Jim & Ko Tateoka

Jim & Ko Tateoka

Scanning photos for a friend, I stumbled upon this photo in a set of pictures that seem to be an Emerson Ward party likely in the early 1980s.  Since I recognized these two, I thought I would share.  Rather than write a history of them, I will share their detailed obituaries.  Jim & Ko lived not too far from me when growing up.  I remember meeting Ko on several occasions at Brucia Crane’s home as a young kid.  Jim sometimes would help move water for the Werners who lived near us.  A couple of times while we swam in canals, he would pull up and visit with us and tell us to be careful.  Later, I come to know their children, and Ted has become a very good friend of mine.  Interesting who comes in and out of our lives.

Jim Suyetaka Tateoka Hazelton, Idaho Jim Suyetaka Tateoka of Hazelton, Idaho was called back to his heavenly home on November 1, 2006, at the age of 83. He died of complications related to Alzheimer’s disease. Jim was born on February 20, 1923, in Garfield, Utah to Tokizo and Natsuko Tateoka. When he was a young child, the family moved to Ogden, Utah. He was fourth in a family of five children. Jim grew up and acquired his love of farming on the small truck farming operation the family ran. Jim graduated from Ogden High School in 1941. He excelled in his studies maintaining excellent marks throughout his formal school years. Jim served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He saw action in Italy. Jim was a member of the highly decorated 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Many of his army buddies were Japanese Americans from Hawaii. They taught him to speak “Pigeon English” and to play the ukulele. He would sing Hawaiian songs to his family. Some of the songs included, “Don’t Say Aloha When I Go,” “Sweet Leilani” and “Hula Oni Oni E.” This provided many hours of enjoyment to his children. Jim was a quiet person and yet he had a quick wit and a “fun” side. After he was discharged from the Army, he and his brother Matt purchased a farm in South Jordan, Utah. On Febrary 11, 1956, Jim married Ko Takeuchi in Salt Lake City, Utah. They recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with all their family in attendance. He continued to farm in South Jordon and with Ko began to raise a family of four sons and one daughter. In 1969, Jim took a “leap of faith” and moved his family to farm in Hazelton, Idaho. The family has received many blessings from this move. He was a member of the LDS Church and served as a home teacher and membership clerk to four bishoprics. Jim and his family were sealed and his marriage solemnized in the Ogden Temple May 25, 1976. He is survived by his wife Ko, and children, Mark (Itsuko), Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, Paul (Nadine), Hazelton, ID, Penny, Portland, OR, Ted (Rebecca), Hazelton, Idaho, Tom (Jami), Waukesha, Wis.; grandchildren, Luke, Charlotte, Joseph, Elise, Benjamin, Claire, Olivia, Sophia, Amelia, Julia, Grace, Mae and Tak; his brother; Tom of Riverton; and sister, Momoko of Salt Lake City. He was preceded in death by his parents and brothers, Sam and Matt. The funeral will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006, at the Emerson LDS 1st Ward Church, 127 S. 950 W. in Paul, ID, with Bishop Ted Tateoka officiating. A viewing will be held Friday, November 3, 2006 from 7-9 p.m. at the Hansen Mortuary Burley Chapel, 321 E. Main St. and one hour prior to the service from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. at the church. Interment will be at the Paul Cemetery with military rites. The family would like to express their gratitude and heartfelt thanks to Dr. Richard Sandison for his faithful and tireless service, and to the staff of the Cassia Regional Medical Center and Hospice for the loving care that was extended to Jim and his family during his stay. The family would especially like to thank Barbara West his attending nurse for her kindness and excellent care she gave to Jim.

Ko Takeuchi Tateoka died peacefully in her home on April 14, 2013. Her loving family surrounded her, as did the soft light of the late afternoon sun, fresh flowers in colorful bunches, and Luna, the new family cat. Ko was 80 years old.
The Tateoka family will receive friends on Friday, April 19, 2013 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in the viewing room at the Morrison Payne Funeral Home on 321 E Main St. Burley, Idaho. Funeral services for Ko will be held on Saturday, April 20, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the Emerson 1st Ward LDS Church located at 127 South 950 West, Paul, Idaho. (Bishop Burt Belliston officiating). Prior to the funeral, a viewing will take place in the Relief Society room of the Emerson LDS Church from 10:00 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Burial services will be held immediately following the funeral at the Paul Cemetery on 550 W 100 N Paul, Idaho.
Ko was born in the Sugar House area of Salt Lake City, Utah on May 25, 1932. Her parents, Seiichi and Tsune Takeuchi had immigrated to the U.S. from the coastal city of Mikawa, Ishikawa, Japan 14 years earlier in 1918. Ko was the third and last of three daughters born to the Takeuchis. Older sisters, Kimi and Fumi were ages 12 and seven at the time of Ko’s birth.
In 1935, Ko’s family moved from the Sugar House area to a home and small truck farm on 2213 South 4th East in Salt Lake City. Ko entered first grade at Madison School on State Street and 24th South and continued attending the school through the ninth grade. She then attended Granite High School on 3303 South 500 East and graduated in 1949. Ko earned her teaching degree in Business Education in 1954 from the University of Utah. She took a teaching position at Olympus High School where she taught typing and shorthand from 1954-1956. Throughout her life, Ko gave much credit to her father Seiichi who had always stressed the importance of education. Despite the many hardships and barriers of those times and as a result of his influence, Ko and her two sisters received their college educations.
In February of 1956, Ko married Jim Tateoka, a farmer from Garfield, Utah and moved to South Jordan Utah. Jim and his brothers farmed ground on 10000 South 2700. It was there that four sons and a daughter where born to Ko and Jim. In 1969, they moved their young family to a farm in Southern Idaho’s Magic Valley off of Kasota Road in the Emerson area. Ko was a fulltime homemaker and mom until 1980 when she re entered the teaching ranks. She taught 3rd grade at Eden Elementary School in Eden, Idaho and later took a teaching position in the business department at Minidoka County High School in Rupert, Idaho. Ko retired from teaching in 1993. She found teaching to be a very rewarding and fun profession.
Ko enjoyed membership in various community organizations including the Kasota Sagehens, the Delta Kappa Gamma Society, The Mini Cassia Retired Teachers Association and the area “Nisei” Club. She was a strong member of the LDS Church, serving in many positions in the Emerson 1st Ward and Paul Stake. Ko enjoyed gardening, traveling, movie going, watching football and visiting with her kids, grandkids, and many friends. She loved the holiday season and the cheer, lights, gifts and joy it always brings.
In her later years, Ko cared faithfully for husband Jim who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. He passed away in the fall of 2006. In October of 2010, Ko began her extended stay at Parke View Rehabilitation and Care Center in Burley, Idaho. She resided there until returning to her own home on Kasota Rd. in recent weeks.
Ko is survived by her five children, 13 grandchildren, and three great grandchildren. They are: son Mark and his wife Itsuko of Miliani Hawaii and their two children, Luke, also of Miliani, and Charlotte of Salt Lake City, son Paul and his wife Nadine of Hazelton, Idaho and their three children, Joseph of Chicago, Illinois (wife Alison, son, Parker), Elise Mongillo, from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, (husband, Anthony, sons, Oliver, and Nikolas) and Benjamin of Provo, Utah (wife, Alexa), daughter Penny from Portland, Oregon, and her daughter, Claire from Brooklyn, New York, son Ted and his wife Becca from the Emerson Area, and their four daughters, Olivia Brown of Provo, Utah, (husband, Braeden Brown), Sister Sophia Tateoka ( currently serving in the Honolulu, Hawaii Mission) and Emi and Ju Ju (Emerson Area) and son Tom and his wife Jamie of Waukesha, Wisconsin and their three children, Grace, Mae and Takeuchi. (Ko’s parents and sisters, Kimi and Fumi are deceased.)
Many many sincere thanks are due the following individuals and groups: The wonderful staff at Parke View Rehabilitation and Care Center, Dr. Glen Page, Deanna, Pam and Amanda of Horizon Hospice, Bishop Burt Belliston, Dustin McCurdy and family, Loa Maxwell and Margaret Merrill, The Emerson 1st Ward Relief Society, Jan Allen, Mildred Whitesides, and Ralph, Ben and Kristie. Thanks also to the many friends who called, stopped by, and brought in meals, sweet eats, cheer, and support during Ko’s time at home. We appreciate you!
Services are under the direction of Morrison Payne Funeral Home, in Burley.

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Brigham Young College 1915 Crimson Yearbook

I am a member of a Cache Valley Group on Facebook.  After some people posted a number of old photos, I asked if anyone knew if Brigham Young College had yearbooks and if someone had one for roughly 1915.  Within a day, Jennifer Johnson, a cousin of mine had found a copy of the Brigham Young College Crimson yearbook and made it available to me.  Here is a copy of the full 1915 Brigham Young College Crimson Annual if you are interested.

Sure enough, there on page 31 is my great-grandfather, Joseph Nelson Jonas (1893 – 1932).

Joseph Nelson Jonas’ Brigham Young College yearbook picture

Here is the full-page.  This is page 31 of the pdf.  The front of the yearbook says Crimson Annual 1915.  Page 4 shows that it includes the classes of 1915, 1916, 1917, and 1918.

Brigham Young College Crimson yearbook, page 31

Here are two copies of his diploma.

Joseph Jonas graduation diploma from Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah

 

I also found Joseph’s 1st cousin, once removed, Paul Ernest Nelson (1888-1970), was one of the teachers at BYC.  An interesting side note is that the page below states he, “Likes his Ensign.”  He and Martha Eunice Ensign were married 19 August 1914 in the Salt Lake Temple.  It also states he “[e]xpects to be a professor in psychology.”  Their first son, Paul Ensign Nelson, was born 26 June 1916 in Berkeley, California while he was attending school.

Brigham Young College yearbook, page 26

Here is a dedication to the Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Charles Winder Nibley (1849-1931).

Dedication in 1915 Brigham Young College Crimson Annual to Charles Winder Nibley

Charles W Nibley was the Presiding Bishop from 1907 to 1925.  He was a kind benefactor to Brigham Young College and as Presiding Bishop was involved with the school.  Bishop Nibley was released in 1925 and became a counselor to Heber Jeddy Grant until his death in 1931.  He is one of the few people to serve in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who was not an Apostle.

Charles Winder Nibley (1849-1931)

Brigham Young College was located in Logan, Utah.  It was founded by Brigham Young shortly before his death.  The college was meant for individuals from Northern Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming.  When The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints closed all its academy’s in 1926, except Brigham Young University, it suffered the same fate.  The buildings were sold and became Logan High School.

As records become more and more available, who knows what else we may find of our ancestors.

 

 

Back from Father’s Day

Another weekend with some visits to a far away land.  Well, at least another state.  We get around!  Colorado, Idaho, and Utah all in the last few weeks.  In the upcoming weeks, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, and Virginia.  We are looking forward to it.  It should all be an adventure.

We went up to Idaho for Father’s Day.  In typical Ross household fashion, they forgot we were coming.  A couple of grandchildren gave up their bed so we could have a bed to sleep in.  Jan had just returned from the hospital in the previous day from having a kidney infection.  I hope she improves quickly.

The next morning with nobody home, I left Amanda sleeping and went to a field out at Ridgeway.  I met Ted there and we ended up chatting for several hours.  The pump on his 4-wheeler died, so we ran to Murtaugh for parts.  They had what we needed, but we were hungry, so we ran to Kimberly.  The Maverick for some reason or another was not serving breakfast, so we ran to Eden for food.  They did not have anything desirable, so we headed to Burley.  We ended up settling for a breakfast at Burger King.  We enjoyed the time to chat.  He counseled me on my marriage, and I counseled him on his being Bishop.  It really weighs on him at the moment for a variety of reasons.  Some of which I hope no Bishop ever has to endure.  Our several hours were finally up with Amanda calling me.  She was finishing the laundry.  Ted really has some heavy burdens.  I hope I never am called to such a position.  He was curious what my ideas were on what he should do in a couple of scenarios.  The only thing I had to call on was mission experience, and they did not really seem to apply.

I went home, got ready for the day, and Amanda and I headed out.  We ran to visit some people, none of which it seemed were home.  Steve and Abby Whitesides, Dennis and Joan Isaak, Paul and Kathy Duncan, Warren and Sara Crane.  It was a good day.  We stopped for burgers at Burgers Ect.  Then we had to drive to Burley to pick up Jan’s granddaughter, Shyanne (spelling).  We picked her up and headed home.  We stopped at Andra’s and dropped off her wedding photo.  At home, I crashed for a couple of hours.  I had been fighting a cold since Friday afternoon.  The nap was great, and I think it was the breaking point.  I awoke and we met Kevin and Megan Orton for dinner at Perkins.  Dustin and Maren McClellan were to meet us, but I suppose they had more important things going on.  It was great to visit with Kevin and Megan again.  They seem like they are doing really well in their lives.  I am happy for them.  Ryan and Kegan were there, and they seem like good kids.  I hope they grow up to be good, faithful, diligent boys.

Sunday arrived and I slept in I think due to the cold.  We got ready and went to church.  I really enjoyed Elder’s Quorum, Sunday School, and Sacrament.  Sunday School was about David and how one little innocent thought can lead to a whole host of things.  A look, glance led to sin.  Not only that, the desire to hide sin led to greater iniquity.  It even cost someone their life.  They made the comment that the first sin was forgiven, but the second is what cost David his exaltation.  I had never heard this before and I have no idea where Brother Dibb got this from.  I e-mailed his Sister-in-Law and hope to find out.

After church, we ran to Andra’s house and picked up May and Andra.  It was great to see May for the first time in years.  She has matured and looks like a responsible young woman.  In visiting with her, it sounds like she truly has put her life on the right track.  I hope that is truly the case.

We drove to Darrel and Cindy Schmidt’s for Sunday Dinner.  There was quite the host there.  Cindy’s sister, Mary Lou, and brother, Lanny, were both there.  Lanny brought his son Jeremy, who seems to have pulled his life around as well.  I am glad to hear the family is progressing.  I hope many others will put there life in order.

Dinner was absolutely amazing.  I loved it.  I ate two full plates.  It was good to visit with the family and to see Cindy again.  Tia was there, but did not seem too interested in visiting.  I was told that she thinks the only time I call is when I want something.  Which is partially true.  She seems to have become so cynical and pessimistic, that it is hard to visit with her too often.  So I use my coming into town as an excuse to call, which means I also would like to get my car in for a service or something like that.  They go hand in hand.

Andra left with a friend and we headed back with May.  I forgot to go visit Armina Jonas Farnes in Kimberly.  We did visit Tuck and Kathy Taylor though.  That was fun.  I also got a bunch of temple cards back, most of which I will send to St. George to have the sealings to parents done.

We crashed and went to bed.  Monday morning dawned and again we were alone in the house.  I got to see Dad for a whole 15 minutes on Sunday.  We did give him his card and Father’s Day present, which was three photos from the reception.  He said he really liked them, especially the family portrait.  We got ready and headed out.  We met Brock for lunch at Perkins at 11:00.  We had a good visit with him.  He had to run off for an art teaching appointment.  It was good to visit with him.  I am glad he is doing good things with his life.

Afterward, we stopped to visit Ted and Becca Tateoka one last time.  We visited for probably about an hour.  Then went to pay a visit to Paul and Kathy Duncan.  We were there for about 2 hours.  We visited with Kathy and she updated on all the family and everything that was going on.

I was sad to realize that I was saying good bye to many of these people for the last time for several years.  Some of them possibly ever.  On the way back down, we stopped to see Grandpa.  He had left to go pick up his army buddy, Polke at the Greyhound Station.  We left him his two photos in a frame from the wedding.  I hope he appreciates them.  They were for Father’s Day as well.  We stopped to visit the Hemsley family, and they were happy and about the usual.  Jill has flown to Pennsylvania for a week of meetings.

Anyhow, that was the weekend.  Things are well here.  I worked yesterday and today.  People seems surprised that we are now in single digits for the amount of days I have left at work.  I am going to miss the painting and maintenance.