The Blue Goose

This article was shared with me in 2010.  I downloaded it in 2011 with the intent to share it.  Finally I get around to it 9 years later!

Here is a history of Samaria, Idaho on the Malad City website.  http://www.maladidaho.org/samaria.html

Be aware, as of today, The Blue Goose is open for business, although limited hours.  https://www.facebook.com/thebluegooseSamaria/  The Facebook page has a number of historical photos of The Blue Goose.

The Blue Goose, Samaria, Idaho

This is the Historical Sketch shared with me regarding The Blue Goose.

“Historical sketch of The Blue Goose by Sherrie Daniels

“Until recently this building, owned by Merrill Price, had been a thriving business of one sort or another since its construction just before the turn of the century.  Most remember it as The Blue Goose, a local hot spot of Samaria, Idaho.

“Charming and unique, the structure was originally built for living quarters and a furniture store by Isaac Ike Evans.  Organs, rockers, bureaus and other fine wood furnishings could be purchased there and the only furniture store in Samaria at that time also served as a post office to a population of over 800 people.

“Later on, the furniture store was converted into a candy kitchen.  The new owner, D.D. Williams, sold pop and confectionaries, and had a pool table.  Many remember stopping as youngsters on their way to Mutual to share a soda and socialize.  They were always reminded not to be late for their church meeting by Mrs. Williams, who would usher them out the door at ten minutes till.  Later the teenagers would reunite there to pick up where they had left off.

“A barber chair was also in the south corner of the candy kitchen.  The late Ernest Williams recalled to me many a lazy afternoon spent indulging in second hand gossip and of yesterdays bygone.

“A 1936 calendar hung on the abandoned building’s wall when around 1945 David Bronc Jenkins and Muddy Waters (a nickname – no one seems to remember his real name) took over the building to open it as the local saloon and pool hall.  Card games were a favorite past time and a nickel a cue could buy a splendid time of pool hustling.

“Since then, the lease of the Goose slid through many hands.  To name a few, Ralph Hughes, Waldorf Morse, who gave it up to become Samaria’s school teacher, Ariel Jones, Wally Nicholas, Ralph Williams, Arthur Doc Smith, Ted Loomis and finally Bill Thorpe, the last owner of the lease.

“Many names have been pegged on it since that time such as The Samaria Bar, The Nugget, The Second Ward, The Bucket of Blood, and most everyone’s favorite, The Blue Goose.

“Often, as a little girl, I would trod barefoot down the hot oil road to stand hesitantly outside its door, then almost recklessly make my pretense début.  My father would be too involved in his card game of Cassino to raise an eyelid in acknowledgment of my statement, The cows are in their stalls waitin to be milked, Dad.

“Can’t leave now, would be the mumble that came from lips which were also juggling his Pall Malls.  Got one more hand to play.  Wait on the porch and Spug will bring you a soda.

“Now, to a child who is just learning her A.B.C.’ s and how to count, one became the most versatile number in our numerical system for although I know at least five hands had been played, can of soda, two packages of peanut M&M’s and one bellyache later, my father always swore to my mother (who by this time had already started the milking), Jest had to play that one last hand.

“Today the Goose stands empty.  Weeds grow where once was smooth trodden earth.  No dim light slithers out into the night to say a friendly Hello, I’m open to passersby.   No more tales absorb into the paint-thirsty woodwork on lazy summer afternoons.  No smoke curls out from the chimney ascending to a stark winter’s sky.  No more ringing of the cash register to signal the sale of an ice cream, a soda, or a beer.  But it stands, a structure representing people past and a memory for us in the present.

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Williams-Davis Wedding

Here is another life sketch I want to share.  This time of John Haines Williams and Sarah Jane Davis.  John is the father of David Davis Williams and Mary Jane Williams Davis.  He is the brother to my David D Williams.  At some point I hope I have more history to write of David D and John Haines’ parents, but at this point there are far too many questions.  In all honesty, it seems that their parents John Williams and Frances Henneys have had their history confused, merged, and corrupted by some other Williams lines.  Until we can sort the real information on our line from the rest, I have delayed writing to keep from perpetuating mistakes and confusion.  For example, it appears John Williams died in Ogden, Weber, Utah in 1867.  But some have him merged and combined with John Williams who died in 1876, 1870, and 1867.  On with the already written history.

I will offer more family information after the life sketch.  I do not know who wrote this history.

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“John Haines Williams was born February 1, 1829, at Pembrey, Carmarthenshire, Wales, a son of John Williams and Frances Hennys.  He was the fourth child of ten children: Frances, Elizabeth, Catherine, John, Mary, David, Sarah, Richard and Joseph.  His father was a collier by trade and worked hard to sustain a large family.

“Sarah Jane Davis was born 5 July 1830 at Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales, the daughter of William and Margaret Davis of Kidwelly.  She was the youngest of the nine children born in this family: Margaret, Mary, Ann, William, Eliza, John, David, Lewis, and Sarah Jane.

“After their marriage, John and Sarah Jane made their home in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, Wales, where he worked in the coal mines.  Here two sons were born, William and David.  Upon hearing the gospel and the advantages of life in America, they worked, saved, and made plans for a new home there.  Those who emigrated in their party were: John, Sarah Jane, their sons, William and David, his father, John Williams, then a widower, and his two brothers,  David and wife and Richard.  They took passage from Liverpool, England with a group of Saints in the year 1855, spending eight weeks on the water.

“Landing in New York, they went to Scranton, Pennsylvania to make their home.  While living there, the men worked in the coal mines.  At Scranton, two more children were born, Thomas John and Ann.  The family lived in Scranton until 1859 and then came west, making their home in Ogden, Utah for several years.  There Eliza Bell, Sarah, John, and Mary were born.

“When a group of Saints were leaving for southeastern Idaho, John and Sarah Jane and their eight children went with them and settled in Malad Valley.  At first, they lived in Woodruff where George and Frances were born.  Later they moved to Malad and took up a homestead of three hundred twenty acres at Gwenford.  There they worked hard clearing the land of sage by hand to prepare it for planting.

“John Haines was a lover of fine horses and cattle.  Many people of the valley bought animals from him.  They built a three-room log house and were happy in their new home.  Here Joseph, the eleventh child, was born.

“Desiring the best in education for their children and having a desire to share their happiness in the truths of the gospel, Thomas was sent to Europe and labored as an L.D.S. missionary in England and Wales.  After his return home he attended school and taught school for many years.  This privilege could not be afforded the others after the death of their father.

“Sarah Jane was a very proud, cultured and refined woman, a wonderful homemaker, seamstress and cook.  Many enjoyed her delicious home-cooked meals.  She had to make bread nearly every day.  The Indians were prowlers at that time.  They came to her home often, but she believed in the admonition of President Brigham Young; It is better to feed them than fight them.  This she did.

“John Haines died on January 20, 1882 at the age of fifty-three.  Sarah Jane worked very hard caring for her family.  Her daughter, Frances, lived with her until her mother=s death on August 4, 1892.  They were both buried in the Malad City Cemetery.”

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Some more family history information.

John Haines Williams born 1 February 1829 in Pembrey, Carmarthenshire, Wales and died 20 January 1882 in Gwenford, Oneida, Idaho.  He was buried 23 January 1882 in Malad, Oneida, Idaho.

Sarah Jane Davis born 5 July 1830 in Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales and died 4 August 1892 in Samaria, Oneida, Idaho.  She was buried 7 August 1892 in Malad.

John and Sarah were married in 1849 in Kidwelly.

Their children are:

William Davis Williams born 20 June 1850 in Burry Port, Carmarthenshire, Wales and died 10 May 1916 in Malad.  Buried 13 May 1916 in Malad.  Married Hannah Maria Thomas (1849-1900) 10 April 1871 in Samaria, Oneida, Idaho.

David Davis Williams born 19 June 1852 in Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, Wales and died 27 June 1927 in Samaria.  Buried 30 June 1927 in Samaria.  Married Rebecca Price Williams (1857-1936) 31 December 1877 in St. Johns, Oneida, Idaho.

Catherine Williams born 4 April 1854 in Llanelli and died 27 March 1856 in Pennsylvania.

Thomas Davis Williams born 3 August 1856 in Hyde Park, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania and died 24 January 1900 in Woodruff, Oneida, Idaho.  Buried 27 January 1900 in Samaria.  Married Mary Ann Davis (1860-1895) 20 January 1881 in Samaria.  He married Agnes Ellen Bowen (1868-1943) 18 May 1897 in Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah (married by Rudger Clawson, later LDS Apostle and member of the First Presidency).

Ann Ellen Williams born 11 April 1861 in Scranton, Lackawanna, Pennsylvania and died 26 August 1936 in Malad.  Buried 28 August 1936 in Malad.  Married Joshua “Jessie” Lewis Thomas (1857-1928) 26 March 1888 in Malad.

Sarah Williams born 3 May 1862 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  We don’t know anything more about her.

Eliza Bell Williams born 4 June 1963 in Ogden and died 15 September 1941 in Samaria.  Buried 19 September 1941 in Samaria.  Married William Lewis Jones (1857-1889) 19 January 1887 in Logan, Cache, Utah.

Mary Jane Williams born 8 April 1864 in Ogden and died 20 March 1903 in Samaria.  Buried 24 March 1903 in Samaria.  Married Samuel Deer Davis (1859-1923) 10 October 1882 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

John Haines Williams born 18 February 1866 in Ogden and died 9 August 1956 in Malad.  Buried 11 August 1956 in Samaria.  Married Rebecca Morse (1869-1938) 14 February 1886 in Malad.

George Haines Williams born 15 October 1867 in Woodruff and died 26 December 1950 in Woodruff.  Buried 29 December 1950 in Samaria.  Married Sarah Elizabeth Morse (1872-1908) 20 September 1890 in Samaria.

Frances Williams born 10 April 1870 in Woodruff and died 18 July 1948 in Woodruff.  Buried 20 July 1948 in Samaria.  Married Samuel John Williams (1865-1943) 14 December 1898 in Samaria.

Joseph Davis Williams born 15 January 1872 in Malad and died 5 November 1943 in Samaria.  Buried 9 November 1943 in Samaria.  Married Rachel Morse (1872-1937) 18 August 1896 in Samaria.