The Story of Anna Elizabeth Reber

I stumbled upon this history written about Anna Elizabeth Reber.  Anna was the third spouse to my John Christoph Nuffer.  He married her 28 September 1893 in the Logan Utah Temple after my 3rd Great Grandmother Eva Katharina Greiner died 26 February 1893 in Mapleton, Franklin, Idaho.  I thought it was interesting to review the life of a later spouse for John Christoph Nuffer.  If you would like to review the pdf with pictures and more, it is attached here:  Reber

The Story of Anna Elizabeth Reber

We would like to acknowledge dedicated genealogists who have preserved for decades the oral histories, journals, and handwritten records used in this story.

Faith and Courage

The Story of Anna Elizabeth Reber

By: Christine A. Quinn and Sterling D. Quinn

Graphic design by: Michelle Quinn, Au.D.

2017

Anna Elizabeth Reber

Early Years in Switzerland

1855-1875

 

Frau Reber felt only gratitude that her new baby was alive and had not died as had her last child.  This little girl, born May 17, 1855, would complete their family of three sons and three daughters. They named the child Anna Elizabeth to distinguish her from her older sisters, Anna and Barbara.  Later in life this child would come to be known simply as “Annie.”

The family was settled on the Reber’s ancestral farm in Schangnau, Bern, Switzerland where they spoke a unique Bern dialect of Swiss German, or Schwyzertutsch (Luck 1985).  It was a small country village dotted with chalets, settled in the forested and fertile Emmental valley along the Emme and Aare rivers. It has been said, “An who have wandered through such magnificent forests as those of …Emmental, will never forget the berries, the mushrooms, the neatly arranged stacks of firewood, the beautifully colored autumn foliage, and the grey low-hanging mists and frost-decorated conifers of early winter”  (Luck, 1985 p. 470). For hundreds of years in this valley the same industrious group of families had raised cattle for milk and cheese, while nurturing vineyards, orchards and crops.

This was a Switzerland just emerging from the hated status of a vassal state to the French Emperor Napoleon, an indignity thrown off seven years prior.  Hope arose as the impoverished and beleaguered people named the central city of Bern to be the capital of the new Swiss Confederation (Luck) 1985).

The child Annie grew nurtured in the love of her family.  Little girls in Switzerland wew taught the virtues of being clean, neat, punctual, thrifty, independent, and hard working.  There were cows to be milked as well as household chores to be done. Annie would have been taught to knit and sew the linen, silk, and cotton fabrics for which the Swiss were famous.  Education was also encouraged.

Tragedy visited the family when Annie’s 21 year old brother, Jacob, died in the fall of 1861.  This loss left an indelible impression on the six year old girl, enough that many years later she ensured saving ordinances were performed on his behalf in a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS).

 

Marriage and Family

1875-1890

 

How Annie and her future husband, Gottfried Weiermann, met is a mystery,  but Bern did enjoy the reputation of being “more lively and sociable than any other town in Switzerland”.  Men and women came together to amuse themselves with English country dances as well as waltzes (Luck, 1985 p. 255)

The Weiermann family worked the land and raised cattle for many generations in the village of Wynigen, a little over 20 miles northeast of the city of Bern.  Rather than compete with five brothers for farmland, Gottfried decided to try his hand at the ancient profession of stone masonry. At age 23 when he met Annie, he had perhaps finished his apprenticeship and therefore gained some freedom to marry.

The couple were likely wed in the Protestant church in Wynigen on 21 August 1875.  At the time, Annie was only months away from giving birth. The couple affectionately named this child after his father, Gottfried, but he was known as “Fred”.  Although he was a sickly child, Fred would survive to bring his mother much joy and comfort until the end of her life.

Less than two years later the family moved again to Ferenberg where Anne gave birth to twins, Andre and Peter.  They survived only a day, which tragically was not uncommon at that time as one out of every five births in Switzerland ended in death (Luck, 1985).

A year later Gottfried moved his family closer to the city of Bern to Ostermundigen, the largest regional quarry center in Switzerland.  A special train with a cog in the center had been invented six years earlier to haul the thick, soft, and colorful sandstone up from the mines.  Previously this job relied on horse or mule tams. The train made it possible to quarry enough stone for export, while also enabling urban expansion of Bern, which demanded massive amounts of stone for new buildings.  Up to 500 men were working as either quarry men, Steinbrecher, who extracted the stone, or stone masons, Steinhau, who skillfully dressed, shaped, and cut the stone. Of the two, stone masons enjoyed a higher social status.  The stone masons of Bern had an established fraternity in the city since 1321 (Storemyr, 2012). Gottfried, along with other craftsmen, flocked to this bountiful source of work.

Next to the noisy and dusty train yard, families of stone masons resided in multistory slums (Storemyr, 2012).  Laundry hanging between tenements flapped in the wind while the narrow dirty streets teemed with children of all ages.  Families crowded into tiny, tightly packed rooms, sharing limited sanitation facilities. “The wages were exceedingly low and people extremely poor” (Stucki 1888, Nov. 20).  Stomachs were never full. In 1876, Swiss families were spending 60 % of their income on food. “A typical diet for the older children and adults consisted of coffee, black tea, or cocoa water with a little milk, some cheese and bread.  ….The midday meal typically consisted of boiled potatoes, pasta, cheese, and coffee or tea, and wine. The evening meal was usually of cheese and a vegetable soup – the latter being made by boiling together leeks, cabbage, beetroot, potatoes, and pasta” (Luck, 1985, p.p. 249,441).

In the spring of 1878 with the aid of a midwife, 23 year old Annie gave birth to a son, Christian, and in September of the next year to a daughter, Ida.  Like all their neighbors, the family fought for financial survival. Not quite 4 years old, Fred would have been responsible for helping keep his little sister safe and happy as their mother cared for her new infant.  Imagine her efforts in washing cloth diapers and keeping a clean house under those circumstances! Years later Annie’s daughter, Ida, reflected her mother’s standards when she said, “Just because you are poor, you don’t need to be dirty” (Arave, 2017).

The Weiermanns had lived in Ostermundigen at least five years when on 2 August 1883 they welcomed a blonde curly-haired baby boy into their home.  He was named Jacob after his maternal grandfather and deceased uncle.

Two years later Annie was expecting a child for her final time.  Due to unknown circumstances (perhaps poverty or a medical crisis), she traveled an hour to the hospital in Bern on a cold December day in 1885 where she gave birth to a small girl who didn’t survive (Weyerman, G).  They named her Anna.

At this point, the family consisted of Gottfried age 33, Annie age 30, Fred age 10, Christian 7, Ida 6, and Jacob age 2.  Gottfried may have occasionally taken his oldest son to the stone yard to teach him aspects of his craft, because in later years Fred was known as a skilled stone mason (Weyerman G).

Gottfried’s pursued recreation of heavy drinking with the stone mason’s fraternity began to affect the Weiermann family.  Workers bonded over alcohol, and Ostermundigen quarry men became legendary for schnapps consumption (Storemyr, 2012). Unfortunately, Gottfried’s drinking created a fissure in his marriage.  Circumstances only worsened with the death of 10-year-old Christian on 4 June 1887. The cause is unknown; it may have been an accident, or one of the many infectious diseases rampant at that time such as influenza, smallpox, diphtheria, tuberculosis, Typhus fever, or measles (Luck, 1985).

Annie and Gottfried’s marriage soon reached a breaking point and ended in divorce (Weiermann, I. 1955).  Years later in a heart-wrenching remembrance, Fred wrote, “My parents lived financially poor. Conditions brought it about that the family got badly broken up and scattered.  Three of my brothers and one sister was called on the other side. In the year 1887, the rest of my family met the sad experience of the separation of Father and Mother on account of drunkenness” (Weyerman, G).

Desperate to provide for her children, Annie hired out as a seamstress, one of the few professions available to women that would allow her to care for little ones at home (Wheeler, I.).  Wages were notoriously low; a decade later, women making shirts in their homes were earning less than a penny an hour, and often worked more than 12 hours a day (Cadbury, 2011). Bending over and straining to see tiny stitches by the dim light of an oil lamp was exhausting.  “As one of the infamous sweated trades, seamstressing represented the trails of arduous work, miserable working conditions, impossibly long hours, and equally impossibly low wages” (Harris, chap. 2.). The older children most likely helped their mother by doing the chores and mining their siblings; but life soon changed for 11 year old Fred in a way that must have torn at his mother’s heart.

Because of the family’s poverty and her status as a divorced mother, Annie was legally compelled to register with one of the councils in Ostermundigen responsible to care for the poor and orphans.  If it was believed the children could not be provided for this council had the power to break up the poorest families. Despite Annie’s courageous efforts to support her children, the council forced Fred to enter into foster care, there he became known as a “Verdingkinder”, or literally “discarded child” (Foulkes, 2012).

In this sad circumstance, the amiable and music-loving Fred was taken from his mother and given into the custody of a gentleman who lived in Habstetten, about an hour’s walk from his family.  There, Fred attended school and helped with the chores. He longed for his family, and visited his mother whenever he could obtain permission (Weyerman,G).

 

“Oh! But for one short hour!

A respite however brief!

No Blessed leisure for love or hope,

But in their briny bed

My tears must stop, for every drop

Hiders needle and thread!”

 

With fingers weary and worn,

With eyelids heavy and red,

A woman sat in unwomanly rags,

Plying her needle and thread —

-Thomas Hood

“Song of the Shirt”

 

Within a year after these turbulent events, Annie received an invitation from her neighbor to meet with missionaries, or Elders, from LDS church.  Members of this faith were commonly known as Mormons. After meeting several times, Annie began to take her children along to Sunday School and other meetings (Wheeker, I).  Annie almost immediately recognized the simplicity and truthfulness of the long awaited and newly restored church of Jesus Christ. Her countrymen had been searching for this truth through the Protestant Reformation for over 300 years (Luck, 1985).  One can imagine the gospel of Jesus Christ calming her soul and assuaging her fears at a time of life when it was most needed.

Annie, Ida, and Jacob began a formal study of Mormonism with young Elder Alfred Budge, who taught them the first principles of the gospel (Weyerman, G). Annie may have read the tract, Die Froke Botschaft, (Glad Tidings of Great Joy), or Glaubenskekenntniss, (The Articles of Faith) (Reiser).  In time, she received a witness from the Holy Ghost that Christ’s church had been restored to the earth through the young American prophet, Joseph Smith Jr.  Despite some local persecution, she and Ida were soon converted and baptized by Elder Budge in late October 1888. At this time, Jacob had not yet reached the age of 8 years old required for baptism (Wheeler, I).

Arriving at church on Sundays took an hour of walking into downtown Bern, where Annie and her children wound through cobblestone streets lined with ancient stone houses standing side by side like soldiers at attention.  They knew they were getting close to their destination when they heard the Sabbath bells pealing from the gothic tower of the Bern cathedral. Soon they arrived at the mission office where church services were held. The many families who attended the Bern Branch may have eaten a modest lunch as the fellowshipped between morning and evening meetings.  Every week the congregation took the sacrament and listened to preaching by either Mission President Stucki, the local Branch President, or one of the Elders. A volunteer choir provided uplifting music (Stucki, 1837-1918).

Around this time Fred went to live with another foster family in the closer town of Ittigen, which shortened the walk to see his loved ones.  During Fred’s visits, his mother earnestly shared with him the principles of the new religion she was learning. It was her heart’s desire that he would be baptized and join the church.

 

Swiss/German

Missionaries

1880-1890

 

The Mormon missionaries in the region of Bern were led by John Ulrich Stucki.  A native of Switzerland, Stucki had been living in the territory of Utah at the time of his assignment to serve as the Swiss/German Mission President.  This would be the second time he accepted this weighty responsibility.

Not only would Stucki be responsible for the 13 traveling Elders in the mission; he would also publish the monthly LDS newsletter, “Der Stern”, and he would administer from his office in Bern all the branches of the church in Germany and Switzerland.  Added to these weighty responsibilities was overseeing the twice yearly emigration to Utah made by Swiss and German Mormons. These members wishing to join others of their faith in the building up of “Zion” would leave their homes and travel to the Rocky Mountains of the United States of America (Stucki, 1837-1918).

Accompanying Presiden Stucki to the mission field was 19 year old Alfred Budge, the son of Stucki’s good friend, William Budge.  What thoughts and anticipations might have filled the young elder’s mind as he contemplated his father’s earlier mission to Switzerland in 1854, “when opposition to the church was so violent that within three months he was on thirteen occasions placed under arrest and imprisoned for short periods, and finally was obligated to return to England!” (Budge, W).

When President Stucki and Elder Budge arrived in Switzerland on 15 May 1888 Elder Budge did not speak German (Stucki, 1837-1918).  Five months later he was teaching the Weiermann family in Ostermundigan using their native tongue (Wheeler, I).

Working with Elder Budge was the pleasant-mannered Elder Albert Schneider Reiser from Salt Lake City.  His Swiss parents spoke German at home, so he had the advantage of being familiar with the language.

Seventeen old Albert had been forced to grow up fast after his father, along with many faithful LDS men, was incarcerated by the United States government for the common practice of polygamy.  To support his family, Albert took charge of their clock repair business in downtown Salt Lake. He delivered customers’ clocks to the prison, where his father repaired them. Interestingly, Elder Budge’s father was converted to the LDS faith in Scotland, and Elder Reiser’s in Switzerland; yet they both emigrated to America on the same ship and crossed the plains to Utah in the same wagon train 28 years earlier in 1860 (Reiser).

 

Switzerland to United States

Emigration

1890

 

Elder Reiser arrived in Switzerland just a few days after Annie’s baptism, and began helping to teach the Weiermann family (Stucki 1837-1918).  The missionaries had with them some pictures of Utah. For decades, Mormon converts in Europe had been encouraged by church leaders to gather to “Zion” in the American West.  Surely ideas of emigration were planted by visiting Elders and church officials, but when accused of being an emigration agent, Elder Reiser remarked: “It was not my business to persuade people to emigrate, but to bring them the Gospel….there was only one true church….[I] told them how important it was for mankind to investigate Joseph Smith’s message….”(Reiser).

One late summer morning Fred joined his family on their brisk walk to church.  His mother made an astonishing announcement that she had arranged for them to emigrate to Zion!  Because the children had received an inheritance from the death of their father’s Aunt Isali, they could afford to emigrate.  The family would be reunited and travel together to start a new life with the Saints in Utah. (Weyerman, G.)

After the day’s church services, Annie shared with the mission president some of her worries about Fred’s situation.  President Stucki lovingly took hold of her hands and prophesied, “Fear not, for your son Gottfried. He will be the means of bringing many souls into the church” (Weyerman, G).  Within 10 days, Annie and her three children, led by President Stucki and joined by Elder Budge, began their odyssey to Zion.

The miracle of emigration did not take place without Annie’s heroic effort and faith.  President Stucki promised that if the saints paid their tithing, a way would be opened up for them to join the saints in Zion (Stucki, July 31, 1888).  The children’s inheritance from their great aunt had been put into an untouchable trust. With nerve and steely determination, the slight-built Annie faced authorities and requested they give her the funds to use for emigration to America.  When they refused, she threatened to leave without the children and then the state could raise them! After this ultimatum, they relented and granted her the inheritance of 500 Swiss francs (Weiermann, I., 1955).

Annie delivered the money to President Stucki, who hired agents from the Guion shipping line to purchase train and steamer tickets.  These agents arranged transportation, loding, and food, and also oversaw the moving of luggage from Switzerland to England and then on to America.  President Stucki also took care of details such as procuring bedding, tinware, etc. to be forwarded to the steamer for the transatlantic crossing (Stucki, 1937-1918).

In preparation for the voyage, Annie made some traditional hard dry Swiss bread, then fried it in butter to be their principal diet.  The missionaries taught them how to say “hot water” in English, so they could request some to pour over their bread, thus making it edible (Wheeler, F 1948).  Then the family of four packed all their worldly goods into five pieces of luggage (Mormon Migration). They were now ready to travel over 5,000 miles to join the Saints in Utah.

 

May God Bless Them All and Bring

Them Safely into the Bosom of the

Church and Kingdom of God”

 

This was the fourth and final emigration that President Stucki oversaw during this mission.  He and Elder Budge wew being released from their callings to return home to America with the emigrating saints.  Feelings were tender in the Bern branches the day before departure when President Stucki preached his farewell sermon in Sacrament Meeting.  Since his arrival two years earlier, he served the saints daily while surviving fever and smallpox. At the close of the meeting it is likely they sang the Swiss hymn, “May God Bless Them All and Bring Them Safely in the Bosom of the Church and Kingdom of God” (Stucki, 1837-1918).

The next morning, Monday, 1 September 1890, Annie (35), Fred (14), Ida (10), and Jacob (7) began their pilgrimage by boarding the train in Bern.  Who can know the conflicted feelings that must have been in their hearts? These may have involved jow, excitement, and hope of a new life in America among the Saints of God; mixed with the regret of leaving loved ones and the magnificent country of their birth.  Years later when Fred saw a newsreel about the Alps in Switzerland he sat and wept from homesickness for his native land. He commented, “The beauty of that land could not be found anywhere else”. (Weyerman, G).

At 10:30 a.m. the saints were on their way north to the border city of Basel entertaining themselves with singing.  Arriving after noon, the train pulled into Basel to pick up the missionaries as well as 13 members of the faithful Gygi family.  To everyone’s horror Rudolph Gygi, the father, had been stabbed the night before in the face by a mob of hoodlums who thought he was taking his six daughters to be enslaved in polygamy (Gygi).

Through the night and into Tuesday, the travelers continued north by train into Belgium.  It was 2 September, Ida’s 11th birthday. Perhaps she made friends with Anna and Elisa Gygi and helped them watch their younger brothers and sisters.  At the late hour of 11:00 p.m. the weary saints arrived in the port city of Antwerp. The Swiss emigrants were met at the train station by their agent who provided a wagon to transport their luggage and at least seven children under age 10 to a boarding house.  Before retiring, all received refreshment, which could have been soup, meat, vegetables, coffee, and bread (Stucki, J. 1837-1918).

After a night’s rest, the Swiss saints united with about 51 emigrating converts from Germany who spoke German so differently that neither group could understand the other.  Together this made 72 travelers. Once again they loaded their belongings onto a wagon to transport them down to the dock where the shop was moored (Stucki 1937-1918.) There the family had their first glimpse of the vast sea and all the ships and business of the bustling Antwerp harbor.  Searching for words, Ida wrote as an old woman, :The trip across the ocean was quite – I don’t know what you would call it – an experience to us” (Weiermann,I. 1955).

All boarded the steamer, which launched into the North Sea shortly after noon.  Their destination was the port of Hull on England’s eastern shore (Woods & Evans 2002).  For many, this was the first time on the open sea. Spirits were high and the saints passed time with singing hymns of praise, or conversion pleasantly.  President Stucki recorded, “the vessel went steady, sea sickness was therefore very light and confined to but few” (Stucki 1837-1918).

They traveled all night to reach Hull on Thursday at 3:00 in the morning.  The ship could not dock at low tide, so the passengers had to transfer in the dark to a tugboat that took them to shore.  Ida remembered the confusion, “While crossing the North Sea, something went wrong with the ship and we had to change ships.  Somehow we lost a roll of bedding, which we needed very much” (Stucki 1837-1918) (Weiermann, I., 1955). Despite the hassle of getting ashore, the emigrants were met by a kindly agent who examined their luggage to verify it was duty-free.  He also saw that the hungry Saints received something to eat before boarding a train late in the day.

Lulled to sleep by the clicking -clacking rhythm of the steam train’s wheels, the adventures slept most of the six-hour 140 mile journey across England to Liverpool.  They arrived before dawn on Friday morning (Stucki, 1837-1918).

 

September 1890

MON 01    Train: Bern – Basel

TUES 02    Train: Antwerp

WED 03    Boat: Antwerp – Hull

Thurs 04    Train: Hull – Liverpool

FRI 05        Liverpool – Immigration House

SAT 06    Loading of the ship, off at 3pm

SUN 07    Atlantic Crossing Day 1 – Queenstown

MON 08    Atlantic Crossing Day 2 – 294 miles

TUES 09    Atlantic Crossing Day 3 – 300 miles

WED 10    Atlantic Crossing Day 4 – 320 miles

THURS 11    Atlantic Crossing Day 5 – 298 miles

FRI 12     Atlantic Crossing Day 6 – Newfoundland

SAT 13     Atlantic Crossing Day 7 – 314 miles

SUN 14    Atlantic Crossing Day 8 – 320 miles

MON 15    Atlantic Crossing Day 9 – 298 – miles

TUE 16     Atlantic Crossing Day 10 – 308 miles

        Arrival in New York, USA

WED 17    Luggage and Customs

    TRAIN CROSSING TO UTAH & IDAHO

SUN 28    Train: Montpelier, ID

Wagon and Buggy to Paris, ID

Once again, shipping hires by President Stucki greeted the Mormon converts upon their arrival to Liverpool.  This city situated on the western coast of England was considered in the nineteenth century the most active international port of emigration in the world.  It was also home to the British Mission, and served as the administrative headquarters for the LDS church in Europe (Woods & Evans, p.91).

Passengers were not allowed to board their ships until either the day before or the day of departure (Liverpool); thus, the saints were taken to an immigration house to wait, eat, and rest for a day (Stucki, 1837-1918).

Meanwhile, it was LDS church procedure that every emigration company have a Presidency.  They would watch over the saints, conduct Sunday services, and see that everyone reached their destination.  John U. Stucki acted as President, and selected Alfred Budge and C. Meyer as his counselors. The day before departure, they were called and set apart by the British mission president, George Teasdale (Stucki, 1857-1918) (Mormon Migration Database, 1890, Sept. 6).

The sleek 366.2 ft steamer S/S Wisconsin, piloted by Captain Worral, waited patiently at port to receive her passengers (Mormon migration database, 1890, Sept. 6).  She was one of a fleet of 16 ships run by the Liverpool and Great Western Steamship Company,  known commonly as the “Guion Line.”  For 20 years the company’s ships had been launching twice a week to transport passengers and mail from Liverpool to New York.  A typical trip across the Atlantic took a week. At a time when there was no air travel, they were known as “ocean greyhounds” (Guion) (Miller).

All day Saturday September 6 a steady stream of humanity carting trunks, baskets, bags, and bed rolls trudged up the ramp of the stately steamship with its tall dark smokestack.  Seventy-six first staterooms as well as spacious dining rooms. Thy were joined by 100 intermediate passengers.

Then the Weiermann family joined a mass of 800 impoverished voyagers crowded into the notorious “steerage” section below deck (miller).  Annie, Ida, and Jacob were together in the Port Aft Steerage, while Fred was assigned Fore Steerage, perhaps because he was an older single male (Mormon migration Database, 1890, Sep.6).

It was a cacophony of humanity: men women and children from many countries speaking a babble of languages.  Each passenger was assigned a number on a canvas berth. When not in use the berths could be neatly stowed away making space for tables and  seats during the day. The journey would be no luxury cruise for these steerage passengers. Conditions were cramped, food was poor, and the atmosphere often bad; especially during rough weather when access to the upper deck was restricted. (Solem).

By 3:00 PM the ship’s crew drew up anchor.  All passengers went on deck, waving white handkerchiefs and throwing hats as they watched England slowly shrink into the horizon.  With this fanfare, Annie and her family bid farewell to their old life, and looked with hope to a brighter future in America, the land of opportunity.

As the ship glided into the night, the Swiss converts completed the irs six days of their traveling adventure.  When the sun came up it was a beautiful morning and the sea was as smooth as glass. President Stucki would have liked to conduct Sunday services, but the ship was too crowded and there was nowhere they could meet without disturbing someone.

By Late morning they reached the southern seaport of Ireland’s Queenstown harbor, where they remained for an hour or so to pick up more passengers.  Soon after moving out, they were engulfed in a dense blanket of fog. Everyone listened with suspense to a shrill whistle blow in rapid succession waning other floating vessels of their presence.  Soon all was well as they glided out of the fog into weather as fine as before. Although the steamer was quite steady, some began to get sea sick (Stucki, 1837-1918).

By Monday, several of the women and a baby were pretty sick, which kept President Stucki and his counselors busy.  Ida and her brothers were focused on the adventure and didn’t seem to mind the discomforts of travel. She said, “We used to go up on deck all the time.  The sailors would take us skating across it. We really had a good time – us kids did when we wasn’t sick” (Weiermann, I., 1955).

If the passengers weren’t sick on Monday, many became queasy on the next day when a wind made the sea rough and caused the ship to pitch and roll.

An English convert traveling a few years earlier on the same ship described a similar chaotic event:

“….Towards night the wind began to raise rather rough and the captain shouted out from the upper deck, “Look out for a storm.” The sailors began to run from one end of the ship to the other with large chains and ropes….We was then all ordered down below.  Pots, pans, buckets, and everything that was not fast was rolling about. Old people falling down, young ones laughing at the fun but did not last long. A large rope had been placed all along the water closets for protection. During the time we was standing by this rope waiting to get in the closets, our ship gave another sudden roll and we fell over this rope, old and young, head and tail together, vomiting on each other.  Girls screaming, boys laughing, old men and women grumbling, children crying” (Horsley, S., 1877, September 19-29).

The Ship continued to roll heavy with water pouring over the deck clear into Wednesday.  Soon even President Stucki and Elder Budge were sick too (Stucki, 1837-1918.) Years later Ida recalled, “When we were sick we would have to go on deck every day no matter how sick you were.  But we got across” (Weiermann, I. 1955).

On Thursday quite a number of suffering women remained in their berths.  Crowded conditions below deck caused the air to become fetid with disagreeable body odors, strange foods, vomit, waste, and ship oil.  Mercifully, the temperatures were quite cool (Stucki, 1837-1918).

By the sixth day at sea the weather improved, the ship steadied, and everyone felt much more cheerful.  Despite the rather chilly stiff breeze most passengers enjoyed a refreshing interlude basking in the sun on deck.  Some excitedly observed an iceberg silhouetted against the horizon about ten miles to the left (Stucki, 1837-1918).

At last after being a sea for a week, the ship entered cal waters off the coast of Newfoundland.  Some of the sick were beginning to feel better; everyone felt happier and more hopeful. In the afternoon, steerage passengers had to pass a routine health inspection, and if necessary receive vaccinations.  This was in the interest of the shipping company to avoid paying a hefty fee for any unhealthy passengers.

Sunday, President Stucki conducted church services in he saloon, or the first class public area of the ship.  The next few days passed without incident. There was some rain, but much to the passengers. President Stucki notes in his journal, “If it had been as warm all the way as the first two days, there would no doubt have been a good deal of sickness; the Lord is overruling all things for good.” (Stucki, 1837-1918).

On Tuesday afternoon, to everyone’s great joy  and anticipation,their destination was sighted!  All the immigrants strained to see the fabled America.  With gratitude and relief for a safe journey, the travelers watched the New York skyline slowly grow into view.  Their hearts certainly swelled at the first glimpse of the magnificent and newly erected Statue of Liberty. Majestically she  lifted her lamp to greet the “huddled masses yearning to breathe free”. (Lazarus, 1883). They passed Staten or “Quarantine” Island at 5:00 that evening, pulling up to the pier at 7:15 p.m. It was 16 September 1890; the first day of their life in America!

Heavy rain caused some delay the next day, but the baggage was unloaded by Wednesday noon, and an examination made by custom house officers.  Since the Immigration Station on Ellis Island was under construction, new arrivals were taken to the temporary Barge Office located in Castle Clinton at Battery Park on the southern tip of Manhattan Island (Ellis Island Immigration Museum.)  There all steerage passengers had to pass inspection or be sent back. Ida years later remembered the tense time in this way, “When we arrived at Ellis Island (sic), [mother] did not have the necessary amount of money the government required of those coming into this country, so she showed them a letter of proposal of marriage she had received from a convert who was already in the United States, and let them believe she was coming to marry him” (Weiermann, I. 1955) (Wheeler, F., 1948).

When all was cleared and the immigration process finished President Stucki concluded in a letter, “We are very thankful to our Heavenly Father for the many blessings received thus far, and feel to trust in him for our safe arrival in the land of his choice” (Mormon Migration database 6 Sept. 1890-Sept. 1890.).

It isn’t known for sure which railroad route the Weiermann family and their fellow saints took west.  Nevertheless as they crossed the continent, vast flat prairie lands would seem endless to someone from a tiny country encircled by tall mountains.  It was an adventure with pleasures for wide-eyed travelers. Ida thrilled to see wild horses running with the train (Wheeler, I., 1955). Fred with gratitude recorded, “We had good health and lots of pleasure on our journey both on train and ship”. (Weyerman, G).

Most of the European immigrants were destined for the Utah towns of Salt Lake City, Provo, Payson, Logan, and Nephi.  About 21 of the weary saints stayed on the train to travel northwest into the new state of Idaho. They arrived in the frontier town of Montpelier on 28 September 1890.  Continuing on by wagon and buggy, the Weiermann family, returning missionaries, and others rolled 10 miles south to the tiny town of Paris, Idaho. Fred remembered, “Elders Stucki and Budge were also glad to get home and and had all things arranged for hospitality.”  (Weyerman, G) (Stocker, J).

In Paris, the red sandstone of the newly dedicated tabernacle looked down on the little town.  This recently settled country of small farms was very different from the noisy crowded city the Weiermann’s were used to.  However, for Annie it may have triggered happy memories of her youth growing up in rural Switzerland.

 

Life in America

1890-1893

 

One of the great motivations for Mormon emigration was to be able to reach a temple, considered the “Lord’s house,” where they could receive ordinances necessary for their own salvation and perform them by proxy on behalf of their deceased ancestors.  This was a priority which Annie acted on immediately. It is recorded that her 10 year old son, Christian Weiermnn, three years deceased, was baptized by proxy in the Logan, Utah temple on 25 September 1890, suggesting someone took his name to the temple before the family finished their journey to their new home in Idaho. (Proxy baptisms were not required for her twin sons and daughter, since they died as innocent infants).

Many people who came to the United States chose to change or “americanize” the spelling or their names.  Fred’s Posterity most often spell their name Weyerman, while the family of Ida has most often spelled their name Weiermann.  In various family records the name can be seen in old records; Gottfried was known as “Fred”, his brother Jacob sometimes as “Jake”, and their mother, Anna Elizabeth, came to be known as “Annie” (1900 census).

Soon Annie and her young son Jacob moved into a rented log cabin owned by a Mrs. Herzog.  Annie began earning money taking in sewing. Ida had the opportunity to live with and work for the beloved Stucki family, who were also boarding the local school teacher.  Ida reminisces, “My teacher lived at the Stucky (sic) home and was very good to help me with my lessons” (wheeler,I., 1955). Once again, Fred boarded away from his family when he went to work on a farm.

Paris, Idaho had been colonized by the Latter-day Saints 17 years earlier and had two LDS wards.  What a change after attending the small branch in Bern! It was wonderful to dwell without persecution among people who believed and lived as they did; however, life was not without challenges.  Everyone had to work hard on the frontier for the survival of their family. It wasn’t easy learning a new language and adjusting to the ways of America. For example the young Swiss girl, Elisa Gygi, whom Ida certainly made friends with on the journey to Utah, recalls how at school she was told her name was to be the more familiar Alice instead of Elisa.  The children made fun of her because her shoes and clothes were different. Subsequently, Elisa took turns with her sister wearing to school a nice dress and some shoes someone gave them. In their poverty the Gygi family happily received groceries, clothes, and candy for Christmas from the Bishop of their ward (Gygi). It isn’t hard to imagine the Weiermann family relying on friends in a similar way until they were able to earn money to support themselves.

On 29 December 1890, several months after their arrival in Idaho, Fred received the ordinance of baptism into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.  Several days later, on New Year’s Day, his younger brother, Jacob, was also baptized. Then, according to the custom at that time for member immigrants arriving in Zion, Annie and her daughter, Idam, were rebaptized.  It was a new year and a new life for the Weiermann family.

Fred traveled 20 miles north to Nounan, Idaho, to work.  There he was also able to procure a log cabin for his mother and brother.  Ida earned money by living in several homes where she helped with chores. Then she said, “Mother got work so I stayed at home the next year.  Then we went back to Paris [Idaho} where mother met Mr Nuffer at a German Conference….” (Wheeler, I. 1955).

 

Family and Marriage

1893-1901

 

A medieval castle overlooks the southern city of [Neuffen], Germany, where 27-year-old Johann Christoph Nuffer married Agnes Barbara Spring early in the year of 1862. Four years later tragedy struck when within 7 months their baby girl and her 26-year -old mother died.  Christoph was now left a widower to raise two sons, John, age 4, and Fred, age 3. (Nuffer, C).

A month later on July 25, 1867, he married Eva Katharina Greiner, who began to raise his sons as her own.  Christoph and Eva were surrounded by their extended family, and were supported by Christopher’s work as a dress goods weaver and a salesman of produce from his vineyard and farm.  Over a span of ten years, they added Regina, Charles, and Adolf to their family. (Nuffer, C).

After listening to the Mormon missionaries, the Nuffer family decided to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  They secretly damned a millrace at the rear of the house so the family could be baptized at night, undisturbed by hostile villagers.  To avoid the persecution that immediately followed, they decided to emigrate to Utah as soon as possible. Christoph sold their home and land, and borrowed money from another immigrating family to gather the needed funds.  Notwithstanding all the children catching measles, the family survived the transatlantic crossing in May 1880 on the steamship Wisconsin. (Ironically, the very same ship that in ten years would bring the Weiermann Family to America) (Naef, 1990).

The Nuffers followed many German and Swiss saints who pioneered Providence, Utah, situated just south of Logan.  Like countless others, they started our poor and worked hard to better their circumstances. Thankfully, the older sons Fred and John helped a great deal with the heavy labor.  A year after arriving in Zion, their last child, Mary was born (Naef, 1990).

In the fall of 1883 the oldest son, John, persuaded his father to sell their home and move into southeastern Idaho to homestead.  Two years later they set up another claim. It was a rough life, but his son Charles recalled, “(We) were happy and thanked the Lord for what we had.  Mother would read a chapter from the Bible, we would have prayer an we would go to bed early….We thanked our Heavenly Father for what we had and lived by faith…a I remember we never got discouraged for we felt the Lord was on our side” (Nuffer, C., 1949).

The Nuffer ranch was located northwest of Mapleton, Idaho.  Their farm was cut in half be the main road. On the east side was the land where their homes, stables, and fruit orchards were located.  On the west side of the road was meadow blanketed in lush grass with a creek running through it. This farm from one end to the other was a beautiful place (Naef, 1990).

In the winter of 1893, Eva, Christoph’s wife of 2 years, developed pneumonia and suddenly died within a week.  Her grieving family buried her in the first grave in the new Preston, Idaho cemetery. Christoph could not bear to be alone in the home where he had so happily lived with his wife, so his sons Charles an Adolf ran the farm, “while there father was away most of the summer at Bear Lake and other places” (Nuffer, C).

While away, Christoph, now known as Christopher, met 38 year old Annie Weierman at a German Conference (Wheeler, I., 1955).  These conferences were an opportunity for German speaking LDS converts to socialize using their native language. Through uplifting sermons, singing and dancing the Conferences offered support for immigrants adjusting to their new lives.

By the end of the summer, Christopher and Annie knew they wanted to get married.  They were sealed for Time and Eternity in the Logan temple a few months later on 26 September 1893 (Reber).

The one photograph we have of Annie was likely taken in Logan, “The Temple City”, at this time.  She serenely gazes out of the image, an attractive women with light-colored deep set eyes, high cheekbones, fair smooth skin, and unusually sculpted lips.  Her brown hair is modestly pulled back to the nape of her neck and wrapped into a bun. She is slightly built, probably no taller than her daughter who grew to about 5 feet 2 inches.  Her newly learned English would have been graced with a lilting Swiss accent. She wears a dark tailored dress, which she may have sewn, that has a high collar and mutton sleeves, the height of fashion in 1893.  It could be imagined the jeweled heart brooch pinned to her collar could have been a wedding gift from her husband.

At age 59, Brother Nuffer was considered “ an old widower” by Annie’s children.  (Weyerman, G). Besides love and companionship, he offered their mother a social status and financial security that she had likely never experienced.  Their stone house surrounded by pastures, orchards, and a garden may have reminded her of her rural youth in Switzerland. Because her new husband had lived in the area for many years, she benefited from the reputation he had in the community as a successful farmer.  The Nuffer name was well known in the surrounding towns as Christopher’s oldest son, John, was a trained architect and stone mason. He helped build the Logan temple, and also designed many of the public buildings in Preston, Idaho; including the opera house, bank, and churches. (Nuffer, J).

Annie and Christopher had many things in common, such as firm testimonies that Joseph Smith had indeed been an instrument in the restoration of Christ’s church, and that they were building up Zion in the American west.  They had both followed the same path of conversion, they both spoke German and understood the ways of the “old country”, and they both followed a strikingly similar emigration path. But like many second marriages, there was the potential for tension and competition for loyalty between their children.  As can be imagined, the children and their mother were very close after weathering so many adversities together. Annie’s marriage to Mr. Nuffer may not have been favored by the children. Fred’s feelings were, “Ida and Jacob remained no longer with mother then, but had to look out for themselves, neither I had any place that I could call my home” (Weyerman, G).

During the next year, Fred Weyerman became engaged to a girl named Sally, but this arrangement ended abruptly when Sally eloped with another man.  This seemingly devastating event turned out to be a blessing when Fred met 20 year old Olena Hoth while they were at a party of a mutual friend. Fred and Olena were married by their bishop two weeks later.  “Lena” was raised in a faithful Latter-day Saint family. She was a loving, loyal, and hardworking woman who would have a special role in the life of her mother-in-law. She and Fred loved each other and eventually had a family of 15 children.  (Weyerman, L).

Two months later the newly married Fred and Lena traveled a distance to the Logan temple to be sealed on 26 September 1894 for Time and Eternity.  In preparation for his temple ordinances, Fred Weyerman was ordained an Elder by their beloved Swiss mission president, John U. Stucki. It was a joyful occasion as Lena and Fred received their endowments and were sealed together. (eyerman, G)  Later that same day, Annie must have glowed with happiness as all her children were sealed to her and Christopher Nuffer (Reber, A).

About this same time Annie’s step son, Charles, recorded she made him temple clothes in preparation for his marriage.  He reminisced that, “His new step mother was helpful to us in many ways as we began our married life” (Nuffer, C., 1949).

In 1895 Fred and Lena welcomed a baby and named her Anna Weyerman.  Fred bargained with his stepfather for forty acres of his farmland in Mapleton, so Annie looked forward to seeing her new granddaughter often.  (Weyerman, G).

Near this time, Christopher’s oldest son, John, left to serve in the German/Swiss mission.  Imagine Annie’s feelings of curiosity and nostalgia as she read letters posted from the mission headquarters in Bern, Switzerland.

That winter Ida married David Wheeler.  His father, Calvin Wheeler, was a notable pioneer who settled in the Mapleton area seven years earlier.  David reminisces in his autobiography, “I finally met a girl, Ida Weiermann Nuffer, that I thought just suited me, and finally ask her to marry me.  She wanted me to wait for a while but as I had got a call to go on a mission she finally consented. We married in the Logan Temple on December 4, 1895.  Ida was just a few months past sixteen years of age.” David let six weeks later to serve a mission in the southern states of the USA. Ida supported herself by living with and working for families until he returned two and a half years later (Wheeler, D).

After a year of improving his land, Fred went to make a payment and fix the deeds; however, the sons of “Mr. Christoffer Nuffer would not agree, so [we] had to pull out with empty hands” (Weyerman, G).  It could have been that the sons didn’t know about their father’s deal or agree with it. There was a lot of competition in the area over staking out claims on various parcels of land. Christopher’s sons had also been working the land for years with the hope of ownership.  The emotions raised at that time may have prompted Ida to comment that “We, [Fred, IDa and Jacob], were not welcomed there” (Wheeler, I. 1955).

In the year 1896, Fred and Lena lost a baby named after Fred’s brother, Christian.  In 1898 they also lost a month-old baby girl named Marie Weyerman. That same year Ida’s husband, David, returned from his mission.  Also, Annie’s first husband and father of her children Gottfried Weiermann, died at age 46 in his home town of Wynigen, Switzerland (Wheeler, D.) (Reber,A).

David and Ida moved to the mountains of Western Idaho where David took a contract to cut railroad ties.  On 28 December 1899 Ida gave birth to her first child, Florence, alone in a crude timberland shelter while waiting for a doctor to arrive.  Ida’s only assistance was a blessing from the local missionaries, who afterward sent out into the yard to pray for her (Wheeler, I).

The last years of Annie’s life were marked by marriages, births, harvests, missions, and some deaths.  Mostly it was the day-to-day rhythm of life that generously filled the calendar. After they sold their ranch to the Hull Brothers of Whitney, Christopher and Annie moved to Preston into a two-room frame house near his oldest son, john (Naef, 1990).  The 1900 US Census records the family living in Preston, Idaho, and lists Christopher Nuffer as a farmer, Annie E. as his wife, and Jacob, his single stepson, as a farm laborer. It also notes that Annie can read and write English. Sometime between the 1900 Census and March 1901, Christopher and Annie Nuffer moved to Logan, Utah, which was to be their last home together (Naef, 1990).

By the time, Annie was very ill with “dropsy”, an old term for edema, or fluid retention usually in the feet, ankles and legs (Weyerman, L).  She may have suffered from it for years as it could have been caused by congestive heart failure, diseases of the heart muscle, or some other heart ailment.  As these diseases progress breathing becomes difficult; making walking arduous (Quinn, 2017).

Possibly because Annie needed someone stronger than her aging husband to nurse her, she moved in with her son, Fred.  His wife, Lena, was two months from giving birth. This was a charitable and generous act on Lena’s part, as she was now caring for Annie, a baby and three other children under the age of 5.  (Weyerman, L).

As soon as Annie’s daughter, Ida, recovered enough from the birth of her second child in August 1901, she came to Logan to relieve Lena as her mother’s sole nurse (Wheeler, I. 1955.)    Many Christian virtues were exercised as Lena and Ida worked together to take care of their 6 small children as well as nurse their mother through her last living days. (Weyerman, L).

When November came around, Fred was preparing to leave his seriously ill mother and family of small children to fulfill a call t the German/Swiss mission,  Under what he called “very hard circumstances”, he departed for Switzerland 25 November 1901. This young father knew he would not see his cherished family for over two years.  (Weyerman, G). It was also likely he would never see his beloved mother again. Indeed, she died 1 December 1901, less than a week after his departure for Switzerland. The grieving family buried 4-year-old Annie E. Nuffer in the Logan City Cemetery (Utah Cemetery Inventory).

For an unknown reason, Annie made made the unusual request before she died to have their family’s temple sealing to her second husband, John Christoph Nuffer, cancelled.  She wanted Fred to go to the LDS authorities and arrange for her to be sealed to her first husband, Gottfried Weiermann, and then to have their seven children sealed to them.  This wish was eventually fulfilled in the Logan LDS temple on 8 March 1905, about a year after Fred returned from his mission. (Ida Christensen Arave witnessed the Church temple records at the family history center in SLC) (Wheeler, I., 1955).

Anna Elizabeth Reber’s family was one of 90,000 known Latter-day Saint immigrants who crossed the oceans to America between 1840-1891.  “They had a most unusual success rate; making about 550 voyages, and losing no vessels crossing the Atlantic….These Mormon immigrants were responding to a call to gather with the righteous in a promised land, which they called Zion” (Woods, 2000 p. 74).  Because of courage to act on her faith, a tenacious 3 year old divorced mother of three changed her family’s course into the future. Annie’s decision to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and emigrate to the American west where she could help build the Lord’s kingdom on earth has directly influenced hundreds of her progeny.  Her determination not only lifted her family out of poverty, but more importantly pioneered the way toward salvation for untold numbers of future and past generations. For this act of faith, valor, and love we praise and remember her.

 

EPILOGUE

 

John Christoph Nuffer married for the fourth time four months after Annie’s death.  He lived to age 73, dying 12 April 1908 (Naef, 1990).

Fred Weyerman was suddenly killed 9 March 1935 at age 59 when the bike he was riding slipped on ice and hit a bus.  He left nine surviving children and his widow, who would never remarry. His sister Ida and her family kept in touch with “Aunt Lena” and their cousins for many years after his passing.  (Weyerman, G).

Ida Weierman Wheeler bore 10 children and lived to be 80.  She remained a faithful member of the LDS church through a multitude of trials as her she and her husband, David, worked to eke out a living on the frontier of southeastern Idaho.  Her obituary quoted her friends as saying, “She was a bulwark of strength, patience, and loving kindness to all who knew her” (Wheeler, D) (Olsen, L).

Jacob Weiermann didn’t marry until 1908, when he was 25.  His wife died in the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic.  Their two children, Donald and Martha, went to live with their Aunt Ida and Uncle Dave for a time (Arave, I., 2017). Jacob didn’t marry again.  He worked as a miner in Nevada, and died in Utah of tuberculosis 25 January 1945 at age 61 (Weierman, J., 1945).

 

The Church of Jesus Christ of [Latter-day] Saints in Europe

 

President Joseph F. Smith visited

Zurich, Switzerland in 1906, and predicted:

“The time would come when temples to the Most High would be built in various countries of the world.”

The Bern Switzerland Temple was the first temple built where English was not the main local language.  It was dedicated on 11 September 1955 (Petersen, S., 2013).

 

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Spring City, Utah

Manti Temple, Paul & Amanda Ross

Last weekend was Amanda’s sister’s wedding in Manti, Sanpete, Utah.  We went down to attend the wedding for Zachary & Alyssa Smart.  It was a wonderful trip, time to get away, celebrate the wedding and reception, and enjoy ourselves.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at Manti Temple

I have done enough family history that I knew my 4th Great Grandmother is buried in Spring City.  Like other locations, if I am in Sanpete County, I make an effort to stop and visit her grave.  I think the last time I was able to stop was about 2003, so it had been about 15 years.

Paul, Aliza, Hiram, and Lillian Ross at the grave of Johanna Johannsson Benson (Bengtsson)

Here is how we are related.

My mother’s name is Sandra Jonas.

Her father was Wilburn Norwood Jonas (1924 – 1975).

His father was Joseph Nelson Jonas (1893 – 1932).

His mother was Annetta Josephine Nelson (she went by Annie) (1864 – 1907).

Her mother was Agnetta Benson (she went by Annie) (anglicized from Bengtsson) (1832 – 1873).

Her mother was Johanna Johansdotter (which shows up on the tombstone as Johansson) (1813 – 1897), who was married to Nils Benson (anglicized from Bengtsson).

I really don’t know tons about Johanna.  Nels August Nelson makes only passing reference to his grandmother.  I have been unable to find when she immigrated to the United States.

Hiram and Aliza Ross waiting for a hummingbird to land on them

Johanna Johansdotter was born 15 February 1813 in Öringe, Veinge, Halland, Sweden.  She met and married Nils Bengtsson on 4 July 1830 in Veinge, Halland, Sweden.  Nils was born 1 August 1802 in Brunskog, Tönnersjö, Halland, Sweden.  Together they had 8 children together.

Agnetta Nilsdotter born 9 Dec 1832.

Lars Nilsson born 11 May 1835.

Ingjard Nilsdotter born 17 February 1839.

Christina Nilsdotter born 21 June 1841.

Bengta Nilsdotter born 19 March 1843.

Nils (Nels) Nilsson born 23 August 1846.

Borta Nilsdotter born 6 April 1849.

Johan Petter Nilsson born 31 August 1855.

Nils passed away 12 March 1859.

Johanna was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 11 May 1861.  Agnetta was baptized 10 November 1863, Lars 5 May 1860, Ingjard 5 May 1861, Christina 4 February 1866, and Nils Jr 5 May 1860.  Johann joined 7 September 1893 after immigration to Utah.  The other two were after their deaths.  Bengta and Borta did not join or immigrate to Utah.

Johanna’s daughter Agnetta (Annie) traveled with her husband Johan Nilsson from Halmstadt, Sweden through Liverpool, England docking in New York City, New York on 3 June 1864.  I cannot tell that Johanna traveled with Johan and Agnetta.

Most of the children upon traveling to the United States were given the last name of Benson instead of Nilsson.

The children spread.  Agnetta went with her husband to Logan, Utah.  Lars went with his family to what is now Sandy, Utah.  Ingjard to what is now Sandy.  Christina to Vernon, Utah.  Nils to Spring City, Utah.  John also to Sandy.  For whatever reason Johanna went with Nils to Spring City and remained there the rest of her days.  She passed away May 1897, we do not have an exact date.  Nils served a mission from 1892 to 1894 back to the Scandinavia mission.

Manti Temple 2018

An interesting tidbit about our trip to Manti.  We stayed in a restored home of James Marks Works.  He was the brother-in-law to Brigham Young.  It was an early home with various additions, modifications, and ultimate restoration.  James Marks Works and Phebe Jones had a daughter named Mary Ann Angel Works.  Mary Ann is the second wife to Nils Benson and they had 9 children together.  The home in Manti we stayed may very well have been visited by my 3rd Great Grand Uncle and his 9 children, all of which were grandchildren of James Marks Works.  James Marks Works died in 1889 and the first of the 9 children were born in 1892, but James’ son James Marks Works (Jr) kept the home and continued working the sawmill behind the home.

Here is a picture of the Manti Temple from James Marks Works’ home.

Manti Temple from James Marks Works’ home

Another interesting side note that I remembered from the last time I walked around the Spring City Cemetery.  Orson Hyde is also buried there.  I walked the kids over to Elder Hyde’s grave and we snapped a picture there as well.  I explained his role as an Apostle, President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Dedication of Palestine for the return of the Jews, clerk to Joseph Smith, lawyer, Justice on Utah Supreme Court.  The kids didn’t seem to care much…

Hiram, Lillian, and Aliza Ross at the grave of Orson Hyde

Here is Orson’s short biography from the Joseph Smith papers.

8 Jan. 1805 – 28 Nov. 1878.  Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge.  Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut.  Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe.  Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812.  Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1819.  Joined Methodist church, ca. 1827.  Later affiliated with reformed Baptists (later Disciples of Christ or Campbellites).  Baptized into LDS church by Sidney Rigdon and ordained an elder by JS and Sidney Rigdon, Oct. 1831, at Kirtland.  Ordained a high priest by Oliver Cowdery, 26 Oct. 1831.  Appointed to serve mission to Ohio, Nov. 1831, in Orange, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio.  Baptized many during proselytizing mission with Samuel H. Smith to eastern U.S., 1832.  Attended organizational meeting of School of the Prophets, 22–23 Jan. 1833, in Kirtland.  Appointed clerk to church presidency, 1833.  Appointed to serve mission to Jackson Co., Missouri, summer 1833.  Served mission to Pennsylvania and New York, winter and spring 1834.  Member of Kirtland high council, 1834.  Participated in Camp of Israel expedition to Missouri, 1834.  Married to Marinda Nancy Johnson by Sidney Rigdon, 4 Sept. 1834, at Kirtland.  Ordained member of Quorum of the Twelve by Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer, and Martin Harris, 15 Feb. 1835, in Kirtland.  Served mission to western New York and Upper Canada, 1836.  Served mission to England with Heber C. Kimball, 1837–1838.  Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri, summer 1838.  Sided with dissenters against JS, 1838.  Lived in Missouri, winter 1838–1839.  Removed from Quorum of the Twelve, 4 May 1839.  Restored to Quorum of the Twelve, 27 June 1839, at Commerce (later Nauvoo), Hancock Co., Illinois.  Served mission to Palestine to dedicate land for gathering of the Jews, 1840–1842.  Member of Nauvoo Masonic Lodge, 1842.  Member of Nauvoo City Council, 1843–1845.  Admitted to Council of Fifty, 13 Mar. 1844.  Presented petition from JS to U.S. Congress, 1844.  Participated in plural marriage during JS’s lifetime.  Departed Nauvoo during exodus to the West, mid-May 1846.  Served mission to Great Britain, 1846–1847.  Presided over Latter-day Saints in Iowa before migrating to Utah Territory.  Appointed president of Quorum of the Twelve, 1847.  Published Frontier Guardian at Kanesville (later Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie Co., Iowa, 1849–1852.  Appointed to preside over church east of Rocky Mountains, 20 Apr. 1851, at Kanesville.  Migrated to Utah Territory, 1852.  Appointed associate judge of U.S. Supreme Court for Utah Territory, 1852.  Elected to Utah territorial legislature, 27 Nov. 1852, 1858.  Presided over church in Carson Co., Utah Territory (later the Nevada Territory), 1855–1856.  Served colonizing mission to Sanpete Co., Utah Territory, by 1860; presided as ecclesiastical authority there, beginning 1860.  Died at Spring City, Sanpete Co.

 

Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp written by Annie Thompson (27 August 1957)

I came upon this history and thought I would share it.  Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp is the mother of my William Sharp.  She was also the mother of Isabella Sharp Carlisle, Elizabeth Sharp Quayle, and James Sharp.  I don’t know where she got all of her information, hopefully from being passed down.  I will enter some updates in brackets.

LIFE HISTORY: Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp, written by Annie Thompson, (August 27, 1957).

“Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp was the daughter and only child, of George and Ann (Matthews) Cartwright, and was christened at Misson, Nottinghamshire, England, 20 December 1803. She died in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, probably late in the year 1850 [17 February 1851].

Elizabeth grew up a tall young lady, reared in an atmosphere of wealth and refinement. At the age of 17 her father died (burial 27 February 1820, age 46) and three years later, on 4 June 1823, her mother remarried to a widower named George Beighton. Little is known of this marriage except that George Beighton is purported to have gambled away at the races at Doncaster, the money belonging to Elizabeth’s mother.

On 29 December 1823, Elizabeth Cartwright was married at Mission to Thomas Sharp, and they became parents of eight children, four of whom died young in England; the other four, William, Isabella, Elizabeth and James emigrated to this country with their mother:

George Sharp, chr. 11 Nov 1824, Misson, Nottinghamshire, England
Mary Sharp, chr. 27 Nov 1825, “,”,”
William Sharp, born 10 Dec 1826, “,”,”
George Sharp, chr. 13 May 1826, “,”,”
Isabella Sharp, born 22 Dec 1831, “,”,”
Elizabeth Sharp, chr. 11 June 1834, “,”,”
Ann Sharp, chr. 29 July 1838, “,”,”
James Sharp, Born 7 Jan 1840, “,”,”
(Extract from the history of Isabella Sharp Carlisle)

Misson is a little town in the northern part of Nottinghamshire, in what used to be the Sherwood Forest, (made famous by the stories of Robin Hood). As well as having a historical setting, the place, at the time of Elizabeth Cartwright’s birth, was one of beauty, with its green pastures a bloom with cowslips.

Thomas Sharp died in 1841 at the age of 45 (buried 15 Jul 1841, Mission), leaving Elizabeth to care for the children.

Sometime about 1848, the LDS missionaries were preaching in the vicinity of Mission, and Elizabeth Sharp joined the LDS church, together with her eldest son, William, who was baptized 20 Jun 1848.

Elizabeth’s home was opened to the missionaries, and among the elders who stayed there was Elder George Emery.

Elizabeth Sharp decided to emigrate with her family to Utah, but her folks tried hard to discourage her from taking the hazardous trip; they told her if you leave for the west, “A red Indian will eat ye.” But Elizabeth’s determination prevailed, and in 1850 the family, consisting of the mother and her four children, booked passage for America. (The price of the ticket being twenty-five pounds sterling). They set sail from Liverpool, England, bound for New Orléans, Louisiana, USA, on 2 October 1850, on the sailing vessel “James Pennell”, commanded by Captain Fullerton. The voyage was a rough one and it took six weeks to reach their destination.

From New Orléans, they traveled by boat up the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri, a trip that was not a healthy one.

Shortly after the family reached St. Louis, the mother took sick and died, and was buried there. This left the children on their own. They found employment and Elizabeth and James married and stayed in Missouri.

William Sharp married Mrs. Mary Ann Bailey Padley, a young widow who had joined the church in England.

Isabella Sharp was baptized into the church while in St. Louis, and Joseph Carlisle. Elizabeth Sharp married John Quayle, and settled around St. Louis, and had a family of three children.

James, who was about twelve years old when his mother died, made arrangements to come to Salt Lake City, but the company he was to travel with finally turned back. He then found employment with a meat-packing concern in St. Louis (in which he later became a partner), and married Eudora Mann and had a family of five children.

Elizabeth Sharp Quayle and James Sharp never joined the church.

Both William Sharp and Joseph Carlisle were good athletes, and while in St. Louis, they challenged anyone to a wrestling match that cared to accept. They became well-known in this respect and they had few who accepted their challenge.

In 1853, both William Sharp and his family, which now consisted of his wife Mary Ann, his step-son Lorenzo Padley, and daughter Annie. Elizabeth who was born in St. Louis, and Joseph Carlisle and his wife Isabella Sharp Carlisle, started their journey across the plains. They drove a wagon for Williams Jennings, a Salt Lake merchant and freighter, (whether they drove one wagon or two is not known). They came in the Moses Clawson Co., arriving in Salt Lake City about September 15, 1853. (Journal History, Aug 18, 1853, pg. 5-7; Church Emigrations Vol. 2, 2, 1851 to 1863).

Joseph and Isabella Sharp Carlisle settled in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah; and William and Mary Ann Sharp settled in Plain City, Weber County, Utah.

Annie Thompson
August 27, 1957

My relationship: Elizabeth Cartwright- Thomas Sharp
William Sharp
Milo Riley Sharp
Edward William Sharp
Edward Junior Sharp

Plain City Cemetery Incident

I wanted to share this interesting little incident that happened on Friday.

Amanda and the rest of the kids went to Utah for the weekend.  Aliza stayed because she had school and rode down with me on Friday.

As we neared Plain City I asked if she remembered Great Grandpa Milo.  She said that she did.  She then asked if we could drive past his house.  (She often asks to drive past places.)

We drove past and I asked if she wanted to stop at the Plain City Cemetery.  She said yes.

We stopped and walked over to Grandpa and Grandma Ross’ grave stone.

Aliza with Milo & Gladys Ross tombstone

Aliza with Milo & Gladys Ross tombstone

I asked if she wanted to see Grandpa Milo’s mother’s grave.  She agreed and we walked over to the grave of Ethel Sharp Ross.

I also took her to the grave of Paul Ross, 1922-1932, and I explained my relationship to him.

We then walked to the grave of Ethel Sharp Ross’ parents, Milo Riley and Mary Ann “Lillie” Stoker Sharp.

Aliza with Milo and Mary Ann "Lillie" Sharp, also Mary Ann Stoker.

Aliza with Milo and Mary Ann “Lillie” Sharp, also Mary Ann Sharp’s tombstone.

Aliza recognized the Lillie, although Lillian was only loosely named after this Lillie.  We use the Lillie spelling for her nickname based on this Lillie though.  I explained the Milo name, the relationships, and how Mary Ann on this stone is Mary Ann Bailey Sharp, Milo Riley’s mother.

We then walked over to Lillie’s father, William Edward Stoker.  In this picture below, you can see Mary Ann or Lillie Sharp’s proximity to her father’s grave.  Her mother died in England before the family could immigrate to Utah.

Aliza with William Edward Stoker

Aliza with William Edward Stoker’s grave stone

Needless to say, being related to some of the older graves in the cemetery, we are related to a number of the other families in the graveyard.  We walked around for quite a while talking about names and how they are related.

I started walking back toward the car and Aliza wanted to go back over by William Stoker.  I told her we did not have any more family graves over in that part of the cemetery.  She insisted, “we didn’t stop at the other family tombstone for a picture.”  Knowing there was no other family over there, I followed her so she could see for herself.

She then stopped at another grave.  She wanted to take a picture of it.  I told her we were not related to them and she said, “Yes we are, I want a picture.”  Rather than have a battle in the cemetery over it, I took her picture.

Aliza with William and Martha Wayment tomb stone

Aliza with William and Martha Wayment tombstone

If you look closely, you can see William Stoker’s grave behind William Wayment’s grave marker, and the Sharp tombstone right above Aliza.  I took the picture and it dawned on me, Amanda’s Great Grandfather’s middle name was Wayment and his mother had been a Wayment.  I was not sure if these Wayments were related to Amanda’s Wayments or not.

Sure enough, Aliza was right.  While not related to me, these were her relatives!  These are her 5th Great Grandparents through Amanda’s line.

I was a bit struck by the determination she had that we had another family grave I had not taken her.  Dumbfounded that they were in fact her family, and not mine!  It inspired and spooked at the same time.

Amanda’s Great Grandfather is Walter Wayment Hansen, 1904 -1995.  His mother is Martha Ann Wayment Hansen, 1877-1908.  Her father is Joseph Wayment, 1844 – 1931.  His parents are William Wayment, 1822 – 1883, and Martha Brown, 1823 – 1905, the individuals whose graves Aliza wanted a picture.  My father-in-law, Bryan Hemsley, did not remember they were buried in Plain City.

Martha Brown and William Wayment's tombestone

Martha Brown and William Wayment’s tombestone

A quick internet search located this brief history of William and Martha Wayment.  In reading, the Stokers and Wayments came to America both on the same ship, the Amazon!  Multiple linkages in history between the two families.  I corrected a couple of spellings in the biography.

Martha Brown was born May 26, 1823 in Bassingbourne, Cambridgeshire, England to William Brown and Mary Wade. Cambridge is a flat coastal plain located in the southeast part of England. The climate is moderate with much rainfall which produces much vegetation. Martha met and married William Wayment on Christmas Day December 25, 1841 in the Bassingbourne Parrish in Whaddon, Cambridgeshire, England. They both signed the certificate which seemed an unusual procedure to the clerk. William signed his name Whayment. He gave his age as 20 and was listed as a laborer. Martha gave her age as 19 and was listed as a s spinster. William and Mary made their home with h is widowed mother, Mary Rook Wayment. Several members of her family have told of this incident – “as a bride living in her mother-in-laws home”, Martha found that circumstances and conditions were not always pleasant. One stressful day Martha threatened to leave the home and her husband. She went into a small room (or a clothes closet) to get some of her things, her mother-in-law quickly closed and locked the door. There Martha was kept until she promised not to leave. Satisfactory adjustments were made and she kept her promise. Martha’s grandfather, William Brown of Whaddon has been described as a wealthy farmer. His son, Samuel, Martha’s father was disinherited after he married a servant girl, Mary Wade, who worked for his parents. He was a butcher by trade. He extended his business and it is said he became a well to do merchant. Martha had seven brothers and 1 sister all born in Bassingbourne. It is said the Browns were a family of large men, all of them being over 6 ft tall, and long lived. Martha was the only one to live to be over 80, however. Though a hard worker William, Martha father, never accumulated much wealth. Their modest home and limited circumstances was a source of embarrassment at times for Martha in England. William earning being sometimes about 8 shillings a week (about $2 in US dollars). But through careful management they were able to take care of their children as they came into the family. William and Martha had 6 boys and 2 girls, all born in Whaddon. Aaron, Joseph, Samuel, William Emily John Brown William Thomas, Martha. Seems as though it was necessary for them to come to America to develop their potential. The children hired out at an early age, working for farmers of the area. work included keeping birds out of the cherry trees and pulling poppies out of the grain fields. Often the children would leave home at 5:00 in the morning and work for 3 or 4 hours then they would be called in for breakfast. Some meals were very meager. The first missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints arrived in Liverpool, England July 20, 1837. Having sailed on the ship “Garrick” under the leadership of Heber C Kimball. Later working their way to the Whaddon, Bassingbourne area. after William and Martha heard their messages they opened their home to the missionaries. Many people of the community stirred up others to try to stop the spread of the gospel. This made it necessary to hold meetings and baptisms services at night to avoid the mobs that were a continually threat to them. The Brown family were especially bitter against the church. This caused William and Martha to delay joining the church although they were convince of the truth. Finally in 1850 William and Martha decided to disregard the threats of the Brown family. William was baptized May 1850 a few months later Williams mother, Mary Rook Wayment was baptized in 1851. The three of them continued to support the missionaries. Martha was baptized 1 May 1857 in spite of her families wishes. When her father learned of her actions he disinherited her except for the benefit o f a few schillings. All the children were each baptized into the church eventually. Joseph the oldest living son worked with his father fossil digging and earned enough money for his transportation to America. Joseph aged 19, 1863 booked passage on the “Amazon”. After Joseph left the family continued working together to meet their needs and maybe to emigrate? It took many years to reach their goal. by the spring of 1878 they were making final preparations to emigrate to Zion. They booked passage on the ship “Nevada” and sailed from Liverpool May 25, 1878. Travel was long and much seasickness. After arriving on the shores they rode west on Pullman cars to Philadelphia then changed here to “immigrant cars” which were very uncomfortable. The east was beautiful but the farther west they came the habitation vanished and scenes about them were dry and barren. They arrived in Ogden, Utah Territory June 1878 the family was met by son, Joseph and Samuel and taken to Samuel’s home in Plain City, After living here a few months they settled in the Salt Creek area close to Joseph on land he had purchased in 1872. Their home was a log house. William applied for homestead rights to a quarter section of land. They planted cotton wood trees, yellow roses, tea vines and other fast growing plants. They all continued being active in the church and received their endowments in the Salt Lake Temple. Martha was not idle as she received her citizenship papers November 16, 1885. In 1886 Martha received the property deed William had applied for Signed by President Grover C Cleveland, President of the United States of America Oct 18,1886 Martha cared for most of her needs but over the years became very overweight. The story is told: April 12, 1905 at age 82, she saw the traveling grocer coming & hastened to arrive home before him. Arriving about the same time, she told him she would have to gather her eggs for his pay. The grocer said he would go to other places and come back later. When he returned he could not find her, over exertion had brought on a stroke and she died. Her survivors were, Joseph, Samuel, John, William Thomas, Emily and Martha, 46 grandchildren and 29 great grandchildren. Her service held in the Warren church was overflowing with family & friends. She is buried in the Plain City Cemetery next to her loving husband April 14, 1905

 

Mission Journal of Johann Wendel

John & Mina Wendel

John & Mina Wendel

I need to give some background before I post this journal.  The past few weeks I have posted some stories of Theodor & Christiana Andra.  As the stories relate, Theodor died in 1902 due to a quarry accident.  Christiana and the children converted to Mormonism and the family moved to Utah.  After being in Utah for a few years, she met and married a widower, John Wendel on 22 May 1914 in the Salt Lake City Temple.

John became a father to her children who were teenagers.  William Fredrick Andra, the middle born knew him toward the end of his teenage years in this home.

Johann Wendel was born 27 September 1856 in Wasserberndorf, Mittlefranken, Bavaria and died 20 January 1930 in Salt Lake City, Utah.  He married Elisabeth Streckfuss 19 October 1880 in Wasserberndorf.  Elisabeth was born 21 February 1850 in Buchheim, Mittlefranken, Bavaria and died 31 August 1913 in Farmers Ward, Salt Lake, Utah.  Christiana Wilhelmina (going by Mina in Utah) was born 24 October 1869 in Radebuel, Dresden, Saxony and died 25 December 1957 in Salt Lake City.

 

Missionary Journal of Johann Wendel ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE GERMAN MISSIONARY JOURNAL OF JOHANN (JOHN) WENDEL. HUSBAND OF ELIZABETH STRECKFUSS WENDEL (and 2nd wife: Christiana Wilhelmina Knauke) ALSO FATHER OF ANNA BARBARA W. MAUERMANN, LEONARD MICHAEL WENDEL, JOHN WENDEL, GEORG FRIEDRICH WENDEL. MISSION TO GERMANY FROM JANUARY 25, 1922 TO OCTOBER 31, 1923

PREFACE This Grandpa Wendel is a Grandpa to all his living descendants in the year 1978. The younger descendants may have to put 2 or 3 “greats” before the “Grandpa”, but he is indeed a Grandpa to all of us. Grandpa John Wendel was born September 27, 1856. He married Elizabeth Streckfuss on September 17, 1880, lacking ten days of being age 24. He joined the Church in the Nuremberg Branch on October 4, 1902, just past his 46th birthday. He emigrated with his wife to Salt Lake City, arriving here in August 1905 — not quite 49 years old. His dear wife was killed by a car in Aug. 1913. when he was almost 57 years old. He was in the Church a few months over 19 years when he was called on a Mission to his Native Land of Germany — a few months past the age of 65. He had re-married to Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke on the 22 May 1914 at the age of 57. He died in January 1930, a few months past the age of 73.

This Missionary Journal is written in the Gothic German handwriting and in the German Language. The average American missionary who has served a mission to Germany has not learned to read this Gothic German handwriting. Ursula Hilbert Wendel, an emigrant from Germany, the wife of John A. Wendel, a grandson to Grandpa Wendel, was able to read this journal. Uncle Leonard Michael Wendel brought this journal to Ursula about 1966 or 1967. Ursula’s children were quite small at the time and she had the constant care of her father and part of the time her father-in law. Consequently she was unable to translate the journal as rapidly as Uncle Leonard had hoped, because Uncle Leonard had desired that his oldest grandson should be given the journal, he requested his grandson, John Richard Wendel go to Ursula’s home and get the journal. At the Grave side of Leonard Fredrick Wendel in early June 1977 Pearl Wendel, a sister-in-law to Ursula approached John Richard Wendel and asked him to please bring the journal to the Wendel Family Reunion in July 1977, so that Ursula may finish the translation of it. This he did. God moves in a mysterious way His wonders to perform! At this time Ursula’s oldest son Ronald was on a Mission. So, to help out financially, Ursula obtained a job with one of the schools in Bountiful to help with the hot lunch program. In January and February 1978, Ursula was forced to quit her job and spend much time in bed because of trouble with her legs. During this time she was able to complete the translation of Grandpa’s Missionary Journal.

She then gave the completed work to Pearl Wendel, who had volunteered to type it and have copies made for as many of the descendants of Grandpa Wendel who desired them. This Journal should be of particular interest to the families in the Leonard Michael Wendel Line, because one of the first people whom Grandpa called on was the father of Frieda Johanna Neuner (Uncle Leonard’s wife). He also mentions finding Fredrick Kohles completely blind. I tried to find how he fit into the Kohles line, but from the Genealogy sheets which I have I was unable to fit him in. He may have been a cousin of Grandpa’s. I, as typist, have tried to put the translation into the American way of saying things without destroying the real meaning Grandpa meant to say. I have worked very closely with Ursula on this so that the translated Journal will tell the story Grandpa wrote.

The reader of this Journal should keep a few thoughts in mind to get the true understanding of Grandpa’s Mission. Apparently In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s the field of converts in Germany was ready to harvest. Many converts came into the Church and many emigrated to Utah to help build up the Kingdom here and enjoy the full blessings of the Gospel including Temple Work. World War I came along from 1914 to 1918. Germany and France were both hit hard by this war. To try to pick up the pieces and carry on as Nations was a great task. In 1922 and 1923 Inflation hit Germany so hard that it took bushel baskets of money to buy very little. The Spirit of Conversions seemed to have left this fruitful field. By the time Grandpa returned in 1922, it was an achievement and a fullness of joy just to have a long Gospel Conversation, let alone a Conversion. The Church also had grown fairly strong in Western U.S.A., so they were trying to encourage the members who were left and those newly converted to remain in the foreign countries and try to build up the Kingdom there. Elders often worked alone, and the discouraging moments often far exceeded the encouraging ones. The Great Grandsons and Great Grand-daughters of John Wendel, who have had the privilege of filling missions in the 1960’s and 1970’s when once again the Spirit of Conversion reigns upon the earth, will find that their mission journals and experiences were almost opposite to Grandpa Wendel’s. The number of Mission Fields have doubled many times since the early 1920’s. The Missionary Force is probably 10 or 20 times what it was then. Foreign Stakes are being created as rapidly as leadership will allow. Temples are being built in many Foreign Lands as rapidly as they can be built. The Modern Prophet’s Counsel “to widen our strides and hasten our pace” is being accomplished by the 1978 Missionaries. We hope the time spent in translating, typing, correcting and copying this journal will prove to be time well spent, by all those who will find true enjoyment in reading it, owning a copy, and having their testimonies strengthened by the testimony and experiences of Grandpa John Wendel. Sincerely, Pearl Wendel, 175 East 2nd South, Bountiful, Utah 84010

THE GOLDEN RULE DO UNTO OTHERS AS YOU WANT THEM TO DO UNTO YOU.

DIARY Missionary Journal of Johann Wendel MISSION TO GERMANY FROM JANUARY 25, 1922 TO OCTOBER 31, 1923

On January 25. 1922. 5:OO P.M. I left Salt Lake City, through Wyoming, Nebraska, Illinois, arrived in Chicago, January 27, 7:OO P.M. sight seeing on the 28th, like Museum, Post Office, Michigan Lake, climbed the highest building and in the evening at 7:OO P.M. on the 28th, leaving for Buffalo. We arrived here on the 29 of Jan. at 4:00 P.M. One hour delay and then on to Montreal, where we arrived Jan. 30 at 8:00 A.M. From Vermillion till Buffalo, we traveled on the big river to Niagara Falls. In Erie we saw a lot of cultivation of grapes. After our passport was inspected by the German Consulate in Montreal and $10.00 paid for, we left on the 30 of Jan. at 12:OO o’clock noon for St. John. We arrived there on the 31st of Jan. at 7:30 A.M.

On February 1st at 11:00 A.M. we got on the ship “Montcalm”. In the afternoon 3:30 P.M. the ship left the Harbor. On Feb. 2nd. 9:OO A.M. we arrived in Halifax, where the boat laid all day and night till 2:OO A.M. and loaded 16,000 barrels of apples, a lot of sugar and cheese. I could hardly believe what such a ship could carry. The boat is 560 feet long and keeps going by oil. The City of Halifax is very mountainous and was covered by snow.

On the 3rd of Feb. 1922 at 5:00 A. M. the ship left. Everything is very noble and modern and we are 212 man. in First Class.

On Sunday. February 9, 1922. we held Church Service from the Church of England in the Dinning Room.

On Feb. 9th, we passed the Coast of Ireland, where the water looks light green compared to the Atlantic Ocean’s dark blue or even black.

On Feb. 10th at 3:00 A.M. we arrived in Liverpool. We the German Brothers Pitsch, Pohlmann and I, together with 3 others had to stay here one day, because our Passports haven’t been inspected, by the English Consul.

On Feb. 11 at noon, we left the boat, took care of our luggage and at 2:00 P.M. left Liverpool for Grimby Dock, where we arrived at 6:20 P.M. At once we went to the boat for Hamburg, Germany. In the Evening at 7:30 P.M. the ship left and we arrive in Hamburg, Feb, 13th at 8:00 A.M. We stayed in Hotel Stein. The Voyage till Hamburg, Germany, with Passport difficulties, food and tips cost $274.00. In Liverpool, we stayed half an hour in the passenger train, where Apostle Whitney and two other Elders visited us.

On Feb. 15th. I saw the Exotic Garden, but because of snow, I didn’t see very much. Then I visited the Volksmuseum (People’s Museum) and there was a lot to see. With a guide, it cost me 6 Marks and 50 Pfennige (cents). In the evening I went to the Bible hour and I liked it very much.

Feb. 16th Today I shall study.

Feb. 17th At 12:30 P.M. I left Hamburg for Berlin and arrived here at 8:30 P.M. A few good women I met on the train, looked after me. They showed me the way to a lodging and carried my luggage. I met here Brother Stoddard, he is the Conference President.

On the 18th of Feb. he sent me to a family, where only the woman is a member of the Church. The first night, I slept in Brother Stoddard’s Lodge Samariter Str. 38.

On Sunday the 19th. I visited Sunday School and got invited for Dinner with another Elder. I had a good time. In the Evening, we went to the meeting, where I had to speak for the first time. Afterwards we blessed oil and a sick person. The members were all very good to me.

On Feb. 20th It is very cold in the lodge.

On Feb. 21st I received word from Swiss that I was transferred to Nuremberg. Tomorrow I shall leave. The name of the sister where I’ll stay is Anders, Guntenerstreet 24.

On Feb.22nd at lO:OO A.M., I left for Nuremberg by D Zug (fast Train) thru Wittenberg, Halle, Jena Saaletal (River Saale Valley) up to Lichtenfels, Bramberg and arrived in Nuremberg 8:30 P.M., where Brother Strebel picked me up from the station. He took me right from there to a farewell for Sister Keil and Brother Ludwig. On Feb. 23rd. I visited Brother and Sister Adelemann and a family Harold, where I found Friedrich Kohles completely blind. A sad fate.

On the 24th. I visited Carl Neuner in Failhof in the poor Hospital. He is very weak, but was very glad when I introduced myself as Father-in-law to his daughter and gave him $10.00 from his Son-in-law. I spoke a long time with him about the Gospel.

On the 25th. I visited the Eckardt Hamer family. He recognized me at once, but not his wife. I had a very warm welcome here. Afterwards I made a visit in Birkenwald, where I was strongly welcomed and fed well by the Hartmann family.

On the 26th. I went to Sunday School in Nuremberg, Bucherstrasse 90 and noon meeting. They welcomed me good and I had to speak.

On the 27th, I went tracting, but had no success.

On the 28th of Feb., we have been by Brother and Sister Schneider’s place.

On March 1st, I have been in Birkenwald, where I explained the Gospel to Hartmann.

On March 2nd, we have been in Fuerth by Brother and Sister Habermann, and in Feucht with the Dannenfelzer family. On the 1st Brother Strebel and I were in Ziegelstein too, a colonie 2 by Brother Mueller, who was ill.

On the 3rd of March, I have been to Mrs. Hartmann in Birkenwald and Janitor Schwarm and Hass, where I was welcomed friendly.

On the 4th, I stayed in bed, and on the 5th, we had Ward Conference. Brother Stoof (Stover) Conference President, from Stuttgart was present and we had four meetings.

On March 6th, I visited Mr. Baurner and L. Gruensteidel. I was welcomed good.

On the 7th to the 11th, I visited some friends and had opportunity to preach the Gospel and did tracting.

On the 12th of March. Sunday School and after that meeting, I went with Sister Saum and wrote some addresses down. I visited then ‘Gg.’ and Kath. Schmidthammer, where I stayed over night.

On March 13th, I visited Conrad Hassler, Geutherstr. 1. Here I was welcomed good also.

On March 14, 15, and 16th. I was ill and stayed in bed. In the evening on the 16th, I got up from bed and visited Anna Schmied. She is married to a man named Lechner. I didn’t recognize her anymore, with her 35 years she is an old woman.

Today March 17th. I received my eviction. Such a dangerous Individual has no right to be in the civilized City of Nuremberg.

On the 18th and 19th, I was in bed again.

On the 21st, I got up and received another eviction. I visited Walz and Ditsch. Ditsch wanted to convert me.

On March, 20th….thru the 23rd, I was in bed.

On the 23rd, much snow and wind.

Until April 1st, I visited several inactive members.

April 2nd, I have been to the meeting and Sister Huber was sustained as a Sunday School Teacher.

Yesterday, April 6th, I attended a meeting in the Hercules Veledroon, a very good one, arranged by the inter-National Jehovah Witnesses. The Lesson was: “Can men talk with the dead?” They pointed out, that the dead ones with whom the Spiritualists communicate, are not our dead persons, but the spirits who were cast out of Heaven. “Rev. John 12:4,9” They want to show off and tempt mankind.

April 11. I was busy a half a day in the city hall because of my eviction. I made a petition.

On April 18. 19t and 20th, I was ill at Brother and Sister Schneider’s.

On the 22nd, I went to Frankfurt for Conference. I feel better. I arrived in Frankfurt at 5:00 P.M. I stayed with Brother and Sister Anton Huck, Schillstreet 5, 2nd story. A place where I was welcomed good.

Sunday morning — Sunday School and 3:00 P.M. Meeting.

Monday from lO:OO A.M. till 3:00 P.M. Missionary meeting. Present were President Balif and President Stoof. Twenty-one men received good instructions how to tract. In the evening at 7:30 P.M. Priesthood Meeting until 10:00 P.M.

On Sunday I had to speak briefly and I mentioned by the way, that I would like to see from our big branches here a compliance for our German Wards in Zion, so that they may receive the blessings of Temple Work with us, and so on. After the meeting President Balif said to me, if I speak again about emigration, I would be released from my mission at once. Now I don’t understand how to reconcile this with my opinion, but I’ll try as much as possible to obey.

On Tuesday, we went home, 6:00 P.M. in Munich, in Wuerzburg some hours delay and so we could go and see the city. Twelve of us were from Nuremberg. Brother Strebel, myself and two Sisters Strecker drove home together, but first I came alone. The trip to Frankfurt and back cost 200 Marks. Frankfurt is a beautiful city and I liked it very much.

Today, Rain April 28th. I walked all day and visited four friends and explained the Gospel to them. Afterwards I visited 5 astray members, who didn’t want to know anything anymore, because they know already enough. The whole day I didn’t eat anything. So, late in the evening, I visited The Schmidthammer’s, they were just thru eating. They did not invite me, Well, the Gospel creates not all the time friends. On the way back home I wanted to buy something to eat, but all the stores were closed. When I reached home, my landlord, Brother and Sister Strebel had gone to bed already, I went to bed, the first time hungry and I felt very weak, and wished I were home and my mission complete.

On the 29th, I bought with Sister Ceder’s help a Fur for my Mina (2nd wife, Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke). Sister Strebel will send it to her. The price is 2600 Marks. Today I received my sanction for my stay until July 15th, and payed 442 Marks for it. Sometimes I feel very sad because people have so very little interest for the Gospel. We have rain again.

The weather suits my mood I am in today, May 1st.

May 6th. I visited several lukewarm members, and invited them to a special meeting, where they will have to declare if they are for or against the Church, concerning excommunication.

May 7th The divorced Mrs. Wieleitner got excommunicated from the Church today because of adultery. President Stoof was here today and we had all day long meetings, where I had to speak too. I administered to Sister Ceder also today because of her headache and blessed a child of Brother and Sister Wieleitner, which received the name of Bruno Wieleitner. The weather is beautiful today and it seems as Spring is coming.

May 8. Today Sister Stern’s son Bruno got buried at the Johannis Kirchhof Cemetary. He was a member, fallen away from the Church. The Sermon was given by a Priest. He was 20 years old. (Translator’s note* I guess the son was 20 years old, it is not quite clear, who; Priest or son.) Afterwards I visited some members and friends and talked with a Catholic nurse in the Hospital, about the Gospel but without success.

May 9. I visited Mrs. Hartmann’s family Reichel in Birkenwald and bore my Testimony; also to Hempfling and Hefner, where the women were very attentive.

May 13th. Today I went to the Cemetery (Sudfriedhof) where a former Co-worker, Work Master Schlegel from Birkenwald is buried. I visited him several times before his death. He associated with the International Bible Investigators and was buried from them also.

May 14th. Today was Mothers’ Day. It was appropriately celebrated and. the Mothers received flowers from six girls dressed in white. Brother Dinse remembered the Mission Mothers especially. It was a splendid Sabbath and we had a beautiful time.

May 25. In the morning 4:45 A.M. I drove to Steppach (I assume by train the only transportation possible) passed Strullendorf. Till here the fare was 18 Marks, and till Steppach 6 Marks. At noon I visited Gg (Georg) Holler in Pommersfelden the Castle. There was much to see, like wonderful paintings and a Hall that was completely adorned with sea shells, a herd of Deer with antlers, (Steinbocke) and so on.

May 24th I moved out from Mullner Street 23, Brother and Sister Strebel and moved in with Fritz Hefner, Peter Henlein Street 25 third floor.

May 25 to 26. I stayed over night in Steppach with Lisie Grau. I visited then Mrs. Vogel at the Hutzolmill, then preached the Gospel to the Holler Family afterwards traveled by train to Simmersdorf, paid 2 Marks for the ticket. Then I traveled to Horbach and to Weingartsgreuth, where I went to the Parson’s (Minister’s) Office, and received Genealogy from the Wendel families and paid 20 Marks for it. Then I went back to Weingartsgreuth and preached the Gospel to a family by the name of Kronester and tracted in this town. In Horbach I stayed over night with Blacksmith Master, Matthaeus Rost and preached the Gospel and gave him tracts also.

On the 27th. I went on to Wagenroth, where I looked up the minister for Genealogy and received some. Then I asked the Minister “What do you think about the Mormons?” He answered, “Well, you teach the Bible also, but the Bible contains many unclear passages, where one without a leader cannot understand what is said and therefore every Sect interprets it differently.” I wanted to give him tracts, but he refused to take them. Then I rode to Schluesselfeld, paid 3 Marks for the Ticket, from here I went to Ashbach and Wasserberndorf, visited on my way Blacksmith Matthaeus Hassler in Heucholheim; then Vogelsfrieden in Aschbach. In Wasserberndorf I lodged with my godmother.

May 28. I went to Wasserberndorf, my birthplace, and I found many changes there, my people and the town itself. Most of the old people are dead and the young ones grew up.

May 29. I visited F. Wendel in the Hutzol mill and the old Ritzau and many other acquaintances.

On the 30th, I went to Langenberg and Abtswind, where I stayed over night by F. Herrmann, visited the Wendel families in Langenberg and was here well received.

On the 31 st of May. I returned and had a long conversation with J. Uhl and also with Mrs. Doctor in Geiselwind.

On June 1st, I went to Fuettersee Kleinbirkach and Grossbirkach, Gg.(Georg) Kleinlein accompanied me. We had great joy as well as all others I met. With Mr. Teacher in Grossbirkach, we stayed a longer time and talked about the Gospel.

On the 2nd and 3rd, I made several visits in Wasserberndorf and preached the Gospel, but had not much success. I gave the teacher of Wasserberndorf tracts and explained the Gospel to him.

 

On June 5. I was in Church in Fuettersee. At noon Gg. Kleinlein visited me and we talked half the day about the Gospel. What kept him interested, June 6, I was in Burghasslach with H. Dekon for Genealogy and visited F. Paul and conversed with him for a long time about the Gospel.

On June 8. I went (by train) with Fritz to Ziegenbach and visited Gg. (Georg) Wendel and there I tried to explain the Gospel.

June 9 and 10. I stayed in Breitbach with Martin Kohles. There I met a man from Altenschoenbach and we talked for a long time about the Gospel. His name is K. Lamprecht and he is a Blacksmith.

On June 14. I went to Kirchrimbach and Taschendorf to get Family Records and in Taschendorf I had a conversation about the Gospel with the Minister for one hour. He don’t believe in a pre-existance. Furthermore, he could not understand how blessings can result in having a big family (many children).

June 17. I went back to Nuremberg.

June 18. We had a nice meeting, Brother Stoof gave a good speech. The branch was re-organized because the Branch President, Brother Strebel is emigrating to America (United States). Two Brethren were ordained in the Aaronic Priesthood. I ordained one of them, Brother Schneider, as a Teacher.

June 25, Today we had a beautiful meeting in the Forest and Sunday School in Erbanstegen. The Branch from Fuerth was present also.

July 6, We had a great Conference July 2nd in Stuttgart, where all the Missionaries from Holland, Swiss, Austria and all Germany were present. We received good instructions and it would be desirable if all the instructions could be followed. About 112 American Missionaries went to Oberammergau (The town for the Famous Passion Play in Germany). Most of the German Missionaries stayed in Stuttgart, probably because of lack of money. I went with Sister Zeter sight-seeing in Stuttgart and I liked it very much. I stayed three days in a Hotel, but it was too expensive; I paid 102 Marks the night. The last two nights I moved to Sister Zeter’s Landlord, which let me stay without any pay. They were real nice people, their name is R. Hald and they live in Strohbergstrasse 36, three stories high in Stuttgart.

July 5. We returned to Nuremberg and had there photographic pictures made.

July 9. Today the Branch Moegeldorf-Hammer was organized and the first meeting was held 3:00 P.M. In Nuremberg at Sunday School the following brethren from Salt Lake City were present: Brothers H. Rueckert, L. Schobert, Gasser and Little. In the evening we had a beautiful meeting in Nuremberg, and I blessed a child of Sister Buchholzer and gave her the name Bertha Edeltrude Buchholzer. In Stuttgart, I met many friends (acquaintances) from Salt Lake City. The first one I met was the son of Brother Curtis. I stayed there in one room with Brother Glissmeyer (Glissmaier) and saw Brother Pitsch and Brother Pohlmann, The first time again, since we departed from each other in Hamburg.

July 13. Today I was at a Catholic funeral. The wife of Mr. H. Popp, a past job-colleague, was buried at the South Cemetary. She was 39 years old.

On July l6th, We had some well attended meetings. . In the after noon at 3:00 P.M. I went from here to Moegeldorf with Mr. Hiltmann and his wife to her sister and brother-in-law whose last name was Fink. While there, we had a long conversation about the Gospel. We had a beautiful time. In the morning I visited M. Huegelschaefer and was invited for Dinner, and had opportunity too to explain the Gospel.

July 27. This morning I went with the Brethren Dinsi, Schmidt, Karl Weiss to Brother Binder to bless him. He has to go to the “Martha Haus” (Hospital) for a nose operation, because of probable cancer.

July 29. Today I went to Fuerth and visited Maria Klein of Holzberndorf. She lives with her daughters, one of them is married and lives in Marien Street 5. She is divorced, but her husband is married again.

July 30. I was laying in bed at night and had a toothache and was thinking about something, when suddenly someone called out loud “Hauner” Mr. Wendel. At once I recognized the voice of Woodworker Uhl from the Hutzelmuehle. I thought at once, why is he coming here. He probably came by train and has no night lodge (a place to stay for the night). At once, I jumped out of bed in my room, went to the window where I called out: “What is the matter?” I got no answer. I leaned out of the window and saw nobody. After a few minutes there came a few pedestrians. I turned on the light and it was 10 minutes before one o’clock in the morning. I layed down again. Now, I can understand when people have so many visions.

August 6. We had Fastmeeting. We had six meetings on Sunday. One before Sunday School, Brother meeting, Priesthood meeting, Fast meeting, and afterwards a short meeting, where a brother by the name of Foerster got excommunicated, who was against the Church and probably asked for his excommunication. Afterwards we visited Sister Ancon who is ill.

August 12. We drove to Munich for a Sunday School Conference and we arrived there at noon. In the evening we had Priesthood Meeting with President Stoof conducting. There was a Brother by the name of Spengler ordered to come, who was accused of adultery and therefore was to be excommunicated. But because he showed remorse and promised to improve and seriously repent, they forgave him.

Sunday, August 13, The Elders fasted for him. We had that Sunday three meetings and returned home in the evening at 9:00 P.M.

August 14th. We visited the Industrial Exhibition and the “Bavaria”.

On the 15th, We viewed Starnberg and Schlossberg. It was really nice there. But when we enjoyed the Observatory the most, did we get surprised by a rainstorm and got quite wet. Afterwards in the evening we returned to Munich. It was very cold on the ship and we did freeze very much.

On the 16th we drove back to Nuremberg and in the evening we had a meeting too. My hostess (or housewife for renting a room) baked a big Goloph (I guess a cake) for our return, that we enjoyed. Besides, there was a letter waiting for me from my Mina with five dollars in it.

On August 19. I went to Reusch to visit my friends there. I had opportunity, a Mrs. Rike Hahn, Stusdamm(?) was in the train who visited her Sister in Reusch. I saw my relatives again after a long time. My brother-in-law Gunder (?’) looks proportional good with his 82 years. With a daughter of my sister-in-law Geissendorfer, who is married to a man named Schumann in Reusch, I stayed over night. From Reusch I went to Ippesheim, where I stayed with M. Herrmann. I visited my old friends and afterwards I went to Gallhofen and Rakenlohr and visited all acquaintances and preached the Gospel to them as good as I could. I didn’t think that there are so many people who had never heard about Mormonism. M. Herrmannn, Gg. Serbi and two girls from my brother-in-law were interested about the Gospel.

On August 25th I went back to Nuremberg. In Ippesheim I registered for my stay.

On August 30th. I was in Fuerth with Brother Habermann where I was invited for dinner. In the evening we had a Bible hour (meeting) here in Nuremberg and from here we went to Sister Baer, who doesn’t feel good, and administered to her. She has a baby. Today, September 1. Gg. Friedrich Kohles was buried. He died August 30.

September 3rd We had 5 meetings. The evening meeting was well attended by friends. In the fast meeting Brother Piclo and myself blessed the child of Sister Baer and it received the name Dorothea Baer. We had a very good time there.

September 12th. Today I have to report a great joy. I received from my good wife a package. In it was: 6 cans of milk, sugar, one box crackers, candy, one dollar and 50 cents, a beautiful shirt, and a tie, I was very happy about it and also happy, Sister Fetzer let me know, she will send a full basket of clothing for our children at Christmas celebration, God helps all the time again.

Today the 23rd of September, we buried in Fuerth, Brother Ernsberger’s sister, Mrs. Beck. She wanted to be baptized, but got ill and died without being baptized. Brother Hans Schmidt and Brother Hofmann were the speakers at the grave and I dedicated the grave. The choir sang two songs.

September 25th. We rode to Frankfurt, where a Missionary Meeting was held, President Balif and President Stoof and all the Missionaries of Frankfurt were present.

On September 26. We had a meeting from 2:00 P.M. until 6:l5 P.M. and received good instructions and admonitions from the Presidents. In the evening 7:30 was a big meeting for members and friends which was very well attended.

On September 27. I stayed with Brother and Sister Gg. Schloer, Franken Allee 59. Here they Congratulated me on my Birthday. I received delicious pastry and Dinner.

On the 25th, I stayed over night with the family Wolfermann, Spahr Street 33- Besides I visited Elise Walz, who is married to a certain Mr. Wuenschbach, a Jew, and lives in Finkenhof Street 28. We had good weather and a pleasant time.

On the 28th. In the evening we rode back to Nuremberg again. By Gemuenden happened a big Train Accident and we saw many smashed train wagon (cars) and freight railroad wagon and had a delay of some hours till the rail road was cleared and we could pass. President Stoof rode with us to Nuremberg.

On September 29th. I visited together with Brother Stoof, some of my investigator families, which will get baptized in the near future.

On September 30. We had early in the morning 8:30 A.M. a small Missionary meeting with Brother and Sister Hofmann, KoernerStreet, where I was asked to ordain Brother E. Otto Holstein an Elder.

October 1. Was Fast meeting. We had five meetings. Brother Stoof was in Fuerth in the morning, and in the afternoon in Nuremberg, where he was present in the Priesthood meeting and Sacrament meeting. After the meeting, two brothers got ordained. Brother F. Georg Leupold became a Priest and Brother Bayerlein a Teacher. I ordained Brother Leupold and Brother Bayerlein was ordained by Brother Holstein.

On September 30th, we celebrated my Birthday with my landlord Hefner. They had baked and cooked a lot of food. Brother Stoof, myself, and my landlord’s family had a good time.

On October 3rd We had here in Nuremberg 18 Baptisms. They were performed in “Wild-Swimming pool”. Ten friends from Fuerth which were baptized by Brother Otterson and eight friends were from Nuremberg: Marie Walter Regina Schneider Babetta Walter Grethe Walter Elise Walter Elise Anna Walter Babatta Maria Zader Anna Katharina Eysser which I baptized I confirmed Marie Walter and Elise Anna Walter. We had a very good blessed time and many friends and members were present. And I am very grateful to my Heavenly Father for the great mercy I received that I may work in His Gospel.

October 4th was my 20th anniversary of my baptism and I was in Fuerth where I was baptized 20 years ago. Brother Habermann invited me and we had a good time together. In the Evening I went to the Bible Hour in Fuerth and I liked it very much.

October 5 I received a big package from my Anna which gave me great joy. Everything are Blessings of the Lord.

October 16. We had Relief Society, Two sisters were urged to come, Sister Amon and Sister Seykauf. Sister Amon claimed that Sister Seykauf did steal about 600 Mark from her. She surprised her when Sister Seykauf was busy with her purse. But Sister Seykauf denied it and threatened to leave the Church. Her excommunication was granted.

November 1. President Stoof was the Brethren and afterwards 7:15 a main meeting (like Sacrament Meeting). There were three branches, Nuremberg, West-Moegeldorf and Fuerth were present. Prosident Stoof gave us once more some good instructions and mentioned afterwards that this is his last meeting as Presiding Conference President because he will soon be released. Afterwards all the missionaries gave a speech, Brother Gardner spoke as successor of Brother Stoof, then Wendel, Brother Otteson, Brother Bigolow, then the three Branch Presidents, Holstein, Hofmann, and Weiss. After the meeting four Brethren from the Moegeldorfer Branch were ordained as Deacons. Brother Kuefner, Weiss, Loscher and Strecker. Brother Schwemmer from Nueremberg was ordained also. The Hefner family were present too, as friends.

November 4. Missionary meeting at Brother and Sister Hofmann.

November 6. Missionary meeting with Brother Hofmann

8, 11, and 15.

November 20 and 21. In Munich my Passport was extended.

On December 23. my Mina and Otto arrived here in Nuremberg.

Sunday the 24th, we had a Christmas celebration for the children in the Buchenstrasse 90. On the 25th, we went to Dinner at Brother Habermann in Fuerth,

On the 26th, we went to the Christmas celebration in the Tulnau Hall. It was everywhere real nice.

On December 27th, we both went to Stuttgart where a Missionary Conference was held. We stayed with Brother Mueller over night and also with the Hald family, who are good people.

On December 30th in the evening my Mina went by train to Meissen.

JANUARY 1923 On the 13th, 14th, and 15th. Conference in Frankfurt. Saturday Priesthood meeting from 7:00 until 9:30 (probably evening). Sunday, Sunday School from l0:00 until 12:00. Afternoon from 2:00 P.M. until 4:00 P.M. Meeting. Evening from 8:00 P.M. until l0:00 P.M. Meeting on Monday from 9:00 A.M. until 11:30 A.M. Missionary Meeting, then from 2:30 P.M. until 7:00 P.M. another Missionary Meeting.

On the l6th. at noon we went back home by train.

On the 23rd, Bible Hour in Hammer with Brother Schobert, with Heinrich Weis we ate and had Bible hour.

On January 28, I went to Meissen. My Mina was a little ill with influenza but she recovered again. In Meissen we were invited on the 29th by several friends; Zinka, Backer, Koehler.

On January 30, we went by train to Freiberg, passing through Dresden, and visited Hugo Mauermann’s relatives. We found there much poverty.

On the 31st, we went to Chemnitz and visited there the relatives. In the evening we attended Bible Hour, which was well attended and we liked it very much.

On February 1, I went back to Nuremberg and by train I passed through Hof and Bayreuth and arrived in Nuremberg at night 1:00 A.M. Mina went back to Meissen. I had some difficulties with my train ride. The Conductor said to me I should transfer in Hof, but I went naturally in good moods till Pirk. There a Conductor said to me, I should have transferred in Plauen. Then I rode two Stations back to Plauen and had to pay fair once more. From Plauen I went to Hof where I transferred again, came through Bayreuth to Nuremberg. The Railroad Company had several Trains restricted and also the Express train, because of occupation of the Ruhr Area by France, the coal is quite limited.

On February 6, I went to Ippesheim where I was expected by my relatives and was well received. I stayed over night with Karl Almoslechner, and the second night with his sister Wiesen. The Mayor by name of Doeller went with me to the City Hall in Uffenheim, where the District Official read to me, that a new law is effective since January 11, 1923. All Foreigners in the City or County have to be treated equal and a three week’s stay permit will be 35,000 Mark, more than three weeks till two months will cost 70,000 Mark. I induced my leave.

On the 12th of February, I received a letter from Anna, she informed me about a prescription for Gallstones.

On the I5th of February. I went early in the morning to Wuerzburg and from Sanitaetsrat Dr. Sprins, I received the prescription. I sent it to the drug store (Schwanenapotheke) to Steinbuehl with a letter and was able to receive the medicine. The medicine expenses were 750 Mark, the Doctor expenses were 3,000 Mark and the train expense was 1,680 Mark.

On February 16, we went to Berlin by train. There was a great conference. Apostle (David 0.) McKay was present. From the German Mission there were 207 Elders present.

We had on February 17th a Missionary Meeting from 9:00 o’clock A.M. until 5:00 o’clock P.M., Everyone was called on to speak.

On Sunday, February 18, we had meetings, Sunday School at 10:00 A.M. and so on! Saturday we had another evening meeting from 7:30 until 9:30 P.M. Sunday afternoon there was a general meeting from 2:30 until 6:00 and in the evening from 7:00 until 9:00 P.M. another meeting was held.

(NOTE: At the time of the typing of the mission diary of Johann (John) Wendel by Pearl Wendel in July 1978, it was revealed that Otto had been living in Preston, Idaho at the time Grandpa, John Wendel, received a Mission Call while living in Sugar House with Elder LeGrande Richards as his Bishop. Otto moved down to stay with Mina (Grandpa’s Second wife and Otto’s mother). In November 1922, Bishop LeGrande Richards then had a call for Otto to go to Germany on a Mission. Otto informed him that he had come to take care of his mother while her husband filled a mission. Bishop Richards just suggested that he take Mina with him. Even though it did take them a little longer to get ready, Otto did accept his mission call and his mother went with him. Part of her time was then spent with Grandpa in visiting various places, relatives and conferences. The remainder of her time was spent in Meissen visiting her sister and other relatives.)

MISSION JOURNAL CONTINUED: My wife was present, she came alone from Meissen, also our son Otto was here, he works in Stettin. We had dinner in a restaurant Sunday together with Brother Kraemer, Brother Hirschmann from Wien and Brother Mauermann. In the evening I lodged in a Hotel with my wife and several Brothers. Most of the brethren lodged in the hotel.

On Monday, my wife and I went to Lauchhammer where we stayed over night with brother-in-law Kamprathen, and were welcomed very friendly there. I saw here big manufacturers and a Priket (brown coal) factory. The brown coal is laying openly and maybe only 3 feet deep is cleared and then the coal is ready for processing; it gets ground up and then is pressed into the form of a Priket (which is about 12 inches long, 4 inches wide and about 6 inches high).

On February 20th, we went by train to Meissen, where my wife stayed with her sister.

February 22, I went by train back to Nuremberg again and arrived here safely in the morning at 9:00 o’clock. All expenses must have been about 70,000 Mark, February 24. I registered my stay in Nuremberg for three months and had to pay a fee of 210,100 Mark. They told me that I couldn’t do any more Mission Work. Today.

March 8th, the 3 month old daughter of the Kail family, living in Zirkelschmiedsgasse was buried. The father of the child is a member of the church, but the baby was not blessed by our Church. Our choir sang 2 songs, Brother Waldhaus gave a speech and I dedicated the grave.

Friday, March 9. Brother Schoberth, Brother Waldhaus and myself were invited to a wedding by Brother and Sister Hofmann. The son, Hans Hofmann married Sister Olga Kail, There were about 30 persons present, good dinner, music and dance and we had a good time.

March 13 Brother Schobert is ill. I conducted the Bible Hour in the home of Brother and Sister Adelmann.

On March 17 we had a celebration and Bazaar in Relief Society (I guess a Birthday Party of the Relief Society organized in 1842). It was held in the Bucherstrasse. There were several members from Fuerth and many friends present. It was pretty well attended. We had a good time. Many handmade items were displayed which the Relief Society had made and were selling. The proceeds were more than 97,000 Mark. Besides a good program was also presented.

On March 19. we had missionary conference in Stuttgart. Brothers Schobert, Waldhaus, Otterson and Brother Barri from Fuerth and myself went by train 8:30 from here and arrived in Stuttgart 1:00 P.M. We went right away to the meeting house. There we got a meal, afterwards was meeting held until 6:00 P.M. Then we went back to the Railroad Station, but we were too late. I went back to the meeting house and the Brethren Hamon and Braun went with me to Sister Christina Scholl, Schloss Strasse 57 first floor. I was welcomed here and stayed over night. In the morning at 6:30 we went by train.

On March 26, Brother Schoberth, Brother Otterson and myself administered to a friend by the name of Wilhelmine Carl, rossweidenmuehl No.31 Room 19, who has been ill for ten years already and cannot do anything and presumably was possessed by spirits.

On March 27. my Mina arrived from Meissen and March 28. we went by train to Wasserberndorf. We stayed here until the 2nd of April and then returned to Nuremberg. We received one round loaf of bread from G. Senft and sausage and eggs, which we shared with Hefners. April 7. I didn’t sleep very good last night, woke up at 2:00 o’clock in the morning. I ate in the evening one bowl of soup and two soft boiled eggs.

On April 14. I moved from my lodging people Hefner, Peter Henleiri Strasse 25 to Brother and Sister Hofmann, Koernerstrasse 58, third floor, I hope I can stay here until I go back. (To Utah.)

On April .15. We had a beautiful meeting in “Goldenen Schwan” ( a room in a Restaurant). The Sunday School got re-organized. Brother Huinrich Weiss as Superintendent was set apart by Brother Schobert. Brother Johann Leipold as first counselor was set apart by me, and Brother Willeithner as second counselor was set apart by Carl Weiss.

April 24. One day missionary meeting in Stuttgart.

May 10th. Mother and I went to Eichstaedt to visit Mrs. Fetzer, Friedhofstrasse 54. We were welcomed very well. Eichstaedt is a city with 3,000 Population, the majority is Catholic, and is surrounded by mountains. We visited several churches to look at, and in the Walburga, Church there is an Alter, the bones of the corpse of the holy Walburga rested in a tomb like place covered with stone plates. I was told, nobody could enter the tomblike place. The stone plates develop a moisture (caused from heat in the tomb) which they catch in containers and is used as holy Walburga oil. It is said the oil has a great healing power. There are many pictures which indicate the great healing power in miracles.

Today, May 12, Mother went to Kaubenheim.

May 19. We both went by train to Windsheim. In Neustadt, we had five hours delay, and we reached Windsheim at 10:00 o’clock. We stayed in Windsheim over night and had a good lodging for 2,800 Mark.

Penecost Sunday, we went to Buchhoim, Monday to Rudolshofen, where we were welcomed.

Tuesday we left by train from Ermetzhofen where Georg Streckfuss accompanied us to Hernbergtheim, from there we went to Ippesheim and we were made welcome by Wiessner, Herrmann and Almoslechner.

On May 23 we went back again to Nuremberg.

On May 24 in the evening 8:OO o’clock, we had baptisms in Wildbad. The following people were baptized: Georg Walther, Simon Genthner, Miss Seiferth, Luise Seiferth, Miss Haeberlein, Mrs. Genthner and Mrs. Grauf. Brother Schoborth executed the baptisms and I blessed the baptismal water. I confirmed Brother Genther and Sister Luise Seiferth, Brother Schoberth confirmed Brother Walther and Sister Haeberlcin, Brother Sinsul confirmed Sister_____________ Brother Kufner confirmed Sister______________ May 28. I went to Wasserberndorf and registered there, made several visits in town and attended a war monument dedication in the Churchyard of Hohn in Berg for the dead soldiers from 1914 until 1918.

June 3. We had Fast meeting, from 8:30 in the morning until 4:00 P.M. we had meetings. Brother Binder got ordained a Priest by J.W. Me.

On June 4. I went to Munich and had my Passport extended for six months. I had no good time there, it rained all the time. I visited the Hofkirche (famous Church in Munich), the Hofbrauhaus, the Art Museum and several other places.

June 9 until June 12. Conference in Stuttgart. I stayed with a Hald family, StrohbergStrasse 36, third floor, where I was made very welcome. I had a good bed and very good meals. Sunday morning I went on a walk with Mr. Hald. Tuesday, he accompanied me to the railroad station. Sunday, we had Sunday School, Priesthood meeting and in the evening Sacrament Meeting. Monday, we had from 9:00 A.M. until 1:00 P.M. and from 3:00 P.M. until 5:00 P.M. Missionary meetings.

Tuesday at noon, I arrived again in Nuremberg. With Brother Schoberth, I made some visits and in the evening we went to Hammer, where we had a small cottage meeting with the Weiss Family. Wednesday and Thursday, I didn’t feel very good and stayed in bed.

Friday, the 15th of June, I got up again and made several visits with Mina. The weather is always very cold and rainy.

June 21. I am ill and Minna is sick too, she has a rash on her face for eight days already, July 1st.

Fast meeting, Sunday School in the forest near Klettschen Fabrik. Brother Otto Baer was ordained a Deacon by me in the Bucherstrasse, July 1, 1923.

On July 9. Sister Haeberlein was set apart a teacher in the children’s class by me in the “Goldenen Schwan” (Resturant).

On July 25. Mina and I visited Brother Habermann in Fuerth. Afterwards, we went to the Klein family, where we had a good time. In the evening, we visited Brother and Sister Schneider and then we went to the Bible Hour where I received my release from Brother Erdil.

On the 27th. I visited with my Minna and several friends in Johan’s ——-. In the evening 5:00 o’clock, we went by train to Roethenbach, where we had a Bible hour (cottage meeting) with the Hahn Family. Brother Schugk gave the lesson. It was the third time I was in Roethenbach for the Bible hour. When we returned home at 9:00 o’clock in the evening, Brother Hofmann and myself went to Fuerth where we administered to Brother and Sister Plesol’s two children age one and one-fourth, and three years old. They were very ill. One o’clock in the morning we returned back home.

On July 31, We had 16 baptisms in the “Wildbad”. I baptized seven persons and Brother Schoberth baptized nine persons: M. Wilhelm Baer from Roethenbach Babetha Geist From Roethenbach Konrad Geist from Roethenbach Hahn from Roethenbach Frieda Naehr from Nuremberg Michael Oberseider from Nuremberg Margaretha Weis from Nuremberg Those are the persons I baptized. Anna Geist from Roethenbach Kunigunda Geist from Roethenbach Walburga Hahn from Roethenbach M. Margaretha Hofmann from Nuremberg Johanna Gak from Nuremberg Cristonsia Gak from Nuremberg V. Franz Stiller from Nuremberg Helena A. Stiller from Nuremberg Those are the persons Brother Schoberth baptized. *Angela Stiller from Nuremberg Page 46 was left blank.

On August 1, Our Otto came to visit us from Landsborg and we went to Fuerth to Brother Habermann’s home and had dinner at noon.

August 2. We visited the Naehr family, afterwards we visited Otto. Brothers Schoberth, Kanfild and myself then viewed the Klettsche Fabric (Plant).

August 3. We, Minna, Otto and I went to Streitberg and Muggendorf, where in Streitberg, we visited the Bing-Cave. The cave is 396 meters long and 70 meters under ground level and very interesting, because of its drop formations.

On August 12, We had a meeting in Erlenstegen in the forest and there we took a branch photograph.

Last Friday, we had a Farewell meeting for me and for Brother Schoberth, who went then to Breslau as Conference-President. August 19. I received word from Leonard, he paid for the (Schips ticket) Ship’s ticket, American Line, for Mother and F. Naehr.

(NOTE by Pearl Wendel: The Frieda Naehr who came home with Grandpa and Grandma Wendel was a niece to Frieda Johanna Neuner, who was the wife of Leonhardt (Leonard) Michael Wendel, the oldest son of Grandpa John Wendel.)

August 24. was farewell for Brother Dotzler, who received a Mission Call. August 28. We had in Nuremberg, a wonderful conference. The mission President, Brother Tadge was here and Brother Hueckert, from Fuerth, who is now released, was the first speaker, followed by Brother Erdli, Conference-President, and Brother Tadge was the last speaker. Brother Mueller conducted the meeting. There were more than 300 persons present. A great part of the attendance were investigators (friends). On August 27. Conference was in Fuerth. There were 400 persons present.

On August 29 We went with Frieda Naehr to Munich, American Embassy (Consulate) to obtain a Visa for Frieda. We have no idea yet, when we can leave here.

Today, September 1, I received a letter from Brother Schoberth from Breslau. September 1, 1923. There were seven Baptisms in Fuerth, but I could not attend,

On September 2, I was with my Mina in Fuerth, attending Fast meeting and afterwards visited Sister Igelhaud and the families of Klein and Goissler.

On September 14. Brother Canfild, Brother Cunningham and myself administered to Sister Leupold. She has (Ischias) like Arthritis, and is in great pain.

On September 15. We arrived by the Hefners and had a good dinner and supper.

On September 16, I blessed the oil in Sunday School (consecrated the oil). After Sacrament Meeting, Brother Canfild, Brother Sus, Brother Mueller and myself blessed the child of Brother and Sister Baer, which was born August 30, 1923, and gave it the name of Otto. I administered the blessing.

On September 17 at 9:00 o’clock in the morning, my Minna went by train to Meissen to say “Good bye” to her relatives.

On September 18. I went by train to Neustadt and visited there an old friend by the name of Vogel (Liessweth) (I guess Liessbeth), whom I hadn’t seen for about 33 years. Then I went by train to Windsheim and then to Buchheim, where I stayed for three days by Georg Streckfuss. They gave me a warm welcome. From here, I went by train, with Johan to Ermetzhofen and visited Mrs.______ Donner, who told me all about her suffering, but she was happy to see me. She went with me to Rudolshofen, where we visited my Brother-in-law Streckfuss. But I was not welcome here. The old ones and the young ones had a quarrel and Brother-in-law H. Georg said it would be the best for us to leave at once, because he cannot accommodate me, and the young ones would look upon me like a pig in a Jew court yard. It was raining real hard at this time, and so I stayed until the rain got less; and then I left without shaking the hands of the young ones. In the night I reached Uffenheim and went to the Busch family. His wife is a twin sister to Reuscher Gundel. They gave me a warm welcome and they were happy I visited them. Here I stayed overnight and in the morning I went to Gallhofen and I visited first the Serbin family. They were just butchering a pig. I didn’t go in the house, said “Good bye”, and went to the Herbst Family, who married the youngest daughter of Gundel. But they had not much time for me. Then I went away and walked in the Street. It was raining a lot and I opened up my umbrella and walked without turning around. It was one and one-half hours until I reached Oberruekelsheim. I had to turn around and walk half way back. After half an hour’s walk on a very dirty road I reached Herrnbergtheim and then to Ippesheim, where in the evening I reached cousin Wiessnar, very tired and stayed overnight. They gave me a very warm welcome. I stayed here until September 25th. There was an American visiting with his wife, who came from Wienna (Vienna). They visited his parents. We had a good conversation together.

On Sunday, he traveled back home to New York. Sunday I attended a funeral and Tuesday I went to Reusch and visited Brother-in-law Gundel. Here I met a son of the Busch Family, who is enrolled in the Technical College in Nuremberg. Then I went to W. Geissendorfer and her daughter, who is married to a certain________________ in Reusch. Then I went back to Ippesheim and from there bo Herrnbergtheim. From here I went back home by train to Nuremberg, and arrived in the evening at 8:00 o’clock.

On September 27, My Birthday, I was invited at noon by the Hefners and in the evening for Dinner by Brother and Sister Schneider. Later on at 9:00 o’clock in the evening came all the choir members and youth and gave a serenade of three songs “Befehl Du Deine Wege” – “Trust Your Ways In The Lord” “Du Was Ist Recht” – “Do What Is Right” and “Nocheinmal Will Ich Singen” – “Once More I Will Sing”. It made me very happy.

October 4, 1923. My Minna came back from Meissen.

On Friday, we went by train to Helmmitzheim and from there to Ziegenbach to Georg Wendel. They gave us a warm welcome and we stayed over night. The other day, Saturday, we went to Wasserberndorf. We arrived there in the evening. I gave notice of my leaving at the Registrar, and we visited several friends and stayed over night with the Rodammer’s. Next day at noon we went back to Nuremberg again by train.

On October 9, We left Nuremberg by train at 2:30 P.M. Anna Herold helped us carrying our small luggage to the Railroad Station. The Elders and several members and Sister Naehr accompanied us to the platform. There they wanted to give me a helping hand, but I refused. We rode then all night thru and arrived in Hamburg in the morning. There we came to the emigration building and stayed in one room with other people like a herd of sheep. One after another got called out and the emigration papers brought in order. Our turn was finally at 4:00 P. M. The other day we got vaccinated and that lasted almost all the day long because all the passengers for three ships were all together.

On the 12 of October, we all had a physical examination by an American Doctor. It lasted until noon. In the afternoon, we went into town for a little while. There are three mealtimes: at 8:00 A.M., 12:00 Noon, and 5:00 P.M. The food is good and enough of it. But the quarters I cannot praise. In our hall are forty-eight beds. The beds are very hard and cold. Men and women are separated and also the different races. With me, there are only Germans. There are four halls in those quarters. The Poles and the Jews are by themselves.

October 13. We all had to gather and then we received our Passports. Afterwards several formalities were settled and 12:00 o’clock, after we received a good bread and a piece of sausage from the barracks, we entered the ship. The bigger luggage was transported, the small ones we had to carry. From this ship, we all were transported to a Hall, where again, we got treated like a herd of sheep. Here again, several formalities were settled. Then, we were transferred again to another ship, which took us, after showing our papers, to the huge ship “Bayern”, which was pretty far away in the ocean. Here one had to show the passport to a German Officer, who put a seal on, and then one was allowed to enter the ship. We had difficulties. When our turn came, the officer put our Passports aside and said, we have to wait, probably to wait for the next ship, because we have not paid the consumption tax. Mina got real mad and scolded the Officer. The Officer said cold-hearted, “What will you do when I don’t let you go? It is the Americans fault that we have a bad life.” She gave him a Dollar and after the Captain from the ship came, we paid the consumption tax 240,000,000 Million Mark, he let us go. When we were on the Ship and got our cabin, the dining room, served coffey and cake. I have cabin No. 100 and Mina and Frieda have No. 58. In my cabin, there are 14 beds, and in Minna’s are 4 beds. In the evening was served goulash, potatoes, Tea, bread and butter. After the meal we had a concert. The mealtimes are arranged in three, one after another following divisions. We three are in the first division, at table No. 1 in front at the first chair.

October 14. Morning. Today is Sunday. The morning is quite calm, some fine rain, but the sun is always shining again. It is a little windy. In the morning was served fried eggs, bread, butter, coffee and rolls. Many people are sea sick and have to feed the fish. Some had to get up during the night to go on Deck, even one man from my cabin, who is from Nuremberg ______________________(probably space for his name). We feel so far, pretty good. Only I think a lot back on Nuremberg. At 10:00 o’clock I went to bed, as I was tired. At Noon we had noodles, red cabbage, Roast with sauce and coffee. In the afternoon it was raining quite a bit. We were mostly alone in the room. We were together with a man from Saxony, Leipzig, by the name of _________________________he is 56 years old. In the evening they served Potato salad, sausage, and meat balls, Tea and butter and bread.

October 15 Today, I slept very well, got up in the morning at 6:45 A.M. It is a beautiful morning. We went at once to the Deck. It is a little windy, but otherwise nice. The sun was a little hidden in the clouds when he came up, but then at once, it was a clear morning. Just now, we passed England and could see very close the English white coastline, like white rock. With the telescope, we could see English Towns and many fishing boats. For breakfast we had Coffee, Rolls, Hash (like fried cornbeef) delicate pickels and bread. It is a beautiful day today. The ocean seems so calm and the sun is shining so warm. Everybody Is on deck today. At noon we had pea soup, potatoes, lamb roast, sauce, green beans mixed with white beans, coffee and cake, bread and butter. After the meal, we saw at the English Coast seven English battleships maneuvering. Oh it is beautiful. Now I think of all those beloved ones we left behind in Germany, could they not be with us now? But it had to be farewell. At Noon, I had a conversation with a man from my cabin. He is from Berlin. He don’t think much about Religion, but was quite interested in the Gospel and wants to hear more about it.

October 16. Today I saw a Sunset. It was a bright sky and splendid to see how the sun disappeared in the water (Ocean). He went down European time 6:20 until 6:25 P.M. Our supper was fried or baked fish, potato salad, Sausage, bread, butter and Tea. In the evening, 9:00 P.M. I went to bed.

October l6.(?) The morning is beautiful. The Ocean is smooth like a mirror. I feel good, Breakfast Coffee, Rolls, Meatballs, butter and bread, Potatoes, and Schelle?

(NOTE by typist Pearl Wendel: page 25 under the date of October 16th where he is giving the breakfast menu, we now think the last food mentioned was “jelly”. However, if that is what he meant he misspelled it.)

Noon meal at l:00 P.M. Hamburg, Germany time: Potatoes boiled, beefbreast with Kohlrabi (German vegetable) cut in little squares, soup and coffee. The afternoon is a little windy. Now we are a short distance out of the Channel (between England and France). The time difference is one hour and 10 minutes. Evening meal: Potatoes, white cabbage, beef meat, bread, butter, cheese and tea. The Ocean is a little restless. The sunset was very beautiful from 7:50 until 7:55 P.M. Hamburg time.

October 17. This morning is very gloomy weather. The Ocean is still pretty calm. Breakfast: Rice, Macaroni with meat, coffee, bread with butter, I feel quite good. At noon: bread, peas, mash with meat, coffee, rolls, butter, meatsauce, potatoes, and pudding. Evening: Potatoes with beefbreast, sauce, coffee, bread, butter and pudding.

October 18. In the morning, I slept well, feel good, the weather is a little stormy and some rain. Breakfast: eggs fried with potatoes, coffee, bread, butter, and wek? The weather is very windy. The water splashed to the Deck. Noon Meal: Soup, potatoes, white cabbage, beefmeat, sauce, butter, bread, coffee, and cake. Afternoon sleep. The wind is pretty strong and the water always uplashes over the rail. Evening Meal: Ricemash with meat, frank furter Liverwurst, bread, butter, tea. I have not a good appetite.

October 19, slept good. The weather is gloomy and unfriendly. Breakfast: fried meat, potatoes, rolls, butter, I didn’t eat much. Noon Meal: Vegetable soup with sausage, potatoes, fish marinated with sauce, coffee and pudding. The weather is windy.

October 20. The weather is windy and gloomy. I layed down all day long. I have a temperature from my vaccination, evening meal: I ate herring (fish) and potatoes and went right after in bed again. Pain at the bladder.

October 21. In the morning the weather was rainy, later on it cleared up. Breakfast: fried eggs, coffee. Noon Meal: noodles with chicken soup, boiled chicken with sauce, rice, sweet rolls and coffee. At Evening Meal: Potatoes with sauce, Livercheese sausage, butter, coffee and bread. Afterwards there was a program in the Dining Hall, it was decorated. Several plays and productions were presented. I went to the Doctor, too. He bandaged my arm which is inflamed. I have pain.

October 22. I got up early and feel a little better. The weather is rainy and gloomy. In the night the Foghorn made noise every few minutes. Breakfast: mashed potatoes with cornbeef, pickles, coffee, rolls, butter, and one apple. Mina is not feeling well. Noon Meal: Potatoes, beef stew-roast, beets, sauce, noodles with vanilla and Coffee. The Ocean is wonderfully calm, but the fog is all around us. The foghorns shake the air uninterrupted. Mina is not feeling well. Evening mealt Rice, sauce, canned meat, tea, bread, and butter.

October 23. In the morning rainy. The Ocean is calm, the fog is decreasing. Mina is still sick . The Doctor gave her some medicine. My appetite is not big, but I feel good. Breakfast: Meatballs with sauce, coffee, bread, butter and raisins, Noon Meal: red cabbage with porkmeat, potatoes, sauce, and Coffee. Today I took up a collection for the Steward, but didn’t got very much, Mina is up again.

October 24. It is Mina’s Birthday, She feels a little bettor. Breakfast: Porkchops, one Apple, Coffee, rolls, butter, and jelly. After the meal we were all counted. Then we went on Deck, It is beautiful weather. The sun is shining warm and the Ocean is beautiful, beautiful mirrored in the sunlight. We stayed mostly on Deck. Supper: Soup with Livermeatballs, Sausage, Rolls, butter, and pudding with vanilla. Afterwards, we went once more on Deck. It was a beautiful warm and bright night.

October 25. In the morning 6:00 o’clock a tidal wave. One big wave came through our open port hole and flooded our cabin completely. It is raining and we have fog. Breakfast: coffee, two eggs, one apple, rolls, and butter. I have no appetite. Mina did not come for breakfast, she is in bed, I dreamed today about last Dec. 29 and 30th and about 2 Saturday and Sunday of February.

(It is a little confusing as to whether he meant two Saturdays and Sundays in February, or whether he meant the 2nd Saturday and Sunday of February. At the time of typing this I do not have that part of the diary here to look up and see if some outstanding things happened then.)

October 26, I got up this morning at 5:00 o’clock. At 5:30 Coffee, and then I went to the Deck. When the sun came up, we could already see land. It is a glorious morning. The sun came out of the Ocean in blue-red color. After awhile, we could see many ships. About 7:00 o’clock the Pilot ship picked us up and the German flag was taken down. The American flag and the Mail Flag were put up. Afterwards, another boat came and picked up the mail, and the mail flag was taken down again. Then another little boat came with the Doctor on it. Now, once more, there was a physical examination. Men and women had to disrobe separately and walk in front of the Doctor. When I noticed that this procedure was not done thoroughly, I didn’t follow it. There is a lot to see all around us. The ship is standing still at this time. It is 9:00 o’clock in the morning, American time and 3:00 o’clock P.M. Nuremberg time. At noon, we had once more a meal on the ship, then the amusement started. First, the people from second class could leave the ship, after them all American citizens. We had to go to the Custom hall and go through all the struggle, because Frieda was with us. We were once more counted and had to go from one room to the other again, then back to the ship where all the luggage was and then we went to the Island. Here, we came to a big building where we had to run up and down stairways. Each time we were sent from one place to another. All the time, there were three or four men, who looked at us and searched through our belongings, and with everyone we had to show different papers (like ship release papers, emigration papers). One had to follow the correct procedures. But we could not leave before we got another certificate, because we had no ticket for further traveling. We had to go back to New York, to the American Express Company and get our money. And so, we were sent from one place to the other, until we had permission to travel to New York. We went with several “suffernden” companions back, and there we ended up in a big hall. Afterward, we went with three other people to a Hotel, where a bellhop showed us the way. We had to climb stairs again to the elevated railway. Soon we could not drag our luggage anymore. After we rode a distance, we had to travel by foot again to the hotel, “The New Hotel Keller” 385 West Street, New York City. We had a pretty good place with a comfortable bed, which was pleasant after all those exhaustions. We paid five Dollars for three persons without meals.

On October 27. In the morning, I called President Roberts and Brother Ina was at the telephone. They sent a Missionary by the name of Carl B. Wever, 2825 Lincoln Ave., Ogden, who brought my ticket and our money, 200 Dollars, which was paid by the American Express Company. He helped us to get the two tickets for Mina, and Frieda. It cost $171.54 from New York City to Salt Lake City. We then went back once more to look after our basket luggage to get them to the railroad. Afterwards, we went again to the hotel and paid our bill and to eat something. Then we crossed the Street and entered a ship and went directly to the railroad Station. We did not have much time and left by train at 2:30 P.M. We had beautiful weather.

October 28. Sunday, we arrived in Chicago at 6:00 o’clock P.M. and held a delay until midnight 12:00 o’clock. In a Restaurant, we strengthened us a little, and the rest of the time we stayed in the Railroad Station. It is the most beautiful Railroad Station, I have ever seen.

October 29. Early in the morning (just past midnight) at 12:15 A, M. we left Chicago and arrived in Omaha (Nebraska) in the evening at 4:30 P.M. We had here a delay of 45 minutes. We had beautiful weather until we reached Council Bluff, then it started to snow violently. Now the train wagon (cars) starts to be shaky, so much so, that I can not write anymore, besides the ink is all gone, too.

October 30. The sun got up really beautiful and bright and it is a sunny day. We came to Juliusburg. There is a little snow cover and it is very cold. Even though the sun is shining so warmly, icicles and snow are hanging on the train wagon. By 11:00 o’clock A.M. we reached Cheyenne, (Wyoming). Here, we had a delay until 2:25 P.M. We went sight-seeing at the Capitol and the Museum. We saw here much Indian-war-equipment and works. Also several German war-equipment from 1870 and from World War I from 1914 until 1918. Afterwards, we got some food.

October 31 We arrived in Salt Lake City at 8:00 o’clock in the morning. Anna came with Loni to the Railroad Station and picked us up with the car. We went first to Fetters, where Leonard took Frieda home by car. Afterwards Loni drove us and Anna to her place, where we had a good meal. After that we went to Frieda, (probably Frieda Greaves— Mina’s daughter) then to Klara, then home to our paradise.

END OF MISSION FINAL NOTE by typist Pearl Wendel: A call made to Otto Andra — At the time of the typing of this diary by Pearl Wendel in July 1978, it was revealed that Otto had been living in Preston, Idaho at the time Grandpa, John Wendel, received a Mission Call while living in Sugar House with Elder LeGrande Richards as his Bishop. Otto moved down to stay with Mina (Grandpa’s Second wife and Otto’s mother). In November 1922, Bishop LeGrande Richards then had a call for Otto to go to Germany on a Mission. Otto informed him and he had come to take care of his mother while her husband filled a mission. Bishop Richards just suggested that he take Mina with him. Even though it did take them a little longer to get ready, Otto did accept his mission call and his mother went with him. Part of her time was then spent with Grandpa in visiting various places, relatives and conferences. The remainder of her time was spent in Meissen visiting her sister and other relatives. The Frieda Naehr who came home with Grandpa and Grandma Wendel was a niece to Frieda Johanna Neuner, who was the wife of Leonhardt (Leonard) Michael Wendel, the oldest son of Grandpa John Wendel.

John Nuffer

John and Louisa Nuffer Family

Back l-r: Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman; Middle l-r: Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes; Front l-r: Karl, Athene Nuffer

Here is a copy of the autobiography of John Nuffer, brother to siblings Regina Wanner (my great great Grandmother) and Charles August Nuffer.

“I was born December 4, 1862 at Neuffen, Wuerttemberg, Germany, the eldest son of [John] Christopher and Agnes Barbara Spring Nuffer. After attending the common grade schools for eight years I was confirmed in the Lutheran Church, at age of thirteen years.

“I was apprenticed to an architect builder in the building trade in the city of Stuttgart where I labored with the stone cutters and masons six months in the summer time, and attended the Architectural college the six remaining months alternately for three years, when I received my diploma as a journeyman in the building trade. The following spring I emigrated with my father’s family to America the first week in May 1880.

“My mother died when I was four years old. There was another boy, Fred, of the same mother, a year and a half old when she died. Father married another woman, Eva Katrina Greiner. Through her influence the family joined the Church.

“This is how the Nuffer family joined the Mormon Church:

“In the year 1879 the missionary, Henry Flam, a distant relative of the Nuffer family came to the city of Neuffen, the State of Wuerttemberg, Germany, preaching his religion to the family of John Christopher Nuffer in a cottage meeting. The following families attended the meeting: Jacob Schweitzer, Anton Lalatin, Abraham Kneiting. They all joined the Church and in 1880, immigrated to Utah, with the exception of the Kneiting family who emigrated in 1881. Now Eva Katrina Nuffer, wife of John Christopher Nuffer, being a very religious woman accepted the doctrine first, being somewhat out of harmony in her belief with the States’ Kirche, (State Church), the Lutheran Church, especially on the doctrine of child baptism, vicarious atonement and the punishment for Adam’s transgression. It was she who kept the doctrines before the others, so when Elder John Theurer followed Elder Henry Flam, the following year to visit them, the four families Nuffer, Schweitzer, Lalatin and Kneiting were ready to be baptized by Elder Theurer, which took place at the house of Christopher Nuffer. There was a running millrace at the rear of the house which they dammed off with planks. The baptism took place at night to keep them from disturbance, for there was much hostility in the town. The town parson especially made a tirade against it in his Sunday sermon. To avoid persecution, they decided to emigrate as soon as possible.

“They sold their holdings at once at auction sale, at a great loss to the real value. In the first days of May 1880 the three families Nuffer, Schweitzer and Lalatin left Neuffen by team to the capitol of the state, Stuttgart, from where they took the train to Mannheim (Home of Men) on the Rhine River. Here they joined a party of about thirty from Switzerland under the leadership of Elder John Theurer. From Mannheim they took two boats down the River Rhine to the North Sea. Here they took the steamer to Hull, England and then crossed England on the railroad to Liverpool. Here more Saints joined them. They left Liverpool in the company of about two hundred. After three weeks on the Atlantic Ocean they arrived in New York. From here the leaders chartered a special train which in about a weeks time went directly to Ogden, Utah, where they were royally received by some of the Saints.

“The Nuffer family then went to Logan (1880). I was baptized on the first Tuesday in August in the Blacksmith Fork River by Nicholas Summers, confirmed by John Lederman. I got a job working on the Logan Temple the first winter as a stonecutter. Father’s family bought a home in Providence and settled there. The second year I worked in Salt Lake on the Deseret University building for contractor Elias Morris as a stonecutter and mason.

“In 1882 I went with Tom Ricks to Montana to do some mason work on the Great Northern Railroad. I stayed there about six months. I came back to Logan and worked on the Logan Temple helping to finish the baptismal font and helped to point (to point is to fill and finish carefully the joints with mortar) the Temple until it was finished on the outside. In the fall of 1883 I persuaded father’s family to sell their home and we moved into Idaho and took up a homestead in Worm Creek, Oneida County, then called Preston, now called Glendale.

“On September 18, 1884, I married Louisa Zollinger and was sealed in the Logan Temple in 1891. She was the daughter of Ferdinand and Louisa Meier Zollinger. We lived at Glendale until the fall of 1890 when we moved to Preston, having been called by the Church to take charge and superintend the building of the Oneida Stake Academy.

“In the spring of 1895, I was called on a mission to Germany. I worked in the city of Stuttgart eleven months, presiding over that branch and baptized five persons. From there I went to Nuremberg where I labored six months. From there I was called to Mission headquarters in Bern, Switzerland, to edit the “Stern”, the German edition of the Millennial Star. While there I translated B.H. Roberts’ “The Gospel”, and Wilford Woodruff’s “Experiences”, and “The Key to Theology” into the German language, which were published as serials in the “Stern”.

“In the summer of 1897 I received my release and taking charge of a company of Saints, I arrived in Salt Lake the third of July and arrived at my home in Preston on the 4th of July 1897.

“After coming home I was contracting building in partnership with Joseph S. Geddes, building several residences, the Weston Tabernacle, The First Ward chapel, and several school houses and other buildings. After that I opened an architect office and planned most of the older business blocks, the Opera House, State Bank building, the Oneida Stake Science building and several other school buildings outside of Preston at McCammon and Grace.

“When Preston was organized into a village I served four years as a village trustee, and two years as village clerk until Preston was organized into a city.

“Eleven children were born to us: Luther Jacob, John Willard, Louis Ferdinand, Herman Christopher, Austin Ekert, Karl Aaron, Agnes Louise, Myron David, Florence Myrtle, Edwin Joseph and Athene Barbara.

“The foregoing was told to Jennie Smart Nuffer

September 1938

John Nuffer raised apples for many years. His orchard was located at the family home East on Fourth South Street. When he retired from public office, he continued to look after his fruit raising as well as dairy cattle. He was very proud of the fine fruit he raised and never over-charged for his produce. His health failed very fast following the death of his wife on October 1945 and he followed her in death on June 4, 1946. He was buried in the Preston Cemetery. He was a High Priest.

Grandpa and Grandma Wanner

I have previously provided a limited history of Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Schmid.  As I wrote that history and compiled some other histories, I kept finding a couple of references to a history written by Edna Wagstaff Owen.  I started trying to contact a member of that family and to see if they had a copy of that history.  Fortunately after some time, a copy of that history was provided.  I now provide it in full with minimal edits.

Wanner Family about 1895,

Wanner Family about 1895,

Grandpa and Grandma Wanner
Compiled and delivered by Edna Wagstaff Owen at the Wanner, Schmid reunion at Lagoon in Farmington, Utah on Saturday, 17 June 1978
I was asked a few day ago to represent Mary Wanner Wagstaff’s family at the 1978 Wanner – Schmid reunion, to do something on the program. I haven’t had much time to get ready for it and really didn’t know what I could do. After much thought and meditation, I decided it would be nice to honor Grandpa and Grandma Wanner by telling you a few things I can remember about them.
On 6 June 1870, a little 24 year old man from Holzgerlingen, Germany, John George Wanner and a beautiful 21 year old girl, with beautiful auburn hair named Anna Maria Schmid from Holzgerlingen, Germany were married and started a life for themselves together.
This lovely couple, we love to call our grandparents, became the proud parents of 10 children – 5 boys and 5 girls, all of whom lived long good lives, except 2 sons, who died in Germany and dear Aunt Pauline, who passed on at the age of 37. Their youngest daughter Wilhelmina is here with us today and we are honoring her. She is 90 years young. They have had 73 grandchildren born to them and now their posterity runs into the hundreds.
They dearly loved these children and tried untiringly to bring them up and taught them by example as well as precept. Some of the great qualities they left us always to love the Lord and our fellowman. To be honest always and how to work. I don’t know of one of their children, grandchildren or great grandchildren, who haven’t tried very hard to do this.
Grandpa and Grandma never lost sight of what they left Germany for – which was the Gospel and to live in America where they were free and could worship as they choose.
It was in May 1891 while Grandpa was working on the highway, two missionaries came along and told him about the Gospel and the Lord’s work. In October 1891, they and their three eldest daughters were baptized. George was the first to be baptized in July 1891 and came over to America with one of the missionaries, Brother Terrell from Providence, Utah. Louise, Frederich and Pauline were baptized in June 1894. Gottlob in June 1894 and Wilhelmina in August 1896.
Grandma took the missionaries in and accommodated them with beds, food, etc. and helped them with the German language.
Over in Germany, it was the custom for women to do the farm work, cutting of the hay with a scythe and putting it up by hand. When the children needed shoes or dresses, the shoemaker and the dressmaker would come to the home to do these services.
In writing this little history and remembrances about Grandpa and Grandma Wanner, I thought it would be proper, nice, and informative to tell just a little about the country they lived in before coming to America.
Germany had been a great country and has produced many great and talented people. It has become known as the land of poets and thinkers. Germany as a nation state did not exist until the German Reich of 1871. The Roman Empire was in control for five centuries. It is a diversified country – wooded areas account for 29 percent of the land, providing beautiful forests with hiking trails. The people of Germany love nature and most of the homes have plants and flowers in them.
Germany has become known for its beautiful castles and for being a progressive country. Germany has been described by some of our relatives and friends who, have visited it, as a very beautiful country of mountains, streams, rivers and beautiful forests.
Grandma left behind a sister, a brother and her father. She was the only one that joined the church. She was the youngest in her family. Grandpa was the only one in his family also that joined the church.
What a serious though it must have been to them as they contemplated the LONG, LONG JOURNEY TO AMERICA AND THE HEADQUARTERS OF THE CHURCH WHICH THEY BELONGED TOO.
I wonder if any of us grandchildren can even realize what it meant to undertake the task of bringing their family to America. They sold their property in Germany and packed up the thing they could bring. They left behind their friends, loved ones, and many happy memories. It was brave family, who loved the Lord, were grateful for the Gospel Plan and for their membership in the TRUE CHURCH ON THE EARTH. Such was their faith, and it was enough to bring them through every trial, every hardship, every discouragement that came their way. They triumphed in the end and WE AS THEIR POSTERITY HAVE BEEN GREATLY BLESSED BY THEIR WISDOM, FAITH, AND ENDURANCE.
They rode the train for a day and then got on a ship and went up the Rhine River. This took them three or four days. They then rode the train another day and got on a ship on the North Sea that took them to England; the sea was very turbulent and they had a rough voyage.
At Liverpool they boarded a ship and was on the ocean 13 days. They stayed in New York for two days and in Chicago one day and a night. They then rode the train straight to Franklin, Idaho. They arrived on the 18th of June 1893. This was Uncle Gottlob’s birthday. It was 85 years ago tomorrow.
They were met by their son George and Fred Nuffer, who was the man George was working for. They brought a buggy and wagon and took the family to Brother Nuffer’s place in Cub River. Here they stayed about a week; then purchased the farm of John Nuffer in Glendale, Idaho. It was during this week Grandpa took his daughter Mary, my mother, and they walked to the Bear Lake County seeking a farm and a home to see what was available there. They slept on the ground at nights and saved some of their bread to feed the bears so they wouldn’t bother them. They had to take off their shoes as they forged streams. It was a rough trip.
From Glendale they bought a farm in Whitney and from here to Preston. In 1910 they moved to Logan, Utah to be near the Temple where they could go often. In Logan, they lived at two or three different places, but I wasn’t able to find out for sure. The places I distinctly remember was on 3rd North and two or so block East and their last home in Logan was a lovely home thy built located on 4th North and two blocks East.
The first Sunday they were in Glendale, Grandpa and Grandma went to church with these five beautiful daughters and two sons. My dad, William Addison Wagstaff was the ward clerk and mother had on a red dress; dad looked down at her and winked. You see dad was well past 30 and not married. I bet he thought here is my chance. Of course there were other nice gals available, but he hadn’t married and we are happy he choose mother.
Grandma soon joined the Relief Society and in the minutes of the meetings that I have, tell of her bearing her testimony often and donating eggs, wheat, calico or whatever, when ask to do so.
They had a strong testimony and remained true to the Church and were ardent Temple Workers till their last days on earth.
I feel these parents, children, grandchildren and great grandchildren have accomplished so much in that time 85 years tomorrow, all of the children have gone to the Temple, many have done Temple work and many of the grandchildren and great grandchildren also. Many have gone on Missions. There are Bishops, Doctors, poets, Nurses and professional people in the family.
I being one of the younger ones of Grandpa and Grandma’s grandchildren, I have had the privilege of attending the funerals of some of their children and their children’s mates and many of the grandchildren and I have really been thrilled and lifted up about the wonderful things that have been said – of their good lives – their devotion to their families. I have felt so thrilled and humble to belong to such a good family and I know for a fact the wonderful words that have been spoken are true, because I have observed and could say Amen to it all.
I have felt many times that if Grandpa and Grandma could see their posterity and how wonderful, faithful, devoted they ware; with a strong testimony and ardent Temple workers; they surely would be thrilled and happy.
They taught their children the way they should live by example and precept and each in turn taught their children the same principles and they in turn did the same to their children. This is very commendable, I am sure.
While in Germany, Grandpa worked on the roads and was a road overseer. He also worked in the Black Forest and fought in the Civil War in Germany in 1865 and the war of 1870-71. He also owned a little farm and cattle. He wasn’t a very large man about 5 foot 6 inches. He always looked well dressed, clean and very nice.
Grandma was about 5 foot 3 or 4 inches and had a good shape. She always fixed her hair so beautiful, she looked nice and well dressed. I can remember this beautiful black knit winter dress she had and she always wore gloves.
While in Logan Grandpa always had a lively horse, a good looking single black buggy and a real snazzy buggy whip. This one place they lived on in Logan had an extra lot where he grew hay for his horse and he’d cut it with a scythe. They also always had a nice garden and beautiful flowers. As I remember this home was on 3rd North and a few blocks East.
They were hard working, thrifty people and handled their affairs very well. They really made hay while the sun shone and were able to retire at a reasonable age and had enough to live on plus an estate they left.
Speaking of hard working people which they were, their children were also. I know Mother always worked in the fields, had a lovely garden – flowers and fruits and berries. Also plus making soap, butter, curing meat and those good sausages and canning besides washing on the board and knitting stockings for all of us 8 children, one pair for Sunday and one for school and everyday use. I know mother’s sisters and brothers were of the same caliber.
Now I have just mentioned Mother mostly, but I guess because I knew her better, but I have observed through my life and I know for a fact that all their children, grandchildren and great grandchildren have been hard working people and early risers. At least I and my brothers and sisters and all my children know how to work, so some of it has rubbed off.
I am sure life for them in Germany was hard. It wasn’t always sunshine and roses. Of course all of us knew we’d have trials and sorrows to go thru when we came to earth and I’m sure they had their share.
Grandma lost her mother at age two and she was said her stepmother wasn’t very good to her. She said her father was a weaver and Grandma had to walk many miles through dark woods at night to deliver the linen to different customers. She’d carry it on her head with arms and hands to help. Often she was afraid she prayed and was never harmed. She said many times all she had to eat was a piece of brown bread and potato peeling soup, but she was thankful for that.
I feel sure Grandma and Grandpa had many happy times, but they also knew sorrow. It must have been heart breaking to loose their two little boys at a tender age and have to leave them buried in Germany, when they came to America. I’m sure as most all parents are, they were grieved at times over their children’s actions.
In Germany they all worked hard to help make a living. Grandma and children would do most of the farm work and care for the animals, so Grandpa could work away on roads, etc to bring a little extra means in. They would put the hay up and spend long hard days getting wood in from the forest for fuel for winter.
At Christmas time and other special occasions, they could have white bread and some little cakes. They had beautiful Christmas trees decorated, Grandma really tried hard to make a sweet happy home and life for her children. Now I’d like to quickly relate a few things I can remember about them.
I can remember Mother and Grandma most always conversed in German and she’d also always write letters often to her in German. She was so good at keeping up her correspondence. She’d always send love and kisses to us kids. At Christmas time they always sent a check to their children and 50 cents for each of us grandchildren. I thought I was really rich to have this half dollar to spend.
The last time I saw Grandpa was in December of 1921, when he came to Ogden to Aunt Pauline’s funeral. In February 1922 he had just finished helping to pay Aunt Pauline’s funeral expenses when he took sick and died. I believe it was of Pneumonia.
The last time I saw Grandma was in July 1929, when we stopped in to visit her on our way to Idaho. We took her some nice fresh strawberries from our garden.
I can remember how sad and lonely she looked. She had carried on alone for almost 8 years. She was a dear and faithful to the end. She passed away in December 1929. I can remember how sad I was and what a lovely funeral they had and the nice things that were spoken of her.
As a child I can remember going to Logan on the U.I.C., Railroad, or sometimes called the Galloping Goose, with Mom and Dad to visit them. It was the joy of my life. They always made you welcome and shared willingly what they had with you.
It seemed we always had the same thing for supper. She would sauté a little onion in the fry pan and then add boiled potatoes cut up or sliced and browned, a piece of cheese, bread, butter and applesauce, but oh! It was good. It was such a thrill to sleep on her feather bed.
I can well remember they always went to the Temple and I can see them now walking Temple hill in high gear, especially Grandpa.
They always had some mints for the Grandchildren and you always got loves and kisses. I didn’t always like Grandpa’s kisses and his beard would tickle my face and his kisses were kind of wet, but I knew then and I know now also that he loved us all.
What a thrill it was to go to Logan to be baptized and stay at their place and I was always so happy when they came to visit us, or we went to visit them, especially after Grandpa died and Grandma spent time with us is Ogden.
They were really hospitable and in 1917 Annie our sister and Mary Wanner Andra stayed at their home while taking a course in sewing and pattern drafting at the college.
Electricity at their home in Logan was cheap and they’d burn the lights most all day and night. I was really fascinated by them, as when we lived in Glendale we just had kerosene lamps, until the last two years, when we had gas lights.
It seemed to me as a young child when Grandma would kneel beside her bed to say her night prayers, she’d sure pray a long time – always I the German language, but I now realize it was a sweet humble and sincere prayer.
When I go to Logan now and to the Budge Clinic, I look across the street to their last beautiful house and well remember going there to visit them many times.
There are many reasons why we should honor and love our Grandparents, but among their most wonderful accomplishments, we would have to list their diligent pursuit in genealogy and Temple Work. Both Grandma and Grandpa had a great deal of research done to find the names and vital information concerning their progenitors. Each one of us are taught to do this by the leaders of our church. Grandma and Grandpa carried on this responsibility to the best of their ability for many years. I am sure when they learned of the statement of Prophet Joseph Smith to the effect if we neglect this important work we do so at the peril of our own salvation, that it aroused in them a never ending desire to see that nothing was left undone, that was within their ability to do.
After having had the research done they were able to secure the names of hundreds of their dead ancestors and spent many many hours I the Temple acting as proxy for those who never had the opportunity to hear the Gospel and take upon themselves the sacred covenants, which are necessary for exaltation in the Celestial Kingdom.
I am most grateful to them for their integrity and not only teaching the highest principles of honorable dealings in their daily affairs, but for the example of following the Savior’s admonition “To love one another and to do our best to help those in need”.
Dear cousins, second and third cousins, in-laws and others, our grandparents are long since gone, but I am sure their memory lives on and it could be said of them they laughed a lot and cried a little. They aren’t really dead for no man dies as long as there is one living person in the world who remembers them with fond memories and no man really dies as long as there are people on earth who really loved them. This can be said of them, many many people loved them for what they really were. They had many many friends and as I have told Horace many times, I truly loved my Grandma and Grandpa Wanner.