5th Grade, Park Elementary, Richmond, Utah

Back (l-r): Jimmy Johnson, Gary Anderson, Kirt ?, Jeffery Theurer, Zan Christensen, Gary Bowles?, Reed Webb, Mrs. Leona Rasmussen McCarrey.  Middle: Leslie Smith, Jay Purser, Dixie Eskelsen, Sandra Jonas, Barbara Housley, Debra Day, Fern Housley, Beth Cartwright, Kim Christensen.  Front: Ann Bair, Fay Housley, Beth Ann Miller, Jane Robinson, Peggy Jo Kippes, Peggy Anne Plant, Shanna Bullen.

This is one of two grade school pictures of my Mom.  This one is of her 5th Grade year at Park Elementary, Richmond, Cache, Utah.  This is probably the 1963-1964 school year.  I wonder if any of these other students are out there somewhere?  What stories would they tell?  Mom won’t tell me much of her childhood so I really don’t have much to add.  Anyone venture?

There are two that are unknown or uncertain.  If anyone can correct or clarify, I would very much appreciate it.

Leona Pearl Rasmussen McCarrey (1902 – 1981)

Kirt ?

Gary Anderson ( – living)

Ann Bair married Downs ( – living)

Gary Bowles?

Shanna Bullen married Gibbons ( – living)

Beth Cartwright ( – living)

Kim Christensen ( – living)

Zan Leonard Christensen (1954 – 1996)

Debra Day married Pursuer (1954 – 2010)

Dixie Eskelsen

Barbara Housley married Sharp ( – living)

Fay Housley married Purser ( – living)

Fern Housley married Taylor ( – living)

Jimmy Johnson

Sandra Jonas (1954 – living)

Peggy Jo Kippes married Beins ( – living)

Beth Ann Miller (1954 – 1974)

Peggy Anne Plant married Ivanyo ( – living)

Jay Purser

Jane Robinson married Larsen ( – living)

Leslie Smith ( – living)

Jeffery Theurer ( – living)

Reed Leon Webb (1954 – 1992)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Flanders

John William Ross tombstone

(I originally published this in 2008.  I edited it and updated it with pictures for today.)

I thought I would write a little in relation to Veteran’s Day.  For the most part, it seems this holiday is somewhat forgotten in the United States.  Really, American’s celebrate the same day on Memorial Day in May.  I can understand the European View of holding it on the 11th of November.  It is the day WWI ended.

I remember well the time I first experienced Veteran’s Day.  I sat in the Eccles Ward Chapel in Patricroft, England.  I sat there on 11 November 1999.  The services started at 11 AM.  We had the hymn, opening prayer, and a few comments by the Bishop until 11:11 arrived.  It was then we took two minutes to remember what was done.

Growing up in Idaho means we had little or no realization of any war.  There are small war memorials inside of cemeteries to commemorate.  No war in modern days has taken place anywhere near Idaho.  Even the American Civil War means little to Idahoans.  My grandfather served in the Philippines during WWII but he spoke so little of it.  I had Uncles and Great Uncles who perished in WWI and WWII.  I had been to their graves but they were the dead, just like the other dead in the cemetery.  The idea of dying for one’s country meant very little to me.

Irwin John Jonas

One of my first memories of England is the day after we arrived.  We were taken into Altrincham Town Centre and there we proselyted for an hour or two on the way to the mission office.  I did notice the cenotaph.  I thought how oddly placed it was.  It was something that we have relegated mostly to cemeteries in the US.  Once and a while you find one in front of a town or city hall.

While I served in Hyde, Cheshire once of the way we knew where to turn in town was at the cenotaphs.  The same in Dukinfield.  When we arrived early at one member’s house we would loiter at the cenotaph to street contact until time for dinner.  A number of times I thought how oddly placed these things were.  I knew they were naming those who died in the ‘Great War’.  For some reason or another I thought they doubled up on the names over the various cenotaphs.  It never occurred to me names are not typically duplicated on these things, or if they do, the intention is not to do so.

Ellis Seth Jonas

Suddenly I found myself sitting in a church meeting remembering.  These souls did not fight for my country.  However I felt come into my heart a gratitude for their sacrifice.  Could I do the same thing if called upon?  Somehow a dawning realization came upon me of the hundreds if not thousands of names I had seen on cenotaphs in my first year in England.  They were everywhere.  There were continuous reminders of the dead who fought for their country.

About a month later I found myself walking the streets of Runcorn, Cheshire.  There is a large cenotaph probably 15 feet tall.  The bus would drive by it every day.  I could not help but notice the little red, fake flowers on popsicle sticks stuck in the flower bed all around it.  The cenotaph meant more to me by this point but what were the little red flowers?  I noticed each of them had a name written on them and they appeared hand-made.

James William Ross

I asked what the little red flowers meant that were still scattered everywhere a month after the 11th of November.  I was then told about Flanders Fields and the poppies.  The poem was shared with me.  It made sense, I felt the poignancy of it.  I have a cousin, Harry Coley (1891 – 1917) who died in Broodseinde, Flanders, Belgium as part of the war.  His body was lost in the mud and potholes of the war and never recovered.

The imagery is intense while the poem isn’t all that catchy to me.  In fact, some of it still doesn’t make sense to me so I share only the first verse here:

In Flanders Fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

David Delos Donaldson (back), John Edmund Donaldson (left), and William George Donaldson

Would I have this type of courage?  Would I be willing to go and serve my country so willingly?  Even if I was drafted, unwillingly?  To set aside all other hopes and aspirations to serve my country?  I did so to serve a mission for my church.  I would think I would be willing to for my nation.  While I am not entirely enamoured with my country at the present, would I still be willing to do it?  Probably.

In fact, I feel some desire to serve in the military.  My life hasn’t permitted the chance and my wife is against the idea.  I don’t think I will be making the decision to join.  But I wish to honour those who do and especially those who died in doing so.  Accordingly, when I saw my clock at 11:11 this morning, I stopped for 2 minutes to remember.  What does our future hold?  I don’t know.  But our past is nobler because of these good souls who gave all.  Not only to join, but they never returned.  We were on the side of right then, and our nation was preserved.  I hope and pray our nation continues on the side of right and we will yet be preserved.

An Wanner uncle of mine arrived in Whitney, Idaho a year after his death in WWI.  His remains arrived in a lead casket which was buried with great fanfare for the small community.  WWII repeated this scenario with another Uncle, another family line, buried in Richmond, Utah.  His body arrived months later and he was interred with great fanfare.  May we live our lives in such a way, regardless if dying for our nation, but let us die in such a way that the community wishes to come out and pay homage for your great sacrifice for the future of man, good, and our country.

Milo James Ross

Irwin Jonas Honored

Irwin Jonas Newspaper Article

This newspaper article regarding the funeral of Irwin Jonas was just shared with me.  I have wrote of Irwin’s life previously.  Family history is an ongoing endeavor with little nuggets appearing from time to time!

I don’t know which newspaper this article was published.  I do know that Irwin died 11 July 1944 in Saint-Lo, Normandy, France.  He was actually buried 6 February 1948 in Richmond, Cache, Utah, almost four years later.  But this article sounds like a memorial service held within weeks or months afterward, and not with Irwin’s body actually present.  It is my understanding he was buried for a time in France, then brought home years later.  I cannot imagine having to deal with this as his parent, widow, or family member.

“Memorial services will be held Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. in the Richmond South ward chapel for Sgt. Irwin Jonas who was killed in France on July 11.  Bishop E. M. Hicken will preside and Commander Neal Hillyard of the American Legion Post 33 will conduct the services.

“The program has been arranged as follows: Advance of colors; selection, The Lord’s Prayer, by the ladies’ chorus; invocation, Hyrum Hansen; solo, My Task, C. I. Stoddard; poem composed by Leona Carson and dedicated to the son of Sgt. Jonas will be read by Bishop E. M. Hicken; talk, Scoutmaster A. J. Mendenhall, Jr.; duet, Resignation, Florence and Rebecca Lewis; talk, O. L. Ballam; violin solo, J. W. Pulsipher; talk, William Jonas of Salt Lake City; and Lt. Commander G. Ellis Doty; selection, the Flag Without a Stain, Ladiers’ chorus; retiring of colors, taps, and benediction, J. W. Stoddard.

Isn’t it amazing where our society is now found?  Due to the sacrifice of people like Irwin, we have the right to fight over what we can see and how we can treat each other?  Without that freedom protected Irwin, we might all be dead, speaking another language, or without the rights of speech or equal protection.  Rather than defend those rights and use them, we would rather trample the symbol of them.  But that too is protected speech.  But let us be careful that we actually use the right so much that we divide and undermine and actually lose it in doing so.

New Jonas Photo

The search for family photos continues, even though not with the effort and time dedication it once did.  But here are some fruits of the latest search.  I scanned an entire photo album for two photos and gave the back in digital format.  Granted all the photos were of extended family.

Colleen and Norwood Jonas, with Doug and Sandy in front. This photo is out at Hunt, Jerome, Idaho on the Johnson farm about 1957-58.

Norwood and Colleen married in 1946.  Colleen’s sister, June Andra (1923 – 1999), married Keith Hillstead Johnson (1920 – 1993) on 29 January 1942 in the Logan Utah LDS Temple.  Six children were both to Keith and June: Sharon, Peggy, Lanny, Dennis (1948 – 1948), Mary Lou, and Cindy.

These photos came from some of June’s albums.  As is usual, when a person dies the family separates the photos among the children.  Sometimes a person has to visit all the children of a person to see all the photos, if those people will even dig them out for you.  These came from Mary Lou.

Doug Jonas, Sandy Jonas, Cindy Johnson, Mary Lou Johnson.  Not sure what happened, but it is likely a good story.

Fun to have a photo of my Mom as a little girl and Grandpa with a horse.

Ole Loren Christiansen

Which Christiansen?

I have this photo sitting on my desk at work.  It is a little 2×3 inch picture inside a soldered silver metallic frame.  It belonged to my Great Grandmother, Lillian Coley Jonas (1898 – 1987).  It came from the collection of photos left to her by her mother, Martha Christiansen Coley (1879 – 1961).

My first impressions of the picture remind me of Lillian’s brother, Arthur Christiansen Coley (1921 – 2004).  But for his age, the clothing are the wrong time frame.  But because of the family resemblance I can see in Uncle Art, I know this man is related to me.

Since the picture belonged to Martha, I have often wondered if this is a picture of her father, Olle Christiansen (1853 – 1900).  But the hat, tie, shirt, and suspenders don’t match for a person who passed away in 1900.

Since he looks like Uncle Art, but the person in the photo has to be greying and older by the 1930’s, then I believe this is one of Marth’a brothers.  I know very little about the brothers.  Martha had three brothers: Henry Owen Christiansen (1887 – 1932), Roy Christin Christiansen (1892 – 1892), and Ole Loren Christiansen (1898 – 1977).  Since Roy died as a baby, I know it isn’t him.

That leaves me to Henry Owen and Ole Loren.  Henry Owen and Martha seem to have done very little to keep in contact.  Not a single letter, post card, or photograph that we can tell document anything in communication.  Plus he died in 1932, so the photo above had to predate that date.  I am not a great teller of fashion styles and changes, but I believe the above photo’s clothing would date during the 1930s into the 1940s.  As such, I believe this photo is of Ole Loren.

I have one photo of Ole Loren.  Don’t you think they are close enough in features that they could be the same.  However, I do not know if Henry Owen looked like him.

Sister, Ole Loren, Florence?

I don’t even know which sister of Loren’s is on the left.  From other photos and correspondence I very much believe this is Rhoda.  With the letters and cards between the two, it is very likely this photo was provided to Martha by her.  The photo only says “Sister, Loren, and wife” on the back.  Ole Loren, who I believe went by Loren, probably to differentiate him from his father, only had two wives that I am aware.  Sara Strong (1900 – ?) who he married in 1918 and Florence Knapp (1898 – ?) who he married in 1926.  I don’t know what happened to Sara, there appears to have been a divorce.  For the time of this photo, Florence is likely his wife.  I can tell the sister on the left is a sibling to Martha and Loren, I just don’t know which one.

Henry Owen Christiansen appears to have died in Tillamook County, Oregon.  On his service registration in 1918 he is living in Northport, Stevens, Washington with a wife of Anna Wilda Christiansen.  I believe she is Anna Wilda Hooser from Texas.  They appear to have had children named Mary, Madison, Gerald, Henry Jr, and John.  Quite a bit more research to properly piece the family together.

Ole Loren Christiansen appears to have died in Oakland, Alameda, California.  I believe two children were born to Sara, Ruth and Robert, and two to Florence, Lorraine, and Lucille.  Lorraine and Lucille may have been twins, both born the same year.

Without more photos to compare, I don’t believe I will pin point these individuals while in mortality.  But at least I have narrowed down the family relationships.  If anyone has more information on Ole Loren Christiansen or Henry Owen Christiansen, I am very much interested in any clues or leads you can provide.

At any rate, people often ask me about the little frame on my desk.  All I usually say is it is my Great Great Grandmother’s brother, I don’t know which one.  Most don’t say anything about that, but a number of commented on how intriguing the picture is.  I agree, some day I will learn more on Loren and Henry and hopefully can provide an update.

 

1961 Coley Film

I stumbled upon a photo of a Great, Great Uncle, Wilford Herbert Coley, posted on a website. I e-mailed the lady who posted the picture and she forwarded my e-mail to her brother. As it turns out, the family has a number of film reels taken from the early 1960’s. I asked him to share any that he thought I might be interested in.  He indicated that one was from a funeral and it seemed to include extended family.  He could only identify his grandfather, Wilford Herbert Coley, in the film.

On a hunch, I sent him this photo and informed him that it was taken 17 August 1961 at the burial of my Great, Great Grandmother, Martha Christiansen Coley, in Richmond, Utah.  This is Wilford’s mother and I knew he was at the funeral.  I also knew that if the family was into filming events, this could very well be one such event to catch.

Art, Golden, Wilford, Roland, Lloyd, Edna, Hannah, Carrie, Lillian, Ivan Coley at their mother’s funeral in 1961.

He responded to me stating the film was from the same funeral and it actually covered the carrying of the casket from the hearse, some scanning of the crowd, and then the final shots of the 10 siblings standing together in which this photo was taken. He shared the converted video from the film with me yesterday.

The 10 siblings in the picture above and film are as follows from left to right.
Arthur Christiansen Coley (Art), 1921-2004
William Golden Coley (Goldie), 1924-2009
Wilford Herbert Coley, 1903-1966
Roland Charles Coley, 1915-2005
Oley Lloyd Coley (Lloyd), 1918-1998
Edna Coley Neilson, 1900-1983
Hannah Marie Coley Thomson, 1909-1982
Carrie Christiansen Coley McMurdie, 1906-1992
Lillian Coley Jonas, 1898-1987
Ivan Stephen Coley, 1912-1994

The film starts out with children carrying flowers out of the church.  I am pretty sure this is the old Richmond, Utah South Ward Building (demolished after the 1962 earthquake).  I do not think we will be able to identify any of these girls because of how cloudy and short the video is at this point.

The film then moves to the Richmond, Utah Cemetery viewing the place where Martha will be laid to rest.  Two girls appear in the background, again probably too short a span of time and too fuzzy to identify them.

We jump to the casket being carried by 6 men, the 6 male siblings.  On the far side of the casket from right to left are Roland, Wilford, and Art.  On the near side from right to left are Lloyd, Golden, and Ivan.

In the background right as the pallbearers appear with the casket are two girls dressed in white.  The taller of the two are Connie Gittins (Wilford’s granddaughter) and an unknown girl.

A young unidentified girl walks in front of the group bearing the casket.

Then we start the first scan of the crowd counter-clockwise from the south.  These are the individuals:
Wilford Coley
Short boy in white that Bob Jonas steps in front of
Bob Jonas in white shirt
Steve Coley in white shirt
Gary Coley revealed when Steve Coley steps aside
Art Coley
Mary Coley (Art’s wife and Bob, Steve, and Gary’s mother)
Lillian Coley Jonas
Carrie Coley McMurdie
Edna Coley Neilson
Hannah Thomson
Tall guy in background (probably Lorenzo “Ren” Bowcutt?)
Lady in white in background
Tall thin man in background
Shorter man in foreground, very short time

Then we move to the 10 siblings back and forth as mentioned above in the photo.

The video is below.  Be sure to open it in full screen and to have your mouse on the pause button so you can look more carefully.

If anyone can add more information, I certainly welcome it.  I hope we can identify every person in the video but I think I hope for too much.  After all, this was taken 40 years ago!  Nevertheless, the video is interesting to see people living and moving who are now all gone from mortality.

For those interested, here is a copy of Lillian Coley Jonas’ journal that includes this funeral.  Martha died on the 14th of August 1961.  I also include the other two journals we have for her.

Lillians 1961 Journal

Lillians 1962 Journal

Lillians 1963 Journal

1959 Andra Reunion

B

Back l-r: Kenny Beck, Twila Andra (holding Jeffrey Andra), Marlene Beck, Patty Andra, Sharon Johnson, Gary Beck, and Peggy Johnson.  Middle l-r: Doug Jonas, Jeffrey Andra (held by Twila), Sandy Jonas, Golden Andra Jr, Mary Lou Johnson, Chad Andra, Greg Andra.  Front l-r: Marc Andra, Kent Andra, Andy Sorenson, Lanny Johnson, Scott Sorenson, and Cindy Johnson

In my constant pursuit of family history photos, I stumbled upon this gem.  We believe it is the Andra family reunion from 1959.  Most of the reunions during this time were in Richmond, Utah or Preston, Idaho.  I believe these three photos were all taken in Preston.  This photo includes the older children from the older Andra siblings.  I don’t have many pictures of the Andra grandchildren from the reunions.  Plenty of photos of the siblings or even my Great Grandparents, Bill and Mary Andra.  That makes this even more rare.

This photo has children of the six oldest siblings.  William, June (married Johnson), Millie (married Beck), Golden, Colleen (married Jonas), and Sergene (married Sorenson).  I will not include much information since most of these children are alive.

Kenneth Beck (1949 – Living)

Twila Andra (1947 – Living)

Marlene Beck (1948 – Living)

Patricia Andra (1946 – Living)

Sharon Johnson (1943 – Living)

Gary Beck (1947 – Living)

Peggy Johnson (1945 – Living)

Douglas Jonas (1952 – Living)

Jeffrey Andra (1957 – Living)

Sandra Jonas (1954 – Living)

Golden Andra Jr (1951 – Living)

Mary Lou Johnson (1953 – Living)

Chad Andra (1949 – Living)

Greg Andra(1948 – Living)

Marc David Andra (2 September 1955 – 6 August 2011), son of William and Edith.

Kent Melvin Andra (20 April 1954 – 17 April 2003), son of William and Edith.

Andrew Sorenson (1953 – Living)

Lanny Johnson (1947 – Living)

Scott B Sorenson (28 April 1951 – 10 December 2001), son of Bert and Sergene.

Cindy Johnson (1955 – Living)

Here is a second shot, but not as clear.

andra-kids-2

Here a photo of the parent siblings from the same day.

l-r: Bill Andra,

l-r: Bill & Mary Andra, June Johnson, Mildred (Millie) Beck, Colleen Jonas, Sergene Sorenson, Ross Andra, Dale Andra, Larry Andra.