Ole Loren Christiansen

Which Christiansen?

I have this photo sitting on my desk at work.  It is a little 2×3 inch picture inside a soldered silver metallic frame.  It belonged to my Great Grandmother, Lillian Coley Jonas (1898 – 1987).  It came from the collection of photos left to her by her mother, Martha Christiansen Coley (1879 – 1961).

My first impressions of the picture remind me of Lillian’s brother, Arthur Christiansen Coley (1921 – 2004).  But for his age, the clothing are the wrong time frame.  But because of the family resemblance I can see in Uncle Art, I know this man is related to me.

Since the picture belonged to Martha, I have often wondered if this is a picture of her father, Olle Christiansen (1853 – 1900).  But the hat, tie, shirt, and suspenders don’t match for a person who passed away in 1900.

Since he looks like Uncle Art, but the person in the photo has to be greying and older by the 1930’s, then I believe this is one of Marth’a brothers.  I know very little about the brothers.  Martha had three brothers: Henry Owen Christiansen (1887 – 1932), Roy Christin Christiansen (1892 – 1892), and Ole Loren Christiansen (1898 – 1977).  Since Roy died as a baby, I know it isn’t him.

That leaves me to Henry Owen and Ole Loren.  Henry Owen and Martha seem to have done very little to keep in contact.  Not a single letter, post card, or photograph that we can tell document anything in communication.  Plus he died in 1932, so the photo above had to predate that date.  I am not a great teller of fashion styles and changes, but I believe the above photo’s clothing would date during the 1930s into the 1940s.  As such, I believe this photo is of Ole Loren.

I have one photo of Ole Loren.  Don’t you think they are close enough in features that they could be the same.  However, I do not know if Henry Owen looked like him.

Sister, Ole Loren, Florence?

I don’t even know which sister of Loren’s is on the left.  From other photos and correspondence I very much believe this is Rhoda.  With the letters and cards between the two, it is very likely this photo was provided to Martha by her.  The photo only says “Sister, Loren, and wife” on the back.  Ole Loren, who I believe went by Loren, probably to differentiate him from his father, only had two wives that I am aware.  Sara Strong (1900 – ?) who he married in 1918 and Florence Knapp (1898 – ?) who he married in 1926.  I don’t know what happened to Sara, there appears to have been a divorce.  For the time of this photo, Florence is likely his wife.  I can tell the sister on the left is a sibling to Martha and Loren, I just don’t know which one.

Henry Owen Christiansen appears to have died in Tillamook County, Oregon.  On his service registration in 1918 he is living in Northport, Stevens, Washington with a wife of Anna Wilda Christiansen.  I believe she is Anna Wilda Hooser from Texas.  They appear to have had children named Mary, Madison, Gerald, Henry Jr, and John.  Quite a bit more research to properly piece the family together.

Ole Loren Christiansen appears to have died in Oakland, Alameda, California.  I believe two children were born to Sara, Ruth and Robert, and two to Florence, Lorraine, and Lucille.  Lorraine and Lucille may have been twins, both born the same year.

Without more photos to compare, I don’t believe I will pin point these individuals while in mortality.  But at least I have narrowed down the family relationships.  If anyone has more information on Ole Loren Christiansen or Henry Owen Christiansen, I am very much interested in any clues or leads you can provide.

At any rate, people often ask me about the little frame on my desk.  All I usually say is it is my Great Great Grandmother’s brother, I don’t know which one.  Most don’t say anything about that, but a number of commented on how intriguing the picture is.  I agree, some day I will learn more on Loren and Henry and hopefully can provide an update.

 

1961 Coley Film

I stumbled upon a photo of a Great, Great Uncle, Wilford Herbert Coley, posted on a website. I e-mailed the lady who posted the picture and she forwarded my e-mail to her brother. As it turns out, the family has a number of film reels taken from the early 1960’s. I asked him to share any that he thought I might be interested in.  He indicated that one was from a funeral and it seemed to include extended family.  He could only identify his grandfather, Wilford Herbert Coley, in the film.

On a hunch, I sent him this photo and informed him that it was taken 17 August 1961 at the burial of my Great, Great Grandmother, Martha Christiansen Coley, in Richmond, Utah.  This is Wilford’s mother and I knew he was at the funeral.  I also knew that if the family was into filming events, this could very well be one such event to catch.

Art, Golden, Wilford, Roland, Lloyd, Edna, Hannah, Carrie, Lillian, Ivan Coley at their mother’s funeral in 1961.

He responded to me stating the film was from the same funeral and it actually covered the carrying of the casket from the hearse, some scanning of the crowd, and then the final shots of the 10 siblings standing together in which this photo was taken. He shared the converted video from the film with me yesterday.

The 10 siblings in the picture above and film are as follows from left to right.
Arthur Christiansen Coley (Art), 1921-2004
William Golden Coley (Goldie), 1924-2009
Wilford Herbert Coley, 1903-1966
Roland Charles Coley, 1915-2005
Oley Lloyd Coley (Lloyd), 1918-1998
Edna Coley Neilson, 1900-1983
Hannah Marie Coley Thomson, 1909-1982
Carrie Christiansen Coley McMurdie, 1906-1992
Lillian Coley Jonas, 1898-1987
Ivan Stephen Coley, 1912-1994

The film starts out with children carrying flowers out of the church.  I am pretty sure this is the old Richmond, Utah South Ward Building (demolished after the 1962 earthquake).  I do not think we will be able to identify any of these girls because of how cloudy and short the video is at this point.

The film then moves to the Richmond, Utah Cemetery viewing the place where Martha will be laid to rest.  Two girls appear in the background, again probably too short a span of time and too fuzzy to identify them.

We jump to the casket being carried by 6 men, the 6 male siblings.  On the far side of the casket from right to left are Roland, Wilford, and Art.  On the near side from right to left are Lloyd, Golden, and Ivan.

In the background right as the pallbearers appear with the casket are two girls dressed in white.  The taller of the two are Connie Gittins (Wilford’s granddaughter) and an unknown girl.

A young unidentified girl walks in front of the group bearing the casket.

Then we start the first scan of the crowd counter-clockwise from the south.  These are the individuals:
Wilford Coley
Short boy in white that Bob Jonas steps in front of
Bob Jonas in white shirt
Steve Coley in white shirt
Gary Coley revealed when Steve Coley steps aside
Art Coley
Mary Coley (Art’s wife and Bob, Steve, and Gary’s mother)
Lillian Coley Jonas
Carrie Coley McMurdie
Edna Coley Neilson
Hannah Thomson
Tall guy in background (probably Lorenzo “Ren” Bowcutt?)
Lady in white in background
Tall thin man in background
Shorter man in foreground, very short time

Then we move to the 10 siblings back and forth as mentioned above in the photo.

The video is below.  Be sure to open it in full screen and to have your mouse on the pause button so you can look more carefully.

If anyone can add more information, I certainly welcome it.  I hope we can identify every person in the video but I think I hope for too much.  After all, this was taken 40 years ago!  Nevertheless, the video is interesting to see people living and moving who are now all gone from mortality.

For those interested, here is a copy of Lillian Coley Jonas’ journal that includes this funeral.  Martha died on the 14th of August 1961.  I also include the other two journals we have for her.

Lillians 1961 Journal

Lillians 1962 Journal

Lillians 1963 Journal

1959 Andra Reunion

B

Back l-r: Kenny Beck, Twila Andra (holding Jeffrey Andra), Marlene Beck, Patty Andra, Sharon Johnson, Gary Beck, and Peggy Johnson.  Middle l-r: Doug Jonas, Jeffrey Andra (held by Twila), Sandy Jonas, Golden Andra Jr, Mary Lou Johnson, Chad Andra, Greg Andra.  Front l-r: Marc Andra, Kent Andra, Andy Sorenson, Lanny Johnson, Scott Sorenson, and Cindy Johnson

In my constant pursuit of family history photos, I stumbled upon this gem.  We believe it is the Andra family reunion from 1959.  Most of the reunions during this time were in Richmond, Utah or Preston, Idaho.  I believe these three photos were all taken in Preston.  This photo includes the older children from the older Andra siblings.  I don’t have many pictures of the Andra grandchildren from the reunions.  Plenty of photos of the siblings or even my Great Grandparents, Bill and Mary Andra.  That makes this even more rare.

This photo has children of the six oldest siblings.  William, June (married Johnson), Millie (married Beck), Golden, Colleen (married Jonas), and Sergene (married Sorenson).  I will not include much information since most of these children are alive.

Kenneth Beck (1949 – Living)

Twila Andra (1947 – Living)

Marlene Beck (1948 – Living)

Patricia Andra (1946 – Living)

Sharon Johnson (1943 – Living)

Gary Beck (1947 – Living)

Peggy Johnson (1945 – Living)

Douglas Jonas (1952 – Living)

Jeffrey Andra (1957 – Living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – Living)

Golden Andra Jr (1951 – Living)

Mary Lou Johnson (1953 – Living)

Chad Andra (1949 – Living)

Greg Andra(1948 – Living)

Marc David Andra (2 September 1955 – 6 August 2011), son of William and Edith.

Kent Melvin Andra (20 April 1954 – 17 April 2003), son of William and Edith.

Andrew Sorenson (1953 – Living)

Lanny Johnson (1947 – Living)

Scott B Sorenson (28 April 1951 – 10 December 2001), son of Bert and Sergene.

Cindy Johnson (1955 – Living)

Here is a second shot, but not as clear.

andra-kids-2

Here a photo of the parent siblings from the same day.

l-r: Bill Andra,

l-r: Bill & Mary Andra, June Johnson, Mildred (Millie) Beck, Colleen Jonas, Sergene Sorenson, Ross Andra, Dale Andra, Larry Andra.

Birthday Season

I just passed by 37th birthday last month.  It came and went like all the others, just another day with a little extra sugar.

If the average lifespan of a male is 72 years, I am now officially over half dead.

With the passing of the date, I thought I would post some pictures of birthdays from days gone.  Some of this will surely be to the chagrin of my little sister, Andra.  But she was born the day before my birthday, so we inevitably had our birthday parties together.

Some of the photos were scanned from a scrapbook, so you will have to forgive some of the stickers and other related paraphernalia.

Maybe I didn’t have birthdays in later years, or at least no pictures in my collection to commemorate the day.

I think this is about my 5th birthday, Andra's 3rd at Grandma's house in Paul, Idaho.

I think this is about my 4th birthday, Andra’s 2nd at Grandma’s house in Paul, Idaho.

 

I think this is about my 5th, Andra's 3rd.

I think this is about my 5th, Andra’s 3rd.

 

This one you can see my arrowhead necklace I wore for many years. I loved that necklace.

This one you can see my arrowhead necklace I wore for many years. I loved that necklace.

 

I think this is about age 7 for me, age 5 for Andra.

I think this is about age 7 for me, age 5 for Andra.

 

I believe this is my 11th birthday, Andra's 9th.

I believe this is my 9th birthday, Andra’s 7th.

 

With Gwen Thompson at their home in Virginia.  This was my 26th birthday.

With Gwen Thompson at their home in Virginia. This was my 26th birthday.

Happy 100th Anniversary

Joseph and Lillian Portrait

For several weeks leading up to September 6, I repeatedly thought of my Great Grandparents Joseph and Lillian Jonas.

I have written of their life, you can read the post here.

It is not because I have some great memory for the dates of others.  That particulate date has more history for Joseph and Lillian.  They married on that date in 1916.  Their son, Ellis, was born on that date in 1926.  Joseph tragically died on that date in 1932.  Grandson Randall was born on that date in 1950.

Alas, I found myself in trial on the date of their anniversary and did not get an opportunity to write about it before.  At least I am doing it afterward.

Happy 100th Anniversary Great Grandpa and Grandma Jonas.

Geraldine Pitcher Jonas

Aunt Geraldine “Jerri” Pitcher Jonas passed away in May.  I wish to share her obituary and a number of photos I have of her.

Geraldine ‘Jerri’ Jonas, 85, returned to our Heavenly Father on 26 May 2016.  She was born 1 October 1930 in Smithfield, Cache, Utah to Mary Geraldine Fulkerson and Ronald Nelson Pitcher.

She grew up in Smithfield and graduated from North Cache High School in Richmond, Cache, Utah, in 1948.

She married Ellis Seth Jonas on 18 August 1947. They were sealed in the Logan Utah LDS Temple on 24 April 1964.

She was very industrious and resourceful in all she did. She spent many hours working in her flower gardens, surrounding herself with the beauty they brought.

She took many horticulture and flower design classes at Utah State University prior to opening Jerri’s Floral and Greenhouse in 1976. Her successful business lasted for over 24 years before she retired.

Jerri was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She served as Relief Society president, Primary president, and as a counselor in the stake Young Women’s presidency along with many other callings. She served a LDS full-time mission with her husband, Ellis Seth Jonas, in the Arkansas Little Rock Mission from 1993-94.

She was very active in community service for Smithfield and Cache County. She played a big part in designing and making floats for Smithfield Health Days. She was known and appreciated by all who knew for her willingness to serve.

She is our beloved mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, wife and friend. She was proceeded in death by her husband, Ellis Seth Jonas; her sons, Kent Ronald Jonas and Dan Ellis Jonas; parents, Mary Geraldine Fulkerson and Ronald Nelson Pitcher. She is survived by her children, Mary Lou Jonas (Jarel Hoyt), Julie Ann Jonas (Darnell Kowallis), and Ronald Nelson Jonas (Denise Chambers); and sisters, Faye Pitcher (Don Schiess) and Jenness Pitcher Pond. She has 11 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, 4 June 2016, at the LDS meetinghouse at 79 E. 200 South, in Smithfield.
A viewing will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on 3 June 2016, at Nelson Funeral Home, located at 85 S. Main St., in Smithfield. There will be a viewing for family and friends from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. prior to the services at the church. She will be laid to rest in the Smithfield City Cemetery.

Friend and Jerri

Friend and Jerri

 

School Picture

School Picture

 

Jerri is in the back between Evan and Lona, to the right of Ellis

Jerri is in the back between Evan and Lona, to the right of Ellis

 

B: Julie, Dan, Mary Lou, F: Ellis, Ron, Jerri

B: Julie, Dan, Mary Lou, F: Ellis, Ron, Jerri

 

Ellis & Jerri

Ellis & Jerri

 

Jonas home 25 July 2003

Jonas home 25 July 2003

I don’t have any of the family reunion photos from the past 10 years to share.  Maybe some of the rest of the family will share them or provide a copy to me so I can share them.

I really came to know Uncle Ellis and Aunt Geri (I know others spelled it Jerri, but I always used Geri and she signed my birthday cards that way too) while I was at Utah State.  I stopped in after I moved there in 2003.  As I got to know them quite a bit more, they invited me to dinner.  Eventually I fairly regularly went to Smithfield to get away, study, and do laundry.  It turned out to be a great opportunity to get away from campus, relax, and do homework.

I got to know Geri’s Mom, helped clean her home, and even did work for Jenness at her home.

I gave Ellis some books that I had that I thought he might be interested in and he gave me some of Great Grandma Lillians books as well as Great Grandpa Joseph’s books.  I still have them all.

Eventually I graduated from college, married, and moved away.  I always felt very welcome in their home and Geri always felt at ease to help me do things around the house.  I don’t know how many times I helped her weed some of her flower beds.

I wish I could have gone to the funeral but my own daughter, Aliza, was in the hospital.  Farewell until we meet again.

Pet Evaporated Milk

Here is a history of Pet milk published in the Northside Journal in Jerome, Idaho.  It provides some history of Pet Milk, aka Sego Milk.  They also had a plant in Richmond, Utah, which is where my Grandfather, Norwood Jonas worked until it closed about 1967.

Pet Evaporated Milk

Buhl, ID

Compiled by Earl Gilmartin

Condensed History Pet Evaporated Milk Corporation

 

1885- It started with an idea of canning as a preservative in the small town of Highland, Illinois. After a $15,000 investment the Helvetia Milk Condensing Company was born (later to be renamed PET).

1895 – After overcoming a number of growing pains, more than half the company’s sales were in the West. The “Our PET” trademark is registered and becomes the official name for the company’s leading brand.

1898 – “Our PET” helps supply Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders and other.

American fighting troops with a safe and convenient  source of milk in Spanish-American War. At war’s end, the troops scattered home across the U.S. and many, remembering the high quality milk, brought it home to their families.

1914 – Once again, the U.S. government places large orders of PET to supply  U.S. troops fighting overseas in World War I.

1929 – In the midst of the Great Depression PET becomes an important staple to American families and is able to expand its service to consumers with the creation of original recipes using PET products.

1941 – Again, PET is called upon to supply GIs fighting in World War II, as well as the citizens at home. More recipes, specifically designed with rationing limitations in mind are created to help families get a wholesome diet.

1950 – the combination of post-war prosperity and a baby boom result in more cans of PET Milk being sold than any other time in company’s 65-year history. PET also establishes its own test kitchens to develop and test new products and recipes.

1966 – PET began making “better for you” products including a Skimmed Milk and a 99% Fat Free Evaporated Skim Milk.

Today – PET Evaporated Milk continues to be a staple in millions of homes and is used in many different homes and is used in many different recipes, from main dishes, to soups, desserts and more.

We invite you to try the recipes on this site to create sensational food for your family!

Early History Pet Evaporated Milk

John Baptist Meyenberg (1847-1914) was an operator at the Anglo-Swiss milk condenser at Cham, Switzerland. Anglo-Swiss made sweetened condensed milk.

From 1866 through 1883, Meyenberg experimented with preservation of milk without the use of sugar. He discovered that condensed milk would last longer if heated to 120 C (248 F) in a sealed container, and hence could be preserved without adding sugar. When Anglo-Swiss declined to implement Meyenberg’s work, he resigned from the company and emigrated to the United States. John Meyenbert first moved to St. Louis, but soon transferred to Highland, Illinois , due to its large Swiss population. On 25 November 1884, U.S. Patents 308,421 (Apparatus for Preserving Milk) and 308,422 (Process for Preserving Milk) were issued to Meyenberg.  Meyenburg associated with various local merchants, including John Wildi, Louis Latzer, Dr. Knoebel, George Roth and Fred Kaeser and, on February 14, 1885, organized the Helvetia Milk Condensing Company. In 1899, Meyenberg assisted Elbridge Amos Stuart in producing Carnation Evaporated Milk.

John Wildi was instrumental in marketing the product nationally and internationally, especially in areas where fresh milk or refrigeration were scarce. In 1895, the company registered the Pet trademark.

The Sterling company of Twin Falls leases the Buhl Creamery facility for one year.  TFTN 11-11-1911

A transaction of importance to the dairymen of Buhl county was consummated on Saturday afternoon of last week when the Sterling Creamery Co of Twin Falls, secured by lease for a period of one year, the plant, business and good will of the Buhl Creamery, Milk Condensing, Cheese Manufacturing company of this city. The consideration was highly satisfactory and most remunerative to the local company, guaranteeing, as it does, a substantial market, paying a liberal consideration for the business and being in effect for a period of only one year.

Early History Pet Evaporated Milk

Funding universe

During the Spanish-American and First World wars, the U.S. government ordered huge supplies of evaporated milk, spurring Helvetia to build a second plant in Greenville, Illinois. By 1918 the company had a total of ten production sites in the Midwest, Pennsylvania, and Colorado. As World War I ended, Helvetia closed plants due to oversupply, reluctantly pulling out of western markets. Latzer sold the excess milk to St. Louis businessmen, who turned to him in 1920 when a strike by the local milk producers association limited the brokers’ supplies. The St. Louis strikers also convinced the Highland area farmers to strike, however , and Latzer was forced to close the plant.

By early 1921, Latzer’s son John ran Helvetia from its reestablied headquarters in nearby St. Louis. In 1923, Helvetica was renamed Pet Milk Company, after its best-selling evaporated milk brand.

Health & Home TFTN 7-3-1925

Many people are wont to confuse evaporated and condensed milk, but there is no similarity between the two. Condensed milk is a combination of sugar and milk and can be used only when both of these substances are desired. Evaporated milk is with about sixty per cent of the water removed and the nutrients content left intact.

Pet evaporated milk manufactured in Buhl, & other locations in the United States at the turn of the century.

Six Tons of Milk Received each day by Buhl Dairy Plant

TFDaily News 10-29-1927

About 12,000 lb of milk per day is being received at the Sego condenser which when evaporated makes 5760 tall cans. The product is being stored for the present at the plant.

Pet Milk became traded on the NY Stock exchange 1928

Funding Universe Our Dairy Industry TFIT 6-11-1929 aka Twin Falls Idaho Times

The phenomenal increase in dairying in Idaho is vividly set forth by figures just made public by Idaho Chamber of Commerce in its organization publication for June. Evaporated milk production in 1928 was 1,585,000 lbs, a gain of more then 4,000,000 lbs over 1927.

Employment for Additional 20 Seen; Better Times Indicated

TFIT 5-23-1933 aka Twin Falls Idaho Times

J Frank Smith field director and former manager of the Buhl plant, with E G Meyer production manager, have been supervising the overhauling of the machinery preparatory to opening the condensery. Floyd Englen, local manger, stated about 20 persons will be added to the pay roll.

The opening of the Buhl plant in addition to furnishing added employment will also serve as an outlet for the West End dairy products.

Pet Milk bought Sego Milk Products out of Salt Lake city in 1925, to expand it’s market.

Pet Evaporated Milk Peaked in 1950.

Funding Universe

After World War II Pet Milk began a slight movement into other markets. The company became the first to offer nonfat dry milk, and advance over the powdered milk developed in the 1920s. Sales soared due to the post-war baby boom, making 1950 the all-time-high sales year for Pet Evaporated Milk. Soon thereafter, fresh milk became readily available, however, and sales began a steady decline.

Pet Evaporated Milk diversifies in 1960’s

Funding Universe

Through restructuring, Pet Milk corporate reduced committee numbers, initiated a profit-centered divisional structure, and recruited marketing professionals. The company also planned new product development to wean itself from the declining milk market (as late as 1960, 95 percent of Pet Milk sales were in dairy products). By the early 1960s, diversification had begun in earnest.

Another of Pet Milk’s successful products at this time was Sego Liquid Diet Food, introduced in 1961. After competitors had opened up a market, Pet Milk brought in its own version, a thicker, high-protein drink available in variety of flavors. By 1965 Sego brought in $22 million to the company’s Milk Products Division sales.

In 1966, in order to reflect its enlarged and diversified product line, Pet Milk changed its name to Pet Incorporated.

Funding for these acquisitions came largely from a special credit Pet obtained through the sale of its portion of General Milk Co., a joint venture

Buhl Evaporated Milk to Close (1995 TFTN)

The bulk of this article is based on TFTN articles.

Buhl’s evaporated milk plant – which has provided Magic Valley jobs for 68 years will close June 20. Pillsbury Co executives told 64 workers Thursday morning that they’re shutting the plant which produces evaporated milk as a cost saving measure.

That means 300,000 fewer gallons of milk will be passing through Buhl each day. And a plant that each day produced 5000 cases of canned milk will be vacant. Eventually, the plant will be sold.

Evaporated milk production will shift to a company cannery in Greeneville, TN. But chances are slim that displaced workers will get to follow their jobs back East.