28 July 2018

Aliza, Hiram, and I went to Preston, Idaho at the end of July.  If anyone knows me, I like to stop and visit people, family, and cemeteries.  While we were out visiting, we made a few stops at some cemeteries.  I thought I would share these couple of photos with Aliza and Hiram with the tombstones of a few of their ancestors.  All on the same date!

This is the grave of Wilburn Norwood Jonas, 15 May 1924 – 14 March 1975, who is their Great Grandfather, my Grandfather. There are other posts on Norwood.  This grave is in Richmond, Utah.

Hiram and Aliza at Wilburn Norwood Jonas’ grave.

These are the graves of Joseph Nelson Jonas, 19 March 1893 – 6 September 1932, and Lillian Coley, 26 August 1898 – 11 February 1987, who are their Great Great Grandparents, father of Wilburn Norwood Jonas, whose grave you can see right behind Hiram.  I have also previously written about Joseph and Lillian.

Hiram and Aliza at Joseph and Lillian Jonas’ graves.

These are the graves of Hannah Maria Rogers, 4 June 1932 – 22 October 1894, and Stephen Coley, 28 January 1830 – 22 October 1913, who are their Great Great Great Great Grandparents.  This is the grandparents for Lillian Coley above.  For whatever reason I didn’t get a picture with Herbert and Martha Coley’s grave, the link between.  These graves are in Lewiston, Utah.  I have written of Hannah and Stephen also.

Hiram and Aliza at Hannah and Stephen Coley’s graves.

These are the graves of Mary Louise Wanner, 5 March 1901 – 30 August 1991, and William Fredrick Andra, 11 February 1898 – 13 March 1990, who are their Great Great Grandparents, parents of Colleen Mary Andra, wife of Wilburn Norwood Jonas.  I need to write a biography yet of Mary and William but have been overwhelmed by it in the past and just need to work on it some day.  These graves are in Whitney, Idaho.

Hiram and Aliza at Mary and William Andra’s graves.

These are the graves of John George (Johann Georg) Wanner, 29 October 1870 – 5 January 1947, and Regina Friederike Nuffer, 26 January 1869 – 10 March 1942, who are their Great Great Grandparents, parents of Mary Louise Wanner, whose photo is above, but also the tombstone to the left of Aliza’s head.  I have written of John and Regina in the past.

Aliza and Hiram at John and Regina Wanner’s graves.

These are the graves of Ezra Taft Benson, 4 August 1899 – 30 May 1994, and Flora Smith Amussen, 1 July 1901 – 14 August 1992.  There is no relationship with the Bensons, but it is the same cemetery as Wanners and Andras.  He was the 13th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  As such, the kids know him as a previous prophet of the Lord.  They were happy to make the visit.

Aliza and Hiram at Ezra and Flora Benson’s graves.

 

 

 

 

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Oneida Stake Academy

Aliza and Hiram Ross on steps of Oneida Stake Academy.  You can see the ongoing stone and foundational work here around the steps.

This year my Uncle Larry Andra notified me that during rodeo week in Preston, Idaho, there would presentations on the Nuffer and Wanner families at the Oneida Stake Academy the last week of July.  Amanda had continuing education in Utah so I jumped at the opportunity to go and take the oldest two.

We stayed with Uncle and Aunt Larry & Barbara Andra at their home.  We enjoyed the parade and other activities in northern Cache Valley.  It was also fun to reconnect with family.  Dale Andra was visiting and also staying with Larry & Barbara.

Larry and Barbara Andra with Aliza and Hiram Ross.

Along with the other festivities, we visited the Oneida Stake Academy.  We viewed the updates and ongoing improvements being made to restore that historic building.  (You can help give for its restoration.)  It was fun to also look closely at the pioneer faux painting and other quirks of pioneer Preston.

My link is that of Fred and John Nuffer, brothers to my Regina Nuffer Wanner.  They were a part of the tapestry woven in the construction of that building.  You can read more about the construction of the Oneida Academy and the Nuffer connections at the OSA website.  John provided oversight of the construction and Fred provided the stone from his quarry.

The Oneida Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints filled most of current Franklin County and part of Bannock County.  The Idaho Legislature carved Franklin County (named after Franklin D. Richards, not Benjamin Franklin) from Oneida County in 1913.  The Oneida Stake began in 1884 with its headquarters in Franklin, Idaho.

Inside the main hall, there was this photo and brief history of John Nuffer.  I have previously shared John Nuffer’s autobiography.  I have other posts referencing John, including his history included in the History of Idaho.

Aliza and Hiram Ross with a picture of John Nuffer inside the Oneida Stake Academy.

That same day we visited a number of the local cemeteries where direct ancestors are buried.  I will share those photos in another post.  I am grateful that my ancestors helped build this part of Idaho (as well as the rest of Cache Valley).  Hopefully my children will come to some of that same appreciation that I hold.

 

History of the Adolph Neuffer Family

Emma and Adolph Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The title of this entry in the book is “HISTORY OF THE ADOLPH NEUFFER FAMILY.”  I really don’t have much information on this family as can be evidenced by the quality of the photos I have as well.

“Adolph Neuffer was born in Neuffen, Wurtemberg, Germany, on April 14, 1875, a son of Johann Christoph and Eva Catharine Greiner Neuffer.  He came to the United States when he was only 5 years old.  His family settled in the small town of Providence, Utah,  All children 7 years old and younger wore long dresses.  His family moved to many different small town in Idaho.  Adolph was a stone mason by trade although he worked for Borden’s Milk Company for years before moving to Salt Lake City.  He met his future wife in Logan.  She was Emma Margaret Rinderknecht.  He married her on January 8, 1899.  They were endowed on January 14, 1900.  Adolph died September 21, 1955.  He is buried in the Elysian Burial Gardens in Millcreek, Utah.

“He was divorced from Emma after 44 years of marriage.  He married Grace Irene Frasure on August 9, 1943.  Later, they divorced.

“Adolph’s first wife was Emma Margaret Rinderknecht.  She was born in Providence, Utah, on May 15, 1873.  She was a twin.  Her twin brother, Joseph Hyrum, was given away at birth.  He died because the people he was given to didn’t know how to take care of him.  Emma had to work hard to help her widowed mother.  She would take vegetables to Logan to sell.  She also did washing for people.

“She was the mother of nine children.  Edna and Leona were children by her first marriage to James Peterson.

“Adolph and Emma had seven children together.  She died in Ogden on July 8, 1950.  She is buried in the Elysian Burial Gardens.

Ida, Elvin, Melvin, Lyman, Leona, Blanche, Edna, Dolores, Eva Nuffer

“Emma’s oldest daughter was Emma Edna.  She was born in Providence, Utah, on August 16, 1896.  She was married to Robert Early.  They had three daughters; Tacoma, and twins Doris and Dorothy.  Edna had one daughter, LaRue, by a previous marriage.  One twin, Dorothy, died as an infant.  Doris died when she was in her early twenties.  La Rue died in June, 1985.  Edna was divorced and later married Harold Hart.  They lived in Ogden,  Edna died August 26, 1969.

“Leona was born in Providence, Utah, on December 6, 1898.  She was married to William Walker.  They had four sons; Donald, Dale Lawrence (better known as “Bob”).  Then there was Billy who died when he was nine years old, and Dick died when he was about 26 years old.  Leona was divorced and later married Ray Andrus.  They lived in San Jose, California.  Leona died February 28, 1982.

“Lyman Adolph was born January 30, 1901, in Preston, Idaho.  He is married to Elizabeth Johanna Mellegers.  They had two children: Larry, who was drowned while trying to save another fellow; their daughter, LaRene, who lives in West Valley City.

“Eva Katharine was born in Preston, Idaho, on February 28, 1903.  She was married to John Allen Ricks.  They had one son, Jack Ricks.  They were divorced.  She married Earl Hansen; they were divorced.  She married Floyd Lutzai.  She died on November 1, 1973.

“Ida May was born on November 24, 1906, in Preston, Idaho.  She was married to William Henry Harman.  They had two sons, Bill and Bob.  She lives in 29 Palms, California.  Her husband has passed away.

“Blanche Josephine was born on March 12, 1908, in Preston, Idaho.  She married Christian Hansen, they had one daughter, Dorothy.  They were divorced.  Blanche married Neldon Peter Parker, they had one son, Blaine Parker.  He was drowned in the canal near their home.  They lived in Bennion.

“Elvin Joseph Neuffer was born on December 17, 1910, in Preston, Idaho.  He was married to Mildred Terry.  They had four children.  they are Marilyn, Nina, Bonnie, and Danny.  Millie had one son, Lynn, by a previous marriage.  Millie died at the age of 47, on September 3, 1964.  Elvin married Winona Mondragon, later divorced.  He then married Tessie Larsen, they divorced.  He married Joan Wheatly.  They have three children; Margaret, Jennifer and Joseph.  Elvin and his wife and three children live in Murray, Utah.

“Melvin Hyrum Neuffer was born on December 17, 1910, in Preston, Idaho.  H ewas fifteen minutes younger than his twin brother, Elvin.  He married Eveline D. Cornell.  They have six daughters; Shirlene, Kathleen (Kay), Susan, Holly, JuLee and Darla.  Melvin and Eveline have lived in the same house for 46 years, which is in Midvale, Utah.  They have been married for 52 years.

“Anna Dolores was born on May 12, 1913.  She was married to John Leonard Denovellis.  They only had one son, “Bud.”  Dolores and Johnny were both killed as they crossed State Street.  They were together.  They died September 9, 1979.

Written by Melvin H. Neuffer  108 East 7660 S  Midvale, Utah 84047

Biography of Regina Wanner by Alma Naef

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The title of this entry in the book is “REGINA NUFFER WANNER taken from a biography by her daughter ALMA KATHERINE SCHEIBEL NAEF.”  I have provided other biographies of Regina, the main one can be found here.

“Regina Nuffer was born January 26, 1869, at Neuffen, Germany.  A daughter of Johann Christoph and Eva Katharina Greiner, she came to Utah with her family after they were converted to the gospel.  She married Jacob Scheibel July 15, 1889, in Pleasant Valley, Carbon County, Utah.  Her first child, Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef, was born, September 27, 1889.  When her child was 6 months old, she and her husband separated and she moved back to Mapleton, Idaho, where she stayed with her parents on their farm.  During this period she would help people when they were sick, and her mother would take care of her child.

“In about 1893 after the death of her mother she moved to Weber County, Utah, and worked for the Will Taylor family in Farr West and the Bowman family in Ogden.  She again returned to her father’s farm.

“On her way home she stopped in Logan and walked out to Providence to visit a friend.  While eating lunch she happened to think that she had left her new coat on the train.  She went back to Logan to the train station and they sent out a tracer.  In a few days she got her coat back.  After returning to Idaho she worked for several people in Franklin and Preston.  She lived in one room of her brother John’s home in Preston.  Her brother was on a mission in Germany at the time.

“On August 31, 1898, she married John George Wanner in Logan, Utah.  That winter she lived on his ranch in Work Creek or Glendale, Idaho.  In April she moved with her husband, daughter, and step son, Wayne, to the Bancroft flat a little west of where Grace is now.

“She was known as a fine well mannered woman.  Her niece, Athene Hampton, said that toward the end of her life her health was not very good and she had a hard time speaking.  When Athene and Louisa Nuffer would visit, they would converse by writing notes to each other.  She died on March 10, 1942, in Preston, Idaho.  Her funeral in Preston was very well attended.

Personal Memories of my Grandmother (Regina Friederike Nuffer)

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

“PERSONAL MEMORIES OF MY GRANDMOTHER by Delores N. Anderson.

“I feel my little grandmother Regina along with my mother Kate were two of God’s choice spirits he placed on this earth.  When I think of the trials and tribulations she bore, it breaks my heart.  She lost 4 sons, 2 on missions and 2 in the war.  Oh, how my heart ached for her.

“When we used to go to grandma and grandpa’s, pa would drive along the country roads, and we’d pick up sugar beets and put (them) in the car.  At home grandma would clean them up, slice them, boil them, and use the syrup made from them as she would (use) sugar.

“Always in the corner of the cupboard were two crock jars with a lid or a plate over the top.  When she was setting the table for dinner she would get two small bowls, and we would be able to enjoy her green tomato preserved and peach or some other kind of preserves with our meal.

“My mother told us that her mother Regina worked for Harold B. Lee’s and Ezra Taft Benson’s mothers.  I remember how she revived dry bread for eating when the last batch was dry.  She sewed and kept a lovely home.

“As her health was failing and she couldn’t communicate with people very much.  I was one of them that could understand and figure out what she was trying to say or tell us.

“Several time Grandpa brought her up to her daughter Kates to stay when he had to be away on business.

“At one time I went down to Preston and stayed for a couple of weeks so I could hold the window frames up when grandpa was building a new house.  I new grandpa George was short tempered.  I told him, ‘If he said one cross word to me, I would go home to Downey if I had to walk every step of the way.’  Needless to say we got along fine.  Grandma Regina got quite a chuckle out of that.

Regina, Kate Naef, Carmen Cole, and Ladean Cole

I have written about Regina before.  Regina Friederike Nuffer was born 26 January 1869 in Neuffen, Esslingen, Wuerttemberg and died 10 March 1942 in Preston, Franklin, Idaho.  She married Scheibel and then Wanner.  Her daughter mentioned above is Alma Katherine Scheibel born 27 September 1889 in Pleasant Valley, Carbon, Utah and died 30 March 1969 in Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho.  She married Naef.

 

The Story of My Life by Anna Elizabeth Rinderknecht Nuffer

Anna Rinderknecht Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

“Written October 17, 1933.

“I will begin with my grandmother on my mother’s side, what I remember my mother telling us as children.  My grandmother was a lover of music and she became acquainted with a young man who was very good looking a good singer with curly hair.  He was a poor boy and my grandmother’s parents were well to do.  It seems that they opposed their marriage for that reason.  But they were married anyway.  I do not remember his given name (Ulrich Ramp) but my grandmother’s name was Ann Elizabeth Bauman Ramp.  They lived very happy although they were poor, and for disobeying her parents she was disinherited which made it very hard for them.  In due time, they had a baby boy, and then a baby girl, who was my mother.  I do not remember what became of the boy but they made a great deal of the baby girl.  The father did work whenever he could.  It seems like there always has been hard times for some from the very beginning.

“Everything was going as well as might be expected until father died very suddenly, which caused the mother to go to work in some kind of a mill.  She was unable to take care of the children and, as is the custom in some countries, she let some well to do people take the little girl and raise her.  They sent her to school where she had a good education.  Her name was Anna Barbara Ramp.  She lived with those people for many years.  Her mother would come to see her whenever she could.  She was a great lover of all children and when Easter time came she would get eggs and color them as nice as she could just for the pleasure of giving them to children that she knew.  She was yet a young woman when she died.

“Then my mother, when she was a grown woman, worked in a tred mill which belonged to the people she lived with.  They also had children, some her own age.  They thought a great deal of each other.

“In due time, she met some Mormon missionaries and became very interested in their talks, after which she became a member of the church.  During this time she became acquainted with Jacob Rinderknecht, who later became my father, but she didn’t come to America for a number of years after that.

“Jacob Rinderknecht had a family when my mother first met him which he brought to America in the early sixties.  They lived in New York for a while, then came to Utah.  The family consisted of Father, Mother, a daughter and a son (some children having died in Switzerland where they all came from).  They settled in Providence on the very spot where my brother Jake Rinderknecht now lives.

“All this time my mother was working in her country trying to save enough money to come to America.  Finally the time came when she landed in New York.  Then she came across the plaints with ox teams and walked much of the way.  When she arrived in Salt Lake City, the missionary that she was so good to over in Switzerland was to meet her and take her to Southern Utah.  This he never did.

“Jacob Rinderknecht happened to be there at the time, having had a chance to go to Salt Lake City with someone that drove an ox team there from Providence.  So he got her to go home with him.  Later they made a trip to Salt Lake and were married in the Endowment House.  She was then 36 years old and one of Utah’s Pioneers.  She was the second wife.  I have heard her tell what a terrible, hard life she lived.  At that time she lived in a dugout in a bank, or hollow, that used to run through the lot which is now filled in.  I think that was where I was born.  The first family had a log house and after the first wife died, my mother moved in.

“When I was 4 years old my father gave me away.  Not long after that he died.  I don’t remember him very well.  He was 62 and very poor.  He may have done this and meant it for my good, but my poor mother fought hard for me.  I was older than my brother, Jake, and then a pair of twins; one, my sister, still lives.

“My father gave me to some English people of Providence who adopted me.  They were well to do for those times.  They had buried all their children while babies, and they seemed to take a liking to me.  They said I was so pretty, and I guess they were right as I can remember that I had long ringlets, my hair being curly and how hard it was to comb.  Once, when I played with the neighbor’s children, I got lice in my hair.  My hair had to but cut off close to my head and I was glad because then it was easy to comb.

“At first I rather liked my new home but when I wanted to go back to my mother they said no.  As I got older I would run away and go home, then they would take me back and I would cry for days.  I wanted to go home and my mother did everything she could to get me back, bu no, they watched me so close that I didn’t get a chance very often.  I always had the feeling that I would get back sometime.  They would lock me in a room and if my mother came to see me they would say I had gone somewhere.  Many a time they would see her coming, then they would take me out the back door and hide me somewhere.

“As I grew older, they gave me all kinds of hard jobs to do such as going after the cows that had strayed through town and if I didn’t find them or came home without them they would send me to bed without supper in a dark room, or would lock me in a dark cellar for an hour or so.  They had so many ways of punishing me that I couldn’t them all.  One time, I was trying to jump a ditch of water and fell in backward.  I was scared to go home so I sat around in my wet clothes.  One of the neighbors told on me, then they took my clothes off, got a gunny sack, cut a whole for my head and some for my arms, then put that on and locked me in a small closet that I couldn’t stand up in, and without any dinner.  They left me there all afternoon while they went away.

“I had about 4 years of this life which was anything but a happy one.  It was the rule those days that the ones that could afford it should go to conference either in April or October.  At one of those times, the only man that I can remember calling father, the one who had adopted me, went to Salt Lake.  His wife and myself stayed home and did all the work about the place.  In due time, he came back and I suppose he was very happy although his wife did a lot of crying and was very unhappy.  At the time I didn’t quite grasp the thing or what it was all about but at last it came out.  He had married another woman while he was in the city and she was soon to come and live with us.  Can you imagine what a trick to play on his first wife?  So one fine day she came.  She had not been in this country very long.  She had come from London and rather a nice lady, a dressmaker, I think and as soon as she found out about me she wanted them to let me go to my mother, but I did not for a long time.

“So they finally got things settled and the house was divided and each woman had her half.  Then I had more chores to do.  And in due time there came a baby son which was the king of the house.  When he got old enough I would take him out in his carriage as they called it.  One day one of the wheels came off.  Then I was scared and ran back to the house to get help.  I really was expecting a whipping, but not that time and soon everything was all right again.

“One Sunday all the children in the neighborhood were in the street playing.  I was inside my fence looking on.  I wanted to go out with them so bad that I got up enough courage to go to the house and ask if I could go and play.  Then the second wife said, yes, you can go home to your mother if you want to.  It surprised me so I couldn’t believe they meant it, so I went out and when I got int he street, which was a straight line and in the third block was my mother’s place, I just ran every bit of the way.

“I was, at this time, about nine years old and had started to school.  My mother was so glad and yet she was afraid to believe it.  I had quite a time trying to make her understand as I couldn’t talk German anymore, but I soon learned.  I stayed but I was always on the watch.  If any of them had come after me I couldn’t have been found.  I was very happy at home again.  But one evening here came my adopted mother with an interpreter to talk to mother and try to get me back.  She cried and begged me to come.  I wouldn’t go near her for fear she wouldn’t let me loose.  She promised me things but it did no good.  I wanted to stay with my mother, brother and sister.

“I was so poor and thin that my mother would cry when she saw my thin little body, but I soon grew big and strong and was large for my age.  In due time, I used to go back and see my adopted parents.  As I got older I went back and worked for them.  They were candy makers and sold candy to the stores in Logan.

The book then seems to transfer from the autobiography to the biography of Anna Rinderknecht Nuffer by an unknown person.

“In Hedingen, Zurich, Switzerland lived a girl Elizabeth Bauman.  She was a jolly happy girl with a good home and many friends.  She kept company with Ulrich Ramp, a young man with pretty curly hair.  He was a fine singer.  These two people were very much in love with each other but Elizabeth’s parents who were well to do disapproved of their marriage and threatened to disinherit her if she married Ulrich, but this made no difference.  They were married and lived happily together in spite of being very poor.

“A baby girl was born, which they named Barbara.  When she was two years old, her father died suddenly.  This was a terrible blow to this young mother.  Her parents were bitter and did not help her, so she had someone take care of her baby and went out to work.  When Barbara became of school age her mother had her put into a home of well to do people who put her through school.  Her mother died shortly after and these people cared for her until she was grown.  They treated her kindly and she loved them very much, (and later had Temple work done for them).  These people owned a threat factory and Barbara worked there along time.  She had many friends.  She heard of the Mormon Elders and went to their meetings which seemed to impress her greatly.  She would walk many miles to go to their meetings and would give the Elders all the money she could spare to get food.  She was insulted by her friends when she joined the Mormon Church, but she saved her money to go to Zion.  One missionary from Southern Utah fell in love with her and promised to meet her when she arrived in Salt Lake City.

“She crossed the ocean in an old Sailing Vessel.  There were many bad storms which kept them back.  After eight weeks they landed and crossed the plains with ox-teams in the year 1866.  Grandmother walked most of the way, she being young and strong.  I remember her telling of her breaking her garnet beads, which she prized very highly, on the yoke of the oxen.

“After the long walk across the plains with all the hardships of those Pioneer days, scarcity of food, sickness and death, their faith still unfaltering, they finally reach Salt Lake Valley.  But in her sorrow the good Mormon Elder sweetheart was not there to meet her as promised.  Imagine a young girl here along without relatives.  She did get disappointed badly but not discouraged.  She worked for other Pioneers for her food.

“Jacob Rinderknecht, a pioneer living in the little town of Providence, along with other men, went to Salt Lake City looking for a young wife.  He saw Barbara a fine rosy cheeked strong young lady and decided she would be just what he wanted so he persuaded her to go back with him, offering her a home, so she married him in the Endowment House in 1868 and walked back to Providence with him.  Here she was introduced to his first wife and family.

“Jacob Rinderknecht was in his sixties and Barbara 36.  She lived in a dug-out and his first wife was in a log cabin on the old Rinderknecht lot at Providence, Utah.  There were four children, one died when very young.  When Emma was quite young, her father died, his first wife died several years before.  This left the mother to care for the children.  She had a garden which supplied her with vegetables, a few hens, and a cow which kept the family.  She had a churn which the whole settlement borrowed, and she was noted for her good yeast.  She wanted her girls dressed as fine as she could so she hired Sister Campbell to crochet lace for their petticoats and pants, as father (Jacob Rinderknecht Jr.) told me for he would take the eggs to pay for the lace.

“She was a real tithe payer, always went to church, although she understood very little English.  She taught her children high ideals, love of music, honesty, industry and faith in God.  She was fond of her Grandchildren and went to see them at least once a year.

“She endured many hardships but she never lost her faith.  She said many times she thought God was her only friend.  When her children were sick she went for the Elders.

“After her husband’s death, Jacob, a small boy, took the responsibility of caring for the family.  The girls worked hard.  Annie worked for Frank Madison.  Emma worked hard, she went to wash for people in Logan so Jacob could buy horses to run a small piece of land.  He went up Logan Canyon when 14 years of age all alone and got enough lumber to build the frame house for his mother.

Written by Fred Nuffer for 1938 Cornerstone at USU

Old Main at Utah State Agricultural College (USU now), Logan, Utah, about 1900. The iconic front and tower were build in 1902.  Fred Nuffer provided 3,000 feet of cut stone for the construction of the south wing.

From Utah State’s Facility Planning.

“Old Main is the landmark of Utah State University and remains the oldest academic building still in use in the state of Utah.  In 1889, plans for “The College Building” by C. L. Thompson were selected by the Board of Trustees just two weeks after the land for the Logan campus was secured. The site was chosen the next day so that the main tower would be due east of the end of Logan’s Seventh Street —Today’s Fifth North.  Construction began immediately on the south wing of the three -part building and was completed in 1890.

“With more money appropriated in 1892 than anticipated, the Trustees hired [K]arl C. Schaub to redesign an enlarged structure and the construction began for the east part of the central section and the north wing.  It wasn’t until 1901 that the money was assured for the completion of the building. The front portion along with the tower was completed in 1902 with the design of H. H. Mahler.

Fred Nuffer provided his own contribution to the construction of the south wing of Utah State’s Old Main.  Another interesting side link, Karl Conrad Schaub’s widowed mother married Fred’s father, John Christoph Nuffer.  She was Anna Maria Alker who married him Conrad Schaub who left her widowed in 1894.  Fred Nuffer provided stone, Karl provided design.  Karl and Fred’s brother, John were friends and worked on buildings together.

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The full title of this article from the book was named, “WRITTEN BY FRED NUFFER AT REQUEST OF OFFICIALS OF UTAH STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE TO BE ENCLOSED IN CORNER STONE LAID IN 1938, TO BE OPENED IN 1988, THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THE COLLEGE.”

Utah State was founded in 1888.  It appears that the cornerstone was opened at 50 years in 1938 and a new cornerstone was sealed to be opened in 1988.  As Fred Nuffer was involved with some of the construction of the campus, he was requested to write for the cornerstone.  This was the original part of Old Main, south wing, of what is now Utah State University in Logan, Utah.

“I will recount in detail, as I remember it, the work done by myself and others in supplying stone for the construction of the Utah State Agricultural College buildings in Logan, Utah.

“In the year of 1891-1892, I made contract with Mr. Venables of Ogden to deliver about 3,000 cubic feet of cut stone.  Mr. Venables had previously tried to get the stone somewhere south of the valley, but found the stone unsuitable, and the party could not fill the order.  As I had furnished stone for several buildings in Logan, Mr. Venables came up to see me.  I lived near the quarry at that time.  He inspected the quarry and pronounced the stone suitable and gave me a contract to fill the order.  The quarry was located about ten miles up Cub River Canyon from Franklin, Idaho, on the left side slope going up the river, on a small tributary creek of Cub River called Sheep Creek.

“All work was done by hand.  The main ledge was about 20 feet above ground and about 20 feet wide and 400 to 500 feet long.  We used 12 foot churn drills and blasted large black loose from the main ledge.  We had to be careful how much powder we used so as not to shatter or cause seams in the stone.  We usually had to put a second charge in the opening made by the first charge to dislodge the block from the main ledge.  The block so dislodged was from 6 to 7 feet thick and about 20 feet long.  From then on, all tools used were hammers, axes, wedges, and squares.  Grooves were cut with axes wherever we desired to split the block, then wedges were set in the grooves about ten inches apart and driven in with hammers.  Then we dressed them down to the right measurement allowing one half inch for the stone cutters to take out all the tool marks we made.  Mr. Venables furnished bills for stone in dimension sizes as needed in the building.

“My brother, C[harles]. A[ugust]. Nuffer, worked on the job the whole time it lasted.  I also had a man by the name of Ed Hollingsworth of Preston, also Mr. A. Merrill and Mr. Abel Smart of Cub River, and Mr. Robert Weber of Providence.

“It took part of two years for the job, 1891-1892.  The hauling was all done with wagons and horses: 30 to 35 cubic feet was a good load for two horses.  The following names were the men doing the hauling: John McDonald of Smithfield, Jean Weber of Providence, and Jake Rinderknecht of Providence hauled more than any other.  He used to leave home at 3 a.m., load up the same day and get back to Logan by 3 p.m. the next day.  It was very hard on the horses.  I also hauled a good many loads with my own team.  All loading was done by hand on skids.

“I got 40¢ per cubic foot, of which 20¢ was paid for hauling.  We had a hard time handling the name stone to go on the front of the building.  When it was ordered it had 30 cubic feet in it and only one foot thick.  When the stonecutters got through with it they had found it too big to be hoisted in place so they made it smaller until there wasn’t much left.

“The most difficulty I had was in not getting my pay from Mr. Venables.  We overlooked a large 4-horse load at the final settlement.  A few minutes after I had signed the receipt for the final payment in full I discovered my mistake.  Mr. Venables refused to pay for it, although I produced the bill of lading signed by him.  He didn’t dispute the debt, but said he had a receipt paid in full.  He didn’t have anything, and the government property couldn’t be attached, so I was the loser of about $15, which seemed a lot of money to me at that time.

“by Fred Nuffer, Sr.