Adventuring in Alaska

My cousin, Deanne Driscoll, shared this article with me about my Great Uncle and Aunt Otto and Elizabeth Andra.

Otto and Elizabeth Andra family, August 1961

Otto and Elizabeth Andra family, August 1961

Adventuring in Alaska – for less than $120 a person

By Phyllis J Park Tribune correspondent

A three-and-a-half week tour through the rugged Canadian country …  spotting moose, lynx, mountain goats, there are and caribou along the highway …  Fishing, swimming and leisurely sightseeing their way to Alaska for less than $120 per person, proved to two Utah couples that vacation time can be “Adventure Time.”

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Andra, 4406 S. 3200 West street Granger, and Mr. and Mrs. Dan D. Lehman, 4425 Albright Dr., Holladay, were a bit apprehensive about tackling the Alaskan route and had been warned to be prepared for any emergency but, at the conclusion of their 7000 mile round trip with no flat tires, no car trouble, and good driving conditions, “We’re ready to go again next year, it was great!” they commented.

With a suitcase each, a grub-box with a small supply of food including dehydrated goods, a five gallon can a fresh water, and one spare tire, they started out.

They made camp by the roadside each night or at handy camp-grounds in the Yukon Territory, replenishing their food supply along the way and getting fresh water from nearby waterfalls and streams.  Meals were cooked over two one-burner gas stoves and they took the collapsible table and chairs for added comfort.

The Lehmans slept in sleeping bags on air-mattresses in a tent while the Andras “bedded down” in the back of their 1954 station wagon.

They took ten days to travel from Salt Lake City, to Alaska, going via Glacier National Park in Montana.

There were a few rough spots along the famed 1527 my all Alaska highway, built in 1942, connecting Dawson Creek, B.C.  With Fairbanks, but they found road repair crews constantly on the job and their only trouble came from dust and flying rocks from passing cars.

“Cautious driving was our secret to no car trouble!”  Mr. Andra stated “and we took our time, never going over 50 miles an hour, with frequent stops and lay-overs to enjoy the sights.”  At a service station half-way up to Alaska we heard a fellow in an expensive make car, bemoaning the fact he had already experienced 14 blowouts and when he “dug” away from us leaving a shower of gravel, we thought we knew the reason why.

“The milepost were what we liked,” they said.  It’s a simple yet thorough method of guiding travelers along the way by means of numbered milepost and a mileposts guide-book, describing conditions, accommodations, and services at each post.  There are also handy telephone boxes on poles along the roadside for emergency calls.

Six fun-packed days were spent in various cities in Alaska where they visit the huge gold dredges that strained out thousands of dollars worth of gold each day, splurged $25.00 for a fling at boating and fishing in the Valdez Harbor with the net result of 64 various, tasty fish, and they watched it become dark at 12:45 a.m. and begin to lighten up an hour later.

And what did the women wear on the trip?  “We packed lightly with pedal-pushers and blouses as the main items in our wardrobe,” said Mrs. Andra.  “We didn’t need our coats, it was hot in the daytime and sweaters were enough that night. We found we needed our two pairs of flat-heeled shoes and advise others to take plastic or rubber overshoes to use in the wet, muddy spots they may encounter.”

They said at the border it was necessary to show identification such as driver’s license or birth certificate and since Mr. Andra was born in Germany he had to show a passport.  And they had to assure customs officers that they have sufficient funds with them to cover their trip and possible emergencies.  Checking with your car insurance company concerning foreign coverage was suggested by these travelers, too.

The Salt Lake Tribune HOME Magazine, September 15, 1957, p 30.

Liz and Otto Andra

Liz and Otto Andra

Otto Carl Andra was born 15 May 1902 in Meissen, Germany.

Otto married 25 November 1925 in the Salt Lake Temple to Rebecca Amelia Christensen born 6 March 1904 in Mink Creek, Franklin, Idaho.  She died 16 December 1931 in Salt Lake City.

Otto and Rebecca had two children, Rebecca Ila Andra (1926-2006) and Otto Carl Andra (1929-1929).

Otto remarried 17 February 1932 in the Salt Lake Temple to Elizabeth Mauermann born 27 October 1911 in Salt Lake City.

Otto and Elizabeth had six children, Elizabeth, Iona, Carl Otto, Albert (1938-2009), Carol, and Virginia.

Otto died 20 June 1982 in West Valley City, Utah.

Elizabeth died 14 June 1998 in Salt Lake City.

Otto and both wives were buried in Wasatch Lawn Memorial Park, Salt Lake City.

Hutton – Donaldson Wedding

Archibald and Sarah Waddell Hutton are pleased to announce the marriage of their son Francis Osborne Hutton to Mary Donaldson, son of William and Catherine Scott Donaldson.  Francis and Mary were married 7 January 1862 in Frontenac Township, Ontario.

I have previously written of Mary’s brother, Joseph Russell Donaldson, who is my third great grandfather.  My cousin, Mark, stumbled upon these pictures so I thought I would make them available.

Francis and Mary had eight children which I will list what I know below.

Francis Osborne and Mary Donaldson Hutton with unknown individuals

Francis Osborne and Mary Donaldson Hutton (on the far right) with unknown individuals

Francis and Mary Hutton with unknown family

Francis Osborne and Mary Donaldson Hutton (sitting center) with unknown family

William Osborne Hutton born 29 March 1863 in Pittsburgh, Frontenac, Ontario and died 27 June 1930 in Lethbridge, Alberta.  He married Mary Christine Gillis (1870-1958) 1 June 1893 in Fort MacLeod, Alberta.

Nancy Etta Hutton born 6 February 1866 in Pittsburgh and died 27 April 1956 in Lethbridge.  She married David James Whitney (1861-1936) 23 May 1886 in Pittsburgh.  She remarried after David’s death to Newton Parsons in 1940.

Archibald Hutton born 14 February 1868 in Pittsburgh and died 24 May 1946.  He married Emma Flora Todd (1878-1953) 9 June 1897 in Joyceville, Frontenac, Ontario.

Francis Henry Hutton born 27 March 1870 in Pittsburgh and died 14 March 1937 in Lethbridge.  He married Lillian May Sinclair (1887-1977).

James Alexander Hutton born 30 May 1972 in Pittsburgh and died 5 May 1938.  He married Mary Loney (1881-1963) in 1902.

John Albert Hutton born 14 November 1876 in Pittsburgh and died 25 December 1967 in Grand Forks, Yale, British Columbia.  He married Sarah Mary McLean 15 September 1909 in Whitmount, Frontenac, Ontario.

Ernest Stafford Hutton born 4 March 1879 in Pittsburgh and died 29 July 1916 in Calgary, Alberta.  He married Mabel Rosemont Keeler.

Mary Elizabeth Hutton born 2 February 1883 in Pittsburgh and died 18 May 1968.  She married Francis Orton McLean (1884-1956) 30 January 1907.

Far Flung

I thought another entry would be in order.  A few notes of interest first.

Tonight I again played Dr. Abbott in Squash.  Do you know how humbling it is to be whooped by a 60 year old man in Squash every week?  He is an orthodontic professor at the Dental School Amanda attends.  Anyhow, it is not all bleak.  I beat him 2 of 6 tonight, and 2 of 6 last week.  One of the games tonight was a complete shutout.  He did not make a single point!  Yeah, I am getting my game back.  It just doesn’t seem very impressive against a 60 year old!

For the family history plug, I have two miniature miracles to give.  Family history is one of those things that just keeps on giving.

I received an e-mail from a Juan Jose Breuer Moreno in Buenos Aires suburbia.  Instantly the Breuer name in his name had my interest piqued.  Well, he was sending me an e-mail about family history.  Come to find out, we are exactly 6th cousins.

Going back far enough, I had a set of great something grandparents whose last name was Breuer.  We are talking they were married in Kirchheim, Prussia on the 22 Jul 1777.  Their daughter, Anna Catharina Breuer would marry a Wilhelm Jonas.  A name that would come down through the years to be my mother’s maiden name.

Anna Catharina Breuer had a half brother named Carl.  That is Juan’s ancestor.  So I have officially opened communications with a relative who lives in Argentina.  Who would have ever thought I had ties to Argentina by blood?  I look forward to learning more about the family.  I do recognize that he lives in an area called San Isidro, which is a very affluent area.  It is also an area with heavy ties to the government there.  It will be interesting to learn of their history and if perchance it ties to the history of Argentina.

He tells me he has a full time genealogist working for him.  I wish I could afford someone to help out in the old East Germany!  Luckily this line comes from Rheinland which does make it somewhat easier, besides the language barrier.  At any rate, just what I have seen so far, this genealogist is very thorough and appears to have ALL the information one could want in relation to dates and places for important events.  I am especially interesting in learning what he has for the ancestors of the Breuer line, for what I have only goes one more generation (to1720).  Hopefully he has opened up a whole load more.

For another little miracle.  I received an e-mail from a lady who was inquiring about Sarah Amelia Donaldson from Ontario Province, Canada.  I always knew my Donaldson’s came to Utah via Ontario Province and Ireland.  So I looked into my records to find I did have a Sarah Amelia Donaldson.

I responded to her e-mail but alas, it was not the same one.  It is not uncommon to get e-mails that end up not taking you anywhere.

Oddly, a few days later, she e-mailed me back and said she had the strangest story (I don’t know the details, so I am assuming quite a bit here).  That she had told her mother that I have a different Sarah Amelia Donaldson.  Her mother made the comment that she had some records on that Sarah.

Her mother went and dug out a packet of papers.  At some point in the past, a lady knocked on the door with this packet.  She knew that her mother was related to the Donaldson family and left the packet with her.  For what reason, I am not sure.  She didn’t know what to do with it, it was any relative of hers so she stuck it away.

Here I come with a different Sarah Amelia, and this lady offers to scan all the pages and e-mail them to me.  I can tell you that I have received over 100 e-mails of scanned documents on my Donaldson family.  Granted one brother many years ago moved to Northern Utah and started my line.  But as far as I can tell, all the rest remained in Frontenac Township of Ontario Province.  She sent me scores of documents providing children, families, and information on families I had not traced too much.  (It is a line I have wanted to pursue, but have not).  She gave me information that traced this line of the Donaldson family across Canada to British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan.  These are lines that would have been difficult to establish noticing how much they moved about.  One line even goes to the Seattle area.

Well, I have made it through about half of the e-mails.  I have to admit, I am a bit tired of opening e-mails and inserting the information, but what a treasure of information.  Some of the family group sheets are very complete with all the dates.  Others just have names, and I will have to hunt down more on them at some other time.

But I am grateful to have added a good score of family to the file.  There is plenty more to go.  I am sure of that.  Just information I need to round out what she gave me would keep me occupied for a good while.


Well, there is a bit of an update.  Life continues interesting.