2nd Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Back (l-r): Reed Webb, Roland Hobbs, Jeff Theurer, Kirt Hatch, Zan Christensen, Gary Andersen, Flora Allen; 3rd Row: Susan Jones, Peggy Plant, Ann Bair, Jane Robinson, Molly Lulwyler, Debbie Day, Barbara Housley; 2nd Row: Shanna Bullen, Pamela Bun, Beth Cartwright, Sherry Bundy, Fern Housley, Faye Housley, Sandra Jonas, Barbara Watts; Front: Jay Purser, Michael Smith, Brent Haslam, Tommy Hatch, Jimmy Johnson, Kim Christensen, Leslie Smith

This picture is from the 1961 – 1962 school year at Park Elementary in Richmond, Utah.

Mrs. Flora Greene Allen (1906 – 1996)

Gary Andersen (? – living)

Ann Bair married Downs (1954 – living)

Shanna Bullen married Gibbons (? – living)

Pamela Bun (? – ?)

Sherry Bundy (? – ?)

Beth Cartwright (? – living)

Kim Christensen (? – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Debra Lynn Day married Pursuer (1954 – 2010)

Brent Haslam (? – living)

Kirt Hatch (? – living)

Tommy Hatch (? – ?)

Roland Hobbs (? – ?)

Barbara Housley married Sharp (? – living)

Fay Housley married Purser (? – living)

Fern Housley married Taylor (? – living)

Jimmy Johnson (? – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Susan Jones (? – ?)

Molly Lulwyler (? – ?)

Peggy Anne Plant married Ivanyo (? – living)

Jay Purser (? – living)

Jane Robinson married Larsen ( – living)

Leslie Smith (? – living)

Michael Smith (? – ?)

Jeff Theurer (? – living)

Barbara Watts (? – ?)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

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1st Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Top (l-r): Oral L Ballam, Flora Allen, Leslie Smith, Barbara Housley, Kirt Hatch, Ann Bair, Shanna Bullen, Jimmy Johnson; 2nd Row: Zan Christensen, Jane Robinson, Sandra Jonas, Jeffery Theurer; 3rd Row: Barbara Watts, Reed Webb, Susan Jones, Faye Housley, Molly Lulwyler, Beth Cartwright, Gary Andersen, Johnny Durney; Bottom Row: Peggy Plant, Kim Christensen, Fern Housley, Pamela Bun, Roland Hobbs, Debbie Day

This picture is from the 1960 – 1961 school year at Richmond Grade School (the name given in the photo). I only knew it as Park Elementary.

Playground to the North of Park Elementary, see the Benson Stake Tabernacle on the far left.

I had to do some research and talk to a few people.  Originally the site of Park Elementary was the old Richmond High School.  Richmond High School was built in 1911-12.  North Cache High School was built in 1920.  Richmond High then became Richmond Grade School.  In 1939 an addition was built and it was named Park Auditorium.  Richmond Grade School was always called Park Elementary, but nobody knows when it formally changed or adopted the name.  Cache County School District just recently abandoned the buildings and donated it to Richmond City.  The students now attend White Pine which is now an elementary school.

I understand the 1911-1912 high school portion has been torn down with the 1939 Park Auditorium addition the oldest portion of the complex.  The Auditorium and other newer additions are still present, but will now house Richmond City offices.

1959 Jonas Reunion with Park Elementary in the background with the auditorium addition.

Mr. Oral Lynn Ballam (1901 – 1993).  He was both the Principal and 1st Grade Teacher.  He has appeared in other posts as teacher and also as student!
Flora Greene married Allen (1906 – 1996)
Gary Anderson (? – living)

Ann Bair married Downs (1954 – living)

Shanna Bullen married Gibbons (? – living)

Pamela Bun (? – ?)

Beth Cartwright (? – living)

Kim Christensen (? – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Debra Lynn Day married Pursuer (1954 – 2010)

Johnny Durney (? – ?)

Kirt Hatch (? – living)

Roland Hobbs (? – ?)

Barbara Housley married Sharp (? – living)

Fay Housley married Purser (? – living)

Jimmy Johnson (? – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Susan Jones (? – ?)

Molly Lulwyler (? – ?)

Peggy Anne Plant married Ivanyo (? – living)

Jane Robinson married Larsen (? – living)

Leslie Smith (? – living)

Jeffery Theurer (? – living)

Barbara Watts (? – ?)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

(l-r): Reed Webb, Kim Christensen, Jeff Theurer, Zan Christensen, Sandra Jonas, Beth Ann Miller, and Barbara Housley

Here is another photo shared with me a few years ago.  I believe this photo is another from from Park Elementary School in Richmond, Cache, Utah.  Not sure of the class subject.  Radios?  Soldiering?  Electrics?  It is interesting whatever it is.  The pictures, chalkboard, and school are all familiar to me, even though this was 30 years before I was in school.  Has it changed much to today?

I understand this is Oral Ballam’s classroom on the upper southwest corner of Park Elementary.  The alphabet, maps, turkey are all indicators and reminders of his classroom.

Kim Christensen ( – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Barbara Housley married Sharp ( – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Beth Ann Miller (1954 – 1974)

Jeffery Theurer ( – living)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

6th Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Back (l-r): Peggy Jo Kippes, Fay Housley, Kirt Hatch, Jeff Theurer, Mr. Oral L. Ballam, Lynn Carlson, Zan Christensen, Shanna Bullen, Jane Robinson; Middle: Peggy Anne Plant, Beth Cartwright, Fern Housley, Beth Ann Miller, Barbara Housley, Sandra Jonas, Shelley Fonsbeck, Ann Bair, Debra Day; Front: Jay Purser, Reed Webb, Gary Anderson, Jimmy Johnson, Steven Bowles, Kim Christensen, Leslie Smith.

This is the second of two grade school pictures of my Mom. This one is of her 6th Grade year at Park Elementary, Richmond, Cache, Utah. This is probably the 1964-1965 school year. I wonder if any of these other students are out there somewhere? What stories would they tell? Mom won’t tell me much of her childhood so I really don’t have much to add. Anyone venture?

There are two that are unknown or uncertain. If anyone can correct or clarify, I would very much appreciate it.

Mr. Oral Lynn Ballam (1901 – 1993).  He was both the Principal and 6th Grade Teacher.  He has appeared in other posts as teacher and also as student!

Gary Anderson (? – living)

Ann Bair married Downs (1954 – living)

Steven Bowles (? – ?)

Shanna Bullen married Gibbons (? – living)

Lynn Carlson (? – ?)

Beth Cartwright (? – living)

Kim Christensen (? – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Debra Lynn Day married Pursuer (1954 – 2010)

Shelley Fonsbeck (? – ?)

Kirt Hatch (? – living)

Barbara Housley married Sharp (? – living)

Fay Housley married Purser (? – living)

Fern Housley married Taylor (? – living)

Jimmy Johnson (? – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Peggy Jo Kippes married Beins (? – living)

Beth Ann Miller (1954 – 1974)

Peggy Anne Plant married Ivanyo (? – living)

Jay Purser (? – living)

Jane Robinson married Larsen (? – living)

Leslie Smith (? – living)

Jeffery Theurer (? – living)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

5th Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Back (l-r): Jimmy Johnson, Gary Anderson, Kirt Hatch, Jeffery Theurer, Zan Christensen, Steven Bowles, Reed Webb, Mrs. Leona Rasmussen McCarrey.  Middle: Leslie Smith, Jay Purser, Dixie Eskelsen, Sandra Jonas, Barbara Housley, Debra Day, Fern Housley, Beth Cartwright, Kim Christensen.  Front: Ann Bair, Fay Housley, Beth Ann Miller, Jane Robinson, Peggy Jo Kippes, Peggy Anne Plant, Shanna Bullen.

This is one of two grade school pictures of my Mom.  This one is of her 5th Grade year at Park Elementary, Richmond, Cache, Utah.  This is probably the 1963-1964 school year.  I wonder if any of these other students are out there somewhere?  What stories would they tell?  Mom won’t tell me much of her childhood so I really don’t have much to add.  Anyone venture?

Leona Pearl Rasmussen McCarrey (1902 – 1981)

Gary Anderson (? – living)

Ann Bair married Downs (1954 – living)

Steven Bowles (? – ?)

Shanna Bullen married Gibbons (? – living)

Beth Cartwright (? – living)

Kim Christensen (? – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Debra Lynn Day married Purser (1954 – 2010)

Dixie Eskelsen (? – ?)

Kirt Hatch (? – living)

Barbara Housley married Sharp (? – living)

Fay Housley married Purser (? – living)

Fern Housley married Taylor (? – living)

Jimmy Johnson (? – living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Peggy Jo Kippes married Beins (? – living)

Beth Ann Miller (1954 – 1974)

Peggy Anne Plant married Ivanyo (? – living)

Jay Purser (? – living)

Jane Robinson married Larsen (? – living)

Leslie Smith (? – living)

Jeffery Theurer (? – living)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

Flanders

John William Ross tombstone

(I originally published this in 2008.  I edited it and updated it with pictures for today.)

I thought I would write a little in relation to Veteran’s Day.  For the most part, it seems this holiday is somewhat forgotten in the United States.  Really, American’s celebrate the same day on Memorial Day in May.  I can understand the European View of holding it on the 11th of November.  It is the day WWI ended.

I remember well the time I first experienced Veteran’s Day.  I sat in the Eccles Ward Chapel in Patricroft, England.  I sat there on 11 November 1999.  The services started at 11 AM.  We had the hymn, opening prayer, and a few comments by the Bishop until 11:11 arrived.  It was then we took two minutes to remember what was done.

Growing up in Idaho means we had little or no realization of any war.  There are small war memorials inside of cemeteries to commemorate.  No war in modern days has taken place anywhere near Idaho.  Even the American Civil War means little to Idahoans.  My grandfather served in the Philippines during WWII but he spoke so little of it.  I had Uncles and Great Uncles who perished in WWI and WWII.  I had been to their graves but they were the dead, just like the other dead in the cemetery.  The idea of dying for one’s country meant very little to me.

Irwin John Jonas

One of my first memories of England is the day after we arrived.  We were taken into Altrincham Town Centre and there we proselyted for an hour or two on the way to the mission office.  I did notice the cenotaph.  I thought how oddly placed it was.  It was something that we have relegated mostly to cemeteries in the US.  Once and a while you find one in front of a town or city hall.

While I served in Hyde, Cheshire once of the way we knew where to turn in town was at the cenotaphs.  The same in Dukinfield.  When we arrived early at one member’s house we would loiter at the cenotaph to street contact until time for dinner.  A number of times I thought how oddly placed these things were.  I knew they were naming those who died in the ‘Great War’.  For some reason or another I thought they doubled up on the names over the various cenotaphs.  It never occurred to me names are not typically duplicated on these things, or if they do, the intention is not to do so.

Ellis Seth Jonas

Suddenly I found myself sitting in a church meeting remembering.  These souls did not fight for my country.  However I felt come into my heart a gratitude for their sacrifice.  Could I do the same thing if called upon?  Somehow a dawning realization came upon me of the hundreds if not thousands of names I had seen on cenotaphs in my first year in England.  They were everywhere.  There were continuous reminders of the dead who fought for their country.

About a month later I found myself walking the streets of Runcorn, Cheshire.  There is a large cenotaph probably 15 feet tall.  The bus would drive by it every day.  I could not help but notice the little red, fake flowers on popsicle sticks stuck in the flower bed all around it.  The cenotaph meant more to me by this point but what were the little red flowers?  I noticed each of them had a name written on them and they appeared hand-made.

James William Ross

I asked what the little red flowers meant that were still scattered everywhere a month after the 11th of November.  I was then told about Flanders Fields and the poppies.  The poem was shared with me.  It made sense, I felt the poignancy of it.  I have a cousin, Harry Coley (1891 – 1917) who died in Broodseinde, Flanders, Belgium as part of the war.  His body was lost in the mud and potholes of the war and never recovered.

The imagery is intense while the poem isn’t all that catchy to me.  In fact, some of it still doesn’t make sense to me so I share only the first verse here:

In Flanders Fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

David Delos Donaldson (back), John Edmund Donaldson (left), and William George Donaldson

Would I have this type of courage?  Would I be willing to go and serve my country so willingly?  Even if I was drafted, unwillingly?  To set aside all other hopes and aspirations to serve my country?  I did so to serve a mission for my church.  I would think I would be willing to for my nation.  While I am not entirely enamoured with my country at the present, would I still be willing to do it?  Probably.

In fact, I feel some desire to serve in the military.  My life hasn’t permitted the chance and my wife is against the idea.  I don’t think I will be making the decision to join.  But I wish to honour those who do and especially those who died in doing so.  Accordingly, when I saw my clock at 11:11 this morning, I stopped for 2 minutes to remember.  What does our future hold?  I don’t know.  But our past is nobler because of these good souls who gave all.  Not only to join, but they never returned.  We were on the side of right then, and our nation was preserved.  I hope and pray our nation continues on the side of right and we will yet be preserved.

An Wanner uncle of mine arrived in Whitney, Idaho a year after his death in WWI.  His remains arrived in a lead casket which was buried with great fanfare for the small community.  WWII repeated this scenario with another Uncle, another family line, buried in Richmond, Utah.  His body arrived months later and he was interred with great fanfare.  May we live our lives in such a way, regardless if dying for our nation, but let us die in such a way that the community wishes to come out and pay homage for your great sacrifice for the future of man, good, and our country.

Milo James Ross

Irwin Jonas Honored

Irwin Jonas Newspaper Article

This newspaper article regarding the funeral of Irwin Jonas was just shared with me.  I have wrote of Irwin’s life previously.  Family history is an ongoing endeavor with little nuggets appearing from time to time!

I don’t know which newspaper this article was published.  I do know that Irwin died 11 July 1944 in Saint-Lo, Normandy, France.  He was actually buried 6 February 1948 in Richmond, Cache, Utah, almost four years later.  But this article sounds like a memorial service held within weeks or months afterward, and not with Irwin’s body actually present.  It is my understanding he was buried for a time in France, then brought home years later.  I cannot imagine having to deal with this as his parent, widow, or family member.

“Memorial services will be held Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. in the Richmond South ward chapel for Sgt. Irwin Jonas who was killed in France on July 11.  Bishop E. M. Hicken will preside and Commander Neal Hillyard of the American Legion Post 33 will conduct the services.

“The program has been arranged as follows: Advance of colors; selection, The Lord’s Prayer, by the ladies’ chorus; invocation, Hyrum Hansen; solo, My Task, C. I. Stoddard; poem composed by Leona Carson and dedicated to the son of Sgt. Jonas will be read by Bishop E. M. Hicken; talk, Scoutmaster A. J. Mendenhall, Jr.; duet, Resignation, Florence and Rebecca Lewis; talk, O. L. Ballam; violin solo, J. W. Pulsipher; talk, William Jonas of Salt Lake City; and Lt. Commander G. Ellis Doty; selection, the Flag Without a Stain, Ladiers’ chorus; retiring of colors, taps, and benediction, J. W. Stoddard.

Isn’t it amazing where our society is now found?  Due to the sacrifice of people like Irwin, we have the right to fight over what we can see and how we can treat each other?  Without that freedom protected Irwin, we might all be dead, speaking another language, or without the rights of speech or equal protection.  Rather than defend those rights and use them, we would rather trample the symbol of them.  But that too is protected speech.  But let us be careful that we actually use the right so much that we divide and undermine and actually lose it in doing so.

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