History of Idaho: John Nuffer

Back l-r: Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman; Middle l-r: Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes; Front l-r: Karl, Athene Nuffer

From “History of Idaho” and found in Volume III starting page 1197.  “A Narrative Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People and Its Principal Interests”  This book is by Hiram T. French, M.S.  The book also says it is Illustrated and published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago and New York, 1914.

I found this book while at Utah State University originally.  I knew the history was inside but did not copy it then.  I finally returned a few years ago, found the book in the new library, and made a copy.  But at least I had it.  I found it just recently on Google Books.  This is John Nuffer, half-brother of my Regina Nuffer Wanner, not her father as some have previously indicated.  John went by John, his father John Christoph, went by Christoph and Christopher.  I have kept the spelling of the article.  You can also read his own biography too.

“A quarter century’s residence at Preston constitutes Mr. John Nuffer one of the old timers of this vicinity.  The mere fact of long residence, however, is somewhat of an empty distinction without works accompanying such residence.  In the case of Mr. Nuffer there can be found ample evidence both of long residence and accomplishments in the realm of practical affairs and in good citizenship.  Mr. Nuffer in early life was a graduate of one of Germany’s foremost schools of architecture.  All his life he has been a builder and contractor and in Preston in particular probably much the greater part of the higher class public and residential buildings has been done under his supervision, or through his business organization.

“Mr. Nuffer was born in Wuertemberg, Germany, December 4, 1862.  He is a son of Christopher and Agnes Barbara (Spring) Nuffer.  The father, who was a wine grower in the old country, came to America in 1882, first settling at Logan, Utah, but a year later came to Oneida county, Idaho, where as one of the early settlers he took up land and was a homesteader and farmer until his death in 1908.  He was born in 1835.  The mother, who was born in Germany in 1838, died there in 1865.  Of two children, John is the older, while his brother Fred is also a resident of Preston.

“The grade schools of Germany were the source of Mr. Nuffer’s education up to his fourteenth year.  At that customary age, when the German youths take up an education for practical life, he entered the Royal Architectural College at Stuttgart, where he was a student for four terms, and on leaving school as a budding young architect, he followed his profession in his native country for four years, up to the time of the removal of his father to America, when he became a resident of the western county.  Mr. Nuffer has been largely engaged in contract work since coming to Idaho, and during the past ten years has had a large business of his own as an architect and builder.  A complete list of his work at Preston and vicinity would be too long, buth some of the more prominent structures should be mentioned.  They include the Oneida Stake Academy, consisting of two buildings; the Western [should be Weston] Tabernacle; the Preston Opera House; the McCammon public school, the grade public school: Fairview, Mapleton and Whitney public schools; the Tabernacle at Grace; the high school at Grace; the Latter Day Saints church in the First Ward; and most of the business blocks as well as many of the larger and more attractive residence structures in Preston.  Mr. Nuffer is a director and secretary-treasurer of the Cub River and Worm Creek Canal Company.

“His part in civic affairs has been hardly less important than in business.  For four years, or two terms, he served as justice of the peace of Preston; one term as village trustee, and was clerk of the village board for one term.  His politics is Democratic.  He is a high priest in the Church of the Latter Day Saints, and served a two years’ mission for the church in Germany.

“In November, 1885, at Logan, Utah, Mr. Nuffer married Miss Louise Zollinger, a daughter of Ferd and Louise (Meyer) Zollinger.  Her father died December 16, 1912, and her mother is living in Providence, Utah.  Her parents were pioneers of Utah in 1862, having crossed the plains to the then territory.

“The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Nuffer has been blessed with a large family of eleven children, who are named as follows: Luther Jacob born at Providence in 1886, is a resident of Preston and is married and has two children; Willard John, born at Preston in 1888, is a graduate of Idaho State University in the law department and is a young lawyer at Downey, Idaho; Louis Ferd, born at Preston in 1889, is a school teacher in Preston; Herman Christ, born at Preston in 1891, is a student of civil engineering in the University of Moscow; Austin Eckart, born at Preston in 1893, is a high school student; Carl Joseph, born in 1895, died in 1904; Agnes Louise, born at Preston in 1898, is a schoolgirl; Myron David, born in 1900; Florence Myrtel, born in 1902, and Edwin Joseph, born in 1904, are all attending school; and Athene Barbara, born in 1907.

“As a successful man and long business builder in this section of Idaho, Mr. Nuffer has a very high opinion of the state and forecasts its taking place among the first of American states.  He has had a career of substantial self-advancement and practically all the propserity he has won due to his own labor.

“His fondness for home life has precluded any association without outside organizations except the church in which he has had a prominent part.

That ends the history from The History of Idaho.  I thought I would provide some additional details on the family.

John was born in Neuffen, Württemberg, Germany.

Louise was born in Providence, Cache, Utah.

Luther Jacob was born 21 June 1885 in Providence and died 27 January 1952 in Oak Grove, Clackmas, Oregon.  He married Rosa Morf and later Mary Crockett.

Willard John was born 19 January 1888 in Preston and died 27 January 1948 in San Bernardino County, California.  I am not aware that he ever married.

Louis Ferdinand was born 20 September 1889 in Glendale, Oneida (now Franklin), Idaho and died 19 August 1966 in Canby, Clackmas, Oregon.  He married Ruby May Jensen.

Herman Christopher was born 12 October 1891 in Preston and died 23 August 1940.  He married Virginia Pryde Simmons.

Austin Eckhert was born 6 August 1893 in Preston and died 2 March 1944 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Karl Aron was born 6 September 1895 in Preston and died 7 February 1905 in Preston.

Karl Nuffer

Agnes Louise was born 11 May 1898 in Preston and died 28 June 1983 in Downey, Bannock, Idaho.  She married Raymond Hurst.

Myron David was born 21 July 1900 in Preston and died 24 November 1976 in Logan.  He married Camille Cole.

Florence Myrtle was born 19 October 1902 in Preston and died 23 March 1994 in Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho.  She married Heber Wilford Christensen.

Edwin Joseph was born 25 August 1904 in Preston and died 21 June 1996 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  He married Jennie Arrella Smart.

Athlene Barbara was born 21 November 1907 in Preston and died 23 November 1991 in Preston.  She married Adrian Biggs Hampton.

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Finding Willie

Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke Andra Wendel

Christiana Wilhelmina Knauke Andra Wendel

A continuation of the compilation by Deanne Driscoll.

Frieda Andra continues her story: “After we arrived in Salt Lake City, we hired a hack, which is like a buggy but much nicer.  The driver sits up very high.  We couldn’t locate the Boettcher’s so we went to the L.D.S. President’s residence (Joseph F. Smith) where their daughter Ida worked.  Ida was so happy to see us.  She sent us to her sister Clara’s.  After visiting there, she gave us her mother’s address and we left to look for it as it was getting late.”

“Although we had come to America in hopes of finding my brother, Willie, whom the lady had reported as lost, I know that coming to America was God’s plan.  Our Father in Heaven works in a mysterious way His wonders to perform.  Our driver kept driving towards the address we had given him.  As we came to 9 West and 4 North, he turned.  This country was so different to us.  Then Mother saw a little boy coming down the street and we stopped to ask him directions.  Then Mother shouted, “That is my boy! My Willie!”  And sure enough it was our brother.  He couldn’t speak German.  He just stood there trembling and pointing to where the place was.  We all jumped out and hugged him.  He had been on his way to the depot to meet our train.  Mrs. Boettcher had told him we were coming when he had returned from Fairview where he had been working for that man.”

“Two blocks away lived the lady we had been hunting.  So we paid the driver $3 for driving us around all day.  When we knocked at the lady’s house, she refused to let us in.  For her excuse she said, “Keep your things out there.  I don’t want any lice in my house.”  Of course we knew we didn’t have lice, but we sat out doors on some lumber and she brought us a piece of bread and a drink of water.  Her home was filthy.  There was a pig in her house and the chickens were running in and out.  What an awful place!  When Mr. Boettcher came home, he invited us in and fed us.”

“Then a sister Rigler came and said, ‘Come.  There is an empty house you may stay in.  I will give you a couple of blankets and a lantern.’  It was about eleven o’clock by now and we were all very sleepy.  We were even too tired to look around the house.  We all slept soundly, grateful to have our brother Willie with us again.  His lips were bleeding and his feet were sore and bleeding, also.  He had not been cared for, only given a lot of cussing and lickings.”

“In the morning we looked around the house.  This house had been flooded during the time that the Jordan River had flooded this area.  It had left dirt throughout the house.  There were no windows.  Outside there was a big barn, a flowing well, and four large trees (Poplars).  It was a beautiful day.  Everything looked green.  Mother called us together to have our morning prayer.  She thanked our Father in Heaven for all his goodness and for providing us with this house, which would be our paradise.  We were so thankful to be in America.  I have never heard a more inspiring prayer in my life.  The next day Mr. Rigler came back and told Mother who owned the house.  We made arrangements to rent the house for $2.50 a month.  Then Mr Rigler took Mother to town on a streetcar to buy a stove, washtub, dishes, food, pans, and a dishpan.  While Mother was gone, we scraped the dirt out.  Sister Rigler bought glass for the windows and even helped Mother put them in.  Walter made a cupboard from some lumber he had found.  We used orange crates for chairs.  We were very busy that Saturday.  Then on Sunday we attended Sunday School.  People were very kind to us.”

“We had arrived on June 3.  On June 5, I got a job for $5 a week plus room and boarding at the boarding house.  On June 6, Walter found a job at the floor mill (Hastler’s).  He boarded with Mother.  Willie worked at a slaughter house, so we were able to get meat to eat – tails, liver, etc.  It was very good.  Mother bought Willie a small red wagon which he took to market and brought home food we had never seen before.  The cantaloupes made us sick.  We ate the corn raw, which didn’t make us feel any better.  It wasn’t long before we learned which foods to cook.” (Clara and Otto would have still been in school during the early years in Salt Lake)

Frieda continues: “Well, it wasn’t long before our little house was a cute little dream house, complete with furniture and curtains.  Soon we had some baby chicks, a dog, and a cat.  Oh, those wonderful days in a very wonderful country which was given to us by God.  God bless America!”

Written by Frieda Minna Andra Clara added the following memories: “We missed our friends and relatives and everyone dear to us. Mother was so homesick for a long time, we used to talk about Germany and cry and cry, Mother and I.  But time heals all sorrow.  We had a new life here, and new friends to make, go to school and learn a new language.  Mother got work, so did my sister, Frieda, and Walter.  Willie was our spokesman when we couldn’t make someone understand, he would help us.  He was such a help to Mother.  He worked at the slaughterhouse and got meat for it.  Then he would go to the market place and help the men there, and get fruits and vegetables for it.  Then he went to the railroad tracks and picked up coal.  So Mother was able to save the money and pay back the money she had borrowed for us to come to America.”

“It was so different here.  In Germany we lived in an apartment with lots of people around.  I had a cousin Elsa, we were such pals, but here we were so alone.  We moved into a little old house no one had lived in for a long time.  We cleaned it good and Mother bought second hand furniture and beds, and a stove that we could bake in.  There was a well by the back door so we had to bring all the water in.  Mother had brought dishes and some pots and pans, bedding, and the curtains.  My brother Walter bought some lumber and made a nice kitchen table and benches, built a cupboard so we had something to put our dishes on.  This place had a big yard, so we cleared the weeds away, and dug a large space for a garden.  Mother bought all kinds of seeds.  It was Otto’s and my job to keep the garden watered every day.  It turned out to be a beautiful vegetable garden.  We bought some chickens, the boys got a dog, I got a kitten.  It was the first time in our lives we could have them.”

NOTE: Otto Andra was baptized on 31, Dec 1910. He was living in Salt Lake City, Utah with his mother and family at that time.  The 1940 Census states that Otto had a fourth-grade education.  It was difficult for the family because they arrived only speaking the German language.  However, Otto seemed to learn fast as did the others in his family.  On 22 May 1914 his mother married John Wendel and they would eventually move to his farm.  Otto listed on a passport that he was a farmer and I assume he worked on the family farm. John Wendel would be the only father he actually would know.

 

William Fredrick Andra Autobiography

Andra Boys: William, Donald, Larry, Bill, Golden, Dale, Ross

Andra Boys: William, Donald, Larry, Bill, Golden, Dale, Ross

A copy of this autobiography of my Great Grandfather was given to me years ago.  I wanted to make it more widely available.  I will insert clarification or other information in brackets [].

The Life Story of William Fredrick Andra Sr
I was born on February 11, 1898 in Meissen, Saxony, Germany to Wilhimina [Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke] and Theodor F. [Fredrick] Andra.  My father died when I was about four years old [23 November 1902].
I was baptized in the Elbe River in [16] April 1909; came to the United States in the following month of May.  I left at the age of eleven, one year ahead of the same boat, but were for some reason delayed a month.  The boat that they had intended to take sank in mid-ocean.  “The Lord moves in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform!”
Upon arriving here, I went to Fairview, Utah to work out my board and room from John R. Anderson, who was a former missionary in Germany.  After being in Fairview for one year, I went back to Salt Lake to meet the rest of the family when they arrived.  We had quite a struggle at first, but we made out when the rest had learned the language.
At the age of fourteen, my Mother took me to Preston, Idaho to the home of a former missionary [George Wanner] who had helped convert my mother in Germany.  I thinned, hoed and topped beets; worked in the potatoes; and did many other things around the farm.  There were about 24 head of cows to be milked.  For my work, I got $18.00 a month.  The next summer I got $25.00 and then $30.00 per month.  In the winter I went back to Salt Lake City because there wasn’t any work left on the farm.
I worked in the Apex Mine in Bingham at the same time Jack Dempsey was a diamond drill sharpener.
The next winter, I worked in the coal mine at Wattis in Carbon County during the flu epidemic in 1918.  My future father-in-law [George Wanner] took the flu and was in the hospital in Salt Lake City.  Shortly after, his boy, Golden also caught the flu and died.  I took the body home to Whitney, Idaho on the train.
I did the chores for the family because they all had the flu.  After working for George Wanner for seven years on and off, I married at the age of 22 his daughter, Mary Louise Wanner, in the Salt Lake Temple on March 10,1920.
At a time when things were tough, I worked on the farm for James R. Bodily and in the winter I did janitor work at the Whitney School and meeting house for $30.00 a month.  Then our son, William Junior was born.  During this time, I helped build the sugar factory in Whitney.
In 1922, we moved to Salt Lake City and I worked for the Royal Bakery for one year and then we moved back to Preston and went into the café business with my brother Walter.  We stayed in the café business until the end of 1925.  We then bought the Wanner farm in Preston during depression times.
I used to dig basements, haul gravel and sand and haul sugar beets from the beet piles to the sugar factory for $4.00 a ton.  It was hard making this $1000.00 principal and $500.00 interest, but with the Lord’s help and a good wife and children, we paid for the farm.  In 1937 we bought nine more acres on the east side of our farm, making forty-four acres.
In 1937 I was made a High Priest.  I have been a ward teacher for thirty-six years, ward teaching supervisor for seven years, and a group leader for the High Priests Quorum for twelve years.  I am at present a director of the Mink Creek-Riverdale Canal Company.
Our main crops on this farm have been sugar beets and potatoes.  We have raised peas and corn for many years.  Our present family consists of twelve children; eight boys and four girls (of which two of the boys have passed on).
In 1947 I had a back fusion operation.  It was very successful.
Seven of our children are married and we have twenty-eight grandchildren and two great grandchildren.  One of the boys is in the Western States Mission now.  We have had two on missions previously.
I would like to pass this biography on to my son.
Prepared and arranged November 28, 1961 by William F. Andra, Sr.  (Age sixty-three)

Del Monte Shield, July/August 1969 pt 3

Here is the last page (of three) given to me from Gib & Janet Richardson of my Grandfather, Norwood Jonas.  This picture resembles much the Del Monte plant in Burley, Idaho as I remember it as a kid.  My Grandma and I would go and drop things off from time to time.  I don’t remember what we dropped off, but we were there on a fairly regular basis.  I do not remember the plan having changed much at that time from 1969 to my memories in the mid 1980’s.

doc20150124225812_001

I remember as a boy my Mom would often remind me as we drove past Del Monte that my Grandfather helped build that water tower.  I don’t know how much he actually helped build it, but since he worked in maintenance I assumed he helped with its maintenance.  Who knows.  Too much time has probably passed to know for certain.  I tried locating information on the rest of the people in the pictures.  Many are likely still alive.  I tried searching names but none were an obvious match.  I will have to do more work to pin some of them down.

Jack Wilson Woolley, 18 Jan 1919 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon to 28 Jun 1973 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.

Ron Peters (? – ?)

Wilburn Norwood Jonas, 15 May 1924 in Richmond, Cache, Utah to 14 Mar 1975 in Burley, Cassia, Idaho.

Patrick Mellott (? – ?)

Jon Reinhold Sadler, 4 April 1940 in Nevada to 6 November 1978 in Roy, Weber, Utah.

Earl Moser (? – ?)

Sheldon Rawlings, 9 Mar 1927 in Fairview, Franklin, Idaho to 8 Feb 1993 in Bountiful, Davis, Utah.

Paul Wood (? – ?)

David Carter (? – ?)

Brent Chugg (? – ?)

Del Monte Shield, July/August 1969

doc20150124225757_001The week of church when our memberships were read into the ward, we went through the usual procedure.  They read your names in, you are asked to stand, everyone welcomes you to the ward with an upright hand, you sit, and the meeting goes on.  After the meeting was done a lady stopped me.

“Are you related to Norwood Jonas?”

“Yes, I am.  Why do you ask?  How do you know that?”

“They read in your name.”

One of those points where you slap yourself for asking a dumb question.  My full name is Paul Norwood Jonas Ross.

“I knew your Grandparents.”

As time went on, we visited about the link between my Grandparents, Norwood and Colleen Jonas, and Gib and Janet Richardson.  Through a chain of events, my Grandparents had helped bring the Richardsons to Burley, Idaho from Smithfield, Utah.  My mother, Sandy Jonas, actually went to school with their daughter, LuAnn, in Utah.

Gib mentioned he thought he had some pictures of Grandpa.

When I met with him and Janet, they revealed that they actually drove all the way to Grandpa’s funeral in Richmond in 1975.  They kept in contact with Grandma through the years  and were at her funeral in 1999.  She told me stories of taking my mother to Young Women and other activities with her daughter.  Small world!

Gib gave me three copies from a booklet, the first of which is above.  The Del Monte Shield was apparently a periodical that was produced, I am not sure if it was a one time thing for the opening or if it continued.  If it was regular, I also do not know if it was just the Burley Plant or if it was for other plants as well (like the one that was in Smithfield).  Grandpa is the one farthest on the left for the cover of this booklet.  I believe the next person is Sheldon Rawlings, then Ed Carlton (in front), I don’t know the two people immediately behind Ed Carlton, then a Mr. Wood, and finally Jack Woolley.  Obviously the date is July/August 1969 and the photo is in front of the plant’s main office building for the ribbon cutting ceremony.

Wilburn Norwood Jonas, 15 May 1924 in Richmond, Cache, Utah to 14 Mar 1975 in Burley, Cassia, Idaho.

Sheldon Rawlings, 9 Mar 1927 in Fairview, Franklin, Idaho to 8 Feb 1993 in Bountiful, Davis, Utah.

Floyd Edward Carlton, 3 Mar 1914 in Randall, Jewell, Kansas to 8 Jun 1974 in Heyburn, Minidoka, Idaho.

Mr. Wood, Unknown to Unknown.

Jack Wilson Woolley, 18 Jan 1919 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon to 28 Jun 1973 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.