Christine Wanner Nuffer

Back (l-r): Ida, Joe, Louise, Clara, Anna, Fred, Bertha  Front: Christina, Laura, Preston, Charles

This is a biography written of Christina (Christine in her record in the first line) Wanner Nuffer by her daughter Louise.  I have maintained her grammar and spelling in the biography.  I have written of Charles and Christina previouslyHere is August’s autobiography.

My Mother, Christine, Wanner was born 30 March 1872 in Holzgerlinger, Germany.  She was the daughter of Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  She was the second child of a family of ten children.  Mother started school at the age of seven in 1879 and graduated at the age of fourteen in 1886 in Greengrant (Gruenkraut), Germany.

The gospel message was brought to her parent’s home in Germany by the Mormon Missionaries.  My grandparents joined the church and came to America 18 Jun 1893.  Mother was twenty-one years old then.  She was baptized on the 26th of January 1894 in Mapleton, Idaho by Heber Taylor.  She learned to speak English by talking to other people.  Her parents settled in Glendale, Idaho.  There is where she met my father Charles August Nuffer, he was living in Mapleton with his parents.  Mother did some housework for people before her marriage.  She didn’t get much money, what she earned she had to give to her parents.  My parents were married 1 Feb 1894 in the Logan Temple by W. M. (Marriner Wood) Merrill.

Father had built a rock house and they moved right in about all the furniture they had is what Father had made from boxes and other wood.  In those days they got along fine with the few things they had.

Mother always made the best of everything.  She also believed the best of everyone.  She was kind and loved her children very much.  Mother was a good homemaker and did all the sewing and knitting for her family.  She loved to do things for others.  She believed in bringing up her children by teaching them to pray and by always taking them to church.

Father was busy making a living for the family, he worked hard to secure the necessities of life.  Wood was used for fuel and Father had to get this from the canyons.  Kerosene lamps provided the lights for the house.  Father and Mother often visited the sick and sat up nights with the dead and helped lay them away.

They lived in their first house over thirteen years and seven children were born there.  In November of 1907 they moved to Preston.  For the first few years they had much sickness, Father, Clara and Annie had Typhoid Fever.  This worked a hardship on Mother as she had a young baby also.  Mother promise the Lord that if He would bless her husband to get better that she would let him go on a mission.  She was true to her word and in the spring of 1910 he left to go on a mission to the Eastern States for two years.  Mother was left to care for nine children including Laura who was the baby only two months old.  This took much courage for Mother and was a hardship but she never complained.  With the Lord’s help and the help of friends and relatives she got along the best that she could.  When Father came home from his mission they had to start all over again, by borrowing money to buy a farm.  It took a long time for them to get out of debt.

Father and Mother always took the time to go visiting relatives in the early days.  They would travel by horse and buggy.  They also liked to go fishing.  When her sister Pauline died they took Cyril (Crossley) the youngest boy and took care of him for two years.  When Annie died 25 Jan 1928 there came another big responsibility for Mother that of taking care of her two youngest children, the twins Barbara and Beverly.

Mother was set apart as a Relief Society teacher 30 April 1916 by N. S. Geddes and she retained this position until the time of her death and she was faithful in her duty.

She and Father worked on the Genealogy Committee for years going into the homes helping people prepare their family group sheets for their own use and to sent to Salt Lake.  They were very interested in Temple work and made many trips to Logan doing this work for their ancestors and others.

Father and Mother were active in their German Speaking Latter Day Saint organization until World War I.  Racial feelings at that time made it necessary for the organization to be discontinued.  Many times our parents used to practice singing Germany Hymns in the home.  Preston and Laura were born in Preston, Idaho and the rest of us in Mapleton, Idaho.  Mother died 10 August 1940 on my sister Clara’s birthday.  She is buried in Preston Cemetery.

Funeral services for Christina Wanner Nuffer were held August 14th, at 2:00 P.M.  The pall-bearers were Donald Hansen, Max Hansen, Keith Winn, Devon Winn, Donald Cummings, & Leon Nuffer.  Admiring friends and relatives assembled at the Second Ward Chapel to pay a final tribute to Christina W. Nuffer.  Scores of floral tributes were added testimony of her many admirers.

Services were conducted by Bishop Howard Hall and interment was in the Preston Cemetery.  Mrs. Christina Wanner age sixty eight died Saturday August 10th at her home of a tumor of the spine.  She had lived in Preston for thirty three years.  Surviving are her husband, three sons, and five daughters, six brothers and sisters, George and Fred Wanner of Preston, Gotlob B. Wanner of Inkom, Idaho, Mrs. Louise Bodero and Mrs Mina Bodero of Logan, Utah, and Mrs. Mary Wagstaff of Ogden.  Mrs. Nuffer reared two of her grandchildren, Barbara and Beverly Cummings with the help of her daughter Louise Nuffer Roberts.

My Blood Lineage

Walking and visiting with a professor today, she asked the name of my daughter.  I indicated it was Aliza and she stated, “A good English name.  You definitely look English, is it a family name?”  We chatted a little longer before we separated, but it left me thinking, “Exactly what are my proportions of nationality?”  Well, here they are.  Even though I had always thought I was more German, I was wrong.  I am more British.

Looking back 6 generations, I took each ancestor and assigned them 1/32 of my blood line (obviously).  I then assigned them the nation to which their ancestors came from.  Most of this generation were still in their native country so it was easy.  My “US” line is only those designated that I do not definitively know which mother country they came from because they are so long in Virginia (at least to 1780).  I debated about whether to lump the Saxon, Prussian, and Wuerttemberg lines because I am not lumping the Ireland, Wales, and English lines.  I have provided a separate indication of my “German” and “British” lines.

3/16 – England – Sharp, Bailey, Stoker, Eames, Coley, Rogers

1/8 – Netherlands – Van Leeuwen, Weenig, Janzen, Van der Meij

1/8 – Saxony – Schneider, Andra, Knauke, Richter

1/8 – Wuerttemberg – Wanner, Schmid, Nuffer, Greiner

1/8 – US – Meredith, Shepherd, Graham and Miles lines

1/16 – Ireland – Donaldson, Todd

1/16 – Norway – Christiansen, Jorgensen

1/16 – Prussia – Jonas, Schumacher

1/16 – Sweden – Nelson (Nilsson), Benson (Bengtsson)

1/16 – Wales – Williams, Jordan

All together

5/16 – British

5/16 – German

I am willing to bet all 4 of my US lines were Wales and England.  Therefore, 7/16 would be British.  This is the largest percentage of them all, almost 50% of me is British!  Maybe that is why I served a British mission (although none of my family came from within my mission).

Chester, England

Some of you have already noticed, but I uploaded a whole lot of photos yesterday.  About 250 actually were in the batch.  It includes the rest of the photos from Germany, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, and France.  I did not upload any photos from Scotland or England.  They will have to wait for the next chance I get.

We are now staying with the Byrom family in Runcorn, England.  Today we went to Chester and walked the walls.  We went through the cathedral and went down the main shopping streets.  It was a beautiful day for what we were doing.  We quite enjoyed ourselves.  We each had a pasty and a vanilla finger.  She liked it but it was too much.

We stopped by Ellesmere Port on the way home at a outlet mall.  We picked out a couple of suits and bought them.  However, we were not convinced we had the best deal so we took them back.  For as much money as we were paying, I didn’t absolutely love the suits.  With our buyers remorse, we took them back.  Interestingly, on the way out, we stumbled upon another store.  I found better quality suits that were on sale for almost half of the cost for the other two suits.  Hands down, Amanda and I both liked the second store over the first.  Now I have some new suits, one of the reasons I wanted to come back to Europe.

We had dinner this evening, some amazing lasagna.  Rose has always made great lasagna.  Afterward, Rose, Amanda, and I went to visit an older lady I taught on the mission.  She was such a sweet soul and she proved to be the same.  We have all aged, but the sociality has not diminished or changed with time.  I think Amanda quite enjoyed Jane Young and her quaint little home in the English countryside.

Yesterday, we had dinner with Jack and Brenda Millington from Howe Bridge.  Jack used to cook us as missionaries some wonderful homemade pot pies.  Visiting with him on Sunday, he offered to make me and Amanda one.  We agreed and met with them yesterday.  The pot pie was as wonderful as ever, boiled cabbage, and homemade trifle.  We really had some good laughs.  Jack even sent us off with a couple of parting gifts.

There are so many people that nearly 10 years have changed nothing.  We don’t always remember each other’s names, but the feelings are still the same.  Memories seem to come back quickly, surprisingly.  What will heaven be like?

Lausanne, Geneva, and Paris

We did not have internet in Paris, so there has been a long silence.  Perhaps that is a good thing.

As a note, I did upload some photos on the blog.  They were the ones from Dresden.  Well, a few.  I hit my limit for the month for how many photos I can upload.  As soon as July 1st hits, I will start uploading again.  Sorry.  There are some great pictures from Dresden and Meissen.

We left Bern and started making our way to Paris.  We were planning on hitting the temple in Bern but after trying to figure out the buses, taxis, or trains with attendant costs, backpacks, and traveling all day in our church clothes, we threw in the towel.  We just started out for Paris.

We made stops in Lausanne and Geneva.  Lausanne was beautiful.  The view coming in over Lake Geneva was amazing.  Some of the Alps between Bern and Lausanne were breathtaking, much like the Alps we passed through in Northern Italy.  We were supposed to catch a train directly from Lausanne to Paris, but it was fully booked.  We were able to book a train from Geneva so we knew our time in Lausanne was limited.  We decided to hike up to the Lausanne Notre-Dame.  We stopped at some church on the way, St. Michaels or whatever.  We heard an Oomp Pah Pah (who knows what they are really called) in a park near the cathedral.  It was so hot, the sun was killing us, and we were wearing our backpacks climbing an asphalt mountain made for a welcome arrival at the top.  We enjoyed the hike back down to the station to head off for Geneva.

We had limited time at Geneva as well.  We walked over and saw the famous Jet d’Eau and enjoyed what little comfort the breeze brought to us from it.  It just made us want to jump into the water for some salvation from the heat.  We walked through the park to see the flower clock, which all these watch-makers got together to show their prowess.  This massive clock set in a flower bed.  However, it was more than 6 hours off, not one of the hands was on the right time.  Watch making prowess must have been a think of the past.  We then walked up to Saint Peter’s Cathedral where we toured where John Calvin taught.  The University of Geneva is right next door.  It was all very fascinating.  We then had to make our way back down to the train station so we could head off to Paris.

The ride to Paris could have been better.  We ended up in an assigned seat going backwards.  Plus this train was going much faster than the other trains we have been riding on it and it swayed back and forth.  I got sea sick on a train!  Boy was I glad when we got to land.  I wasn’t feeling well.

The next few days in Paris were a blur.  It was miserably hot, again, for the first two days.  We walked loads and both of us ended up with blisters on our feet.  Probably more from the swelling of our feet rubbing.  I was fortunate enough to get blisters between my big and index toes on both feet.  Amanda got them on top from her flip flops.  But it was quite the couple of days in Paris.  We hit all the big sites, except the Pantheon.  Arc de Triumphe, Place de la Concorde, Place de la Bastille, Champs-Elysees, Montmarte, L’Opera, Saint Denis Cathedral, Basilique du Sacre-Coeur, Louvre, Tuileries Gardens, Invalides, Eiffel Tower, Notre-Dame de Paris, and Palais Versailles.  I am sure that is not even a full list.  But we saw them, and much of Paris in between.

Since it is late here, only a few highlights.  Amanda got to see the sun set from the top of the Eiffel Tower on the longest day of the year.  I was there too.  How romantic is that?  We had a fancy, full french meal before ascending the Eiffel’s nearly 700 steps to the second state.  Mine included deep fried turkey and marinated (basically pickled) red peppers.  I probably could have done without the peppers.  My baklava was amazing!

We climbed more than 1000 steps between Notre-Dame and the Eiffel Tower in one day.  On other days we climbed mont marte and a whole list of other stairs.  Add to that the oppressive heat, and some days we were about as good as dead when we got back to our hotel room.  Our hotel had no air conditioning!

We enjoyed French pastries every morning and every time Amanda would let us.

We did see the Venis d’ Milo and Mona Lisa, along with scores too many of other artworks.

The Metro of Paris is wonderful.  We could get to nearly anywhere in relative comfort.  However, some of them were hot and the air hung with a motor oil smell and greasiness.

We are glad to be back Oostrozebeke, Belgium for a day of laundry and relaxing.  Thursday we fly out for Glasgow.  Britain, here we come!

Bern, Switzerland

Hallo from Bern, Switzerland.  It has been a verz long daz working our waz through Northern Italz up here to Swityerland.  Zes, we are back to a German kezboard+  About the onlz thing reallz noteworthz todaz is that we made a stop over in Milano, oh and Zurich.  We will be seasoned train travelers the waz we are going.  I cannot forget to mention the endless tunnels as we worked our waz through the breathtaking Alps.

We left the Mediterranean humid heat to come to the Alpine drz heat of Bern.  Aren`t we luckz?

I know I onlz made passing mention of Venice in our verz short time on the internet there.  It was an interesting citz.  We enjozed our different Italian meals and some of the sights.  However, it was hot and sultrz.  We both ended up with blisters on our feet and enough swass for the rest of our lives.  It is the worst laid out citz on the planet.  Between the canals and small allezs, we never knew if we were coming or going.  There were manz wonderful things there, but neither of us think we will go back.

Bern has to be our favorite citz so far.  Dresden is definitelz a match, but unfortunatelz war removed most of its everz daz walk of life.  Bern was fortunate to maintain and hold most of its medieval roots.

We are learning a new currencz here.  We were feeling rich knowing the dollar was worth more than the Swiss Franc, but we are feeling poor watching how much higher everzthing is priced.

Tomorrow we hit the temple and start the long, long, long, long, long train ride to Paris.

Salzburg, Austria

A quick update.  We are back to the shortened e-mail times.

We are writing todaz from Salzburg, Austria.  We arrived last night about midnight.

Zesterdaz was spent traveling to familz historz sites for mz Wanner and Nuffer familz near Stuttgart.  We visited Holzgerlingen and Neuffen, the towns where thez lived in for several centuries.  Neuffen was well worth the trip.  Holzgerlingen turned out to be a bit of a dissapointment as there wasn’t much of anzthing old left.

On Sundaz we went in to Munich and visited the little village of Dachau.  There we spent a good portion of the daz in the Dachau Concentration Camp.  It was interesting to finallz visit one.  Dachau had built the ovens and gas showers for mass use, but fortunatelz thez were never used on a mass scale.  Thez were used, but in a limited sense.  It was interesting.

We maz have a chance to upload photos tonight.  Depending on what this computer will allow us to have access to (meaning, will we be able to find the camera or jump drive in order to upload).

News of Neuschwanstein and Hohenschwangau Castle

Sorrz I uploaded all the Dresden and Germanz photos wrong.  I have deleted them.  I have gone through and named The Netherlands photos.  Plus I have uploaded the photos from todaz.  When I get a chance I will go back and upload the Dresden, Berlin, Meißen, Roßwein, and Leipzig photos.

We have officiallz learned what the Mexicans must feel like in our nation.  Dresden wasn’t so bad as we knew where we were going and there were a few English speakers around.  Feeling our waz around Augsburg has been more difficult.  We went to a Piyya Hut tonight for some dinner and it was a new experience.  Good thing the name of the menu items are in English.  Of course, it was a joint KFC and Piyya Hut together.  The Greece-Russia soccer game was on the big screen on one side of the restaurant.  Zou can buz beer in the restaurant as well.  We ordered and left.  It was difficult.  Trzing to work out trains, even where we are if lost has been a pain.  We are slowlz picking up our German for sure!  Eingang is entrance, ausfahrt is exit.  I alreadz knew mz numbers so that has helped.

Todaz we headed for the famed Sleeping Beautz Castle, Neuschwanstein.  It took us a couple of hours to get there via tram, train, and bus.  It is a bit out of the waz.  But we took a tour of Hohenschwangau Castle as well! It was a full daz trip, but well worth while.