Jacob Friedrich Wanner

I received this history a few years ago.  I will provide it as it is written (only minor edits).  I have written before regarding Fred’s parents Johann George (John George) Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.

Back(l-r): Eva, Carma, Bert Wanner; Front: Lyman, Fred, Eva, Stanley Wanner

“(This History is written by Jacob’s daughter – Eva June Wanner Lewis – with the information sent in by Brother Fred, and Sister Mary Ann, and  her own sweet memories as well as information from Histories of Brothers and Sisters.)

“Jacob Friedrich Wanner was born January 14, 1881, in Gruenkraut, Germany, the 7th child of Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  They had a large family consisting of five boys and five girls.  They were quite poor so Grandfather went to work as a road overseer.  This left the farm work to Grandmother and the children.  They used the milk cows to do the farm work and then would milk them morning and night.  They also got wood from the forest for fuel.

Back(l-r): Mary, Christina, George, Pauline; Front: Anna, Fred, Louisa, Wilhelmina, Gottlop, John Wanner

“It rained a lot in Germany so the out buildings were connected to the house.  One time Grandma went downstairs to get some fruit.  She reached over and touched something hairy – she thought it was the devil!  It was a cow that had wandered down from the barn.

“Dad didn’t talk much about his life as a child but he did say he got a drum for Christmas and then it would disappear about New Year’s Day and he would get it for Christmas again the next year.  He may have been joking.

“The family belonged to the Lutheran Church and was very religious.

“In the summer of 1890 the Lord sent a man along the street in Gruenkraut where Grandpa worked.  He was a missionary from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.  He talked to Grandpa a long time and showed him the Book of Mormon.  He spoke in German.  When it came dinner time Grandpa took the missionary home and said,  “We’ll see Mother.”  From that day the missionaries stayed in their home and the family was soon converted.  They joined the church in 1891.

“Uncle George was baptized in July 1891 and went to America with one of the missionaries, Brother Terrell from Providence, Utah.  Brother Terrell helped him find a job to provide for himself.  He got a job with Fred Nuffer in Glendale.  Grandfather and Grandmother and the three oldest girls were baptized in October 1891.  Louise and Pauline were baptized in June 1894, Gottlob in June 1895 and Wilhelmina in August 1896.  Dad was baptized in Preston or Franklin, Idaho, on June 7, 1894, by Lars C. Larsen and confirmed a member of the church by Austin I. Merrill on June 7, 1894.  He was ordained an Elder by George C. Parkinson on September 27, 1903, and was married by Thos Morgan on September 30, 1903, at the Logan Temple.

“The family left Germany to come to America so they could worship the way the pleased.  It was a long, uncomfortable trip.  They took the train to the Rhine River and then boarded a boat and traveled up the Rhine, a journey of about 3 or 4 days.  Then another train took them to the North Sea where a ship sailed them to Amsterdam, Holland, and then on to England.  At Liverpool they boarded a ship and were on the ocean for 13 days.  Dad was 12 years old when they crossed the ocean and told us of the rough sea.  He had to hang on to his bunk with both hands to keep from being thrown to the floor.  He said he sure got sick of eggs.

“They arrived in New York and stayed there for 2 days.  Then they went to Chicago for a day and a night.  They then rode a train straight through to Franklin, Idaho, which took six days.  They arrived the 18th day of June, 1893.

“Uncle George and Fred Nuffer (the man he worked for) met them with a buggy and wagon and took them to Fred Nuffer’s place in Cub River.  They stayed for a while with the Nuffers and purchased a farm from John Nuffer in Glendale.

Gpa Wanner

“When Grandpa and Grandma moved to Whitney they sold the farm to Dad.  I don’t know if Dad or Grandpa build the sandstone house.  It had a kitchen, two bedrooms and a pantry.  It had a hand pump that pumped water from a spring.  Mary Ann and some of the children were born there.

“Dad met and married a lovely young girl, Mary Elizabeth Carter on September 30, 1903, in the Logan Temple.  They lived in Whitney, Idaho, until they bought the farm.  They worked hard to improve their farm and many times she helped him in the fields.  They built a three bedroom brick house that stood for many years until fire destroyed it years later.  Dad had a Delco generator in the garage so we had our own electricity.

Fred and Mary Elizabeth Wanner

“They had a lovely family, five girls and three boys:  Laverna C., Fredrick D., Lorin C., Florence E., Joseph J., Erma C., Mary Ann and Grace C.

“IN 1923 – Elizabeth died leaving seven children.  The youngest was almost 2 years old.  Laverna got married so that left Erma and MaryAnn to take care of the baby.  Erma would go to school one day and MaryAnn the next.  It was hard.  They tried to leave her with Aunt Ethel Barrington in Riverdale, but she got so lonely and cried all day so they went and got her.  Then Dad hired Eva Christensen to come and work as a housekeeper.  As time went on Dad and Eva (my mother) fell in love and was married June 26, 1925, in the Logan Temple. They had five children:  Carma C., L. Bertus, Eva June, Lyman G., and Stanley C.  We had a happy family life and dad always saw to it that we went to church and did what we were suppose to do.  He went when he could.  He always paid his tithing and other offerings.  He was honest in all his dealings.

Fred and Mary with (l-r) Laverna, Fred, Lorin.

“Dad was the first one in Glendale to buy a car.  We children were used to horses so we would say,  “Gid up, Gid up” when we got in the car.  About this time Dad was struck by lightening but was not harmed.

“Dad owned or had a share in the thrashing machine.  They would go around to all the farmers in Glendale and thrash the grain.  Then we would fix a big meal for all the men.   It was a real fun time for the children but a lot of work for the adults.  Dad worked as an oiler or on the thresher and had part of his finger taken off.  When we were little he told us a fox bit it off!

“Dad was a good farmer.  He took pride in all his work.  He raised hay, barley and wheat.  He always had 10 or 12 dairy cows.  He also had horses, pigs and chickens.  For many years we separated the cream from the milk in the old separator.  Then Dad took the cream to Preston to sell it along with the eggs.  In later years we had the milk truck come and pick up the milk so we didn’t use the separator anymore.  He also bought a grain chopper and prepared his own feed for the animals.  We had a big raspberry patch and used to sell raspberries for 8 quarts for a dollar.  Dad always had a big garden and a big potato patch.  He had a root cellar to keep potatoes, carrots, squash and apples over the winter.

“In the early 1930’s Dad bought silver foxes.  He built a high fence so they couldn’t get out.  He took great pride in his fox furs.  They were always excellent quality!  I remember watching him cure the furs and he took great care to make sure they were done right.  Dad always kept his barnyard as well as the rest of the farm in good repair and very neat.  His fences were always mended.

“Dad always took time out of his farm work to go to Franklin to celebrate Idaho Day on the 15th of June.  We would take a big picnic lunch and spend the day.  We rode the carnival rides and had a good time.  He always took us kids to Downata to go swimming when we finished first crop of hay.

“Dad liked a good joke… I remember how he would laugh.  He loved the radio and his favorite programs were Gang Busters, The Old Ranger and of course the news!  We all had to be quiet when the news came on.

“Dad was very active and was always working except on Sunday – there was never any work done on Sunday except chores.  He loved the Sunday paper.  He always bought the Denver Post.  It was a real shock to us when he had his heart attack because he was so active.  It happened one day when he was working in the barn.  We were all frightened and I called the neighbors to help us get him to the house.

“After that he had to be very careful so he sold the farm and moved to Preston.  They lived just down the street from MaryAnn.  He seemed to miss the farm and would putter around the yard.

“He died at the age of 74 on August 25, 1955.  He was buried in the Preston Cemetery.

Biography of Regina Wanner by Alma Naef

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The title of this entry in the book is “REGINA NUFFER WANNER taken from a biography by her daughter ALMA KATHERINE SCHEIBEL NAEF.”  I have provided other biographies of Regina, the main one can be found here.

“Regina Nuffer was born January 26, 1869, at Neuffen, Germany.  A daughter of Johann Christoph and Eva Katharina Greiner, she came to Utah with her family after they were converted to the gospel.  She married Jacob Scheibel July 15, 1889, in Pleasant Valley, Carbon County, Utah.  Her first child, Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef, was born, September 27, 1889.  When her child was 6 months old, she and her husband separated and she moved back to Mapleton, Idaho, where she stayed with her parents on their farm.  During this period she would help people when they were sick, and her mother would take care of her child.

“In about 1893 after the death of her mother she moved to Weber County, Utah, and worked for the Will Taylor family in Farr West and the Bowman family in Ogden.  She again returned to her father’s farm.

“On her way home she stopped in Logan and walked out to Providence to visit a friend.  While eating lunch she happened to think that she had left her new coat on the train.  She went back to Logan to the train station and they sent out a tracer.  In a few days she got her coat back.  After returning to Idaho she worked for several people in Franklin and Preston.  She lived in one room of her brother John’s home in Preston.  Her brother was on a mission in Germany at the time.

“On August 31, 1898, she married John George Wanner in Logan, Utah.  That winter she lived on his ranch in Work Creek or Glendale, Idaho.  In April she moved with her husband, daughter, and step son, Wayne, to the Bancroft flat a little west of where Grace is now.

“She was known as a fine well mannered woman.  Her niece, Athene Hampton, said that toward the end of her life her health was not very good and she had a hard time speaking.  When Athene and Louisa Nuffer would visit, they would converse by writing notes to each other.  She died on March 10, 1942, in Preston, Idaho.  Her funeral in Preston was very well attended.

Life History of Louisa Zollinger

 

Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman, Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes, Karl, Athene Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The full title reads, “LIFE HISTORY OF LOUISA ZOLLINGER sketch written by JENNIE S. NUFFER early details furnished by MARY Z. BULLOCK and EDWIN J. NUFFER Written November, 20, 1952”

“Louisa Zollinger was born 24 January 1864, at Providence, Utah, the daughter of Ferdinand Zollinger and Louisa Meyer.  She was the eldest of five children, her brothers and sisters being Ferdinand (born 24 January 1866), Bertha (born 3 August 1867), Mary Elizabeth (born 3 March 1870), and Sarah (born 26 July 1875).  Two children died in infancy.

“Living in a pioneer community, Louisa was subjected to all the hardships and trials of her day.  She has related many incidents concerning Indians in the early days of Providence.  She received her education in the district school, having gone through the 8th reader.

“Louisa loved to sew, and before she was fifteen she took a dressmaking course from a lady by the name of Maggie Hyrion.  She learned to cut patterns to fit them to a model.

“She was a very spirited and independent girl, and being the eldest she enjoyed telling her brother and sisters what to do.  She did what she could to help with making a living.  When she was fifteen she worked for a time in the Blanchard Hotel in Logan.  One summer she spent working at the Box Elder dairy at two dollars per week.  She helped milk eighteen to twenty cows.  The next summer she worked at a Logan dairy where she helped with the milking and cheese making.

“Louisa was quite popular with the young people and attended the dances in the community.  One dress she used to wear is still remembered by her sister Mary.  A seamstress came to the home and remained one week to sew the dress, which was of black wool trimmed with heavy black satin.  The young crowd also enjoyed house parties, candy pulls, and sleight (sic) riding parties.

“September 18, 1884, she was married to .John Nuffer at Providence, Utah, and they were sealed in the Logan Temple 15 July 1891.  They then moved to Glendale, Idaho, where her husband had homesteaded and built a small rock house.  Here she made a home for her beautiful flowers.  Snakes were very numerous, and she often told how she would send the dog into the garden first to flush out the snakes before she went into pick vegetables.

“She returned to her mother’s home at Providence for the birth of her first son, Luther Jacob.  Her next two sons, John Willard and Louis Ferdinand, were born at Glendale.

“In the fall of 1890 the family moved to Preston, where her husband had been called by the Church to take charge and superintend the building of the Oneida Stake Academy.  They rented a home on State Street for about one year until John could get a home built for them, which was a four room frame house.  Two more sons were born here, Herman Christopher and Austin Eckertt.

“In the spring of 1895 her husband was called by the Church to go on a mission to Germany, his native land.  Although Louisa had five small sons and was expecting another child, she encouraged him to fulfill the call.  A few months after her husband’s departure, her sixth son, Karl Aaron, was born.  Louisa accepted her responsibilities gladly and cared for her little family.  They did not suffer for the necessities of life, as her husband had left her provided for, and they had two cows to provided (sic) them with milk.  She was also able to knit and sew for herself and children.

“Following her husband’s return her first daughter, Agnes Louisa, was born.  Shortly thereafter John built a larger house of rock for his family.  Myron David, Florence Myrtle, Edwin Joseph, and Athene Barbara were born in this home.  Louisa also raised her grandson Karl Luther, following the death of his mother [Luther’s son].

Karl Nuffer

“Two more lovely homes were built for her by her husband, one a red brick and the other a cement block, where she lived until her death.

“Louisa was very active in the Relief Society, and served as a visiting teacher for many years.  She was very outspoken in defending the things she believed in.  She encouraged her children to seek a higher education.  Seen have attended college, two have fulfilled missions, one son has served as a bishop of his ward, and all her children have gladly accepted positions in the various auxiliaries of the church.

“She taught her children industry and thrift.  She was generous in giving to the poor, and at the same time gave encouragement to all to better their lot.  She was a good cook and neat housekeeper, and her love of sewing was evidenced in the living clothes she made for herself and children.

“The first great sorrow in her life was the death of her son, Karl Aaron on 7 February 1905, at the age of ten years.  Herman Christopher died 23 August 1940, and Austin Eckertt 2 March 1944.

“During the latter part of her life her health was very poor, but with a strong will and determination she carried on her household duties.  Her last illness (cancer) was very painful, and she spent several weeks at the L.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, and the Preston Memorial Hospital in Preston.  She was released to her home few days before her death on Thursday, 25 October 1945.  Besides her husband she was survived by eight of her children, all whom were at her bedside, also 30 grandchildren, and 22 great grandchildren.

“Beautiful and impressive funeral services were held the following Monday at 2 o’clock in the Preston First Ward Chapel.  Burial was in the Preston Cemetery on 29 October 1945.

“THE ZOLLINGER NAME

“Zollo was an old Teutonic name appearing in documents of the 9th century.  The story goes that the Zollingers operating a ferry across the Rhine River near the Lake Constance and charged a toll.  From this trade or occupation came the name Zoll, meaning toll collectors.  They were not the only ones engaged in this profession, for the Romans, prior to this time, had officials appointed to supervise river traffic and collect tolls.

“Farmers by trade, the Zollingers called their settlements Zollinc-hoven, meaning the farms of the Zolling clan.  In that day Zollic-hoven was the name of two different places, Zollikon and Zollikofen.  The present cities, Zollikon near Zurich and Zollikofen near Bern are ample evidences of the settlements and estates once occupied by the Zollingers centuries ago.

“In a manuscript appearing in the periodical of the Swiss Genealogical Society “Der Schweizer Sammler und Familienforscher” in 1935, page 57-58 and 84-85, is an essay with the title “Uber Namesforschung: Der name Zollinger”.  Its author, Gustav Zollinger, Dr. Dentist and member of the Swiss Genealogical Society brings to light in a very comprehensive way, the history and movements of our people in their many places and occupations, from which has evolved the name Zollinger in its many variable spellings.  His work is well documented with sources from court, land, census, death, parish, and tithing records.

History of Idaho: John Nuffer

Back l-r: Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman; Middle l-r: Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes; Front l-r: Karl, Athene Nuffer

From “History of Idaho” and found in Volume III starting page 1197.  “A Narrative Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People and Its Principal Interests”  This book is by Hiram T. French, M.S.  The book also says it is Illustrated and published by The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago and New York, 1914.

I found this book while at Utah State University originally.  I knew the history was inside but did not copy it then.  I finally returned a few years ago, found the book in the new library, and made a copy.  But at least I had it.  I found it just recently on Google Books.  This is John Nuffer, half-brother of my Regina Nuffer Wanner, not her father as some have previously indicated.  John went by John, his father John Christoph, went by Christoph and Christopher.  I have kept the spelling of the article.  You can also read his autobiography too.

“A quarter century’s residence at Preston constitutes Mr. John Nuffer one of the old timers of this vicinity.  The mere fact of long residence, however, is somewhat of an empty distinction without works accompanying such residence.  In the case of Mr. Nuffer there can be found ample evidence both of long residence and accomplishments in the realm of practical affairs and in good citizenship.  Mr. Nuffer in early life was a graduate of one of Germany’s foremost schools of architecture.  All his life he has been a builder and contractor and in Preston in particular probably much the greater part of the higher class public and residential buildings has been done under his supervision, or through his business organization.

“Mr. Nuffer was born in Wuertemberg, Germany, December 4, 1862.  He is a son of Christopher and Agnes Barbara (Spring) Nuffer.  The father, who was a wine grower in the old country, came to America in 1882, first settling at Logan, Utah, but a year later came to Oneida county, Idaho, where as one of the early settlers he took up land and was a homesteader and farmer until his death in 1908.  He was born in 1835.  The mother, who was born in Germany in 1838, died there in 1865.  Of two children, John is the older, while his brother Fred is also a resident of Preston.

“The grade schools of Germany were the source of Mr. Nuffer’s education up to his fourteenth year.  At that customary age, when the German youths take up an education for practical life, he entered the Royal Architectural College at Stuttgart, where he was a student for four terms, and on leaving school as a budding young architect, he followed his profession in his native country for four years, up to the time of the removal of his father to America, when he became a resident of the western county.  Mr. Nuffer has been largely engaged in contract work since coming to Idaho, and during the past ten years has had a large business of his own as an architect and builder.  A complete list of his work at Preston and vicinity would be too long, buth some of the more prominent structures should be mentioned.  They include the Oneida Stake Academy, consisting of two buildings; the Western [should be Weston] Tabernacle; the Preston Opera House; the McCammon public school, the grade public school: Fairview, Mapleton and Whitney public schools; the Tabernacle at Grace; the high school at Grace; the Latter Day Saints church in the First Ward; and most of the business blocks as well as many of the larger and more attractive residence structures in Preston.  Mr. Nuffer is a director and secretary-treasurer of the Cub River and Worm Creek Canal Company.

“His part in civic affairs has been hardly less important than in business.  For four years, or two terms, he served as justice of the peace of Preston; one term as village trustee, and was clerk of the village board for one term.  His politics is Democratic.  He is a high priest in the Church of the Latter Day Saints, and served a two years’ mission for the church in Germany.

“In November, 1885, at Logan, Utah, Mr. Nuffer married Miss Louise Zollinger, a daughter of Ferd and Louise (Meyer) Zollinger.  Her father died December 16, 1912, and her mother is living in Providence, Utah.  Her parents were pioneers of Utah in 1862, having crossed the plains to the then territory.

“The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Nuffer has been blessed with a large family of eleven children, who are named as follows: Luther Jacob born at Providence in 1886, is a resident of Preston and is married and has two children; Willard John, born at Preston in 1888, is a graduate of Idaho State University in the law department and is a young lawyer at Downey, Idaho; Louis Ferd, born at Preston in 1889, is a school teacher in Preston; Herman Christ, born at Preston in 1891, is a student of civil engineering in the University of Moscow; Austin Eckart, born at Preston in 1893, is a high school student; Carl Joseph, born in 1895, died in 1904; Agnes Louise, born at Preston in 1898, is a schoolgirl; Myron David, born in 1900; Florence Myrtel, born in 1902, and Edwin Joseph, born in 1904, are all attending school; and Athene Barbara, born in 1907.

“As a successful man and long business builder in this section of Idaho, Mr. Nuffer has a very high opinion of the state and forecasts its taking place among the first of American states.  He has had a career of substantial self-advancement and practically all the propserity he has won due to his own labor.

“His fondness for home life has precluded any association without outside organizations except the church in which he has had a prominent part.

That ends the history from The History of Idaho.  I thought I would provide some additional details on the family.

John was born in Neuffen, Württemberg, Germany.

Louise was born in Providence, Cache, Utah.

Luther Jacob was born 21 June 1885 in Providence and died 27 January 1952 in Oak Grove, Clackmas, Oregon.  He married Rosa Morf and later Mary Crockett.

Willard John was born 19 January 1888 in Preston and died 27 January 1948 in San Bernardino County, California.  I am not aware that he ever married.

Louis Ferdinand was born 20 September 1889 in Glendale, Oneida (now Franklin), Idaho and died 19 August 1966 in Canby, Clackmas, Oregon.  He married Ruby May Jensen.

Herman Christopher was born 12 October 1891 in Preston and died 23 August 1940.  He married Virginia Pryde Simmons.

Austin Eckhert was born 6 August 1893 in Preston and died 2 March 1944 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Karl Aron was born 6 September 1895 in Preston and died 7 February 1905 in Preston.

Karl Nuffer

Agnes Louise was born 11 May 1898 in Preston and died 28 June 1983 in Downey, Bannock, Idaho.  She married Raymond Hurst.

Myron David was born 21 July 1900 in Preston and died 24 November 1976 in Logan.  He married Camille Cole.

Florence Myrtle was born 19 October 1902 in Preston and died 23 March 1994 in Soda Springs, Caribou, Idaho.  She married Heber Wilford Christensen.

Edwin Joseph was born 25 August 1904 in Preston and died 21 June 1996 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  He married Jennie Arrella Smart.

Athlene Barbara was born 21 November 1907 in Preston and died 23 November 1991 in Preston.  She married Adrian Biggs Hampton.

Wanner-Nuffer Wedding

John and Eva Nuffer are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Regina Friederike to John George, son of John and Anna Wanner.  John and Regina were married 31 August 1898 in the Logan LDS Temple, Logan, Cache, Utah.

John & Regina Wanner

John & Regina Wanner

Regina Friederike Nuffer was the first child of four born to the marriage of John Christoph Nuffer and Eva Katharina Greiner on 26 January 1869 in Neuffen, Esslingen, Wurttemberg.  John was a widower when he married Eva endowing Regina with two older half brothers and sister, John (1862), Georg Friedrich (1864, Fred), and Christiane (1865, who lived less than a year).  John and Eva were married 25 July 1867 in Neuffen.  Regina had three younger siblings, Charles August (1871), Adolph (1875), and Mary (1881).  Regina was christened 7 February 1869 in Evangelische Kirche, Neuffen.

Neuffen Church and Paul Ross

Evangelische Kirche, Neuffen and Paul Ross.  The Nuffer family attended this church and Regina was christened here.

When Regina was about 9 years old, she heard the Mormon Elders preach in town.  One of those Elders was John Jacob Theurer (1837 – 1914) of Providence, Cache, Utah.  She was converted to the LDS church and was baptized 1 January 1880.  Her parents were baptized 12 April 1880 in the mill race behind their home in the very early morning to avoid others in the community knowing.  Other siblings followed later.

Overlooking Neuffen

Overlooking Neuffen, 2008

The family applied to immigrate to North America in April 1880. They left for Stuttgart, then to Mannheim on a boat to Holland, over the North Sea to Hull, England where they left on the Wisconsin for New York.  From Castle Garden they went by train to Utah, finally arriving in Logan.  The family moved to Providence, Cache, Utah where Elder Theurer had connections.  Mary, Regina’s sister, was born in Providence in 1881.  John Jr worked in Montana, Salt Lake, and on the Logan Temple.  After the Logan Temple stonework was completed, the Nuffers sold their home in Providence and moved in 1883 to Preston, Franklin (then Oneida), Idaho.  Eventually they moved around until John and Eva purchased property up Cub River near Mapleton (then St. Joseph), Franklin (then Oneida), Idaho.

Regina Nuffer

Regina Nuffer

I don’t know the details of how or when, but Regina met Jacob Scheibel and married him 15 July 1889 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.  Alma Katherine (“Kate”) Scheibel was born 27 September 1889 in Pleasant Valley, Carbon, Utah to Jacob and Regina.  In 1890, Jacob and Regina separated and she moved back to Mapleton.  She helped as a nurse and midwife while her mom helped tend little Kate.  It was during this time she met a young man named John George Wanner Jr who was working for her brother Fred Nuffer, also in Mapleton.

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

John George (anglicized from Johann Georg but called George by the family) was the first child born to the marriage of John George (also anglicized from Johann Georg) and Anna Maria Schmid on 29 October 1870 in Holzgerlingen, Böblingen, Württemberg.  To keep them separate, younger John George went by George.  He was christened 30 October 1870 in Holzgerlingen.  He grew up in Holzgerlingen and during the summer of 1890 met the LDS missionaries.  He was the first of the family to join the new church on 11 July 1891 and was baptized by Jacob Zollinger (1845 – 1942) of Providence, Utah.

St. Mauritius Church in Holzgerlingen where the Schmid family were christened

St. Mauritius Church in Holzgerlingen, the church where the Wanner’s attended and where John was christened.

George apparently emigrated to America with an Elder Theurer in 1891.  We don’t know who Elder Theurer is, but he was also from Providence although likely a relative of John Theurer who converted the Nuffer family.  The LDS missionary records do not show an Elder Theurer out in 1890 – 1892.  I wonder if this wasn’t meant to be Elder Zollinger in the family histories.  But this Elder helped John find employment with Fred Nuffer.  The rest of the Wanner family followed to Mapleton in 1893.  Mary, George’s daughter, indicates it was an Elder Terrell who brought John to America (Theurer sounds like Tire, and Terrell isn’t that far off, so maybe a misspelling?)

george-wanner-about-1895

George met Eliza Stirland of Providence and married her 14 November 1894 in the Logan LDS Temple.  Two children were born, Earl Wayne Wanner born 31 October 1895 in Providence and George Phineas Wanner on 22 September 1897 in Glendale.  The unhappy marriage ended in divorce.  Nobody seems to know what happened to these two sons either.

Regina received her Patriarchal Blessing 13 September 1897 from John Smith.

George and Regina fell in love and married in the Logan Temple 13 August 1898.

William Christoph and Willard John were born 9 November 1899 in Mapleton.

Mary Louise was born 5 March 1901 in Mapleton.

George was called and set apart as a missionary to Germany on 1 October 1901 .

Acceptance Letter from John to President Snow

Acceptance Letter from John to Lorenzo Snow, President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Golden was born 4 September 1902 in Mapleton while John was on his mission to Germany.

George safely arrived home 7 October 1903.

Eva Virtue was born 24 February 1904 in Mapleton.

Rulon was born 6 November 1905 in Mapleton.

About this time, George Wanner had John Nuffer build him a home on East Oneida Street in Preston.

George was then called to serve a second mission in the fall of 1907, again leaving pregnant Regina and six children.  He was set apart by Orson F. Whitney on 29 October 1907 to serve in the Swiss and German mission.  Interestingly, the missionary record says he was plurally married, but no records or history show another marriage.  I suspect it is a mistake.

Serge Nuffer was born 8 March 1908 in Preston.  Again, another child born while John was on a mission.

Regina with William and Willard in the back and then Golden, Mary in the middle, holding Serge, then Rulon, then Eva.  This picture was taken and sent to George on his mission.

George left Europe sailing on the Southwark from Liverpool, England on 9 December 1909.

1909 Southwark Manifest

1909 Southwark Manifest

George returned home on Christmas day 1909.  It was during this mission that George taught the Christiana Wilhelmina Andra family.  The Andras immigrated to Preston.  William Andra, Christiana’s daughter, would later marry George’s daughter, Mary.

In 1910, George and Regina purchased the Wanner farm (John’s parents) in Whitney (which the Wanners had purchased from the Nuffer family).  His parents moved to Logan.

1910 Whitney Census

1910 Whitney Census, Dursteller, Handy, Beckstead, Foster, Cardon, Wanner, Oliverson, Moser, Benson

About 1912, this picture was taken on the farm.

l-r: Eva, William, Golden, Serge (sitting), George, Regina, Rulon, Willard, Mary Wanner

l-r: Eva, William, Golden, Serge (sitting), George, Regina, Rulon, Willard, Mary Wanner

Another photo from about 1917.

l-r: Golden, Mary, Regina, George, William, Willard. Sitting: Eva, Serge, Rulon

l-r: Golden, Mary, Regina, George, William, Willard. Sitting: Eva, Serge, Rulon

Sadly, things started to change their idyllic world.

Golden died 26 November 1918 in Salt Lake City at age 16.   His death certificate says he was a student, Regina is the informant, but I don’t know where he was going to school.  I was told he died from influenza, but the death certificate just says natural death.

William died 1 December 1918 at Camp Genicart, Gironde, France from influenza.  He enlisted with the army 5 August 1917.  I don’t have anything to back it up, but I suspect the photo above is in preparation for his enlistment.  He left Salt Lake City for Camp Kearney on October 11, 1917.  He served in the Supply Company, 145th Field Artillery, American Expeditionary Forces.  The war did not kill him, disease did (as was common then with influenza).  His body was brought home 11 November 1920, and interred in the Whitney Idaho Cemetery.

Mary married William Andra 10 March 1920 in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple.

Willard was set apart as a missionary 7 January 1921 to New Zealand by Melvin J Ballard and left for the mission 8 January 1921.  He successfully completed his mission and ended his service 18 October 1922.

Willard John Wanner

Mary Andra, Regina Wanner, holding William Andra Jr in 1921

Willard married Gladys Laverna Thompson 15 November 1923 in the Logan LDS Temple.

Rulon was a student in Logan when he caught a cold.  It developed into acute meningitus caused by acute otitis media.  He died 25 February 1924 at the age of 18.  George is the informant.

George was called to serve a third mission to the Southern States Mission.  He was set apart 15 December 1925 by Joseph Fielding Smith and departed 16 December 1925.  He returned home 8 June 1926.

On 4 July 1926, George received his Patriarchal Blessing under the hand of William M Daines.

Serge was set apart as a missionary 24 April 1928 to New Zealand by Orson F Whitney and left for the mission on 28 April 1928.  He arrived in New Zealand 20 May 1928.  He served in the Bay, of Island, Whangerei, and Wellington districts, and on the South Island.  He cut himself while shaving and died from blood poisoning 4 October 1929.  His body was brought home for burial in Whitney with the funeral held in the Preston opera house.  Four sons were now deceased.

Eva was set apart as a missionary 16 April 1930 to California by George F Richards and left for the mission 17 April 1930.  She completed her service 6 June 1932.

George was called to serve a fourth mission to California.  He was set apart by Reed Schmid on 1 December 1933 and left for the mission the same day.  He arrived back home 6 April 1934.

Eva married Adolf Ernest Spatig 29 January 1936 in the Logan LDS Temple.

Regina, Kate Naef, Carmen Cole, and Ladean Cole

George was known for his ability to work hard.  He worked hard, raised his crops, and took exceptional care of his farm animals.  He took great price in having things looking neat and clean around the farm and yard.

George usually was out working when the sun came up.  The story is told that he was usually the first to get to the beet dump in the morning.  Apparently one morning some of the neighbors decided to beat him to the dump.  They got up early to get a head start.  Before they got to the dump, the could hear George Wanner already going down the road ahead of them.  It was still dark but they could tell it was him by the way he was talking to his horses, “Gid up – gid up – gid up.”

George and Regina sold the Whitney farm and purchased 40 acres nearer to Preston and built a home on it.  Oakwood Elementary and Preston Junior High sit on what was part of this farm.  When he retired, it was this farm he sold to William and Mary Andra.

George had a knack for being successful in the various undertakings he engaged in.  He was one of the first in Preston to have an automobile.  When he brought it home he hadn’t quite got the knack of stopping it.  He yelled “whoa” when he got in the garage, but before he got it stopped he had gone through the end of the garage.

Grandma Wanner

Regina Wanner

George built two little homes on the west side of 2nd east and 1st south in Preston.  He also built three homes on 1st south and the south side of the street in Preston.  George and Regina lived in one of those homes until she died.  Regina passed away 10 March 1942 in Preston.  She was buried in Whitney.

She was ill for quite a while before she passed away.  George would care for her the best he could and regularly took her for rides in the car.  She was unable to walk and George would carry her on his back from place to place as they went visiting.

George remarried a few months later Grace Irene Frasure (1893 – 1980) on 3 Jun 1942 in the Salt Lake City LDS Temple.  Their marriage dissolved in divorce.

John George Wanner Jr

George was having a number of health issues and had heard that Florida would help him.  He moved to Florida.  It was there he met Annie Jane Metts (1873 – 1961).  They were married 4 May 1945 in Fort Myers, Lee, Florida.  This marriage also dissolved in divorce.

George and Annie Metts Wanner in Florida

George remained in Florida until he became ill enough that he knew the end was coming.  His daughter, Mary, sent her son, William Andra, out to Florida to bring George back by train.  When William and George arrived in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, he was quite ill and taken to the hospital.  It was there that George passed away 5 January 1947.  William brought George’s body back to Preston.  George was buried beside Regina in Whitney.

Georg Friedrich Nuffer

Georg Friedrich Nuffer

Georg Friedrich Nuffer

I stumbled upon this old photo of Georg Friedrich Nuffer the other day.  It is not often you come across a color photograph of a family member from so long ago.

Georg is the half-brother to my Regina Friederike Nuffer, daughter of John and Eva Nuffer.  Georg is the son of John and Agnes Nuffer.  Agnes Barbara Spring passed away 29 January 1867 in Neuffen, Esslingen, Wurttemburg and John Nuffer remarried to Eva Katharina Greiner 25 July 1867 in Neuffen.

Georg was born 20 January 1864 in Neuffen.  The family immigrated to the Preston, Franklin, Idaho area in 1880, I believe to the Glendale area.  He met and married Anna Elizabeth Rinderknecht 3 April 1888 in Providence, Cache, Utah.  He died 31 March 1952 in Saratoga, Santa Clara, California.  This photo I believe was taken somewhere near Preston.  From the vehicles in the background, it was within a year or two before he passed away.  It is a gem of a picture from the wrinkled suit, bushy eyebrows, and colors.

John Nuffer

John and Louisa Nuffer Family

Back l-r: Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman; Middle l-r: Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes; Front l-r: Karl, Athene Nuffer

Here is a copy of the autobiography of John Nuffer, brother to siblings Regina Wanner (my great great Grandmother) and Charles August Nuffer.

“I was born December 4, 1862 at Neuffen, Wuerttemberg, Germany, the eldest son of [John] Christopher and Agnes Barbara Spring Nuffer. After attending the common grade schools for eight years I was confirmed in the Lutheran Church, at age of thirteen years.

“I was apprenticed to an architect builder in the building trade in the city of Stuttgart where I labored with the stone cutters and masons six months in the summer time, and attended the Architectural college the six remaining months alternately for three years, when I received my diploma as a journeyman in the building trade. The following spring I emigrated with my father’s family to America the first week in May 1880.

“My mother died when I was four years old. There was another boy, Fred, of the same mother, a year and a half old when she died. Father married another woman, Eva Katrina Greiner. Through her influence the family joined the Church.

“This is how the Nuffer family joined the Mormon Church:

“In the year 1879 the missionary, Henry Flam, a distant relative of the Nuffer family came to the city of Neuffen, the State of Wuerttemberg, Germany, preaching his religion to the family of John Christopher Nuffer in a cottage meeting. The following families attended the meeting: Jacob Schweitzer, Anton Lalatin, Abraham Kneiting. They all joined the Church and in 1880, immigrated to Utah, with the exception of the Kneiting family who emigrated in 1881. Now Eva Katrina Nuffer, wife of John Christopher Nuffer, being a very religious woman accepted the doctrine first, being somewhat out of harmony in her belief with the States’ Kirche, (State Church), the Lutheran Church, especially on the doctrine of child baptism, vicarious atonement and the punishment for Adam’s transgression. It was she who kept the doctrines before the others, so when Elder John Theurer followed Elder Henry Flam, the following year to visit them, the four families Nuffer, Schweitzer, Lalatin and Kneiting were ready to be baptized by Elder Theurer, which took place at the house of Christopher Nuffer. There was a running millrace at the rear of the house which they dammed off with planks. The baptism took place at night to keep them from disturbance, for there was much hostility in the town. The town parson especially made a tirade against it in his Sunday sermon. To avoid persecution, they decided to emigrate as soon as possible.

“They sold their holdings at once at auction sale, at a great loss to the real value. In the first days of May 1880 the three families Nuffer, Schweitzer and Lalatin left Neuffen by team to the capitol of the state, Stuttgart, from where they took the train to Mannheim (Home of Men) on the Rhine River. Here they joined a party of about thirty from Switzerland under the leadership of Elder John Theurer. From Mannheim they took two boats down the River Rhine to the North Sea. Here they took the steamer to Hull, England and then crossed England on the railroad to Liverpool. Here more Saints joined them. They left Liverpool in the company of about two hundred. After three weeks on the Atlantic Ocean they arrived in New York. From here the leaders chartered a special train which in about a weeks time went directly to Ogden, Utah, where they were royally received by some of the Saints.

“The Nuffer family then went to Logan (1880). I was baptized on the first Tuesday in August in the Blacksmith Fork River by Nicholas Summers, confirmed by John Lederman. I got a job working on the Logan Temple the first winter as a stonecutter. Father’s family bought a home in Providence and settled there. The second year I worked in Salt Lake on the Deseret University building for contractor Elias Morris as a stonecutter and mason.

“In 1882 I went with Tom Ricks to Montana to do some mason work on the Great Northern Railroad. I stayed there about six months. I came back to Logan and worked on the Logan Temple helping to finish the baptismal font and helped to point (to point is to fill and finish carefully the joints with mortar) the Temple until it was finished on the outside. In the fall of 1883 I persuaded father’s family to sell their home and we moved into Idaho and took up a homestead in Worm Creek, Oneida County, then called Preston, now called Glendale.

“On September 18, 1884, I married Louisa Zollinger and was sealed in the Logan Temple in 1891. She was the daughter of Ferdinand and Louisa Meier Zollinger. We lived at Glendale until the fall of 1890 when we moved to Preston, having been called by the Church to take charge and superintend the building of the Oneida Stake Academy.

“In the spring of 1895, I was called on a mission to Germany. I worked in the city of Stuttgart eleven months, presiding over that branch and baptized five persons. From there I went to Nuremberg where I labored six months. From there I was called to Mission headquarters in Bern, Switzerland, to edit the “Stern”, the German edition of the Millennial Star. While there I translated B.H. Roberts’ “The Gospel”, and Wilford Woodruff’s “Experiences”, and “The Key to Theology” into the German language, which were published as serials in the “Stern”.

“In the summer of 1897 I received my release and taking charge of a company of Saints, I arrived in Salt Lake the third of July and arrived at my home in Preston on the 4th of July 1897.

“After coming home I was contracting building in partnership with Joseph S. Geddes, building several residences, the Weston Tabernacle, The First Ward chapel, and several school houses and other buildings. After that I opened an architect office and planned most of the older business blocks, the Opera House, State Bank building, the Oneida Stake Science building and several other school buildings outside of Preston at McCammon and Grace.

“When Preston was organized into a village I served four years as a village trustee, and two years as village clerk until Preston was organized into a city.

“Eleven children were born to us: Luther Jacob, John Willard, Louis Ferdinand, Herman Christopher, Austin Ekert, Karl Aaron, Agnes Louise, Myron David, Florence Myrtle, Edwin Joseph and Athene Barbara.

“The foregoing was told to Jennie Smart Nuffer

September 1938

John Nuffer raised apples for many years. His orchard was located at the family home East on Fourth South Street. When he retired from public office, he continued to look after his fruit raising as well as dairy cattle. He was very proud of the fine fruit he raised and never over-charged for his produce. His health failed very fast following the death of his wife on October 1945 and he followed her in death on June 4, 1946. He was buried in the Preston Cemetery. He was a High Priest.