospital parking lot. In the moment of rushing her mother to the hospital to give birth she fell from the car and was run over. She was flown to Seattle where she passed away days later from the trauma on Halloween, 1956.

Edward and Delores had another daughter whose plane went down on a berry picking trip in Valdez-Cordova, Alaska. She left behind a husband and daughter.

Anyhow, there are some other stories, but I have less information with them so they would be more speculative.

But for the sake of keeping track,

Milo Ray Sharp’s family would move to Sunset, Davis County to farm.

Delwin Sharp would remain in the Plain City area all his life.

Austin Sharp would move to Washington State.

Ernest Sharp would remain in Plain City.

William Edward Sharp moved to Washington State.

Victorine Sharp and her husband Fred Hunt would remain in Plain City.

Mary Irene Sharp would marry Oscar Childs Richardson and move to Tremonton.

Edith Sharp would marry Clements Richard Martin and move to Southern

Ethel Sharp would move to Idaho returning to Plain City. There she would
have her last child which birth would take her life.