Pet Evaporated Milk

Here is a history of Pet milk published in the Northside Journal in Jerome, Idaho.  It provides some history of Pet Milk, aka Sego Milk.  They also had a plant in Richmond, Utah, which is where my Grandfather, Norwood Jonas worked until it closed about 1967.

Pet Evaporated Milk

Buhl, ID

Compiled by Earl Gilmartin

Condensed History Pet Evaporated Milk Corporation


1885- It started with an idea of canning as a preservative in the small town of Highland, Illinois. After a $15,000 investment the Helvetia Milk Condensing Company was born (later to be renamed PET).

1895 – After overcoming a number of growing pains, more than half the company’s sales were in the West. The “Our PET” trademark is registered and becomes the official name for the company’s leading brand.

1898 – “Our PET” helps supply Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders and other.

American fighting troops with a safe and convenient  source of milk in Spanish-American War. At war’s end, the troops scattered home across the U.S. and many, remembering the high quality milk, brought it home to their families.

1914 – Once again, the U.S. government places large orders of PET to supply  U.S. troops fighting overseas in World War I.

1929 – In the midst of the Great Depression PET becomes an important staple to American families and is able to expand its service to consumers with the creation of original recipes using PET products.

1941 – Again, PET is called upon to supply GIs fighting in World War II, as well as the citizens at home. More recipes, specifically designed with rationing limitations in mind are created to help families get a wholesome diet.

1950 – the combination of post-war prosperity and a baby boom result in more cans of PET Milk being sold than any other time in company’s 65-year history. PET also establishes its own test kitchens to develop and test new products and recipes.

1966 – PET began making “better for you” products including a Skimmed Milk and a 99% Fat Free Evaporated Skim Milk.

Today – PET Evaporated Milk continues to be a staple in millions of homes and is used in many different homes and is used in many different recipes, from main dishes, to soups, desserts and more.

We invite you to try the recipes on this site to create sensational food for your family!

Early History Pet Evaporated Milk

John Baptist Meyenberg (1847-1914) was an operator at the Anglo-Swiss milk condenser at Cham, Switzerland. Anglo-Swiss made sweetened condensed milk.

From 1866 through 1883, Meyenberg experimented with preservation of milk without the use of sugar. He discovered that condensed milk would last longer if heated to 120 C (248 F) in a sealed container, and hence could be preserved without adding sugar. When Anglo-Swiss declined to implement Meyenberg’s work, he resigned from the company and emigrated to the United States. John Meyenbert first moved to St. Louis, but soon transferred to Highland, Illinois , due to its large Swiss population. On 25 November 1884, U.S. Patents 308,421 (Apparatus for Preserving Milk) and 308,422 (Process for Preserving Milk) were issued to Meyenberg.  Meyenburg associated with various local merchants, including John Wildi, Louis Latzer, Dr. Knoebel, George Roth and Fred Kaeser and, on February 14, 1885, organized the Helvetia Milk Condensing Company. In 1899, Meyenberg assisted Elbridge Amos Stuart in producing Carnation Evaporated Milk.

John Wildi was instrumental in marketing the product nationally and internationally, especially in areas where fresh milk or refrigeration were scarce. In 1895, the company registered the Pet trademark.

The Sterling company of Twin Falls leases the Buhl Creamery facility for one year.  TFTN 11-11-1911

A transaction of importance to the dairymen of Buhl county was consummated on Saturday afternoon of last week when the Sterling Creamery Co of Twin Falls, secured by lease for a period of one year, the plant, business and good will of the Buhl Creamery, Milk Condensing, Cheese Manufacturing company of this city. The consideration was highly satisfactory and most remunerative to the local company, guaranteeing, as it does, a substantial market, paying a liberal consideration for the business and being in effect for a period of only one year.

Early History Pet Evaporated Milk

Funding universe

During the Spanish-American and First World wars, the U.S. government ordered huge supplies of evaporated milk, spurring Helvetia to build a second plant in Greenville, Illinois. By 1918 the company had a total of ten production sites in the Midwest, Pennsylvania, and Colorado. As World War I ended, Helvetia closed plants due to oversupply, reluctantly pulling out of western markets. Latzer sold the excess milk to St. Louis businessmen, who turned to him in 1920 when a strike by the local milk producers association limited the brokers’ supplies. The St. Louis strikers also convinced the Highland area farmers to strike, however , and Latzer was forced to close the plant.

By early 1921, Latzer’s son John ran Helvetia from its reestablied headquarters in nearby St. Louis. In 1923, Helvetica was renamed Pet Milk Company, after its best-selling evaporated milk brand.

Health & Home TFTN 7-3-1925

Many people are wont to confuse evaporated and condensed milk, but there is no similarity between the two. Condensed milk is a combination of sugar and milk and can be used only when both of these substances are desired. Evaporated milk is with about sixty per cent of the water removed and the nutrients content left intact.

Pet evaporated milk manufactured in Buhl, & other locations in the United States at the turn of the century.

Six Tons of Milk Received each day by Buhl Dairy Plant

TFDaily News 10-29-1927

About 12,000 lb of milk per day is being received at the Sego condenser which when evaporated makes 5760 tall cans. The product is being stored for the present at the plant.

Pet Milk became traded on the NY Stock exchange 1928

Funding Universe Our Dairy Industry TFIT 6-11-1929 aka Twin Falls Idaho Times

The phenomenal increase in dairying in Idaho is vividly set forth by figures just made public by Idaho Chamber of Commerce in its organization publication for June. Evaporated milk production in 1928 was 1,585,000 lbs, a gain of more then 4,000,000 lbs over 1927.

Employment for Additional 20 Seen; Better Times Indicated

TFIT 5-23-1933 aka Twin Falls Idaho Times

J Frank Smith field director and former manager of the Buhl plant, with E G Meyer production manager, have been supervising the overhauling of the machinery preparatory to opening the condensery. Floyd Englen, local manger, stated about 20 persons will be added to the pay roll.

The opening of the Buhl plant in addition to furnishing added employment will also serve as an outlet for the West End dairy products.

Pet Milk bought Sego Milk Products out of Salt Lake city in 1925, to expand it’s market.

Pet Evaporated Milk Peaked in 1950.

Funding Universe

After World War II Pet Milk began a slight movement into other markets. The company became the first to offer nonfat dry milk, and advance over the powdered milk developed in the 1920s. Sales soared due to the post-war baby boom, making 1950 the all-time-high sales year for Pet Evaporated Milk. Soon thereafter, fresh milk became readily available, however, and sales began a steady decline.

Pet Evaporated Milk diversifies in 1960’s

Funding Universe

Through restructuring, Pet Milk corporate reduced committee numbers, initiated a profit-centered divisional structure, and recruited marketing professionals. The company also planned new product development to wean itself from the declining milk market (as late as 1960, 95 percent of Pet Milk sales were in dairy products). By the early 1960s, diversification had begun in earnest.

Another of Pet Milk’s successful products at this time was Sego Liquid Diet Food, introduced in 1961. After competitors had opened up a market, Pet Milk brought in its own version, a thicker, high-protein drink available in variety of flavors. By 1965 Sego brought in $22 million to the company’s Milk Products Division sales.

In 1966, in order to reflect its enlarged and diversified product line, Pet Milk changed its name to Pet Incorporated.

Funding for these acquisitions came largely from a special credit Pet obtained through the sale of its portion of General Milk Co., a joint venture

Buhl Evaporated Milk to Close (1995 TFTN)

The bulk of this article is based on TFTN articles.

Buhl’s evaporated milk plant – which has provided Magic Valley jobs for 68 years will close June 20. Pillsbury Co executives told 64 workers Thursday morning that they’re shutting the plant which produces evaporated milk as a cost saving measure.

That means 300,000 fewer gallons of milk will be passing through Buhl each day. And a plant that each day produced 5000 cases of canned milk will be vacant. Eventually, the plant will be sold.

Evaporated milk production will shift to a company cannery in Greeneville, TN. But chances are slim that displaced workers will get to follow their jobs back East.


Mission Journal of Johann Wendel

John & Mina Wendel

John & Mina Wendel

I need to give some background before I post this journal.  The past few weeks I have posted some stories of Theodor & Christiana Andra.  As the stories relate, Theodor died in 1902 due to a quarry accident.  Christiana and the children converted to Mormonism and the family moved to Utah.  After being in Utah for a few years, she met and married a widower, John Wendel on 22 May 1914 in the Salt Lake City Temple.

John became a father to her children who were teenagers.  William Fredrick Andra, the middle born knew him toward the end of his teenage years in this home.

Johann Wendel was born 27 September 1856 in Wasserberndorf, Mittlefranken, Bavaria and died 20 January 1930 in Salt Lake City, Utah.  He married Elisabeth Streckfuss 19 October 1880 in Wasserberndorf.  Elisabeth was born 21 February 1850 in Buchheim, Mittlefranken, Bavaria and died 31 August 1913 in Farmers Ward, Salt Lake, Utah.  Christiana Wilhelmina (going by Mina in Utah) was born 24 October 1869 in Radebuel, Dresden, Saxony and died 25 December 1957 in Salt Lake City.



PREFACE This Grandpa Wendel is a Grandpa to all his living descendants in the year 1978. The younger descendants may have to put 2 or 3 “greats” before the “Grandpa”, but he is indeed a Grandpa to all of us. Grandpa John Wendel was born September 27, 1856. He married Elizabeth Streckfuss on September 17, 1880, lacking ten days of being age 24. He joined the Church in the Nuremberg Branch on October 4, 1902, just past his 46th birthday. He emigrated with his wife to Salt Lake City, arriving here in August 1905 — not quite 49 years old. His dear wife was killed by a car in Aug. 1913. when he was almost 57 years old. He was in the Church a few months over 19 years when he was called on a Mission to his Native Land of Germany — a few months past the age of 65. He had re-married to Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke on the 22 May 1914 at the age of 57. He died in January 1930, a few months past the age of 73.

This Missionary Journal is written in the Gothic German handwriting and in the German Language. The average American missionary who has served a mission to Germany has not learned to read this Gothic German handwriting. Ursula Hilbert Wendel, an emigrant from Germany, the wife of John A. Wendel, a grandson to Grandpa Wendel, was able to read this journal. Uncle Leonard Michael Wendel brought this journal to Ursula about 1966 or 1967. Ursula’s children were quite small at the time and she had the constant care of her father and part of the time her father-in law. Consequently she was unable to translate the journal as rapidly as Uncle Leonard had hoped, because Uncle Leonard had desired that his oldest grandson should be given the journal, he requested his grandson, John Richard Wendel go to Ursula’s home and get the journal. At the Grave side of Leonard Fredrick Wendel in early June 1977 Pearl Wendel, a sister-in-law to Ursula approached John Richard Wendel and asked him to please bring the journal to the Wendel Family Reunion in July 1977, so that Ursula may finish the translation of it. This he did. God moves in a mysterious way His wonders to perform! At this time Ursula’s oldest son Ronald was on a Mission. So, to help out financially, Ursula obtained a job with one of the schools in Bountiful to help with the hot lunch program. In January and February 1978, Ursula was forced to quit her job and spend much time in bed because of trouble with her legs. During this time she was able to complete the translation of Grandpa’s Missionary Journal.

She then gave the completed work to Pearl Wendel, who had volunteered to type it and have copies made for as many of the descendants of Grandpa Wendel who desired them. This Journal should be of particular interest to the families in the Leonard Michael Wendel Line, because one of the first people whom Grandpa called on was the father of Frieda Johanna Neuner (Uncle Leonard’s wife). He also mentions finding Fredrick Kohles completely blind. I tried to find how he fit into the Kohles line, but from the Genealogy sheets which I have I was unable to fit him in. He may have been a cousin of Grandpa’s. I, as typist, have tried to put the translation into the American way of saying things without destroying the real meaning Grandpa meant to say. I have worked very closely with Ursula on this so that the translated Journal will tell the story Grandpa wrote.

The reader of this Journal should keep a few thoughts in mind to get the true understanding of Grandpa’s Mission. Apparently In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s the field of converts in Germany was ready to harvest. Many converts came into the Church and many emigrated to Utah to help build up the Kingdom here and enjoy the full blessings of the Gospel including Temple Work. World War I came along from 1914 to 1918. Germany and France were both hit hard by this war. To try to pick up the pieces and carry on as Nations was a great task. In 1922 and 1923 Inflation hit Germany so hard that it took bushel baskets of money to buy very little. The Spirit of Conversions seemed to have left this fruitful field. By the time Grandpa returned in 1922, it was an achievement and a fullness of joy just to have a long Gospel Conversation, let alone a Conversion. The Church also had grown fairly strong in Western U.S.A., so they were trying to encourage the members who were left and those newly converted to remain in the foreign countries and try to build up the Kingdom there. Elders often worked alone, and the discouraging moments often far exceeded the encouraging ones. The Great Grandsons and Great Grand-daughters of John Wendel, who have had the privilege of filling missions in the 1960’s and 1970’s when once again the Spirit of Conversion reigns upon the earth, will find that their mission journals and experiences were almost opposite to Grandpa Wendel’s. The number of Mission Fields have doubled many times since the early 1920’s. The Missionary Force is probably 10 or 20 times what it was then. Foreign Stakes are being created as rapidly as leadership will allow. Temples are being built in many Foreign Lands as rapidly as they can be built. The Modern Prophet’s Counsel “to widen our strides and hasten our pace” is being accomplished by the 1978 Missionaries. We hope the time spent in translating, typing, correcting and copying this journal will prove to be time well spent, by all those who will find true enjoyment in reading it, owning a copy, and having their testimonies strengthened by the testimony and experiences of Grandpa John Wendel. Sincerely, Pearl Wendel, 175 East 2nd South, Bountiful, Utah 84010


DIARY Missionary Journal of Johann Wendel MISSION TO GERMANY FROM JANUARY 25, 1922 TO OCTOBER 31, 1923

On January 25. 1922. 5:OO P.M. I left Salt Lake City, through Wyoming, Nebraska, Illinois, arrived in Chicago, January 27, 7:OO P.M. sight seeing on the 28th, like Museum, Post Office, Michigan Lake, climbed the highest building and in the evening at 7:OO P.M. on the 28th, leaving for Buffalo. We arrived here on the 29 of Jan. at 4:00 P.M. One hour delay and then on to Montreal, where we arrived Jan. 30 at 8:00 A.M. From Vermillion till Buffalo, we traveled on the big river to Niagara Falls. In Erie we saw a lot of cultivation of grapes. After our passport was inspected by the German Consulate in Montreal and $10.00 paid for, we left on the 30 of Jan. at 12:OO o’clock noon for St. John. We arrived there on the 31st of Jan. at 7:30 A.M.

On February 1st at 11:00 A.M. we got on the ship “Montcalm”. In the afternoon 3:30 P.M. the ship left the Harbor. On Feb. 2nd. 9:OO A.M. we arrived in Halifax, where the boat laid all day and night till 2:OO A.M. and loaded 16,000 barrels of apples, a lot of sugar and cheese. I could hardly believe what such a ship could carry. The boat is 560 feet long and keeps going by oil. The City of Halifax is very mountainous and was covered by snow.

On the 3rd of Feb. 1922 at 5:00 A. M. the ship left. Everything is very noble and modern and we are 212 man. in First Class.

On Sunday. February 9, 1922. we held Church Service from the Church of England in the Dinning Room.

On Feb. 9th, we passed the Coast of Ireland, where the water looks light green compared to the Atlantic Ocean’s dark blue or even black.

On Feb. 10th at 3:00 A.M. we arrived in Liverpool. We the German Brothers Pitsch, Pohlmann and I, together with 3 others had to stay here one day, because our Passports haven’t been inspected, by the English Consul.

On Feb. 11 at noon, we left the boat, took care of our luggage and at 2:00 P.M. left Liverpool for Grimby Dock, where we arrived at 6:20 P.M. At once we went to the boat for Hamburg, Germany. In the Evening at 7:30 P.M. the ship left and we arrive in Hamburg, Feb, 13th at 8:00 A.M. We stayed in Hotel Stein. The Voyage till Hamburg, Germany, with Passport difficulties, food and tips cost $274.00. In Liverpool, we stayed half an hour in the passenger train, where Apostle Whitney and two other Elders visited us.

On Feb. 15th. I saw the Exotic Garden, but because of snow, I didn’t see very much. Then I visited the Volksmuseum (People’s Museum) and there was a lot to see. With a guide, it cost me 6 Marks and 50 Pfennige (cents). In the evening I went to the Bible hour and I liked it very much.

Feb. 16th Today I shall study.

Feb. 17th At 12:30 P.M. I left Hamburg for Berlin and arrived here at 8:30 P.M. A few good women I met on the train, looked after me. They showed me the way to a lodging and carried my luggage. I met here Brother Stoddard, he is the Conference President.

On the 18th of Feb. he sent me to a family, where only the woman is a member of the Church. The first night, I slept in Brother Stoddard’s Lodge Samariter Str. 38.

On Sunday the 19th. I visited Sunday School and got invited for Dinner with another Elder. I had a good time. In the Evening, we went to the meeting, where I had to speak for the first time. Afterwards we blessed oil and a sick person. The members were all very good to me.

On Feb. 20th It is very cold in the lodge.

On Feb. 21st I received word from Swiss that I was transferred to Nuremberg. Tomorrow I shall leave. The name of the sister where I’ll stay is Anders, Guntenerstreet 24.

On Feb.22nd at lO:OO A.M., I left for Nuremberg by D Zug (fast Train) thru Wittenberg, Halle, Jena Saaletal (River Saale Valley) up to Lichtenfels, Bramberg and arrived in Nuremberg 8:30 P.M., where Brother Strebel picked me up from the station. He took me right from there to a farewell for Sister Keil and Brother Ludwig. On Feb. 23rd. I visited Brother and Sister Adelemann and a family Harold, where I found Friedrich Kohles completely blind. A sad fate.

On the 24th. I visited Carl Neuner in Failhof in the poor Hospital. He is very weak, but was very glad when I introduced myself as Father-in-law to his daughter and gave him $10.00 from his Son-in-law. I spoke a long time with him about the Gospel.

On the 25th. I visited the Eckardt Hamer family. He recognized me at once, but not his wife. I had a very warm welcome here. Afterwards I made a visit in Birkenwald, where I was strongly welcomed and fed well by the Hartmann family.

On the 26th. I went to Sunday School in Nuremberg, Bucherstrasse 90 and noon meeting. They welcomed me good and I had to speak.

On the 27th, I went tracting, but had no success.

On the 28th of Feb., we have been by Brother and Sister Schneider’s place.

On March 1st, I have been in Birkenwald, where I explained the Gospel to Hartmann.

On March 2nd, we have been in Fuerth by Brother and Sister Habermann, and in Feucht with the Dannenfelzer family. On the 1st Brother Strebel and I were in Ziegelstein too, a colonie 2 by Brother Mueller, who was ill.

On the 3rd of March, I have been to Mrs. Hartmann in Birkenwald and Janitor Schwarm and Hass, where I was welcomed friendly.

On the 4th, I stayed in bed, and on the 5th, we had Ward Conference. Brother Stoof (Stover) Conference President, from Stuttgart was present and we had four meetings.

On March 6th, I visited Mr. Baurner and L. Gruensteidel. I was welcomed good.

On the 7th to the 11th, I visited some friends and had opportunity to preach the Gospel and did tracting.

On the 12th of March. Sunday School and after that meeting, I went with Sister Saum and wrote some addresses down. I visited then ‘Gg.’ and Kath. Schmidthammer, where I stayed over night.

On March 13th, I visited Conrad Hassler, Geutherstr. 1. Here I was welcomed good also.

On March 14, 15, and 16th. I was ill and stayed in bed. In the evening on the 16th, I got up from bed and visited Anna Schmied. She is married to a man named Lechner. I didn’t recognize her anymore, with her 35 years she is an old woman.

Today March 17th. I received my eviction. Such a dangerous Individual has no right to be in the civilized City of Nuremberg.

On the 18th and 19th, I was in bed again.

On the 21st, I got up and received another eviction. I visited Walz and Ditsch. Ditsch wanted to convert me.

On March, 20th….thru the 23rd, I was in bed.

On the 23rd, much snow and wind.

Until April 1st, I visited several inactive members.

April 2nd, I have been to the meeting and Sister Huber was sustained as a Sunday School Teacher.

Yesterday, April 6th, I attended a meeting in the Hercules Veledroon, a very good one, arranged by the inter-National Jehovah Witnesses. The Lesson was: “Can men talk with the dead?” They pointed out, that the dead ones with whom the Spiritualists communicate, are not our dead persons, but the spirits who were cast out of Heaven. “Rev. John 12:4,9” They want to show off and tempt mankind.

April 11. I was busy a half a day in the city hall because of my eviction. I made a petition.

On April 18. 19t and 20th, I was ill at Brother and Sister Schneider’s.

On the 22nd, I went to Frankfurt for Conference. I feel better. I arrived in Frankfurt at 5:00 P.M. I stayed with Brother and Sister Anton Huck, Schillstreet 5, 2nd story. A place where I was welcomed good.

Sunday morning — Sunday School and 3:00 P.M. Meeting.

Monday from lO:OO A.M. till 3:00 P.M. Missionary meeting. Present were President Balif and President Stoof. Twenty-one men received good instructions how to tract. In the evening at 7:30 P.M. Priesthood Meeting until 10:00 P.M.

On Sunday I had to speak briefly and I mentioned by the way, that I would like to see from our big branches here a compliance for our German Wards in Zion, so that they may receive the blessings of Temple Work with us, and so on. After the meeting President Balif said to me, if I speak again about emigration, I would be released from my mission at once. Now I don’t understand how to reconcile this with my opinion, but I’ll try as much as possible to obey.

On Tuesday, we went home, 6:00 P.M. in Munich, in Wuerzburg some hours delay and so we could go and see the city. Twelve of us were from Nuremberg. Brother Strebel, myself and two Sisters Strecker drove home together, but first I came alone. The trip to Frankfurt and back cost 200 Marks. Frankfurt is a beautiful city and I liked it very much.

Today, Rain April 28th. I walked all day and visited four friends and explained the Gospel to them. Afterwards I visited 5 astray members, who didn’t want to know anything anymore, because they know already enough. The whole day I didn’t eat anything. So, late in the evening, I visited The Schmidthammer’s, they were just thru eating. They did not invite me, Well, the Gospel creates not all the time friends. On the way back home I wanted to buy something to eat, but all the stores were closed. When I reached home, my landlord, Brother and Sister Strebel had gone to bed already, I went to bed, the first time hungry and I felt very weak, and wished I were home and my mission complete.

On the 29th, I bought with Sister Ceder’s help a Fur for my Mina (2nd wife, Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke). Sister Strebel will send it to her. The price is 2600 Marks. Today I received my sanction for my stay until July 15th, and payed 442 Marks for it. Sometimes I feel very sad because people have so very little interest for the Gospel. We have rain again.

The weather suits my mood I am in today, May 1st.

May 6th. I visited several lukewarm members, and invited them to a special meeting, where they will have to declare if they are for or against the Church, concerning excommunication.

May 7th The divorced Mrs. Wieleitner got excommunicated from the Church today because of adultery. President Stoof was here today and we had all day long meetings, where I had to speak too. I administered to Sister Ceder also today because of her headache and blessed a child of Brother and Sister Wieleitner, which received the name of Bruno Wieleitner. The weather is beautiful today and it seems as Spring is coming.

May 8. Today Sister Stern’s son Bruno got buried at the Johannis Kirchhof Cemetary. He was a member, fallen away from the Church. The Sermon was given by a Priest. He was 20 years old. (Translator’s note* I guess the son was 20 years old, it is not quite clear, who; Priest or son.) Afterwards I visited some members and friends and talked with a Catholic nurse in the Hospital, about the Gospel but without success.

May 9. I visited Mrs. Hartmann’s family Reichel in Birkenwald and bore my Testimony; also to Hempfling and Hefner, where the women were very attentive.

May 13th. Today I went to the Cemetery (Sudfriedhof) where a former Co-worker, Work Master Schlegel from Birkenwald is buried. I visited him several times before his death. He associated with the International Bible Investigators and was buried from them also.

May 14th. Today was Mothers’ Day. It was appropriately celebrated and. the Mothers received flowers from six girls dressed in white. Brother Dinse remembered the Mission Mothers especially. It was a splendid Sabbath and we had a beautiful time.

May 25. In the morning 4:45 A.M. I drove to Steppach (I assume by train the only transportation possible) passed Strullendorf. Till here the fare was 18 Marks, and till Steppach 6 Marks. At noon I visited Gg (Georg) Holler in Pommersfelden the Castle. There was much to see, like wonderful paintings and a Hall that was completely adorned with sea shells, a herd of Deer with antlers, (Steinbocke) and so on.

May 24th I moved out from Mullner Street 23, Brother and Sister Strebel and moved in with Fritz Hefner, Peter Henlein Street 25 third floor.

May 25 to 26. I stayed over night in Steppach with Lisie Grau. I visited then Mrs. Vogel at the Hutzolmill, then preached the Gospel to the Holler Family afterwards traveled by train to Simmersdorf, paid 2 Marks for the ticket. Then I traveled to Horbach and to Weingartsgreuth, where I went to the Parson’s (Minister’s) Office, and received Genealogy from the Wendel families and paid 20 Marks for it. Then I went back to Weingartsgreuth and preached the Gospel to a family by the name of Kronester and tracted in this town. In Horbach I stayed over night with Blacksmith Master, Matthaeus Rost and preached the Gospel and gave him tracts also.

On the 27th. I went on to Wagenroth, where I looked up the minister for Genealogy and received some. Then I asked the Minister “What do you think about the Mormons?” He answered, “Well, you teach the Bible also, but the Bible contains many unclear passages, where one without a leader cannot understand what is said and therefore every Sect interprets it differently.” I wanted to give him tracts, but he refused to take them. Then I rode to Schluesselfeld, paid 3 Marks for the Ticket, from here I went to Ashbach and Wasserberndorf, visited on my way Blacksmith Matthaeus Hassler in Heucholheim; then Vogelsfrieden in Aschbach. In Wasserberndorf I lodged with my godmother.

May 28. I went to Wasserberndorf, my birthplace, and I found many changes there, my people and the town itself. Most of the old people are dead and the young ones grew up.

May 29. I visited F. Wendel in the Hutzol mill and the old Ritzau and many other acquaintances.

On the 30th, I went to Langenberg and Abtswind, where I stayed over night by F. Herrmann, visited the Wendel families in Langenberg and was here well received.

On the 31 st of May. I returned and had a long conversation with J. Uhl and also with Mrs. Doctor in Geiselwind.

On June 1st, I went to Fuettersee Kleinbirkach and Grossbirkach, Gg.(Georg) Kleinlein accompanied me. We had great joy as well as all others I met. With Mr. Teacher in Grossbirkach, we stayed a longer time and talked about the Gospel.

On the 2nd and 3rd, I made several visits in Wasserberndorf and preached the Gospel, but had not much success. I gave the teacher of Wasserberndorf tracts and explained the Gospel to him.


On June 5. I was in Church in Fuettersee. At noon Gg. Kleinlein visited me and we talked half the day about the Gospel. What kept him interested, June 6, I was in Burghasslach with H. Dekon for Genealogy and visited F. Paul and conversed with him for a long time about the Gospel.

On June 8. I went (by train) with Fritz to Ziegenbach and visited Gg. (Georg) Wendel and there I tried to explain the Gospel.

June 9 and 10. I stayed in Breitbach with Martin Kohles. There I met a man from Altenschoenbach and we talked for a long time about the Gospel. His name is K. Lamprecht and he is a Blacksmith.

On June 14. I went to Kirchrimbach and Taschendorf to get Family Records and in Taschendorf I had a conversation about the Gospel with the Minister for one hour. He don’t believe in a pre-existance. Furthermore, he could not understand how blessings can result in having a big family (many children).

June 17. I went back to Nuremberg.

June 18. We had a nice meeting, Brother Stoof gave a good speech. The branch was re-organized because the Branch President, Brother Strebel is emigrating to America (United States). Two Brethren were ordained in the Aaronic Priesthood. I ordained one of them, Brother Schneider, as a Teacher.

June 25, Today we had a beautiful meeting in the Forest and Sunday School in Erbanstegen. The Branch from Fuerth was present also.

July 6, We had a great Conference July 2nd in Stuttgart, where all the Missionaries from Holland, Swiss, Austria and all Germany were present. We received good instructions and it would be desirable if all the instructions could be followed. About 112 American Missionaries went to Oberammergau (The town for the Famous Passion Play in Germany). Most of the German Missionaries stayed in Stuttgart, probably because of lack of money. I went with Sister Zeter sight-seeing in Stuttgart and I liked it very much. I stayed three days in a Hotel, but it was too expensive; I paid 102 Marks the night. The last two nights I moved to Sister Zeter’s Landlord, which let me stay without any pay. They were real nice people, their name is R. Hald and they live in Strohbergstrasse 36, three stories high in Stuttgart.

July 5. We returned to Nuremberg and had there photographic pictures made.

July 9. Today the Branch Moegeldorf-Hammer was organized and the first meeting was held 3:00 P.M. In Nuremberg at Sunday School the following brethren from Salt Lake City were present: Brothers H. Rueckert, L. Schobert, Gasser and Little. In the evening we had a beautiful meeting in Nuremberg, and I blessed a child of Sister Buchholzer and gave her the name Bertha Edeltrude Buchholzer. In Stuttgart, I met many friends (acquaintances) from Salt Lake City. The first one I met was the son of Brother Curtis. I stayed there in one room with Brother Glissmeyer (Glissmaier) and saw Brother Pitsch and Brother Pohlmann, The first time again, since we departed from each other in Hamburg.

July 13. Today I was at a Catholic funeral. The wife of Mr. H. Popp, a past job-colleague, was buried at the South Cemetary. She was 39 years old.

On July l6th, We had some well attended meetings. . In the after noon at 3:00 P.M. I went from here to Moegeldorf with Mr. Hiltmann and his wife to her sister and brother-in-law whose last name was Fink. While there, we had a long conversation about the Gospel. We had a beautiful time. In the morning I visited M. Huegelschaefer and was invited for Dinner, and had opportunity too to explain the Gospel.

July 27. This morning I went with the Brethren Dinsi, Schmidt, Karl Weiss to Brother Binder to bless him. He has to go to the “Martha Haus” (Hospital) for a nose operation, because of probable cancer.

July 29. Today I went to Fuerth and visited Maria Klein of Holzberndorf. She lives with her daughters, one of them is married and lives in Marien Street 5. She is divorced, but her husband is married again.

July 30. I was laying in bed at night and had a toothache and was thinking about something, when suddenly someone called out loud “Hauner” Mr. Wendel. At once I recognized the voice of Woodworker Uhl from the Hutzelmuehle. I thought at once, why is he coming here. He probably came by train and has no night lodge (a place to stay for the night). At once, I jumped out of bed in my room, went to the window where I called out: “What is the matter?” I got no answer. I leaned out of the window and saw nobody. After a few minutes there came a few pedestrians. I turned on the light and it was 10 minutes before one o’clock in the morning. I layed down again. Now, I can understand when people have so many visions.

August 6. We had Fastmeeting. We had six meetings on Sunday. One before Sunday School, Brother meeting, Priesthood meeting, Fast meeting, and afterwards a short meeting, where a brother by the name of Foerster got excommunicated, who was against the Church and probably asked for his excommunication. Afterwards we visited Sister Ancon who is ill.

August 12. We drove to Munich for a Sunday School Conference and we arrived there at noon. In the evening we had Priesthood Meeting with President Stoof conducting. There was a Brother by the name of Spengler ordered to come, who was accused of adultery and therefore was to be excommunicated. But because he showed remorse and promised to improve and seriously repent, they forgave him.

Sunday, August 13, The Elders fasted for him. We had that Sunday three meetings and returned home in the evening at 9:00 P.M.

August 14th. We visited the Industrial Exhibition and the “Bavaria”.

On the 15th, We viewed Starnberg and Schlossberg. It was really nice there. But when we enjoyed the Observatory the most, did we get surprised by a rainstorm and got quite wet. Afterwards in the evening we returned to Munich. It was very cold on the ship and we did freeze very much.

On the 16th we drove back to Nuremberg and in the evening we had a meeting too. My hostess (or housewife for renting a room) baked a big Goloph (I guess a cake) for our return, that we enjoyed. Besides, there was a letter waiting for me from my Mina with five dollars in it.

On August 19. I went to Reusch to visit my friends there. I had opportunity, a Mrs. Rike Hahn, Stusdamm(?) was in the train who visited her Sister in Reusch. I saw my relatives again after a long time. My brother-in-law Gunder (?’) looks proportional good with his 82 years. With a daughter of my sister-in-law Geissendorfer, who is married to a man named Schumann in Reusch, I stayed over night. From Reusch I went to Ippesheim, where I stayed with M. Herrmann. I visited my old friends and afterwards I went to Gallhofen and Rakenlohr and visited all acquaintances and preached the Gospel to them as good as I could. I didn’t think that there are so many people who had never heard about Mormonism. M. Herrmannn, Gg. Serbi and two girls from my brother-in-law were interested about the Gospel.

On August 25th I went back to Nuremberg. In Ippesheim I registered for my stay.

On August 30th. I was in Fuerth with Brother Habermann where I was invited for dinner. In the evening we had a Bible hour (meeting) here in Nuremberg and from here we went to Sister Baer, who doesn’t feel good, and administered to her. She has a baby. Today, September 1. Gg. Friedrich Kohles was buried. He died August 30.

September 3rd We had 5 meetings. The evening meeting was well attended by friends. In the fast meeting Brother Piclo and myself blessed the child of Sister Baer and it received the name Dorothea Baer. We had a very good time there.

September 12th. Today I have to report a great joy. I received from my good wife a package. In it was: 6 cans of milk, sugar, one box crackers, candy, one dollar and 50 cents, a beautiful shirt, and a tie, I was very happy about it and also happy, Sister Fetzer let me know, she will send a full basket of clothing for our children at Christmas celebration, God helps all the time again.

Today the 23rd of September, we buried in Fuerth, Brother Ernsberger’s sister, Mrs. Beck. She wanted to be baptized, but got ill and died without being baptized. Brother Hans Schmidt and Brother Hofmann were the speakers at the grave and I dedicated the grave. The choir sang two songs.

September 25th. We rode to Frankfurt, where a Missionary Meeting was held, President Balif and President Stoof and all the Missionaries of Frankfurt were present.

On September 26. We had a meeting from 2:00 P.M. until 6:l5 P.M. and received good instructions and admonitions from the Presidents. In the evening 7:30 was a big meeting for members and friends which was very well attended.

On September 27. I stayed with Brother and Sister Gg. Schloer, Franken Allee 59. Here they Congratulated me on my Birthday. I received delicious pastry and Dinner.

On the 25th, I stayed over night with the family Wolfermann, Spahr Street 33- Besides I visited Elise Walz, who is married to a certain Mr. Wuenschbach, a Jew, and lives in Finkenhof Street 28. We had good weather and a pleasant time.

On the 28th. In the evening we rode back to Nuremberg again. By Gemuenden happened a big Train Accident and we saw many smashed train wagon (cars) and freight railroad wagon and had a delay of some hours till the rail road was cleared and we could pass. President Stoof rode with us to Nuremberg.

On September 29th. I visited together with Brother Stoof, some of my investigator families, which will get baptized in the near future.

On September 30. We had early in the morning 8:30 A.M. a small Missionary meeting with Brother and Sister Hofmann, KoernerStreet, where I was asked to ordain Brother E. Otto Holstein an Elder.

October 1. Was Fast meeting. We had five meetings. Brother Stoof was in Fuerth in the morning, and in the afternoon in Nuremberg, where he was present in the Priesthood meeting and Sacrament meeting. After the meeting, two brothers got ordained. Brother F. Georg Leupold became a Priest and Brother Bayerlein a Teacher. I ordained Brother Leupold and Brother Bayerlein was ordained by Brother Holstein.

On September 30th, we celebrated my Birthday with my landlord Hefner. They had baked and cooked a lot of food. Brother Stoof, myself, and my landlord’s family had a good time.

On October 3rd We had here in Nuremberg 18 Baptisms. They were performed in “Wild-Swimming pool”. Ten friends from Fuerth which were baptized by Brother Otterson and eight friends were from Nuremberg: Marie Walter Regina Schneider Babetta Walter Grethe Walter Elise Walter Elise Anna Walter Babatta Maria Zader Anna Katharina Eysser which I baptized I confirmed Marie Walter and Elise Anna Walter. We had a very good blessed time and many friends and members were present. And I am very grateful to my Heavenly Father for the great mercy I received that I may work in His Gospel.

October 4th was my 20th anniversary of my baptism and I was in Fuerth where I was baptized 20 years ago. Brother Habermann invited me and we had a good time together. In the Evening I went to the Bible Hour in Fuerth and I liked it very much.

October 5 I received a big package from my Anna which gave me great joy. Everything are Blessings of the Lord.

October 16. We had Relief Society, Two sisters were urged to come, Sister Amon and Sister Seykauf. Sister Amon claimed that Sister Seykauf did steal about 600 Mark from her. She surprised her when Sister Seykauf was busy with her purse. But Sister Seykauf denied it and threatened to leave the Church. Her excommunication was granted.

November 1. President Stoof was the Brethren and afterwards 7:15 a main meeting (like Sacrament Meeting). There were three branches, Nuremberg, West-Moegeldorf and Fuerth were present. Prosident Stoof gave us once more some good instructions and mentioned afterwards that this is his last meeting as Presiding Conference President because he will soon be released. Afterwards all the missionaries gave a speech, Brother Gardner spoke as successor of Brother Stoof, then Wendel, Brother Otteson, Brother Bigolow, then the three Branch Presidents, Holstein, Hofmann, and Weiss. After the meeting four Brethren from the Moegeldorfer Branch were ordained as Deacons. Brother Kuefner, Weiss, Loscher and Strecker. Brother Schwemmer from Nueremberg was ordained also. The Hefner family were present too, as friends.

November 4. Missionary meeting at Brother and Sister Hofmann.

November 6. Missionary meeting with Brother Hofmann

8, 11, and 15.

November 20 and 21. In Munich my Passport was extended.

On December 23. my Mina and Otto arrived here in Nuremberg.

Sunday the 24th, we had a Christmas celebration for the children in the Buchenstrasse 90. On the 25th, we went to Dinner at Brother Habermann in Fuerth,

On the 26th, we went to the Christmas celebration in the Tulnau Hall. It was everywhere real nice.

On December 27th, we both went to Stuttgart where a Missionary Conference was held. We stayed with Brother Mueller over night and also with the Hald family, who are good people.

On December 30th in the evening my Mina went by train to Meissen.

JANUARY 1923 On the 13th, 14th, and 15th. Conference in Frankfurt. Saturday Priesthood meeting from 7:00 until 9:30 (probably evening). Sunday, Sunday School from l0:00 until 12:00. Afternoon from 2:00 P.M. until 4:00 P.M. Meeting. Evening from 8:00 P.M. until l0:00 P.M. Meeting on Monday from 9:00 A.M. until 11:30 A.M. Missionary Meeting, then from 2:30 P.M. until 7:00 P.M. another Missionary Meeting.

On the l6th. at noon we went back home by train.

On the 23rd, Bible Hour in Hammer with Brother Schobert, with Heinrich Weis we ate and had Bible hour.

On January 28, I went to Meissen. My Mina was a little ill with influenza but she recovered again. In Meissen we were invited on the 29th by several friends; Zinka, Backer, Koehler.

On January 30, we went by train to Freiberg, passing through Dresden, and visited Hugo Mauermann’s relatives. We found there much poverty.

On the 31st, we went to Chemnitz and visited there the relatives. In the evening we attended Bible Hour, which was well attended and we liked it very much.

On February 1, I went back to Nuremberg and by train I passed through Hof and Bayreuth and arrived in Nuremberg at night 1:00 A.M. Mina went back to Meissen. I had some difficulties with my train ride. The Conductor said to me I should transfer in Hof, but I went naturally in good moods till Pirk. There a Conductor said to me, I should have transferred in Plauen. Then I rode two Stations back to Plauen and had to pay fair once more. From Plauen I went to Hof where I transferred again, came through Bayreuth to Nuremberg. The Railroad Company had several Trains restricted and also the Express train, because of occupation of the Ruhr Area by France, the coal is quite limited.

On February 6, I went to Ippesheim where I was expected by my relatives and was well received. I stayed over night with Karl Almoslechner, and the second night with his sister Wiesen. The Mayor by name of Doeller went with me to the City Hall in Uffenheim, where the District Official read to me, that a new law is effective since January 11, 1923. All Foreigners in the City or County have to be treated equal and a three week’s stay permit will be 35,000 Mark, more than three weeks till two months will cost 70,000 Mark. I induced my leave.

On the 12th of February, I received a letter from Anna, she informed me about a prescription for Gallstones.

On the I5th of February. I went early in the morning to Wuerzburg and from Sanitaetsrat Dr. Sprins, I received the prescription. I sent it to the drug store (Schwanenapotheke) to Steinbuehl with a letter and was able to receive the medicine. The medicine expenses were 750 Mark, the Doctor expenses were 3,000 Mark and the train expense was 1,680 Mark.

On February 16, we went to Berlin by train. There was a great conference. Apostle (David 0.) McKay was present. From the German Mission there were 207 Elders present.

We had on February 17th a Missionary Meeting from 9:00 o’clock A.M. until 5:00 o’clock P.M., Everyone was called on to speak.

On Sunday, February 18, we had meetings, Sunday School at 10:00 A.M. and so on! Saturday we had another evening meeting from 7:30 until 9:30 P.M. Sunday afternoon there was a general meeting from 2:30 until 6:00 and in the evening from 7:00 until 9:00 P.M. another meeting was held.

(NOTE: At the time of the typing of the mission diary of Johann (John) Wendel by Pearl Wendel in July 1978, it was revealed that Otto had been living in Preston, Idaho at the time Grandpa, John Wendel, received a Mission Call while living in Sugar House with Elder LeGrande Richards as his Bishop. Otto moved down to stay with Mina (Grandpa’s Second wife and Otto’s mother). In November 1922, Bishop LeGrande Richards then had a call for Otto to go to Germany on a Mission. Otto informed him that he had come to take care of his mother while her husband filled a mission. Bishop Richards just suggested that he take Mina with him. Even though it did take them a little longer to get ready, Otto did accept his mission call and his mother went with him. Part of her time was then spent with Grandpa in visiting various places, relatives and conferences. The remainder of her time was spent in Meissen visiting her sister and other relatives.)

MISSION JOURNAL CONTINUED: My wife was present, she came alone from Meissen, also our son Otto was here, he works in Stettin. We had dinner in a restaurant Sunday together with Brother Kraemer, Brother Hirschmann from Wien and Brother Mauermann. In the evening I lodged in a Hotel with my wife and several Brothers. Most of the brethren lodged in the hotel.

On Monday, my wife and I went to Lauchhammer where we stayed over night with brother-in-law Kamprathen, and were welcomed very friendly there. I saw here big manufacturers and a Priket (brown coal) factory. The brown coal is laying openly and maybe only 3 feet deep is cleared and then the coal is ready for processing; it gets ground up and then is pressed into the form of a Priket (which is about 12 inches long, 4 inches wide and about 6 inches high).

On February 20th, we went by train to Meissen, where my wife stayed with her sister.

February 22, I went by train back to Nuremberg again and arrived here safely in the morning at 9:00 o’clock. All expenses must have been about 70,000 Mark, February 24. I registered my stay in Nuremberg for three months and had to pay a fee of 210,100 Mark. They told me that I couldn’t do any more Mission Work. Today.

March 8th, the 3 month old daughter of the Kail family, living in Zirkelschmiedsgasse was buried. The father of the child is a member of the church, but the baby was not blessed by our Church. Our choir sang 2 songs, Brother Waldhaus gave a speech and I dedicated the grave.

Friday, March 9. Brother Schoberth, Brother Waldhaus and myself were invited to a wedding by Brother and Sister Hofmann. The son, Hans Hofmann married Sister Olga Kail, There were about 30 persons present, good dinner, music and dance and we had a good time.

March 13 Brother Schobert is ill. I conducted the Bible Hour in the home of Brother and Sister Adelmann.

On March 17 we had a celebration and Bazaar in Relief Society (I guess a Birthday Party of the Relief Society organized in 1842). It was held in the Bucherstrasse. There were several members from Fuerth and many friends present. It was pretty well attended. We had a good time. Many handmade items were displayed which the Relief Society had made and were selling. The proceeds were more than 97,000 Mark. Besides a good program was also presented.

On March 19. we had missionary conference in Stuttgart. Brothers Schobert, Waldhaus, Otterson and Brother Barri from Fuerth and myself went by train 8:30 from here and arrived in Stuttgart 1:00 P.M. We went right away to the meeting house. There we got a meal, afterwards was meeting held until 6:00 P.M. Then we went back to the Railroad Station, but we were too late. I went back to the meeting house and the Brethren Hamon and Braun went with me to Sister Christina Scholl, Schloss Strasse 57 first floor. I was welcomed here and stayed over night. In the morning at 6:30 we went by train.

On March 26, Brother Schoberth, Brother Otterson and myself administered to a friend by the name of Wilhelmine Carl, rossweidenmuehl No.31 Room 19, who has been ill for ten years already and cannot do anything and presumably was possessed by spirits.

On March 27. my Mina arrived from Meissen and March 28. we went by train to Wasserberndorf. We stayed here until the 2nd of April and then returned to Nuremberg. We received one round loaf of bread from G. Senft and sausage and eggs, which we shared with Hefners. April 7. I didn’t sleep very good last night, woke up at 2:00 o’clock in the morning. I ate in the evening one bowl of soup and two soft boiled eggs.

On April 14. I moved from my lodging people Hefner, Peter Henleiri Strasse 25 to Brother and Sister Hofmann, Koernerstrasse 58, third floor, I hope I can stay here until I go back. (To Utah.)

On April .15. We had a beautiful meeting in “Goldenen Schwan” ( a room in a Restaurant). The Sunday School got re-organized. Brother Huinrich Weiss as Superintendent was set apart by Brother Schobert. Brother Johann Leipold as first counselor was set apart by me, and Brother Willeithner as second counselor was set apart by Carl Weiss.

April 24. One day missionary meeting in Stuttgart.

May 10th. Mother and I went to Eichstaedt to visit Mrs. Fetzer, Friedhofstrasse 54. We were welcomed very well. Eichstaedt is a city with 3,000 Population, the majority is Catholic, and is surrounded by mountains. We visited several churches to look at, and in the Walburga, Church there is an Alter, the bones of the corpse of the holy Walburga rested in a tomb like place covered with stone plates. I was told, nobody could enter the tomblike place. The stone plates develop a moisture (caused from heat in the tomb) which they catch in containers and is used as holy Walburga oil. It is said the oil has a great healing power. There are many pictures which indicate the great healing power in miracles.

Today, May 12, Mother went to Kaubenheim.

May 19. We both went by train to Windsheim. In Neustadt, we had five hours delay, and we reached Windsheim at 10:00 o’clock. We stayed in Windsheim over night and had a good lodging for 2,800 Mark.

Penecost Sunday, we went to Buchhoim, Monday to Rudolshofen, where we were welcomed.

Tuesday we left by train from Ermetzhofen where Georg Streckfuss accompanied us to Hernbergtheim, from there we went to Ippesheim and we were made welcome by Wiessner, Herrmann and Almoslechner.

On May 23 we went back again to Nuremberg.

On May 24 in the evening 8:OO o’clock, we had baptisms in Wildbad. The following people were baptized: Georg Walther, Simon Genthner, Miss Seiferth, Luise Seiferth, Miss Haeberlein, Mrs. Genthner and Mrs. Grauf. Brother Schoborth executed the baptisms and I blessed the baptismal water. I confirmed Brother Genther and Sister Luise Seiferth, Brother Schoberth confirmed Brother Walther and Sister Haeberlcin, Brother Sinsul confirmed Sister_____________ Brother Kufner confirmed Sister______________ May 28. I went to Wasserberndorf and registered there, made several visits in town and attended a war monument dedication in the Churchyard of Hohn in Berg for the dead soldiers from 1914 until 1918.

June 3. We had Fast meeting, from 8:30 in the morning until 4:00 P.M. we had meetings. Brother Binder got ordained a Priest by J.W. Me.

On June 4. I went to Munich and had my Passport extended for six months. I had no good time there, it rained all the time. I visited the Hofkirche (famous Church in Munich), the Hofbrauhaus, the Art Museum and several other places.

June 9 until June 12. Conference in Stuttgart. I stayed with a Hald family, StrohbergStrasse 36, third floor, where I was made very welcome. I had a good bed and very good meals. Sunday morning I went on a walk with Mr. Hald. Tuesday, he accompanied me to the railroad station. Sunday, we had Sunday School, Priesthood meeting and in the evening Sacrament Meeting. Monday, we had from 9:00 A.M. until 1:00 P.M. and from 3:00 P.M. until 5:00 P.M. Missionary meetings.

Tuesday at noon, I arrived again in Nuremberg. With Brother Schoberth, I made some visits and in the evening we went to Hammer, where we had a small cottage meeting with the Weiss Family. Wednesday and Thursday, I didn’t feel very good and stayed in bed.

Friday, the 15th of June, I got up again and made several visits with Mina. The weather is always very cold and rainy.

June 21. I am ill and Minna is sick too, she has a rash on her face for eight days already, July 1st.

Fast meeting, Sunday School in the forest near Klettschen Fabrik. Brother Otto Baer was ordained a Deacon by me in the Bucherstrasse, July 1, 1923.

On July 9. Sister Haeberlein was set apart a teacher in the children’s class by me in the “Goldenen Schwan” (Resturant).

On July 25. Mina and I visited Brother Habermann in Fuerth. Afterwards, we went to the Klein family, where we had a good time. In the evening, we visited Brother and Sister Schneider and then we went to the Bible Hour where I received my release from Brother Erdil.

On the 27th. I visited with my Minna and several friends in Johan’s ——-. In the evening 5:00 o’clock, we went by train to Roethenbach, where we had a Bible hour (cottage meeting) with the Hahn Family. Brother Schugk gave the lesson. It was the third time I was in Roethenbach for the Bible hour. When we returned home at 9:00 o’clock in the evening, Brother Hofmann and myself went to Fuerth where we administered to Brother and Sister Plesol’s two children age one and one-fourth, and three years old. They were very ill. One o’clock in the morning we returned back home.

On July 31, We had 16 baptisms in the “Wildbad”. I baptized seven persons and Brother Schoberth baptized nine persons: M. Wilhelm Baer from Roethenbach Babetha Geist From Roethenbach Konrad Geist from Roethenbach Hahn from Roethenbach Frieda Naehr from Nuremberg Michael Oberseider from Nuremberg Margaretha Weis from Nuremberg Those are the persons I baptized. Anna Geist from Roethenbach Kunigunda Geist from Roethenbach Walburga Hahn from Roethenbach M. Margaretha Hofmann from Nuremberg Johanna Gak from Nuremberg Cristonsia Gak from Nuremberg V. Franz Stiller from Nuremberg Helena A. Stiller from Nuremberg Those are the persons Brother Schoberth baptized. *Angela Stiller from Nuremberg Page 46 was left blank.

On August 1, Our Otto came to visit us from Landsborg and we went to Fuerth to Brother Habermann’s home and had dinner at noon.

August 2. We visited the Naehr family, afterwards we visited Otto. Brothers Schoberth, Kanfild and myself then viewed the Klettsche Fabric (Plant).

August 3. We, Minna, Otto and I went to Streitberg and Muggendorf, where in Streitberg, we visited the Bing-Cave. The cave is 396 meters long and 70 meters under ground level and very interesting, because of its drop formations.

On August 12, We had a meeting in Erlenstegen in the forest and there we took a branch photograph.

Last Friday, we had a Farewell meeting for me and for Brother Schoberth, who went then to Breslau as Conference-President. August 19. I received word from Leonard, he paid for the (Schips ticket) Ship’s ticket, American Line, for Mother and F. Naehr.

(NOTE by Pearl Wendel: The Frieda Naehr who came home with Grandpa and Grandma Wendel was a niece to Frieda Johanna Neuner, who was the wife of Leonhardt (Leonard) Michael Wendel, the oldest son of Grandpa John Wendel.)

August 24. was farewell for Brother Dotzler, who received a Mission Call. August 28. We had in Nuremberg, a wonderful conference. The mission President, Brother Tadge was here and Brother Hueckert, from Fuerth, who is now released, was the first speaker, followed by Brother Erdli, Conference-President, and Brother Tadge was the last speaker. Brother Mueller conducted the meeting. There were more than 300 persons present. A great part of the attendance were investigators (friends). On August 27. Conference was in Fuerth. There were 400 persons present.

On August 29 We went with Frieda Naehr to Munich, American Embassy (Consulate) to obtain a Visa for Frieda. We have no idea yet, when we can leave here.

Today, September 1, I received a letter from Brother Schoberth from Breslau. September 1, 1923. There were seven Baptisms in Fuerth, but I could not attend,

On September 2, I was with my Mina in Fuerth, attending Fast meeting and afterwards visited Sister Igelhaud and the families of Klein and Goissler.

On September 14. Brother Canfild, Brother Cunningham and myself administered to Sister Leupold. She has (Ischias) like Arthritis, and is in great pain.

On September 15. We arrived by the Hefners and had a good dinner and supper.

On September 16, I blessed the oil in Sunday School (consecrated the oil). After Sacrament Meeting, Brother Canfild, Brother Sus, Brother Mueller and myself blessed the child of Brother and Sister Baer, which was born August 30, 1923, and gave it the name of Otto. I administered the blessing.

On September 17 at 9:00 o’clock in the morning, my Minna went by train to Meissen to say “Good bye” to her relatives.

On September 18. I went by train to Neustadt and visited there an old friend by the name of Vogel (Liessweth) (I guess Liessbeth), whom I hadn’t seen for about 33 years. Then I went by train to Windsheim and then to Buchheim, where I stayed for three days by Georg Streckfuss. They gave me a warm welcome. From here, I went by train, with Johan to Ermetzhofen and visited Mrs.______ Donner, who told me all about her suffering, but she was happy to see me. She went with me to Rudolshofen, where we visited my Brother-in-law Streckfuss. But I was not welcome here. The old ones and the young ones had a quarrel and Brother-in-law H. Georg said it would be the best for us to leave at once, because he cannot accommodate me, and the young ones would look upon me like a pig in a Jew court yard. It was raining real hard at this time, and so I stayed until the rain got less; and then I left without shaking the hands of the young ones. In the night I reached Uffenheim and went to the Busch family. His wife is a twin sister to Reuscher Gundel. They gave me a warm welcome and they were happy I visited them. Here I stayed overnight and in the morning I went to Gallhofen and I visited first the Serbin family. They were just butchering a pig. I didn’t go in the house, said “Good bye”, and went to the Herbst Family, who married the youngest daughter of Gundel. But they had not much time for me. Then I went away and walked in the Street. It was raining a lot and I opened up my umbrella and walked without turning around. It was one and one-half hours until I reached Oberruekelsheim. I had to turn around and walk half way back. After half an hour’s walk on a very dirty road I reached Herrnbergtheim and then to Ippesheim, where in the evening I reached cousin Wiessnar, very tired and stayed overnight. They gave me a very warm welcome. I stayed here until September 25th. There was an American visiting with his wife, who came from Wienna (Vienna). They visited his parents. We had a good conversation together.

On Sunday, he traveled back home to New York. Sunday I attended a funeral and Tuesday I went to Reusch and visited Brother-in-law Gundel. Here I met a son of the Busch Family, who is enrolled in the Technical College in Nuremberg. Then I went to W. Geissendorfer and her daughter, who is married to a certain________________ in Reusch. Then I went back to Ippesheim and from there bo Herrnbergtheim. From here I went back home by train to Nuremberg, and arrived in the evening at 8:00 o’clock.

On September 27, My Birthday, I was invited at noon by the Hefners and in the evening for Dinner by Brother and Sister Schneider. Later on at 9:00 o’clock in the evening came all the choir members and youth and gave a serenade of three songs “Befehl Du Deine Wege” – “Trust Your Ways In The Lord” “Du Was Ist Recht” – “Do What Is Right” and “Nocheinmal Will Ich Singen” – “Once More I Will Sing”. It made me very happy.

October 4, 1923. My Minna came back from Meissen.

On Friday, we went by train to Helmmitzheim and from there to Ziegenbach to Georg Wendel. They gave us a warm welcome and we stayed over night. The other day, Saturday, we went to Wasserberndorf. We arrived there in the evening. I gave notice of my leaving at the Registrar, and we visited several friends and stayed over night with the Rodammer’s. Next day at noon we went back to Nuremberg again by train.

On October 9, We left Nuremberg by train at 2:30 P.M. Anna Herold helped us carrying our small luggage to the Railroad Station. The Elders and several members and Sister Naehr accompanied us to the platform. There they wanted to give me a helping hand, but I refused. We rode then all night thru and arrived in Hamburg in the morning. There we came to the emigration building and stayed in one room with other people like a herd of sheep. One after another got called out and the emigration papers brought in order. Our turn was finally at 4:00 P. M. The other day we got vaccinated and that lasted almost all the day long because all the passengers for three ships were all together.

On the 12 of October, we all had a physical examination by an American Doctor. It lasted until noon. In the afternoon, we went into town for a little while. There are three mealtimes: at 8:00 A.M., 12:00 Noon, and 5:00 P.M. The food is good and enough of it. But the quarters I cannot praise. In our hall are forty-eight beds. The beds are very hard and cold. Men and women are separated and also the different races. With me, there are only Germans. There are four halls in those quarters. The Poles and the Jews are by themselves.

October 13. We all had to gather and then we received our Passports. Afterwards several formalities were settled and 12:00 o’clock, after we received a good bread and a piece of sausage from the barracks, we entered the ship. The bigger luggage was transported, the small ones we had to carry. From this ship, we all were transported to a Hall, where again, we got treated like a herd of sheep. Here again, several formalities were settled. Then, we were transferred again to another ship, which took us, after showing our papers, to the huge ship “Bayern”, which was pretty far away in the ocean. Here one had to show the passport to a German Officer, who put a seal on, and then one was allowed to enter the ship. We had difficulties. When our turn came, the officer put our Passports aside and said, we have to wait, probably to wait for the next ship, because we have not paid the consumption tax. Mina got real mad and scolded the Officer. The Officer said cold-hearted, “What will you do when I don’t let you go? It is the Americans fault that we have a bad life.” She gave him a Dollar and after the Captain from the ship came, we paid the consumption tax 240,000,000 Million Mark, he let us go. When we were on the Ship and got our cabin, the dining room, served coffey and cake. I have cabin No. 100 and Mina and Frieda have No. 58. In my cabin, there are 14 beds, and in Minna’s are 4 beds. In the evening was served goulash, potatoes, Tea, bread and butter. After the meal we had a concert. The mealtimes are arranged in three, one after another following divisions. We three are in the first division, at table No. 1 in front at the first chair.

October 14. Morning. Today is Sunday. The morning is quite calm, some fine rain, but the sun is always shining again. It is a little windy. In the morning was served fried eggs, bread, butter, coffee and rolls. Many people are sea sick and have to feed the fish. Some had to get up during the night to go on Deck, even one man from my cabin, who is from Nuremberg ______________________(probably space for his name). We feel so far, pretty good. Only I think a lot back on Nuremberg. At 10:00 o’clock I went to bed, as I was tired. At Noon we had noodles, red cabbage, Roast with sauce and coffee. In the afternoon it was raining quite a bit. We were mostly alone in the room. We were together with a man from Saxony, Leipzig, by the name of _________________________he is 56 years old. In the evening they served Potato salad, sausage, and meat balls, Tea and butter and bread.

October 15 Today, I slept very well, got up in the morning at 6:45 A.M. It is a beautiful morning. We went at once to the Deck. It is a little windy, but otherwise nice. The sun was a little hidden in the clouds when he came up, but then at once, it was a clear morning. Just now, we passed England and could see very close the English white coastline, like white rock. With the telescope, we could see English Towns and many fishing boats. For breakfast we had Coffee, Rolls, Hash (like fried cornbeef) delicate pickels and bread. It is a beautiful day today. The ocean seems so calm and the sun is shining so warm. Everybody Is on deck today. At noon we had pea soup, potatoes, lamb roast, sauce, green beans mixed with white beans, coffee and cake, bread and butter. After the meal, we saw at the English Coast seven English battleships maneuvering. Oh it is beautiful. Now I think of all those beloved ones we left behind in Germany, could they not be with us now? But it had to be farewell. At Noon, I had a conversation with a man from my cabin. He is from Berlin. He don’t think much about Religion, but was quite interested in the Gospel and wants to hear more about it.

October 16. Today I saw a Sunset. It was a bright sky and splendid to see how the sun disappeared in the water (Ocean). He went down European time 6:20 until 6:25 P.M. Our supper was fried or baked fish, potato salad, Sausage, bread, butter and Tea. In the evening, 9:00 P.M. I went to bed.

October l6.(?) The morning is beautiful. The Ocean is smooth like a mirror. I feel good, Breakfast Coffee, Rolls, Meatballs, butter and bread, Potatoes, and Schelle?

(NOTE by typist Pearl Wendel: page 25 under the date of October 16th where he is giving the breakfast menu, we now think the last food mentioned was “jelly”. However, if that is what he meant he misspelled it.)

Noon meal at l:00 P.M. Hamburg, Germany time: Potatoes boiled, beefbreast with Kohlrabi (German vegetable) cut in little squares, soup and coffee. The afternoon is a little windy. Now we are a short distance out of the Channel (between England and France). The time difference is one hour and 10 minutes. Evening meal: Potatoes, white cabbage, beef meat, bread, butter, cheese and tea. The Ocean is a little restless. The sunset was very beautiful from 7:50 until 7:55 P.M. Hamburg time.

October 17. This morning is very gloomy weather. The Ocean is still pretty calm. Breakfast: Rice, Macaroni with meat, coffee, bread with butter, I feel quite good. At noon: bread, peas, mash with meat, coffee, rolls, butter, meatsauce, potatoes, and pudding. Evening: Potatoes with beefbreast, sauce, coffee, bread, butter and pudding.

October 18. In the morning, I slept well, feel good, the weather is a little stormy and some rain. Breakfast: eggs fried with potatoes, coffee, bread, butter, and wek? The weather is very windy. The water splashed to the Deck. Noon Meal: Soup, potatoes, white cabbage, beefmeat, sauce, butter, bread, coffee, and cake. Afternoon sleep. The wind is pretty strong and the water always uplashes over the rail. Evening Meal: Ricemash with meat, frank furter Liverwurst, bread, butter, tea. I have not a good appetite.

October 19, slept good. The weather is gloomy and unfriendly. Breakfast: fried meat, potatoes, rolls, butter, I didn’t eat much. Noon Meal: Vegetable soup with sausage, potatoes, fish marinated with sauce, coffee and pudding. The weather is windy.

October 20. The weather is windy and gloomy. I layed down all day long. I have a temperature from my vaccination, evening meal: I ate herring (fish) and potatoes and went right after in bed again. Pain at the bladder.

October 21. In the morning the weather was rainy, later on it cleared up. Breakfast: fried eggs, coffee. Noon Meal: noodles with chicken soup, boiled chicken with sauce, rice, sweet rolls and coffee. At Evening Meal: Potatoes with sauce, Livercheese sausage, butter, coffee and bread. Afterwards there was a program in the Dining Hall, it was decorated. Several plays and productions were presented. I went to the Doctor, too. He bandaged my arm which is inflamed. I have pain.

October 22. I got up early and feel a little better. The weather is rainy and gloomy. In the night the Foghorn made noise every few minutes. Breakfast: mashed potatoes with cornbeef, pickles, coffee, rolls, butter, and one apple. Mina is not feeling well. Noon Meal: Potatoes, beef stew-roast, beets, sauce, noodles with vanilla and Coffee. The Ocean is wonderfully calm, but the fog is all around us. The foghorns shake the air uninterrupted. Mina is not feeling well. Evening mealt Rice, sauce, canned meat, tea, bread, and butter.

October 23. In the morning rainy. The Ocean is calm, the fog is decreasing. Mina is still sick . The Doctor gave her some medicine. My appetite is not big, but I feel good. Breakfast: Meatballs with sauce, coffee, bread, butter and raisins, Noon Meal: red cabbage with porkmeat, potatoes, sauce, and Coffee. Today I took up a collection for the Steward, but didn’t got very much, Mina is up again.

October 24. It is Mina’s Birthday, She feels a little bettor. Breakfast: Porkchops, one Apple, Coffee, rolls, butter, and jelly. After the meal we were all counted. Then we went on Deck, It is beautiful weather. The sun is shining warm and the Ocean is beautiful, beautiful mirrored in the sunlight. We stayed mostly on Deck. Supper: Soup with Livermeatballs, Sausage, Rolls, butter, and pudding with vanilla. Afterwards, we went once more on Deck. It was a beautiful warm and bright night.

October 25. In the morning 6:00 o’clock a tidal wave. One big wave came through our open port hole and flooded our cabin completely. It is raining and we have fog. Breakfast: coffee, two eggs, one apple, rolls, and butter. I have no appetite. Mina did not come for breakfast, she is in bed, I dreamed today about last Dec. 29 and 30th and about 2 Saturday and Sunday of February.

(It is a little confusing as to whether he meant two Saturdays and Sundays in February, or whether he meant the 2nd Saturday and Sunday of February. At the time of typing this I do not have that part of the diary here to look up and see if some outstanding things happened then.)

October 26, I got up this morning at 5:00 o’clock. At 5:30 Coffee, and then I went to the Deck. When the sun came up, we could already see land. It is a glorious morning. The sun came out of the Ocean in blue-red color. After awhile, we could see many ships. About 7:00 o’clock the Pilot ship picked us up and the German flag was taken down. The American flag and the Mail Flag were put up. Afterwards, another boat came and picked up the mail, and the mail flag was taken down again. Then another little boat came with the Doctor on it. Now, once more, there was a physical examination. Men and women had to disrobe separately and walk in front of the Doctor. When I noticed that this procedure was not done thoroughly, I didn’t follow it. There is a lot to see all around us. The ship is standing still at this time. It is 9:00 o’clock in the morning, American time and 3:00 o’clock P.M. Nuremberg time. At noon, we had once more a meal on the ship, then the amusement started. First, the people from second class could leave the ship, after them all American citizens. We had to go to the Custom hall and go through all the struggle, because Frieda was with us. We were once more counted and had to go from one room to the other again, then back to the ship where all the luggage was and then we went to the Island. Here, we came to a big building where we had to run up and down stairways. Each time we were sent from one place to another. All the time, there were three or four men, who looked at us and searched through our belongings, and with everyone we had to show different papers (like ship release papers, emigration papers). One had to follow the correct procedures. But we could not leave before we got another certificate, because we had no ticket for further traveling. We had to go back to New York, to the American Express Company and get our money. And so, we were sent from one place to the other, until we had permission to travel to New York. We went with several “suffernden” companions back, and there we ended up in a big hall. Afterward, we went with three other people to a Hotel, where a bellhop showed us the way. We had to climb stairs again to the elevated railway. Soon we could not drag our luggage anymore. After we rode a distance, we had to travel by foot again to the hotel, “The New Hotel Keller” 385 West Street, New York City. We had a pretty good place with a comfortable bed, which was pleasant after all those exhaustions. We paid five Dollars for three persons without meals.

On October 27. In the morning, I called President Roberts and Brother Ina was at the telephone. They sent a Missionary by the name of Carl B. Wever, 2825 Lincoln Ave., Ogden, who brought my ticket and our money, 200 Dollars, which was paid by the American Express Company. He helped us to get the two tickets for Mina, and Frieda. It cost $171.54 from New York City to Salt Lake City. We then went back once more to look after our basket luggage to get them to the railroad. Afterwards, we went again to the hotel and paid our bill and to eat something. Then we crossed the Street and entered a ship and went directly to the railroad Station. We did not have much time and left by train at 2:30 P.M. We had beautiful weather.

October 28. Sunday, we arrived in Chicago at 6:00 o’clock P.M. and held a delay until midnight 12:00 o’clock. In a Restaurant, we strengthened us a little, and the rest of the time we stayed in the Railroad Station. It is the most beautiful Railroad Station, I have ever seen.

October 29. Early in the morning (just past midnight) at 12:15 A, M. we left Chicago and arrived in Omaha (Nebraska) in the evening at 4:30 P.M. We had here a delay of 45 minutes. We had beautiful weather until we reached Council Bluff, then it started to snow violently. Now the train wagon (cars) starts to be shaky, so much so, that I can not write anymore, besides the ink is all gone, too.

October 30. The sun got up really beautiful and bright and it is a sunny day. We came to Juliusburg. There is a little snow cover and it is very cold. Even though the sun is shining so warmly, icicles and snow are hanging on the train wagon. By 11:00 o’clock A.M. we reached Cheyenne, (Wyoming). Here, we had a delay until 2:25 P.M. We went sight-seeing at the Capitol and the Museum. We saw here much Indian-war-equipment and works. Also several German war-equipment from 1870 and from World War I from 1914 until 1918. Afterwards, we got some food.

October 31 We arrived in Salt Lake City at 8:00 o’clock in the morning. Anna came with Loni to the Railroad Station and picked us up with the car. We went first to Fetters, where Leonard took Frieda home by car. Afterwards Loni drove us and Anna to her place, where we had a good meal. After that we went to Frieda, (probably Frieda Greaves— Mina’s daughter) then to Klara, then home to our paradise.

END OF MISSION FINAL NOTE by typist Pearl Wendel: A call made to Otto Andra — At the time of the typing of this diary by Pearl Wendel in July 1978, it was revealed that Otto had been living in Preston, Idaho at the time Grandpa, John Wendel, received a Mission Call while living in Sugar House with Elder LeGrande Richards as his Bishop. Otto moved down to stay with Mina (Grandpa’s Second wife and Otto’s mother). In November 1922, Bishop LeGrande Richards then had a call for Otto to go to Germany on a Mission. Otto informed him and he had come to take care of his mother while her husband filled a mission. Bishop Richards just suggested that he take Mina with him. Even though it did take them a little longer to get ready, Otto did accept his mission call and his mother went with him. Part of her time was then spent with Grandpa in visiting various places, relatives and conferences. The remainder of her time was spent in Meissen visiting her sister and other relatives. The Frieda Naehr who came home with Grandpa and Grandma Wendel was a niece to Frieda Johanna Neuner, who was the wife of Leonhardt (Leonard) Michael Wendel, the oldest son of Grandpa John Wendel.

John & Regina Wanner

John & Regina Wanner

John & Regina Wanner

Thanks to Melece Hudson Salisbury, a Wanner cousin, for this photo.

She found this picture of John & Regina Wanner in a box of photos.  I am glad she was diligent and sought out who they were rather than some of the alternatives.

It appears this might even be a wedding picture, or close to that time, of John & Regina.

I have shared the biography of John & Regina written by their daughter, Mary, before.  Click on the link to read that history.

John George Wanner Jr was born 29 October 1870 in Holzgerlingen, Böblingen, Württemberg, Germany and died 5 January 1947 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois.  He had been married once already and had two children  before this photo.  After Regina passed away, he remarried two more times.

Regina Friederike Nuffer was born 26 January 1869 in Neuffen, Esslingen, Württemberg, Germany and died 10 March 1942 in Preston, Franklin, Idaho.  She had been married once already and had one child before this photo.

Hopefully some day I can write a more comprehensive history of John & Regina.


With my brother-in-law entering the Missionary Training Center (and now already left for his Carlsbad California Mission) I looked through some of the photos I have from the MTC.

That morning we met with the Stake President to finalize everything before driving out to Provo, Utah, Utah.

The morning to go to the MTC with Milo Ross, Colleen Lloyd, and Jackie Melycher (aunt)

The morning to go to the MTC with Milo Ross, Colleen Lloyd, and Jackie Melycher (aunt).  My Grandma particularly liked this photo because it also gives a side profile of me as well as the front.

One final blessing and setting apart before leaving.

Gene Hansen, Paul Ross, Milo Ross, setting apart (again)

Gene Hansen, Paul Ross, Milo Ross, setting apart (again)

The first picture is at the front doors before going in.

Arriving at the MTC

Arriving at the MTC

My first companion Elder Kody Young from St. George, Washington, Utah.

Kody Young and Paul Ross, companions at MTC

Kody Young and Paul Ross, companions at MTC (the camera is incorrect, this was December 1998)

Our first snow while at the MTC.

Snow at the MTC

Snow at the MTC

One of my most distinct memories from the MTC was the heating.  I don’t know what it was, but I ended up with a bloody nose at least once a day.  I was not the only one.  Apparently it had something to do with the dryness of the air and the ventilation systems.  It made for long days where my head was not always in the lessons but often worrying about the next nosebleed and whether I had tissues nearby.  If I had to go to the bathroom, the paper towels only seemed to make the problem worse.

Elder Holland came and spoke to the MTC while we were there.  He insisted on the opening hymn as “Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer.”  After we sang it, he wanted us to sing it again with the silly extra phrases we all know.  It was quite a bit of fun hearing an organ play the introduction and then for us to sing along.  It was also in this talk that he told us that if we had to come home before our time was up, we better come home on a stretcher.  Even at the end, we should have worn out our days as missionaries.  We were so close the the Christmas holidays that we regularly sang Christmas music.

Our MTC District attending the Provo Temple.  Four of us were going to England, the remaining ones were headed to Peoria, Illinois.  The thing I remember most about the Provo Temple were the white escalators.  Years later when I went back, they were gone!  I was a bit disappointed not to see the white escalators again.

Our MTC District, I only know four of the 11.  From l-r, #5 is Elder Olson, #9 Elder Scow, #10 Elder Young, #11 Elder Ross.  The rest were going to Peoria, Illinois if I remember correctly.

Our MTC District, I only know four of the 11. From l-r, #5 is Elder Olson, #9 Elder Scow, #10 Elder Young, #11 Elder Ross.

There were a few things in the MTC that disgusted and horrified me but I will not relate them here.  They were not becoming of missionaries and I let them know.  There were also plenty of fun and enjoyable times.

Then the five of us were flying off to Manchester, England just in time for Christmas.

Elder Olson, Elder Scow, Sister Dunn, Elder Young, and Elder Ross at Salt Lake City airport flying out

Elder Olson, Elder Scow, Sister Dunn, Elder Young, and Elder Ross at Salt Lake City airport flying out

Some good friends and family came to see us off.

Elder Scow, Elder Young, Bryan Jensen, Elder Ross

Elder Scow, Elder Young, Bryan Jensen, Elder Ross

More friends and family.  My Sister, Dad, and Great Aunt Andra and cousin Denise, all came to share.  Sadly, my Grandma was told I was leaving from the wrong gate and was not present so I did not get to see her one last time.  She made it to the concourse just as the plane was about to leave and they let her send a package on the plane to me.  Very good friends to come say goodbye!

Andra Ross, Elena McBride, Milo Ross, Elder Ross, Denise Andra, Brenna Barnes, Adelaide Andra

Andra Ross, Elena McBride, Milo Ross, Elder Ross, Denise Andra, Brenna Barnes, Adelaide Andra

Maybe I can start sharing some more photos of the mission as time goes on.  I should get out my journals to add some more flavor to these entries than just photos.

Charles August Nuffer

This is the life history of Charles August Nuffer.  He wrote this autobiography on 28 January 1949.  I have maintained the language and spellings of the original document.  I also wrote a quick overview of his life previously.

This is a brief history of the life of Charles August Nuffer, son of Johann Christopher Nuffer and Eva Katherina Greiner Nuffer. I was born June 18th 1871 in Neuffen, Wurtemberg, Germany. When about eight years old I remember going with my father and mother to a neighbor’s home where the Mormon Elders were holding a meeting, one was Elder John Theurer of Providence, Utah. Some week later, one morning on getting up the floor was all wet, I asked my mother why, all that she said was that they were baptized members of the Mormon Church last night in the Mill Race back of our house.

It was not long after when they began to make arrangements to emigrate to America. After they had sold their home and land to get money for the voyage except what they could take with them, and that was not very much, they still had to borrow a few hundred dollars before they could go. They borrowed this money from the Schweitzer family that had also joined the Church, and came on the same ship with us, also the Lalatin family that had become members of the Church. So in the month of May 1880 they all bid farewell to friends and the land of their birth for the Gospel’s sake, and set sail on the steamer Wisconsin, for New York, U. S. A. (Early in the morning before daylight we left home in a covered wagon for the City of Stuttgart. I was carried in some bedding as I was sick with the measles and was not well enough to walk. From Stuttgart we went to Manheim and from there by boat on the Rhine to Holland and over the North Sea to London, where everybody was sick the next morning but myself, I think I was just getting over the measles.)

Young Charles August Nuffer

Young Charles August Nuffer

The first place we came to was called Castle Garden where all our belongings were examined. They also gave all the emigrants a little book, the New Testament to take along free. In those days most of the streets of New York were paved with cobble rock. After a few days rest we went by train to Collinston. Arriving in Logan we were taken by a family of Saints that gave us food and lodging for about three weeks by the name of Shaggo in North Logan. After three weeks we found a little old log house with one room and a dirt roof and plenty of bed bugs to keep us company. It was on a vacant lot on the street going to the College just east of the canal. We lived there about a month, as father bought a house and lot of Jacob Engle, full of cobble rock where we intended to make a living but we found it hard going. The house was built of small cobble stone and in the winter at night the walls would get all white with frost. Father would go out where ever he could get some work, he worked on the threshing machines and I went with him to help and he got a bushel of wheat a day. Grandma Spring, Regine and I went out in the north field to glean wheat, we would cut the heads off and put them in a sack. Father threshed them out with the flail and it made about sixteen bushels, so about all father could do is to earn for us so that we could have something to eat while John and Fred were earning money to pay for the place.

Fred went to Idaho working on the Railroad and John worked for Mr. Summers a contractor who later recommended to the Stake Presidency to take charge of building the Stake Academy after we had moved to Idaho. It seems to me the Lord had already begun to open up the way for our life’s mission in this part of the land.

When we arrived in Providence the potatoes were in full bloom on the lot which looked good, at least we would have potatoes to eat. We had to get the wood from the hills near by. They had bought a team and an old wagon so we went to get some wood. Father told me to drive, as I drove out the  gate and over a little ditch the tongue dropped down and the reach came up and the team ran away and I fell under the horses feet. I received a broken shoulder and the horses ran around the block and back in the gate, my first time driving a team, at ten years old.

While living in Providence I went to school a few months during the winters of 1881 and 1882 and learned to speak English. My teacher was Mrs. Mary Neaf Maughn, the mother of Mrs. A. E. Hull and Maughn the brush man, and Peter Maughn was the other teacher.

I was baptized when I was 9 years old by Mr. Campbell the grandfather of Mrs. C. M Crabtree of this ward. My sister Mary was born here October 11, 1881. She died in Mapleton, Idaho, October 5, 1900. I look back to my young days while living in Providence, and I still have many friends there, but my parents had to look forward to some other place for our future and to find the place for our life’s mission. It seems the Lord prepared the way. One of our neighbors, a German family had a daughter married to John Miles who was living at Wormcreek and she wanted him to move to Providence where her mother lived so we traded places. We lived in Providence from June 1880 until October 1883. So from here we go to Idaho the place the Lord had chosen for us to build our future home.

We loaded what we could on our wagon and Mr. Miles the rest on his as he helped us move and all together it was not very much, but it was all the poor teams could pull over the kind of roads there were at that time. On arriving at Wormcreek we found a place with a house on it, a log house about 14 by 16 feet, all one room, with dirt floor, no fence around it and no plowed land, and when it rained the mud would run down the walls and we had to set pans on the bed to catch the rain. Father, Mother, Regine, Adolph, Mary and I lived there then. Fred was out in Oregon but he came later that fall with two big horses and John was working in Logan, I think with Mr. Summers. During the winter John rode the biggest horse to Providence as he was going with Louise Zollinger whom he later married. The horse got warmed up too much and got a sore leg and they finally had to shoot him. John and Fred were in Providence most of that winter as their grandmother lived there and Fred was going with Anna Rinderknecht.

As we did not have much hay we bought two stacks of straw from Jap Hoarn and Tom Miles, the first lived in Richmond and the other in Smithfield as they were only on their farms in the summer. The snow as so deep Regine and I filled some big sacks we had brought from the Old Country with straw and tied on the hand sled and pulled it over the rested snow for home. The Miles were the only family that were living on the Creek besides us on what is now known as the Webster Ranch, and we lived on what is now known as the Fred Wanner Place. The Miles Family ran out of feed for their cattle so in March they shoveled a path over to the south side of the hills where the wind and sun had taken the snow off the grass and it had started to grow. When they drove the cattle through the path you could not see them because the snow was so deep. So with the help of the Lord we pulled through the Winter of 1884. In the Spring John and Fred came back and began to fence and plow the land and plant crops. Later John went over to Oxford to the Land Office to file on the land for himself as he had helped most to pay for the home in Providence. As father wanted a homestead of his own, one Spring day it was on the first of May he sent over the divide between Worm creek and Cub River to find a place where he could make a home for the rest of the family. When he returned he said that no one had gone over there before him that spring, as the snow had not melted yet. That was in the spring of 1885, so during that summer John and Fred were raising the crops and helped father build a log house and we put in some crops so we have something to eat for the winter. As we did not have much of a team they had Joe Nilsen come up from Preston to plow some along the Creek, he had a big team and a sulky plow. But that was not all, we had to fight squirrels and grasshoppers. What we raised that summer had to see us through the Winter, and it was not any too much.

Fred went up Wormcreek and got some logs and had them sawed at the Moorhead and Thomas Sawmill on the Cub River. But we found that there was only enough for the roof and none for the floor and ceiling. They had lumber at the sawmill but they would sell us any for wheat and the store in Franklin did not pay cash for it. Father had already laid some logs down to put the floor on so we just had to step over them all winter but maybe it was a good thing as we got the warmth from the earth as we only had a lumber roof over us 14 feet to the top and just a four hole cook stove to warm the house and wood to burn, and it was not all dry. Still we were happy and thanked the Lord for what we had. Mother would read a chapter from the Bible, we would have prayer and we would go to bed early. (Clayborn  Moorhead told me some years later that Joseph Thomas intended to take up my Father’s Homestead but he was not old enough then so my father was first. He said those Germans can’t make a living there, they will starve to death and I will get the land anyway. But, I think he did not know as much as he thought, he didn’t know we had put our trust in God.)

On Christmas Day 1884 Father sent me over to John’s (Grandma Spring was keeping house for him that winter), after twenty-five pounds of flour. The snow as up to my knees. After that flour was gone we had to grind the wheat in the coffee mill as no one went to the store anymore that winter until Father and I each carried a basket of eggs to the store in Franklin on the 2nd of March, over two feet of :frozen snow to buy some groceries. We could not busy much as we had no money. Mother raised some sugar beets in the garden, as we had no sugar she but some beets in the oven and baked them and put them in a cloth to get some syrup to make her yeast. She cut some up in little squares and browned them in the oven and ground them up to make coffee. Mother would also put the wheat in the oven to dry and brown it just a little so it would grind better and we used it for bread and mush. Finally the cow went dry so we had no milk for some time and no sugar, but we got through the winter without any sickness. We thanked our Heavenly Father for what we had and lived by faith in our Heavenly Father as we had no Church organization of any kind at that time there.

It seems the Lord wanted a tried people to build the Valleys of the Mountains for when we began to raise crops that we might have food for the next winter, we had to fight the squirrels and the grasshoppers. We worked with faith that did not falter and as I remember we never got discouraged for we felt the Lord was on our side.

April 1949

When I was going on 21 years of age I was looking for a homestead to file on. East of my father’s place, about 40 rods from our house in a hollow there was a nice little spring by a service berry bush coming out of a sandstone formation, where I decided to make my home. Not being of age to take up land, I moved a little log building with a dirt roof on it, that my father had used for a granary, onto the land. I had a bed in it and would sleep there some nights. I prayed to the Lord that he would protect it for me, that no one would file on it as I was not yet twenty-one, and not old enough to take up land. There was a man by the name of George Kent, down on the river. His wife told me there was a relative of theirs in Lewiston, Clyde Kent, who was going to jump that land, as they called it those days. I told them that I did not believe he would be that mean. I wanted to start life for myself as soon as I was 21. So on June 17, 1893, I was on my way to Blackfoot, Idaho by train in company of John McDonald, whose fare I paid to Blackfoot, and return as a witness for me as to my age. There was no bridge across Bear River to Dayton at that time. We stopped at Pocatello over night; it was not much of a town at that time, mostly railroad shops and saloons. We arrived at Blackfoot on June 18th, on my 21st birthday to file on that homestead. When I told them at the land office of the land I wanted to take up, they told me there was a man there some months before, the man I spoke of. Not giving up hope altogether we looked over the plat, and I found there was 40 acres all to itself, not filed on. After looking things  over for awhile I said to Mr. McDonald that is the land my cabin and the spring of water is on; so I filed on it and returned home. Arriving on Sunday afternoon my mother said there was a man and his wife looking at your place, as they thought that I had lost out. My family with me felt to thank the Lord that I had a place to build my home on.

As Fred and I started to quarry sandstone on my father’s place that fall, I hauled some sandstone in the Spring to build me a house, but during that winter 1893, my mother came down with pneumonia and died within a week on the 26th of February 1893. She was buried in the Preston Cemetery. She was about the 2nd or 3rd person buried there, as the new cemetery had been started that year.

The following Spring the Wanner family came to Mapleton, from Germany, on my birthday June 18th, which was a Sunday. This was the first time that I had seen my life’s companion, as they came to my brother Fred’s place, where they lived until they found a home to live in. Christine was their oldest daughter and I fell in love with her at first sight. My sister Regine was home again from Montana, her husband had left her, she had a little girl Katy. Christine stayed with her until she went to Millville to work for the Pittgins family for about three months for seventy-five cents a week and her board and some old clothes. When she left they gave her $6.00 and she gave it to her father as he told her she had to earn some money yet before she got married.

That fall as I started to haul stone to build a house, besides taking care of my father’s farm—Adolph helping me, as my father was away most of that summer to Bear Lake and other places, because he didn’t feel like staying home after Mother died. When he came back he brought with him Sister Weirman, and married her in the Logan Temple. Well, during this time I had started to build my house. We dug a hole in the ground and poured water in and mixed it. That was what we used to lay up the walls, and the house is still standing. By New Years the house was finished and cleaned, but we had no furniture or anything else to put in it, but still we made our arrangements to get married. We were baptized by Heber Taylor on 26 June 1894 in Cub River and confirmed by Edward Perkins at Mapleton on the 27 Jun 1894. We were married 1st February 1894 in the Logan Temple by Marriner W. Merrill, president of the temple. (Read Christina’s biography here.)  We made the trip by team and wagon, as there was no snow on the ground in the valley. We put our team in the Tithing Barn, as the Lalladine family were the caretakers. After returning from the temple, for supper we were invited by Charles O. Card at their home on depot street, as Mary Wagstaff’s mother’s sister was working at their home, and we spent our first night with them. He is the Card after which the city of Cardston, in Canada was named, as he later moved to Canada.

As I have said before, after we got the house finished we had nothing to put in it and had no money to get married with, so I asked Grandpa Wanner if he would loan me $10.00 and I would pay him back when I raised a crop. He let me have the money with which we bought our marriage license, and a few dishes for the house. We borrowed a table and an old set of knives and forks from my sister Regina, as she did not need them at that time. We returned them again when she got married to George Wanner a year or so later. We paid Grandpa in seed grain the next fall with many thanks to him for his kindness. For our wedding present Grandpa and Grandma gave us a bedstead to sleep on, as we had no furniture. I nailed some boards together for a cupboard for dishes. Stepmother Weirman Nuffer made some of our temple clothes and the garments were made out of factory. She was helpful to us in many ways, so that was the beginning of our family life in a humble way and we were happy together.

As Adolph was still at home, he and I ran my father’s farm, and I fenced my 40 acres, and started to plant some of it as fast as I could break it up. I helped Fred in the sandstone quarry to get a little money to buy a few things till we raised a crop. The Wanner family bought John’s place on Worm Creek for $2000 and became very successful farmers.

Will pass over a year or so till the first child Clara was born 10 August 1895, Louise 19 Nov 1896, Anna the 8 January 1899, Bertha 9 Jun ‘900, Fred 21 October 1901, Joseph 18 May 1904, Ida 15 Jun 1906. These children were all born in Mapleton.

From here on my main occupation was farming and quarrying sandstone. I cut grain with a binder for people in Mapleton at one dollar an acre. In the winter I worked with Fred on the Mink Creek Canal, blasting the rock with black and giant powder, making the canal from seven to ten feet wide. I worked out four hundred dollars in ditch stock and finally sold it for forty cents on the dollar. I received $1.50 a day in cash so that is all I got for my work, and we had to sleep in a tent in the wintertime and cook our meals but it build the canals so the people would get water for their land and could raise crops.

When Fred moved to Preston I took over the stone quarry. I was also ditch rider for the Preston Cub River Canal for a number of years, making a trip a day while the canal was full, at a dollar a trip. While runnig the quarry I delivered stone for some of the Preston business buildings and for the Lewiston Meetinghouse. During this time we were also taking care of John and Fred’s grandmother for a number of years. As the family was getting larger I built another room on the house as mother was busy taking care of Grandma Spring, and John was going on a mission to Germany. They decided to send Grandma Spring to Blackfoot where she died a year of so later. I think it was in the year of 1897, when Mother and I drove to Blackfoot with the team and buggy to take the rest of our homestead, that we had lost by that Mr. Kent beating me to it before I was of age.  While at Blackfoot we called at the hospital to see Grandma Spring.  They told us she had died before Christmas the year previous, and they had sent no word of her death to anyone.  A few words more while at the land office it seems the Lord had always prepared the way for us.  As we entered the land office the first person we met was President George Parkinson, who knew us well.  Without his help our trip might have been in vain, as it was difficult to take up land when another party had filed on it.  At the time we made this journey this was the frontier of the west.  Where Downey is now there was not one hours and from Pocatello to Blackfoot was all desert, not a house, only the Indian Reservation.  I carried my shotgun with us for safety.  We could say much more, but it would take too long to tell it.

From here on it made a lot of work; to fence the land and break it up and get it ready to farm and to make a living for the family.  From here on I will begin tow rite of some of my work in the Church for which we have left our native land.  On April the 19th, 1896 the Stake Presidency, George Parkinson, Brother Cowley, Solomon Hale came to Glendale to form a German Organization, so we could hold meeting every two weeks, as there were many families Swiss and German that could not speak English. Addison Wagstaff was Ward Clerk and took the minutes. Brother Jacob I. Naef was chosen as President. It was not until 5 Jul 1896 that his counselors were chosen, Brother Jacob Schneider, first, Charles A. Nuffer second counselor. We held our meetings in the homes of the people on their farms and wherever they lived. They traveled with farm wagons a distance of20 miles one way to Mink Creek, Weston, Riverdale, Whitney, Treasureton, Mapleton, Preston and Glendale, there places were we held meetings. Some years later when Joseph Moser became President, I became one of his counselors, also brother Kern. After some years John asked to be released and I became President ofthe Branch on the 21st of March 1915, with Brother Kern and Alma Moser as my counselors. During this time we held the meeting in the old tithing office, later in the new one at Preston, until the 13th of August 1916, we held our last meeting. During the later part of the war some of the people of Preston made it very hot for the German speaking people yet most of them were Swiss, but that did not make any difference. So President Geddes came to me and asked me not to hold anymore meetings. After the war many of the German people had moved away so we never started to hold the meetings anymore, and I never was released to this day. That closes up this chapter of the German Saints of this part here, so I will go on to some of my other duties in the Church. Making in all twenty years that we held German Meetings with the people of Franklin Stake.

Now going back to the year 1899, when I ws called as second counselor to Bishop Edward Perkins in the Mapleton Ward. When Orron J. Merrill moved to Preston I took his place and his son Preston my place in the Bishopric. I was chairman of the School Board for six years, and Brother Merrill was the Clerk, and when he moved away his son was appointed in his place. While on the school board I had a schoolhouse built in the upper end of the District, with Harrison R. Merrill as the first teacher. That way the children of the upper end would not have to go so far to school. The children in the lower part of the Ward met in the old meeting house. While I was in the Bishopric Brother 0. J. Merrill was the Ward Clerk and clerk of the school board. After his father moved to Preston, 0. P. Merrill, his son, was the Ward Clerk and clerk of the School Board. Speaking of schools the first school that was held in Mapleton was in the winter of 1886, when Bishop Perkins went to Lewiston to school. He let the people of the Ward have a school room so they all got together and employed Hirum Johnson as their teacher. All children from seven years up to thirty, married men and young ladies went to school there all in one room. Some came from Franklin and Nashsville. I was feeding cattle for Harrison Thomas that winter and lived with Olive Sweet, she had to board me as she was living in their house, and they paid $150 for my schooling and $.45 for a book. I had to chop all the wood for the family. I was fifteen years old. This school house which was built by the efforts of the people of the upper part of the District, was the first schoolhouse built in Mapleton Ward with H. R. Merrill as its first teacher.

In 1899 in June I was ordained a High Priest by George Parkinson, President of the Oneida Stake, and we labored unitedly together in the Ward. Bishop Perkins was very kind to prepare me for this work, and in his home he read the Book of Mormon and the Doctrine and Covenants to me. So, that I may more fully understand the Gospel, and that I might be an example to the people of the Ward, and he taught me the Law of Tithing, and that we may be worthy to receive all the blessings that the Gospel had in store for His faithful children. So on the 21st ofF ebruary 1900, we were recommended to the Logan temple to receive our second washing and anointing by President Morgan, a blessing that not so many have received, which is the greatest blessing anyone can receive in the House of the Lord, for which I have tried to be thankful all the days of my life.

In the Spring of the same year, as there was a severe drought in Southern Utah, President Lorenzo Snow went to St. George, and met with the people there and told them if they would pay an honest tithing the Lord would bless them and send rain to save their crops. As the church was in a very bad financial condition at that time. So on returning to Salt Lake City President Snow called a special meeting of all the General Authorities of the Church to meet in the temple on the Law of Tithing, on June the 2nd at 9:00 A. M. And as Bishop Perkins had taken so much interest in me he asked me to go with him, only the Bishops were called. All the General Authorities spoke in the Meeting, after which they all shouted “Hosanna to the Lord”. We were in the Temple from 9:00 A.M. until5:00 P.M. The meeting was in the room known as the Celestial Room. At the close of the meeting President Snow said, “If you will go home and pay an honest tithing, the Church will be freed from debt, and the Lord will forgive you of your past neglect, and I promise you your homes will never burn.” From that time forth I always paid a full tithing as long as I lived on this earth. This blessed land of America, which God has blessed above all other lands. So these are some of the blessings that your mother and I received through Bishop Perkins being so kind to me. In appreciation for the blessing the Lord has given us, I desired to do my full duty in my calling with the people of this ward, and we had many opportunities to be called out day and night in time of sickness and death, among the people. We labored together eight years and had much joy in our labors.

I have given you some of the ways I made a living for the family. To make a living during this time and to care for the family, I farmed, raised hogs and horses, milked cows, separating the milk and selling the cream, and making butter getting $.10 a pound at the store. The most I received while selling cream from six to seven cows was $35 a month. I also sold cream separators to the people of Franklin and Preston to make a little extra money. I cut grain with the binder for the people in Mapleton. I quarried stand stone for the Lewiston Meetinghouse, and some buildings in Preston. The Riter Brothers Drug Store and other buildings. For the hogs we received $4.00 per hundred.

I had now lived on Worm Creek, Mapleton twenty-four years and I have related only some parts of my life. During this time in my life it was necessary for us to look toward the future, and seven children had been born to us in our first home. As the family got larger I built room onto the house. During this time my sister Mary was working for a family in Logan and as she was not feeling so well she came home and we needed someone to help mother as Bertha was a baby at that time. But in September Mary came down with pneumonia and died the 5th October 1900.  She had been born in Providence, Utah the 11th of October 1881. At that time most of our children were sick with scarlet fever, but they got well with our care and the help of the Lord as it was hard to get a doctor.

Before leaving Mapleton, speaking of building I feel to give some information pertaining to my father after his third wife died, Mrs. Weirman. He married Mrs. Shaub of Logan and bought the house of her son Gene. He lived in Logan a few years but he wanted to come back to Mapleton again and wanted me to build him a house in my orchard. I bought some sawed square log from Kall Wheeler, and build him the house. He paid for the materials and I did the work free, and I moved them up from wagon by team, but it was only a few years until he wanted to move again. He had already lived in Preston twice before. The first time where Ernest Porter lived, and before that out where Jim Smart’s place is. I then began to haul tone to Preston and John laid up the walls in 1907. In all the houses he lived in were one in Providence, two in Logan, one in Worm Creek, three in Mapleton and three in Preston and he died the 121h Aprill908. When I started to build my home after his death I moved his wife back to Logan with team and wagon.

I will pass over some years as things went on as usual. We began to look to the schooling of the children, as there was not much opportunity in Mapleton. I bought five acres of land in Preston and during the winter of 1905 and 1906, I began to haul sandstone from the quarry for the building of our home. I also planted trees in the spring of 1906, as there was nothing on the land whatever, only a fence around it. So this was the plan for us to move to Preston, not to improve ourselves better financially, but to make it better for Mother and all of us.

The Bishop was called to go on a mission, and I was in line for Bishop as things looked at that time. Mother was already alone so much with the family and I had so many meetings to go to at night. I was still in the German Organization, and I was so far away. I had from two and a half to three miles to ride on horseback to meeting to the home of Brother Merrill or the Bishop. In all the eight years I labored in the ward only one ward was held in our home. I leave the rest for you to answer whey we made this move which needed much consideration and prayer, and the guiding care of our Heavenly Father in making this move.

So in the Spring of 1907, after renting the farm to Hart Wheeler of Mapleton, I built a frame house sixteen feet by twenty feet to have a place to live in. Also, we had a tent for some of the children to sleep in, so I would have the family with me while I was there building our home. I built the barn a place for the cows and chickens. I hauled logs for the bam and most of the lumber for the house from the sawmill on Cub River during the summer. In October of 1907, when the frame house and the bam were built we all moved to Preston. We were all glad especially the children, when they could see the train and hear it when it came to turn on the Y. So this was a great change for all. This was the first time I lived in town, since we left Providence. So in the Spring of 1908, as soon as the snow was gone I began to dig the foundation for the house and laying up the walls; doing the work myself. Our second home in which all the children were brought to men and womanhood. This was the most happy period of our life. In order to get the large stones on the wall we had to roll them up some logs, as they were too heavy to lift. I hired Adolph to help with the work for a while, but before I got the walls finished I took down with Typhoid Fever. Adolph and Mr. Peterson finished the walls. This was in the latter part of September, and I did not know any more of the building of the house till it was finished so the family could move in. Preston was a baby then and I remember that he cried so much it must have been hard for Mother. I can’t give much detail concerning my sickness, only that Mr. States was my doctor and a lady Mary Bodily was my nurse. Brother Arnold Shuldhess, the editor of the German paper “Beobachter”, was up from Salt Lake City and came and administered to me when I first took sick. When Miss Bodily had to go some other place they got Maude Stocks for my nurse. They gave me very little food; mostly brandy and whiskey, as food is most dangerous in Typhoid, at least that was the way they used to do for Typhoid Fever at that time. I never used liquor at other times in my life.

Before I forget, my sister Regina, about the year 1886 also came home from Logan where she had been working and came down with Typhoid and there were no doctors here as there was no town of Preston here then. If there had been we would not have had any money to pay them; so her mother treated her the best she knew with tea from different herbs. Our prayers and faith were in God and she lived and got well, so we did the best we could under different ways and conditions. I will again go on with my own case. The latter part of October as I remember, I began to improve in health and they began to give me some food, as I was getting very hungry and I thought I would not get enough to eat anymore. Mother was very much afraid she might give me too much to eat, as that is the most dangerous time of the disease. The first time I went out doors again was the beginning of November. The trees were all yellow and I went up town to vote on November 6th 1908. I am sorry to say that this was not the end of our grief and sickness, so we had to start all over again and as I write these few lines it fills my eyes with tears when I think of that dear Mother that never gave up, that watched over you all night and day with faith in God for a better day. The Lord heard our prayers and she had the privilege to bring you up to manhood and womanhood, but that was not the end of our trials as stated before.

When Clara and Anna came down with the fever we had to get Doctor Emery, as Doctor States lived in Franklin. As they had to come most every day and we had a nurse that did not belong to the Church. She stayed at Preston Rooming house and we had trouble with her as I will tell you later when I get to that. By this time we were living in the new house. I think it was sometime in December. But, under the care of the new doctor and the new nurse the girls did not show any improvement. It was not long till they came down with pneumonia and week after week they did not get any etter. The nurse had a lady friend that visited some time in the evening. One day I found some empty whiskey bottles in a pile of stone that was beside the house. I at once told the Doctor we did not want his nurse any longer. He said he had a Nuffer barn place in Weston for her. He said that we would be responsible if something went wrong with the girls. I told him I was willing to take the responsibility. The nurse left and shortly she came down with the fever at the rooming house. It was only a week or ten days till the girls were up on their feet again. It was now the latter part of February and what a relief it was especially for that dear Mother, when all could rest again.

Now during my sickness some of the people of Mapleton had been told by Doctor States that there was not much hope for me to get over my sickness and mother heard of it. She prayed to the Lord saying that if he would spare my life she promised Him she would let me go on a mission, under almost any conditions whenever called. So during the summer of 1909, I worked at whatever I could find to earn something to take care of the family, and to keep out of debt, and fmd planted what we could on the lot for the next winter. Sometime if February of 1910, I received a letter from Box B, as it was called in those days, when anyone was called on a mission. I did not know anything as to a call for a mission when I received the letter stating if I could accept this call, if I could be in Salt Lake City on April the 18th. I do not know if Bishop H. Geddes had told the authorities of the Church anything of my financial condition or not, as I remember he did not to me; which was very limited at this time nor did he tell me anything about being called on a mission. We did not hesitate for a moment, but told them that I would be there at the above date. As we had no porch on the south side of the house I went to work on it before leaving. I also built a shed for the white top buggy so it would be under shelter while I was away. On the 15th ofFeb 1910, Laura was born at home with Mrs. Nancy Beckstead in attendance, which made it still harder for me to leave you all alone. I also planted some garden before leaving. So in the morning of April the 18th, I was on my way, Clara going with me to Salt Lake as mother did not want me to leave alone. That way she could hear from me just a little longer, Clara was then nearing 15 years of age and Laura was going on two months.

As I remember I was set apart for my mission by Jonathan C. Campbell to the Eastern States Mission to labor under Ben E. Rich. After a few days in Salt Lake I left with other Elders for New York City, stopping at Des Moines, Omaha, Chicago, Buffalo and on to New York. After a few days there I was appointed by Ben E. Rich to labor in West Pennsylvania, with Elder Hyrum Nelson from Cleveland, Idaho. I was then sent by way of Philadelphia to Pittsburgh with Heber D. Clark as our president. We were then sent out in the country two hundred miles tracting on the way, where there was a Branch of the Church in Buck Valley. It would be too much to give my missionary account, it is written in my missionary journals, those red books in this home. As we met in Conference in Pittsburgh, with Ben E. Rich and all the Elders in February of 1912 I was released to return home. It was most difficult for mother to carry on any longer with the large family as she had to borrow most of the money while I was away, as it was a dry season, and Mr. Wheeler, the one that bought the farm did not make any payments and the Bank charged 12% interest.

When I arrived home Laura, it was on her birthday, was two years old. One great blessing while on this mission was that I did not have one day of sickness and Mother and the children all had good health, for which we thanked the Lord with all our hearts. It was February the 15th 1912 when I arrived at home in time to make arrangements for a new life in caring for the family again, and to pay off the money we had borrowed. But, before I could do that I had to borrow some more to buy a team with which to go to work. I borrowed $700 off of Grandpa Wanner; the team cost $300. On the 15th July 1912, I purchases thirty two acres from Mr. Charles Nelson west of town on time payment, at one hundred dollars per acre. I then planted it in hay and grain, and the same year a hail storm came and destroyed the crop of wheat. I then went hauling sand and gravel for a living, and helped Uncle John with the haying.

On returning home I was asked by President Joseph Geddes to visit the wards of the Stake with the High Council for two years. It was before the Stake was divided. I also was asked to take my place again in the German Organization Meetings, one or two times a month. During this time I was serving as a Ward Teacher, a Sunday School Teacher, and quite a number of years as the class leader of the High Priests group in the ward, at Priesthood meeting, so I had plenty to keep me busy. I was also the ward Chairman ofthe Anti-Tobacco and Liquor campaign. During the First World War, I was called as a Counselor to Peter Hanson, who was Stake Superintendent of the Religion Class until the Stake was divided. In all six years, once or twice a month on Sunday or week days we would go out in the Ward to find someone to teach Religion Class in the schools, or to visit the schools that had teachers as we found it necessary. I was called as Chairman of the Genealogical Organization of the Ward. When the Ward was divided, and your mother and I worked in the Genealogical Organization. We were released when Orion Jensen was Bishop. During the years of 1923,24,25, and 26, I was called to baptize the children of the Franklin Stake. Charles F. Hawkes had done that work before. Also, at times I was called on to baptize children of the 2nd Ward at the Stake House. While in the old Church House I was a teacher in the Sunday School in the different departments at different times.

On October 30, 1916 I bought the farm in Dayton of June Jensen, Sam Morgan and H. A. Peterson of Logan, at the price of $5,500 so we would have work for the boys, so they would not have to go away from home to find work. For a number of years we had to dry farm, before we could get water. We finally got thirty shares at $130 an acres. As the land was all under bond it cost me $800 to buy the rest of the land out and we had to pay $7 per acres to get a ditch thru the Eccles Farm. I traded the land in Preston to Sam Morgon at $125 an acre that helped some. I had to clear off some thirty-five acres of sage with axes all by hand. That was all we had to do that kind of work for number of years. I had the cabin on the west hill of Peterson’s and had to carry the water from a spring below the hill in Petersons’ for cooking and vitrolling the wheat. I had to get a right-of-way from Brother McCarry at a spring to water the horses. We also had a stable on the hill for the horses. Usually we would fill our grub box on Monday morning and stay till Saturday and Mother and the girls would take care of things at home during the week. When we got water on the farm we moved up on the flat to the west of the farm. We went down the creek for water to use. We then built another room and Fred moved over with his family for the summer to help with the work as we rented the Miles farm and a year or so later Miles bought a house that we moved on his farm, for Fred and his family to live in. Later on we built another room onto it.

Preston helped us with the work after school closed and Joseph moved in up stairs when he got married, working with Roy at the car bam at the U. I. C. Railroad. In 1929 we built a house on the farm for Joseph to move in, as we had more work all the time. The cost of the house was $1250. Then came the crash of 1929, when wheat dropped to 30 cents a bushel and hogs to $4 per hundred and beets $4 a ton. To pay our debts and pay for the house all of us got together with a lot of hard work and the help of the Lord we pulled through. We also sold some hay for $5 per ton. In the Spring while the boys were thinning the beets, I was doing the summer fallowing, with the gang plow, with six horses; for a number of years. We started out with only three horses on the farm for a number of years. We could not raise hay without water. We had to haul the hay for the horses from town. Also, for the headers Mother would come over and cook for them. At the first harvest we did not have very much, and I was away trying to earn some money to pay for the heading. Louise and Preston drove over and brought them their dinner. I also went up to Glendale one summer and helped Fred Wanner and Hyrum Jensen get up their hay. They gave me a ton of hay for three days work with wagon and team and I would haul it over to the farm. That was during the early part of our farming that I am writing on this page some of our hardships.

In order to make some money to pay for the farm and to live, as we only raised grain, as we had no water on the farm, I would work on the header and do stacking. Also, I would go out with Fred Nuffer and Fred Steuri doing cement work for school houses, and other buildings. I worked for Joseph Moser as a carpenter on the Gymnasium, also did cement work, while Fred was hauling gravel. I hauled the first load of gravel for that building, also hauled gravel for the Jefferson School Building. I worked for Struve on the 4’h Ward Meeting house doing cement work on many houses in town. I had my team hauling gravel when they built the first sidewalks in Preston, until they were finished, then to the City Water Reservoir. When the Utah-Idaho Central Railroad was built I worked on the cut south of town ten hours a day for $2. Again I helped Joseph Moser when he built the beet dump, the high line by Tom Clayton’s place. I then got a job on the dump with the Sugar Co., loading beets on the cars. The next two years I was tare man for the company, and got lots of scoldings from the farmers, but the company treated me well. They used to pile any beets on the ground in large piles in different places, and haul them on the cars later. So, the boys Fred, Joseph and I would haul beets the rest of the fall. We would leave right after daylight and work until dark, so when Sunday came we were glad to get a short rest and go to Church, or I would be called to visit some Ward in the Stake in the interest of religion class to get in into the school, and on Monday back to work.

Going back to the farm work, in the fall of 1931 and 1932 I bought a herd of sheep to fatten, then took them to Denver to market to help get out of debt. While Fred was living on the Miles place and Joseph on the farm there was some difficulty, I do not know what it was, and Joseph moved back to town. Fred moved into the house on the farm and young Fred Wanner moved in where Fred had lived, as he had him working for him in 1936. I bought a tractor to do the farming, and did the summer fallowing with it that Spring. As Charles Nelson was janitor of the Ward House he asked me if l did not want to take the janitor job. So I had another job, which the girls helped me with at $11 a month, but it all helped. That was during the First World War.

Thinking it was time to retire from farming at the age of sixty-six I sold the farm in 193 7 to my son Fred. In Jun 1937 I bought the Dodge car and the Gamble home. The next year the McCarry farm. The summer of 1937 we went on a trip, Mother and I, Louise, the twins, and Joe and Gretta to Los Angeles, visiting Jim Cummings and Fred Nuffer. From there to San Francisco, then on Highway 1001 , the Redwood Road to Portland, Oregon up the Columbia River to Boise, Idaho and back. I had to come home after over two weeks absence. Mother and I had been to Los Angeles by train to visit Jim and Anna, when they lived at Beverly Glen, and again when she died the 25 January 1928. As given before the third time to California and again to San Francisco to the fair. Mother and I, Louise, Joe and Gretta, when Gretta took sick. After Mothers death, myself and Louise, Ida and Gilbert, went to Los Angeles the fourth time. Later when Jimmy Cummings was married I went on the bus to his wedding. Some years after Mother’s death, I and Louise and the twins went on a trip by car to Zions National Park, Cedar Breaks, and Bryce’s Canyon and to Yellowstone. The first time we went to Yellowstone National Park with Mother, Louise, Roy and Clara. The last time we went Louise, the twins, Donald and Joe and Getta and I went. We also went a few time to Nephi to the Roundup.

These years while Ward Chairman of the Genealogical Committee, we assisted the Stake in getting up large excursions to the temple on the U. I. C. Railroad, every month. All during our married life we would go to the temple every years as often as we were able to go. We carried on research work through the Genealogical Office in Salt Lake City, and we received sheets of names on the Nuffer and Wanner line, and my mothers Griener line, all at our own expense. I have the sheets in my trunk with the work all completed as you will find them there.

For twenty years after buying the Chevrolet car and the Dodge, we went to the Temple, whenever we could once or twice a month with a full car of people from the 2nd and 1st ward, until I took sick in December 1948. Since then I have been to the Temple three times. I am writing this May 11, 1950.While going to the Temple one February morning early it was snowing and the road was slick. I had with me in the car Mother, Louise, Brother and Sister Rindlisbacher and Mrs. Clarence Corbridge. As I was getting near the Utah line I felt there was trouble ahead. I was going about twenty-five miles an house, when George Wanner passed me. When half a mile over the Utah line the car struck a bump in the road and turned over in the barrow pit then over on its side. At that time a car came and took all but Mother and I and Louise to the Temple. Then came Orion Jensen and took Mother and Louise to the Preston Clinic to be examined by the doctor. I stayed with the car until Petterborg came. The damage on the car was over a hundred dollars.

Some months later Mother began to have pains in her back and kept getting worse as time went on. During July she got so bad I took her to the Preston Hospital for an xray. She was there for a week, and Doctor Cutler said we had better take her to the L. D. S. Hospital in Salt Lake as they could not do anymore for her there. We went to Salt Lake July 24th we were told that she had tumor of the spine. She was there for a week, when we were told that they could not do more for her so we bought her home. She died the 10th August 1940.

1 February 1949

Dear Children of Mine,

If your Mother was alive as I am writing, we would be celebrating our 55th Wedding Anniversary, but as it has fallen my lot I’m all alone in this home where you all have been brought up under her loving influence and with my deepest love for you all. I shall ever thank God, my Heavenly Father for the gospel and its blessings.

John and Elizabeth Quayle

Here is a photograph of John Quayle and Elizabeth Sharp and presumably one of their children.  Since I have the photograph, I thought I better make it available.

Elizabeth Sharp was born on Christmas Day in 1834 in Misson, Nottinghamshire, England to Thomas Sharp and Elizabeth Cartwright.  If you are interested, I have written about her parents, the family’s conversion to the LDS faith, and the family’s trip to America in her brother’s short biography, Sharp-Bailey Wedding.

Siblings William and Isabella continued west with a LDS wagon train and Elizabeth stayed behind with her brother James in St Louis.  Elizabeth’s mother died in St. Louis shortly after arriving.  Elizabeth and James did not join the LDS faith with their mother (Elizabeth), William, and Isabella.

Elizabeth married John Quayle who was a shoemaker and born 14 March 1833 in Kirkham, Isle of Man.  I have not been able to find this town, so either it is a mistake or misspelling.  The 1860 Census has the family living in Meramec, St Louis, Missouri.  1870 places them in Central, St Louis, Missouri.  1880 finally places the family back in St Louis, Missouri, where both of them died.  By the 1880 Census, John had become a foreman in a pork house, probably the pork house of his brother-in-law James.  I have a photo of James and his short biography will be available soon.  The family seemed to have some difficulty informing the census takers because their ages jump pretty wildly from the right year to up to nine years in difference.  Further, John Quayle is listed as Isle of Man in one, Wales in another, and even Missouri in another.  We are pretty confident in the date given above, but it is not perfectly sure.

John and Elizabeth have seven children that we are aware of, some believe there is another named Thomas but we cannot link him with any clear documentation.

John Quayle (Jr) was born 5 November 1855 in Illinois and died 13 May 1910 in St. Louis.  He was buried on the 15th in the New St. Marcus Cemetery in St. Louis.  He married Laura Breitenstein 19 June 1833 in St. Louis.

James H Quayle was born 15 February 1858 in St. Louis and 6 September 1864 in St. Louis.  He is buried in the Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis.

Isabella Quayle was born October 1861 in St. Louis and died 12 September 1864 in St. Louis.  She is also buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery.

Margaret Quayle was born July 1864 in St. Louis and died 25 April 1866 in St. Louis.  She is also buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery.

Ida Quayle was born in 1867 and died 13 November 1888.    We do not know much more.

Emily Quayle, also apparently called Emma on some records, was born 29 January 1868 in St. Louis and died 1 February 1928 in St. Louis.  She was buried on the 3rd in St. Marcus Cemetery.  She married Gustavus Crause.

Elizabeth Quayle was born December 1870.  She married William Duggan.  We do not know much else about this family besides this little bit shared with family near the early 1900’s.  She died 25 June 1903 in St. Louis.

In 1878 the family lived at 1286 S 8th St in St Louis.  In 1880 they were living at 1727 Decatur in St. Louis.

John died in 1894 after falling off a load of hay.  We do not know much more than this and it does not appear he is buried with the rest of the family in Bellefontaine Cemetery, if so, it is misspelled or under another name.

Elizabeth lived with her daughter Elizabeth, known as Lizzie to differentiate, until her passing.  Elizabeth died of typhoid fever 6 November 1902 in St. Louis.  She was buried the next day in Bellefontaine.

A dog named Navel

Today I thought I would share a humorous story about the late-night escapades of a car loaded with Utah State University students venturing down to see the Mormon Miracle Pageant in Manti, Sanpete, Utah.  Brad Hales, Mark Morris, Emily Sarà, Seth Warburton, and I made the trip in my 1998 Toyota Camry in what I believe was the spring of 2004.

The story starts with the rather unexciting drive from Logan, Utah to Manti.  We took the normal route off I-15 at Nephi to drive to Manti.  We conveniently located a parking spot only blocks away because we were plenty early.  We met our friends who drove down separately and staked out our territory with quilts on the grassy green expanse you can see in the photo above.  It is on that very same hill that the Mormon Miracle Pageant takes place.  Here is a nice photo I stole from the Deseret News to give some idea of the stage and what is going on.

The pageant ended and the four of us found our way to my little Camry to head out.  We were told by myriad friends that if we truly wanted to get back to I-15 from Manti in a speedy fashion that we should take the old highway out of Manti to the south via Gunnison and Levan.  We started to wend our way through the darkness.

We had a great, great time leaving Manti.  I do not mean to knock the pageant in any way, but we were certainly making light of it.  We hold no ill feelings towards the doctrines or ideas presented, but maybe it was just that year, but the whole thing came off as pretty hokey.  We decided only the local drill team was allowed to be the angels on the hill with their coordinated flag signals that only someone trained in shipping would have understood.  We drove the darkness really making fun and laughing ourselves silly about how poorly some parts of the pageant were done.

The conversation turned as we continued through the dark roads.  We sang along with a song and the conversation turned to Levan, Juab, Utah.  I do not know how true this is, but lore goes that Levan was named Levan because that is “navel” in reverse.  The area was named Levan because it is the very center of the state, about where a navel would be.  I do not think this is really true since I am sure the town was founded before the final boundaries of Utah were defined, but it sure made great fodder for laughing and conversation that night.  (Apparently there is a Levan, Illinois too)

Well, we made our final approach into Levan with the lights of the municipality drawing closer and closer.  Some of the members of the car were preparing the cameras so we could make a very quick stop and everyone could disembark for a photo with the Levan city sign.  We were laughing about getting a picture with Utah’s navel and then it happened.

Do you know that feeling when you see something and suddenly you do not know quite what to do because it is coming upon you so quickly?  As I drove 70 miles an hour down this road and with the blinding of the lights just as you emerge.  I suddenly had a car behind me with his lights on and that was also partly blinding me.  I made out the faint outline of something laying in the middle of my lane.  Just as I could see that, I had a car also coming my direction so I knew I could not really just dodge whatever it was in my lane so I prepared to straddle it.  I could not slam on my breaks because of the car so close behind me, the shoulder on the right, and the car approaching on the left.  I could see it was too big to straddle just as I was too close and too fast to stop.  I clenched my teeth, gripped hard on the steering wheel, and yelled over the conversation for everyone to hold on.

That is when we heard it.  This massive animal went under the car and we heard and felt him rolling under the car and at one point a serious thump right under the feet of the people in the back seat.  The sickening smell of scalded hair filled the car.  Cries rang out, “What was that?”  I watched for the car behind to dodge whatever it was I hit but he didn’t even flinch.  The individuals in the back of my car were trying to see if they could tell what we hit.  I could see no sign of the roadkill in any of my mirrors (beyond the headlight glare from the car behind).  I continued to let the car coast and finally started to breath realizing that massive thing went under the car and did not appear to do any damage at all.  I continued to coast down the now four lane highway until I hit city limits cruising speed.  I think I should point out at this point that this creature was already laying in my lane.  Although because it was so large and lumped, I assume it was a fresh hit and I was just fortunate enough to be the next person to hit it.

Nobody seemed quite as chipper anymore.  Nobody wanted to stop at the Levan city sign.  It was just silence as we drove through town.  As we left town somebody asked if it was a body we hit.  I told them I did not know what we hit but that it looked like a really big dog.  I thought he was a fresh kill and fortunately he rolled right under the car without relatively little incident.  The way he was clumped up in the road though, I was sure the car would jump or he would be lodged there.  The rolling of the thing under the car was clear so no need to get out and take a look underneath.  The others in the car were sure that I killed the dog.  Then more silence; dead silence.

After another 10 or 15 minutes or so with just the faint strains of the radio in the background, conversation started to pick up again.  We named the poor beast “Navel” after Levan.  I did not know what he was, but we were laughing again and having fun conversation again.

We climbed on I-15 and started heading north at full freeway speeds.  I seem to remember that Seth was sitting behind me and he commented on the fact that cars driving by us were looking at us.  Sure enough, we could not figure out why in the world everybody was looking at us.  It surely could not be some coordinated effort to stare us down.  It became a game of sorts to make faces back at the people as they drove by.  This elicited some hilarious expressions back at us.  One lady looked at us in complete and total disgust.  I was the one driving and could see expressions of the individuals.

Finally after probably 20 minutes of this, a car pulled beside us on the freeway and rolled down his window and motioned for me to do the same.  He then yelled, “Hey, you’re dragging a coyote!”  In that split second to conjure and give a response, I yelled back, “It’s okay, we picked him up in Levan!”  The total disgust in his face was quickly manifest and they sped off.  All the occupants of my car erupted into laughter at my complete nonsense reply.  Even now I realize how disconnected it must have sounded motoring down the freeway at 80 miles per hour.  It took me a minute or two to realize what I just said and even I was laughing so hard I was in tears.

Then the thought came, “Now what?”  I am not going to just pull to the side of the freeway in the middle of the dark.  We all decided we would get off at the next exit and see what damage was done.  We had just passed the Nephi exit, so we had at least another 10-20 miles to go before the next exit.  In that meantime driving down the freeway, let me assure you we thoroughly enjoyed those who passed us by.  I deliberately slowed down a little bit to maybe not cause as much damage to Navel.

Here is the question; how do you via some form of charades inform those in other cars that you know you have a coyote dragging behind you?  A thumb up and a big smile just never gets the impression across the 3-4 feet to the passenger in the other vehicle.  They would insist on pointing to the rear portion of the car.  We just smiled bigger and give them two thumbs up.  Of course, we were laughing so hard I don’t know how we stayed on the road.  Every person trying to convey the message must have thought we were a group of sick, psycho individuals who could only laugh.  They must have assumed we did not know, which means they tried all the harder.  As we attempted to confirm we knew, we would all break down in heavier laughter.  I cannot tell you how hilarious this was!

The Santaquin exit fortunately arrived and we left the interstate.  Navel was probably pretty excited about the ending of his trip.  We pulled to the end of the off-ramp and into the gravel of the road.  We all piled out to see our first view of Navel.  This is what we saw!

I know this will be a bit gruesome for some of the viewers out there.  I need to describe this a bit more to you though.  This dog is half worn away by this point!  I think you can tell that half of his head is also ground away.  If you click on the picture and get closer, you can see tiny chunks of hamburger all over the back of my car (Which we did not discover until the next morning because it was so dark.  The picture is only lit from the camera flash).  I cannot tell you the smell that was present, but my expression and covering my nose should give you some hint.  It was flat-out disgusting.  Also, I point out to you that Navel’s leg was jammed between the body of the car and part of my undercarriage right in the middle of the car near the axle.  That means Navel is at this point stretched out probably 5 feet in length from the axle to the end of his leg you can see in the picture.  He was mangled, stretched, and partly disintegrated.

Now the issue became, how to get him out from under the car?  We tried backing up hoping he would become unattached.  We tried poking at him with a tire iron.  Brad even had the idea to stand on him when I drove off, but we then became afraid of Navel coming apart.  You know how you should avoid injured dogs?  None of us really wanted to lay down next this stinky dog, slide under the car in the dark, and try to get him unattached.  What options are left?  We decided to drive to a gas station for assistance.

We hopped back on I-15 and began another episode of being stared down by every car passing us.  It was not quite as funny anymore.  Levity did finally arrive as we would deliberately not look at the cars trying to get our attention and then we would break down laughing to the horror of those trying to inform of us our dire situation.  The 10 miles or so to the next exit with a gas station went exceedingly slow.

Now we were parked on the sanitary and clean concrete of the Payson Maverik.  We all stood around the car again trying to figure out what we were going to do.  At least now we had sufficient lighting to really tell what was going on.  We stood around talking and figuring a plan of attack.  Emily and Seth figured out they would not have to do the dirty deed so they went in the store and returned passing out donuts!  Emily remembers that I made some comment like, “What do you think this is, some sort of Relief Society meeting?”  The comments from individuals as they came up to our circle and realized what we were all standing around looking at, WHILE eating donuts.  I remember one lady was very disgusted.

I tried climbing under the car but it was so low to the ground that I could not reach the spot where Navel had his leg lodged.  Nobody wanted to have to get out a jack so we could climb under the car.  I walked into the Maverik and asked for ideas or thoughts.  The attendant suggested I go grab a rod for turning valves down in the ground (about 3 feet long with a “T” at the top) and try using it to get him dislodged.  We poked and prodded at him for a while.  The broken leg and all the tissue just wasn’t helping me pull out his leg.  I cannot emphasize how terribly disgusting of a sight that Navel was.  This is roadkill that we had to deal with in an intimate fashion.

Finally our hero arrived with a couple of rednecks in a red Dodge minivan.  The dad walked up and asked us what the problem was.  Upon seeing Navel and then looking at my Missouri license plate he asked, “You from Mississippi?”  I responded, “No, Missouri” and he walked back to his minivan and his son quickly appeared with a plastic bag in his hand.  That little 7 or 8 year old climbed under my car without any fear and with his plastic covered hand pulled Navel’s limb out of its wedged location.  (I warned him of the hot exhaust which he still hit with his little arm!)  The kid then and went and hopped back in the little van (and did not go inside to wash!).

I walked in and told the attendant I wanted to buy that red minivan’s fuel.  He let me do it.  The man was appreciative, and so was I!

Now, what to do with the remains of Navel?  The Maverik attendant suggested we just throw him in the dumpster at the side of the building.  No small task for a bag of bones that must have still weighed 50 pounds.  Nobody wanted to touch him so we used the valve rod to pick him up and walked him to the dumpster.  We could not get the rod up over the top of that dumpster without Navel sliding down the rod.  It clearly was not working.  I finally had to reach out and touch Navel to hold him in place and keep him from sliding down the rod while Seth and I put him in the dumpster.

We returned the bloody rod to its location and later, unfortunate user.  We both washed our hands multiple times in the bathroom before heading to the attendant to let him know we were leaving.  He gave us both a Mt. Dew for the road!  We thanked him and headed on our way.  We arrived in Logan, Utah about 1:00 or so in the morning and all collapsed into our beds.  But whenever I hear of Manti, Levan, or the Mormon Miracle Pageant; I now think of Navel the dog from Levan.  May he forgive me for dragging him over 40 miles!  May he forgive us for the endless laughs that night and many since then at his expense.  I feel bad about his owners who wondered where their dog ran off to, I guess at least they did not see his terrible state.