Fred & Vic Hunt

Fred and Vic Hunt, with Clara, Bert, Harold, and Mary

I stumbled upon this photo.

Fredrick Lawrence Hunt, born 18 September 1887 in Plain City, Weber, Utah, married Victorine Sharp, born 23 November 1889 in Plain City.  Victorine Sharp is the brother to my Ethel Sharp and daughter of Milo Riley and Mary Ann Stoker Sharp.  Fred and Vic were married 25 November 1907 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.

Fred and Victorine Hunt marriage license

Fred and Vic had 5 children, Clara Leona born 14 October 1908, Fredrick Bert born 20 August 1910, Harold born 24 March 1914, Mary born 12 October 1916, and Howard born 6 September 1921.

Howard died in World War II 12 May 1944 in Italy.  Bert was electrocuted with his son Bob on 4 September 1960.

Hunt Death Notice

Here is another photo I have of the family.

Fred and Vic Hunt with Mary, Fred, Harold, Howard, and Clara

Here is Vic with two of her daughters, Clara and Mary in 1963.  Fred passed away 23 Decemmber 1967 in Ogden.

Clara Wilbur, Mary Cowan, Victorine Hunt in 1963

Clara married Glen Monroe Wilbur and passed away 9 October 1980.

Victorine passed away 27 August 1987 in Ogden.

Harold married Ina Etherington and died 28 May 2002 in Plain City.

Mary married Carl Richard Cowan and passed 7 March 2016 in Layton, Davis, Utah.

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History of the Adolph Neuffer Family

Emma and Adolph Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The title of this entry in the book is “HISTORY OF THE ADOLPH NEUFFER FAMILY.”  I really don’t have much information on this family as can be evidenced by the quality of the photos I have as well.

“Adolph Neuffer was born in Neuffen, Wurtemberg, Germany, on April 14, 1875, a son of Johann Christoph and Eva Catharine Greiner Neuffer.  He came to the United States when he was only 5 years old.  His family settled in the small town of Providence, Utah,  All children 7 years old and younger wore long dresses.  His family moved to many different small town in Idaho.  Adolph was a stone mason by trade although he worked for Borden’s Milk Company for years before moving to Salt Lake City.  He met his future wife in Logan.  She was Emma Margaret Rinderknecht.  He married her on January 8, 1899.  They were endowed on January 14, 1900.  Adolph died September 21, 1955.  He is buried in the Elysian Burial Gardens in Millcreek, Utah.

“He was divorced from Emma after 44 years of marriage.  He married Grace Irene Frasure on August 9, 1943.  Later, they divorced.

“Adolph’s first wife was Emma Margaret Rinderknecht.  She was born in Providence, Utah, on May 15, 1873.  She was a twin.  Her twin brother, Joseph Hyrum, was given away at birth.  He died because the people he was given to didn’t know how to take care of him.  Emma had to work hard to help her widowed mother.  She would take vegetables to Logan to sell.  She also did washing for people.

“She was the mother of nine children.  Edna and Leona were children by her first marriage to James Peterson.

“Adolph and Emma had seven children together.  She died in Ogden on July 8, 1950.  She is buried in the Elysian Burial Gardens.

Ida, Elvin, Melvin, Lyman, Leona, Blanche, Edna, Dolores, Eva Nuffer

“Emma’s oldest daughter was Emma Edna.  She was born in Providence, Utah, on August 16, 1896.  She was married to Robert Early.  They had three daughters; Tacoma, and twins Doris and Dorothy.  Edna had one daughter, LaRue, by a previous marriage.  One twin, Dorothy, died as an infant.  Doris died when she was in her early twenties.  La Rue died in June, 1985.  Edna was divorced and later married Harold Hart.  They lived in Ogden,  Edna died August 26, 1969.

“Leona was born in Providence, Utah, on December 6, 1898.  She was married to William Walker.  They had four sons; Donald, Dale Lawrence (better known as “Bob”).  Then there was Billy who died when he was nine years old, and Dick died when he was about 26 years old.  Leona was divorced and later married Ray Andrus.  They lived in San Jose, California.  Leona died February 28, 1982.

“Lyman Adolph was born January 30, 1901, in Preston, Idaho.  He is married to Elizabeth Johanna Mellegers.  They had two children: Larry, who was drowned while trying to save another fellow; their daughter, LaRene, who lives in West Valley City.

“Eva Katharine was born in Preston, Idaho, on February 28, 1903.  She was married to John Allen Ricks.  They had one son, Jack Ricks.  They were divorced.  She married Earl Hansen; they were divorced.  She married Floyd Lutzai.  She died on November 1, 1973.

“Ida May was born on November 24, 1906, in Preston, Idaho.  She was married to William Henry Harman.  They had two sons, Bill and Bob.  She lives in 29 Palms, California.  Her husband has passed away.

“Blanche Josephine was born on March 12, 1908, in Preston, Idaho.  She married Christian Hansen, they had one daughter, Dorothy.  They were divorced.  Blanche married Neldon Peter Parker, they had one son, Blaine Parker.  He was drowned in the canal near their home.  They lived in Bennion.

“Elvin Joseph Neuffer was born on December 17, 1910, in Preston, Idaho.  He was married to Mildred Terry.  They had four children.  they are Marilyn, Nina, Bonnie, and Danny.  Millie had one son, Lynn, by a previous marriage.  Millie died at the age of 47, on September 3, 1964.  Elvin married Winona Mondragon, later divorced.  He then married Tessie Larsen, they divorced.  He married Joan Wheatly.  They have three children; Margaret, Jennifer and Joseph.  Elvin and his wife and three children live in Murray, Utah.

“Melvin Hyrum Neuffer was born on December 17, 1910, in Preston, Idaho.  H ewas fifteen minutes younger than his twin brother, Elvin.  He married Eveline D. Cornell.  They have six daughters; Shirlene, Kathleen (Kay), Susan, Holly, JuLee and Darla.  Melvin and Eveline have lived in the same house for 46 years, which is in Midvale, Utah.  They have been married for 52 years.

“Anna Dolores was born on May 12, 1913.  She was married to John Leonard Denovellis.  They only had one son, “Bud.”  Dolores and Johnny were both killed as they crossed State Street.  They were together.  They died September 9, 1979.

Written by Melvin H. Neuffer  108 East 7660 S  Midvale, Utah 84047

Ogden Cemetery 2018

We attended the Jonas Reunion near Huntsville, Utah earlier this month.  After playing for a couple of days, we headed home.  My poor family knows no trip is complete without a stop at a cemetery.  Here are some photos for our Ogden City Cemetery stop.

William Scott Donaldson and Mary Elizabeth Donaldson graves; Paul, Hiram, Aliza, and Lillie Ross

The first set of graves in this picture above are of William Scott Donaldson and Mary Elizabeth Williams Donaldson.  I have previously written part of their story.  William Scott Donaldson was born 18 June 1865 in Joyceville, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada and died 12 September 1913 in Ogden of cancer.  Mary Elizabeth Williams was born 7 April 1869 in Ogden and died 29 March 1951 in Ogden.  They married 2 October 1890 in Slaterville, Utah.  Their son, David Delos Donaldson, is my Great Grandfather.

 

David Delos Donaldson and Berendena Donaldson graves; Paul, Lillie, Aliza, and Hiram Ross

The second set of graves in this picture above are of David Delos Donaldson and Berendena “Dena” Van Leeuwen Donaldson.  I have previously written part of their history.  David Delos Donaldson was born 26 March 1894 in Evanston, Uinta, Wyoming and died 24 September 1953 in Salt Lake City of emphysema.  Dena Van Leeuwen was born 28 December 1898 in Ogden and died 5 March 1959 in Ogden.  They married 16 July 1919 in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Their daughter, Gladys Maxine Donaldson, is my Grandmother.

Gerhardus Hendrik Van Leeuwen and Hermina Janzen Van Leeuwen; Paul, Hiram, Aliza, and Lillie Ross

The third set of graves in this picture above are of Gerhardus Hendrik Van Leeuwen and Hermina Janzen Van Leeuwen.  I have previously written part of their account.  Gerhardus Hendrik Van Leeuwen was born 16 October 1856 in Oldenzaal, Overijssel, Netherlands and died 5 January 1932 in Provo, Utah.  Hermina Janzen was born 19 August 1860 in Gorssel, Gelderland, Netherlands and died 9 June 1921 in Ogden.  They married 31 March 1880 in Arnhem, Gelderland, Netherlands.  Their daughter, Berendena Van Leeuwen, is my Great Grandmother.

Biography of Regina Wanner by Alma Naef

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The title of this entry in the book is “REGINA NUFFER WANNER taken from a biography by her daughter ALMA KATHERINE SCHEIBEL NAEF.”  I have provided other biographies of Regina, the main one can be found here.

“Regina Nuffer was born January 26, 1869, at Neuffen, Germany.  A daughter of Johann Christoph and Eva Katharina Greiner, she came to Utah with her family after they were converted to the gospel.  She married Jacob Scheibel July 15, 1889, in Pleasant Valley, Carbon County, Utah.  Her first child, Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef, was born, September 27, 1889.  When her child was 6 months old, she and her husband separated and she moved back to Mapleton, Idaho, where she stayed with her parents on their farm.  During this period she would help people when they were sick, and her mother would take care of her child.

“In about 1893 after the death of her mother she moved to Weber County, Utah, and worked for the Will Taylor family in Farr West and the Bowman family in Ogden.  She again returned to her father’s farm.

“On her way home she stopped in Logan and walked out to Providence to visit a friend.  While eating lunch she happened to think that she had left her new coat on the train.  She went back to Logan to the train station and they sent out a tracer.  In a few days she got her coat back.  After returning to Idaho she worked for several people in Franklin and Preston.  She lived in one room of her brother John’s home in Preston.  Her brother was on a mission in Germany at the time.

“On August 31, 1898, she married John George Wanner in Logan, Utah.  That winter she lived on his ranch in Work Creek or Glendale, Idaho.  In April she moved with her husband, daughter, and step son, Wayne, to the Bancroft flat a little west of where Grace is now.

“She was known as a fine well mannered woman.  Her niece, Athene Hampton, said that toward the end of her life her health was not very good and she had a hard time speaking.  When Athene and Louisa Nuffer would visit, they would converse by writing notes to each other.  She died on March 10, 1942, in Preston, Idaho.  Her funeral in Preston was very well attended.

Jim & Ko Tateoka

Jim & Ko Tateoka

Scanning photos for a friend, I stumbled upon this photo in a set of pictures that seem to be an Emerson Ward party likely in the early 1980s.  Since I recognized these two, I thought I would share.  Rather than write a history of them, I will share their detailed obituaries.  Jim & Ko lived not too far from me when growing up.  I remember meeting Ko on several occasions at Brucia Crane’s home as a young kid.  Jim sometimes would help move water for the Werners who lived near us.  A couple of times while we swam in canals, he would pull up and visit with us and tell us to be careful.  Later, I come to know their children, and Ted has become a very good friend of mine.  Interesting who comes in and out of our lives.

“Jim Suyetaka Tateoka Hazelton, Idaho

“Jim Suyetaka Tateoka of Hazelton, Idaho was called back to his heavenly home on November 1, 2006, at the age of 83. He died of complications related to Alzheimer’s disease. Jim was born on February 20, 1923, in Garfield, Utah to Tokizo and Natsuko Tateoka. When he was a young child, the family moved to Ogden, Utah. He was fourth in a family of five children. Jim grew up and acquired his love of farming on the small truck farming operation the family ran. Jim graduated from Ogden High School in 1941. He excelled in his studies maintaining excellent marks throughout his formal school years. Jim served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He saw action in Italy. Jim was a member of the highly decorated 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Many of his army buddies were Japanese Americans from Hawaii. They taught him to speak “Pigeon English” and to play the ukulele. He would sing Hawaiian songs to his family. Some of the songs included, “Don’t Say Aloha When I Go,” “Sweet Leilani” and “Hula Oni Oni E.” This provided many hours of enjoyment to his children. Jim was a quiet person and yet he had a quick wit and a “fun” side. After he was discharged from the Army, he and his brother Matt purchased a farm in South Jordan, Utah. On Febrary 11, 1956, Jim married Ko Takeuchi in Salt Lake City, Utah. They recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with all their family in attendance. He continued to farm in South Jordon and with Ko began to raise a family of four sons and one daughter. In 1969, Jim took a “leap of faith” and moved his family to farm in Hazelton, Idaho. The family has received many blessings from this move. He was a member of the LDS Church and served as a home teacher and membership clerk to four bishoprics. Jim and his family were sealed and his marriage solemnized in the Ogden Temple May 25, 1976. He is survived by his wife Ko, and children, Mark (Itsuko), Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, Paul (Nadine), Hazelton, ID, Penny, Portland, OR, Ted (Rebecca), Hazelton, Idaho, Tom (Jami), Waukesha, Wis.; grandchildren, Luke, Charlotte, Joseph, Elise, Benjamin, Claire, Olivia, Sophia, Amelia, Julia, Grace, Mae and Tak; his brother; Tom of Riverton; and sister, Momoko of Salt Lake City. He was preceded in death by his parents and brothers, Sam and Matt. The funeral will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006, at the Emerson LDS 1st Ward Church, 127 S. 950 W. in Paul, ID, with Bishop Ted Tateoka officiating. A viewing will be held Friday, November 3, 2006 from 7-9 p.m. at the Hansen Mortuary Burley Chapel, 321 E. Main St. and one hour prior to the service from 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. at the church. Interment will be at the Paul Cemetery with military rites. The family would like to express their gratitude and heartfelt thanks to Dr. Richard Sandison for his faithful and tireless service, and to the staff of the Cassia Regional Medical Center and Hospice for the loving care that was extended to Jim and his family during his stay. The family would especially like to thank Barbara West his attending nurse for her kindness and excellent care she gave to Jim.

“Ko Takeuchi Tateoka died peacefully in her home on April 14, 2013. Her loving family surrounded her, as did the soft light of the late afternoon sun, fresh flowers in colorful bunches, and Luna, the new family cat. Ko was 80 years old.
The Tateoka family will receive friends on Friday, April 19, 2013 from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in the viewing room at the Morrison Payne Funeral Home on 321 E Main St. Burley, Idaho. Funeral services for Ko will be held on Saturday, April 20, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at the Emerson 1st Ward LDS Church located at 127 South 950 West, Paul, Idaho. (Bishop Burt Belliston officiating). Prior to the funeral, a viewing will take place in the Relief Society room of the Emerson LDS Church from 10:00 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Burial services will be held immediately following the funeral at the Paul Cemetery on 550 W 100 N Paul, Idaho.
Ko was born in the Sugar House area of Salt Lake City, Utah on May 25, 1932. Her parents, Seiichi and Tsune Takeuchi had immigrated to the U.S. from the coastal city of Mikawa, Ishikawa, Japan 14 years earlier in 1918. Ko was the third and last of three daughters born to the Takeuchis. Older sisters, Kimi and Fumi were ages 12 and seven at the time of Ko’s birth.
“In 1935, Ko’s family moved from the Sugar House area to a home and small truck farm on 2213 South 4th East in Salt Lake City. Ko entered first grade at Madison School on State Street and 24th South and continued attending the school through the ninth grade. She then attended Granite High School on 3303 South 500 East and graduated in 1949. Ko earned her teaching degree in Business Education in 1954 from the University of Utah. She took a teaching position at Olympus High School where she taught typing and shorthand from 1954-1956. Throughout her life, Ko gave much credit to her father Seiichi who had always stressed the importance of education. Despite the many hardships and barriers of those times and as a result of his influence, Ko and her two sisters received their college educations.
“In February of 1956, Ko married Jim Tateoka, a farmer from Garfield, Utah and moved to South Jordan Utah. Jim and his brothers farmed ground on 10000 South 2700. It was there that four sons and a daughter where born to Ko and Jim. In 1969, they moved their young family to a farm in Southern Idaho’s Magic Valley off of Kasota Road in the Emerson area. Ko was a fulltime homemaker and mom until 1980 when she re entered the teaching ranks. She taught 3rd grade at Eden Elementary School in Eden, Idaho and later took a teaching position in the business department at Minidoka County High School in Rupert, Idaho. Ko retired from teaching in 1993. She found teaching to be a very rewarding and fun profession.
“Ko enjoyed membership in various community organizations including the Kasota Sagehens, the Delta Kappa Gamma Society, The Mini Cassia Retired Teachers Association and the area “Nisei” Club. She was a strong member of the LDS Church, serving in many positions in the Emerson 1st Ward and Paul Stake. Ko enjoyed gardening, traveling, movie going, watching football and visiting with her kids, grandkids, and many friends. She loved the holiday season and the cheer, lights, gifts and joy it always brings.
In her later years, Ko cared faithfully for husband Jim who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. He passed away in the fall of 2006. In October of 2010, Ko began her extended stay at Parke View Rehabilitation and Care Center in Burley, Idaho. She resided there until returning to her own home on Kasota Rd. in recent weeks.
“Ko is survived by her five children, 13 grandchildren, and three great grandchildren. They are: son Mark and his wife Itsuko of Miliani Hawaii and their two children, Luke, also of Miliani, and Charlotte of Salt Lake City, son Paul and his wife Nadine of Hazelton, Idaho and their three children, Joseph of Chicago, Illinois (wife Alison, son, Parker), Elise Mongillo, from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, (husband, Anthony, sons, Oliver, and Nikolas) and Benjamin of Provo, Utah (wife, Alexa), daughter Penny from Portland, Oregon, and her daughter, Claire from Brooklyn, New York, son Ted and his wife Becca from the Emerson Area, and their four daughters, Olivia Brown of Provo, Utah, (husband, Braeden Brown), Sister Sophia Tateoka ( currently serving in the Honolulu, Hawaii Mission) and Emi and Ju Ju (Emerson Area) and son Tom and his wife Jamie of Waukesha, Wisconsin and their three children, Grace, Mae and Takeuchi. (Ko’s parents and sisters, Kimi and Fumi are deceased.)
“Many many sincere thanks are due the following individuals and groups: The wonderful staff at Parke View Rehabilitation and Care Center, Dr. Glen Page, Deanna, Pam and Amanda of Horizon Hospice, Bishop Burt Belliston, Dustin McCurdy and family, Loa Maxwell and Margaret Merrill, The Emerson 1st Ward Relief Society, Jan Allen, Mildred Whitesides, and Ralph, Ben and Kristie. Thanks also to the many friends who called, stopped by, and brought in meals, sweet eats, cheer, and support during Ko’s time at home. We appreciate you!
“Services are under the direction of Morrison Payne Funeral Home, in Burley.

Written by Fred Nuffer for 1938 Cornerstone at USU

Old Main at Utah State Agricultural College (USU now), Logan, Utah, about 1900. The iconic front and tower were build in 1902.  Fred Nuffer provided 3,000 feet of cut stone for the construction of the south wing.

From Utah State’s Facility Planning.

“Old Main is the landmark of Utah State University and remains the oldest academic building still in use in the state of Utah.  In 1889, plans for “The College Building” by C. L. Thompson were selected by the Board of Trustees just two weeks after the land for the Logan campus was secured. The site was chosen the next day so that the main tower would be due east of the end of Logan’s Seventh Street —Today’s Fifth North.  Construction began immediately on the south wing of the three -part building and was completed in 1890.

“With more money appropriated in 1892 than anticipated, the Trustees hired [K]arl C. Schaub to redesign an enlarged structure and the construction began for the east part of the central section and the north wing.  It wasn’t until 1901 that the money was assured for the completion of the building. The front portion along with the tower was completed in 1902 with the design of H. H. Mahler.

Fred Nuffer provided his own contribution to the construction of the south wing of Utah State’s Old Main.  Another interesting side link, Karl Conrad Schaub’s widowed mother married Fred’s father, John Christoph Nuffer.  She was Anna Maria Alker who married him Conrad Schaub who left her widowed in 1894.  Fred Nuffer provided stone, Karl provided design.  Karl and Fred’s brother, John were friends and worked on buildings together.

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The full title of this article from the book was named, “WRITTEN BY FRED NUFFER AT REQUEST OF OFFICIALS OF UTAH STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE TO BE ENCLOSED IN CORNER STONE LAID IN 1938, TO BE OPENED IN 1988, THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THE COLLEGE.”

Utah State was founded in 1888.  It appears that the cornerstone was opened at 50 years in 1938 and a new cornerstone was sealed to be opened in 1988.  As Fred Nuffer was involved with some of the construction of the campus, he was requested to write for the cornerstone.  This was the original part of Old Main, south wing, of what is now Utah State University in Logan, Utah.

“I will recount in detail, as I remember it, the work done by myself and others in supplying stone for the construction of the Utah State Agricultural College buildings in Logan, Utah.

“In the year of 1891-1892, I made contract with Mr. Venables of Ogden to deliver about 3,000 cubic feet of cut stone.  Mr. Venables had previously tried to get the stone somewhere south of the valley, but found the stone unsuitable, and the party could not fill the order.  As I had furnished stone for several buildings in Logan, Mr. Venables came up to see me.  I lived near the quarry at that time.  He inspected the quarry and pronounced the stone suitable and gave me a contract to fill the order.  The quarry was located about ten miles up Cub River Canyon from Franklin, Idaho, on the left side slope going up the river, on a small tributary creek of Cub River called Sheep Creek.

“All work was done by hand.  The main ledge was about 20 feet above ground and about 20 feet wide and 400 to 500 feet long.  We used 12 foot churn drills and blasted large black loose from the main ledge.  We had to be careful how much powder we used so as not to shatter or cause seams in the stone.  We usually had to put a second charge in the opening made by the first charge to dislodge the block from the main ledge.  The block so dislodged was from 6 to 7 feet thick and about 20 feet long.  From then on, all tools used were hammers, axes, wedges, and squares.  Grooves were cut with axes wherever we desired to split the block, then wedges were set in the grooves about ten inches apart and driven in with hammers.  Then we dressed them down to the right measurement allowing one half inch for the stone cutters to take out all the tool marks we made.  Mr. Venables furnished bills for stone in dimension sizes as needed in the building.

“My brother, C[harles]. A[ugust]. Nuffer, worked on the job the whole time it lasted.  I also had a man by the name of Ed Hollingsworth of Preston, also Mr. A. Merrill and Mr. Abel Smart of Cub River, and Mr. Robert Weber of Providence.

“It took part of two years for the job, 1891-1892.  The hauling was all done with wagons and horses: 30 to 35 cubic feet was a good load for two horses.  The following names were the men doing the hauling: John McDonald of Smithfield, Jean Weber of Providence, and Jake Rinderknecht of Providence hauled more than any other.  He used to leave home at 3 a.m., load up the same day and get back to Logan by 3 p.m. the next day.  It was very hard on the horses.  I also hauled a good many loads with my own team.  All loading was done by hand on skids.

“I got 40¢ per cubic foot, of which 20¢ was paid for hauling.  We had a hard time handling the name stone to go on the front of the building.  When it was ordered it had 30 cubic feet in it and only one foot thick.  When the stonecutters got through with it they had found it too big to be hoisted in place so they made it smaller until there wasn’t much left.

“The most difficulty I had was in not getting my pay from Mr. Venables.  We overlooked a large 4-horse load at the final settlement.  A few minutes after I had signed the receipt for the final payment in full I discovered my mistake.  Mr. Venables refused to pay for it, although I produced the bill of lading signed by him.  He didn’t dispute the debt, but said he had a receipt paid in full.  He didn’t have anything, and the government property couldn’t be attached, so I was the loser of about $15, which seemed a lot of money to me at that time.

“by Fred Nuffer, Sr.

Cove Fort

Having taken work all over the western United States during the great depression, David Delos Donaldson finally landed employment at the Ogden Depot in 1937 as Supervisor of Maintenance.  In 1939, he took his wife, Berendena Van Leeuwen Donaldson, back to California for an extended trip to visit family on both the Donaldson and Van Leeuwen family lines.

David and Dena hit the 1939 San Francisco World Fair and then wound their way over to Phoenix and up through Utah back home to Ogden.  A number of photos exist from this trip, including these two from Cove Fort, Utah.

David and Dena Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

 

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

On 4 November 2017, our little Ross family traveled to Cedar City, Utah for the Cedar City Temple Open House.

We immensely enjoyed our visit.  Well worth the trip.  Beautiful temple in every regard.

Cedar City Temple

 

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at the Cedar City Temple Open House

 

Jill Hemsley with Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at Cedar City Temple Open House

After we drove past Cove Fort on the way down, I kept thinking of the picture of my Great Grandfather David Donaldson and Grand Uncle Dave Donaldson from 1939.  I knew on the way back I wanted to stop and see if I could find the same site.

We stopped and had a great visit with the missionaries who serve at the site.  They also helped us find the spot of the picture from 1939 and we took the following picture.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross with Jill Hemsley recreating a 1939 photo of David and Dave Donaldson.

Here is the photo again for comparison.  The door behind Uncle Dave is the one behind Aliza and Jill.  The grey rock at the right of the bottom window behind me is the same to the right of Dave.

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

The missionaries had to visit with others about the history of Cove Fort.  The large tree in the old picture was only removed a few years ago, along with the well that David and Dave are standing in front.  We were able to figure out which side of the fort from the shadows (both sides look the same).  The fort was restored in the 1990s, so you can see the improvements in the windows, mortar, and the top of the walls above the roof.    But the photo is roughly the same area and vicinity.

I literally stood on the ground where my Great Grandfather David Donaldson walked some 78 years earlier.  Thanks to my family for indulging me.

The fort was an interesting place to learn and stop as well.  I recommend any passing through to stop.