South Park Trapper Cabin

A few weeks ago, Aliza, Ted Tateoka, and I made a visit to the Laidlaw Kipuka.  We made a stop at the South Park Well near the south central part of the Kipuka.

Here is a picture of the sign (in the middle of nowhere!)

Sign at South Park Well

The sign is titled, “South Park Well Trapper’s Cabin”

It reads, “This humble cabin was built in 1940’s to house coyote trappers hired by the U.S. Government to aid local sheep ranchers.  Coyotes were much more plentiful in those days and did serious damage to the many sheep herds that grazed in Laidlaw Park.  There were several trapper’s cabins built in various locations across the desert, but this is the only one remaining within Laidlaw Park.  Please help us preserve it by taking only photos and leaving only footprints.”

Here is a picture of Aliza on the west side of the cabin.

Aliza Ross at South Park Well Trapper Cabin

A little later I stood Lava Point and took this picture looking south to give some idea of the size of the Laidlaw Kipuka.  Lava Point juts down into the kipuka about 2/3 of the way down.  Which means, this is only about the bottom 1/3 of the Laidlaw Kipuka.

Laidlaw Kipuka to the south from Lava Point

A while later to the east of Lava Point I took this picture to the north.

Laidlaw Park with the jutting lava flow and the remaining portion of Laidlaw beyond

Last, here is a picture of Aliza playing in a small lava bubble.

Aliza Ross playing in a lava bubble

 

 

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Racing Father Time

2017 is now ending.  Where in the world has it gone?  Here is a photo that I think more or less sums up the entire year.

Hiram, Lillian, Amanda, Paul, James, and Aliza Ross in 2017!

Ms. Brandi Teuscher took that photo and deserves the credit.  She had some difficult subjects to work with under the circumstances.

A 1956 Dodge Coronet with plenty of blemishes due to age.  She turned 61 this year.  Hopefully we can get her better looking in the future.

One of my favorite things in the photo, beyond the family and car, are the dandelions.  They make my heart happy.

Aliza turned 7, Hiram turned 5, Lillie turned 2, and James was born in March.  Amanda and I continue to mature in age and demeanor.  Our little family continues to grow.

In March we saw the raging Snake River over Shoshone Falls.

Hiram and Aliza at Shoshone Falls 19 March 2017

In April, the Snake River continued to rage so we took a picture at Minidoka Dam.

23 April at Minidoka Dam spillway

Our grass greened up and was beautiful and the kids enjoyed a new Radio Flyer wagon.

Lillie 23 April 2017

We attended the Open House and Rededication of the Idaho Falls Temple.

Idaho Falls Temple during the Open House

Hiram was antsy to start farming in June.

Hiram on Grandpa’s 1948 Ford 8N

During most of the summer, the kids loved to go for walks or bike rides in the evening.

30 July trip around Fairmont Street

We traveled to Rexburg for the 2017 Great American Eclipse!

Amanda during the Total Eclipse 21 August 2017

We enjoyed some hot miniture golfing in Twin Falls in September.

Twin Falls Miniture Golfing

The Annual Hemsley Camp Out also took place in September in Soda Springs.  We not only enjoyed the carbonated springs, we felt a few earthquakes too.

2017 Hemsley Reunion: Front kids (l-r) Aliza Ross, Lillie Ross, Olivia Hemsley, Hiram Ross; Second row Jill Hemsley, Amanda Ross, Derek Hemsley, Jordan Hemsley holding Jack Hemsley, Bryan Hemsley holding Red Solo Cup, with Zack Smart and Alyssa Hemsley behind; James Ross sitting in car seat

James grew up enough to look around, crawl, and Lillie grew enough to pull him in a wagon by September.

Lillie pulling happy James

Made a trip to Cedar City for the Cedar City Open House by November.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at the Cedar City Temple Open House

And Cove Fort.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross with Jill Hemsley recreating a 1939 photo of David and Dave Donaldson.

What shall 2018 bring with it?

I find myself echoing Jacob.  “And it came to pass that I, Paul, began to be old… the time passed away with us, and also our lives passed away like as it were unto us a dream.”  It passes too quickly.  We could make more memories, but health and money are limited.  Hopefully more memories and life in the upcoming year.

 

Beulah Duncan and Damey Ross

Beulah and Damey Ross

I received this photo a few years ago.  It just has “Beulah” written on the back of it.  I asked the person who provided it to see if they could get a higher resolution scan of the photo.  I don’t have one yet, but I can always hope.

There is really only on Beulah Ross in the entire extended family I am aware.  That is Beulah Estell Ross.  She was born 26 March 1908 in Twin Branch, McDowell, West Virginia.  She was born to Robert Leonard Ross (1888-1944) and Minnie Belle Hambrick (1889-abt 1985).  There are many questions about her father Robert.  I have heard stories from West Virginia family that he was running from the law when he visited them in the 1930s.  Which might lead to some explanation on why he is hard to track and records seem to be scant.

We believe Robert and Minnie had 6 children, but only 3 of them have we really been able to find or track.  Beulah Estell Ross is one of those children.  She met and married William Jackson “Jack” Duncan on 20 September 1922 in Burley, Cassia, Idaho.  He was born 26 September 1901 in Clinton, Van Buren, Arkansas.  That would put her at 14 years of age when she married in Burley to Bill, who was 21.

I have written of her grandparents, James & Damey Ross, before.  They lived in and near Paul, Minidoka, Idaho until the late 1920s.  The 1930 census found them in Bend, Deschutes, Oregon.

Looking at the photo, I am guessing Beulah is about 12-14, which puts us in the early 1920s and in southern Idaho.

Beulah and Jack had 4 children that we know.  Jack died 11 July 1977 in Sunnyside, Yakima, Washington.  Beulah remarried to a Kenneth K Marshall.  She then passed away 5 March 2002 in Toppenish, Yakima, Washington.  Jack and Beulah are both buried in Zillah.

Read her obituary here.

I found this note from a 2007 post.  I recorded these notes from a conversation with granddaughter Carol Ann Stone.

“We visited for a few minutes; she told me what she knew of her grandmother, Beulah.  Their story goes something like this.  Robert was an alcoholic and his wife Minnie had some sort of Drug addiction.  All the children were farmed out to others.  Beulah was taken in by her grandparents, my great great grandparents James Thomas Meredith Ross and Damey Catherine Graham.  She was taken and raised near Rupert, Idaho.  But her strict Mormon grandparents was a bit much for her so she was anxious to get out.  That came when she met a Jack or Mack Duncan.  She was 14 and married him.  They moved to Zillah, Washington and lived out the remainder of their days.  He died in the late 70’s and she died in 2002 at about 96 years of age.  They had four children, two of which are deceased.”

The more I looked at the photo, it dawned on me that the lady was her grandmother, Damey Catherine Graham Ross.

Damey Catherine Graham Ross

Here is a photo of James Thomas and Damey Catherine Ross.

James & Damey Ross

Robert, Beulah’s father, is brother to my John “Jack” William Ross.

After I realized that this photograph was another of my Great Great Grandmother, I was pretty excited.  It makes me want to be more diligent in chasing down a better scan of the photo.

Here are a couple of other photos with Beulah and Jack in them.  I don’t know the other individuals.  Some day….

Jack and Beulah Duncan

 

Beulah and Jack Duncan with unknown

 

Beulah’s Son

 

Beulah’s Son Bob

 

Jack and family 1

 

Jack and family 2

 

Jack and Beulah Duncan Family

 

John “Jack” Ross and Beulah Duncan

Cove Fort

Having taken work all over the western United States during the great depression, David Delos Donaldson finally landed employment at the Ogden Depot in 1937 as Supervisor of Maintenance.  In 1939, he took his wife, Berendena Van Leeuwen Donaldson, back to California for an extended trip to visit family on both the Donaldson and Van Leeuwen family lines.

David and Dena hit the 1939 San Francisco World Fair and then wound their way over to Phoenix and up through Utah back home to Ogden.  A number of photos exist from this trip, including these two from Cove Fort, Utah.

David and Dena Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

 

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

On 4 November 2017, our little Ross family traveled to Cedar City, Utah for the Cedar City Temple Open House.

We immensely enjoyed our visit.  Well worth the trip.  Beautiful temple in every regard.

Cedar City Temple

 

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at the Cedar City Temple Open House

 

Jill Hemsley with Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at Cedar City Temple Open House

After we drove past Cove Fort on the way down, I kept thinking of the picture of my Great Grandfather David Donaldson and Grand Uncle Dave Donaldson from 1939.  I knew on the way back I wanted to stop and see if I could find the same site.

We stopped and had a great visit with the missionaries who serve at the site.  They also helped us find the spot of the picture from 1939 and we took the following picture.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross with Jill Hemsley recreating a 1939 photo of David and Dave Donaldson.

Here is the photo again for comparison.  The door behind Uncle Dave is the one behind Aliza and Jill.  The grey rock at the right of the bottom window behind me is the same to the right of Dave.

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

The missionaries had to visit with others about the history of Cove Fort.  The large tree in the old picture was only removed a few years ago, along with the well that David and Dave are standing in front.  We were able to figure out which side of the fort from the shadows (both sides look the same).  The fort was restored in the 1990s, so you can see the improvements in the windows, mortar, and the top of the walls above the roof.    But the photo is roughly the same area and vicinity.

I literally stood on the ground where my Great Grandfather David Donaldson walked some 78 years earlier.  Thanks to my family for indulging me.

The fort was an interesting place to learn and stop as well.  I recommend any passing through to stop.

Flanders

John William Ross tombstone

(I originally published this in 2008.  I edited it and updated it with pictures for today.)

I thought I would write a little in relation to Veteran’s Day.  For the most part, it seems this holiday is somewhat forgotten in the United States.  Really, American’s celebrate the same day on Memorial Day in May.  I can understand the European View of holding it on the 11th of November.  It is the day WWI ended.

I remember well the time I first experienced Veteran’s Day.  I sat in the Eccles Ward Chapel in Patricroft, England.  I sat there on 11 November 1999.  The services started at 11 AM.  We had the hymn, opening prayer, and a few comments by the Bishop until 11:11 arrived.  It was then we took two minutes to remember what was done.

Growing up in Idaho means we had little or no realization of any war.  There are small war memorials inside of cemeteries to commemorate.  No war in modern days has taken place anywhere near Idaho.  Even the American Civil War means little to Idahoans.  My grandfather served in the Philippines during WWII but he spoke so little of it.  I had Uncles and Great Uncles who perished in WWI and WWII.  I had been to their graves but they were the dead, just like the other dead in the cemetery.  The idea of dying for one’s country meant very little to me.

Irwin John Jonas

One of my first memories of England is the day after we arrived.  We were taken into Altrincham Town Centre and there we proselyted for an hour or two on the way to the mission office.  I did notice the cenotaph.  I thought how oddly placed it was.  It was something that we have relegated mostly to cemeteries in the US.  Once and a while you find one in front of a town or city hall.

While I served in Hyde, Cheshire once of the way we knew where to turn in town was at the cenotaphs.  The same in Dukinfield.  When we arrived early at one member’s house we would loiter at the cenotaph to street contact until time for dinner.  A number of times I thought how oddly placed these things were.  I knew they were naming those who died in the ‘Great War’.  For some reason or another I thought they doubled up on the names over the various cenotaphs.  It never occurred to me names are not typically duplicated on these things, or if they do, the intention is not to do so.

Ellis Seth Jonas

Suddenly I found myself sitting in a church meeting remembering.  These souls did not fight for my country.  However I felt come into my heart a gratitude for their sacrifice.  Could I do the same thing if called upon?  Somehow a dawning realization came upon me of the hundreds if not thousands of names I had seen on cenotaphs in my first year in England.  They were everywhere.  There were continuous reminders of the dead who fought for their country.

About a month later I found myself walking the streets of Runcorn, Cheshire.  There is a large cenotaph probably 15 feet tall.  The bus would drive by it every day.  I could not help but notice the little red, fake flowers on popsicle sticks stuck in the flower bed all around it.  The cenotaph meant more to me by this point but what were the little red flowers?  I noticed each of them had a name written on them and they appeared hand-made.

James William Ross

I asked what the little red flowers meant that were still scattered everywhere a month after the 11th of November.  I was then told about Flanders Fields and the poppies.  The poem was shared with me.  It made sense, I felt the poignancy of it.  I have a cousin, Harry Coley (1891 – 1917) who died in Broodseinde, Flanders, Belgium as part of the war.  His body was lost in the mud and potholes of the war and never recovered.

The imagery is intense while the poem isn’t all that catchy to me.  In fact, some of it still doesn’t make sense to me so I share only the first verse here:

In Flanders Fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

David Delos Donaldson (back), John Edmund Donaldson (left), and William George Donaldson

Would I have this type of courage?  Would I be willing to go and serve my country so willingly?  Even if I was drafted, unwillingly?  To set aside all other hopes and aspirations to serve my country?  I did so to serve a mission for my church.  I would think I would be willing to for my nation.  While I am not entirely enamoured with my country at the present, would I still be willing to do it?  Probably.

In fact, I feel some desire to serve in the military.  My life hasn’t permitted the chance and my wife is against the idea.  I don’t think I will be making the decision to join.  But I wish to honour those who do and especially those who died in doing so.  Accordingly, when I saw my clock at 11:11 this morning, I stopped for 2 minutes to remember.  What does our future hold?  I don’t know.  But our past is nobler because of these good souls who gave all.  Not only to join, but they never returned.  We were on the side of right then, and our nation was preserved.  I hope and pray our nation continues on the side of right and we will yet be preserved.

An Wanner uncle of mine arrived in Whitney, Idaho a year after his death in WWI.  His remains arrived in a lead casket which was buried with great fanfare for the small community.  WWII repeated this scenario with another Uncle, another family line, buried in Richmond, Utah.  His body arrived months later and he was interred with great fanfare.  May we live our lives in such a way, regardless if dying for our nation, but let us die in such a way that the community wishes to come out and pay homage for your great sacrifice for the future of man, good, and our country.

Milo James Ross

The City of Neuffen

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

Neuffen train station – 2008

“Neuffen was the home city of our ancestors for at least the period of the early 1700’s to the late 1800’s.  It is the city in which the Mormon Missionaries converted Johann Christoph Nuffer and his family from which they left to come to America.

“Location: County of Swartzwald, State of Wurttemberg, West Germany, 18 miles SSE of Stuttgart.  In what is known as the Swabische Alb. (A high plateau that is deeply dissected by erosion making steep canyons and narrow valleys).  Because of the moist climate the hills are heavily forested.

Paul Ross at Neuffen train station – 2008

“Population: 1910 census, 19896 including 1,833 Protestants & 43 Catholics

“Altitude: 1,300 feet

“Climate: Moist and moderate, very similar to that of Western Oregon.  The countryside is very lush and green.  The principle forest tree is a form of Beech.

“Industry: Mainly farming and especially wine growing.  Neuffener wine is considered a very fine white wine.  At the time our ancestors lived there many of the residents and some of our ancestors were employed as weavers in a fabric mill.

Street cover – Neuffen in 2008

“A small stream runs through the town and at the time Johann Christoph Nuffer left there, it powered the local mill.  It was this stream that they damned up to be baptized in shortly before they left.

“The streets are narrow and all the businesses are on the main street which is the highway running through town.

“The valley is narrow so that most of the houses are on the slopes of the hills.

“The Hohen Neuffen stands prominently on the largest mountain to the West of the city.  This is less than a mile as the crow flies, but about 7 miles by car.

Paul Ross and Martinskirche – 2008, built in 1504

“The Evangelical (Lutheran) church, which our ancestors attended, is the only major church in town.  The parish records there contain the births and marriages of our people from the early 1700’s to present.  The church and City hall are still much the same as when our people were there.

Relief on Martinkirche, Neuffen – 2008, Christ in Gethsemane

“The house where Johann Christoph Nuffer lived faces on the main street and the stream runs by just a short distance behind it.

“The city was heavily damaged during the 30 year war and both world wars, but has been restored so that no damage can be detected.

“The cemetery is neat and well kept with many beautiful flowers in summer.  It is a nice setting overlook the city and with a good view of the Castle.  There are several Nuffers buried there, but they are all of recent times since the law in Germany only allows for a body to occupy a grave for 25 years after which it must be removed to make room for others.  Therefore, the cemetery is of little use in genealogical research.

“The town is typical of most of the small towns in that part of Germany in that most of the houses are stucco and the roofs are red tile.

“The beginnings of the town are not known, but it is known that it predates the castle which was built during or before the 1100’s.

Paul Ross with Neuffen behind – 2008

The Hohen – Neuffen

Neuffen Hohen – 2008

This is an entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.

“The castle ruins of Hohen-Neuffen are the largest in the Schwabian Alps and some of the most attractive.

“The approach to Hohen-Neuffen was still difficult up to 100 years ago, but this did not discourage romantic young people of the surrounding villages nor students from Teubingen from visiting the ruins.  In the 1860’s and 1870’s the authorities provided easier access to it.

“Because former residents of the villages had been carting away the stones in their oxcarts for cheap building material, the entire area is now protected as a memorial.

“The mighty corner towers of Hohen-Neuffen originated either under Duke Ulrich, who spent 10,700 guilder on the fortress between 1543 – 1550 or more probably were built by Duke Christoph who put 16,386 guilder into the project up to the year 1562.

“The towers served as protective towers flanking the outer walls and ramparts.

“At the foot of the hill are the villages of Neuffen, Linsenhofen and Frickenhausen.  In the distance is Nuertingen on the Neckar.  On a clear day the Katzenbuchel (200 ft mtn) is visible in the Odenwald (Oden forest), as are other landmarks.  From the bastion is a panorama of the surrounding scenes – Neuffen with the Martinskirche (St. Martins Church) and the quarry of the Nuertingen cement works.

Overlooking Neuffen

“Returning to the courtyard of the castle, next to the cistern on the east into which flowed the rain water from the roofs, is an embossed picture of Eduart Paulus who is credited with much of the research and preservation of the Hohen-Neuffen.  According to him, the Hohen-Neuffen was the residence of Theodorick the Great, but this is merely his opinion and has no basis in fact according to Dr. Weinland in his treatise about the area.

“It is known that Duke Ludwig (1568 – 1593) built the Ludwig’s bastion.

“Although it was besieged many times, it was never conquered.

“Earliest findings in the castle and surrounding areas include stone ax, skull and skeletal remains, shards, etc. of the stone age; and bronzes of swords, etc. of the bronze age.

“The first citadel or stronghold of the mountain above Neuffen was probably there about 1100.  The first authentic occupant or owner was Count Manegolt of Sulmetingen, County Biberach.  Presumably by the purchase from his father-in-law, Count Egino von Erach, he was able to acquire the surrounding villages of Balzholz, Beuren, Grossbettlingen and Linsenhofen.

“The first recorded mention of the Hohen-Neuffen is in 1198 in which the free nobles of Neuffen were named as occupants.  (There are detailed descriptions of their coats of arms.

“As lower adherents to the Kaiser of the house of Hohenstaufen, the Lords Neuffen played important political roles in the empire.  Heinrich I of Neuffen accompanied the 16 year old King Friederich II from Italy to Swabia.  Berthold II was the king’s councilor from 1212 to 1216 and from 1217 to 1224 he was Bishop von Brixon.  The brothers Heinrich and Albert von Neuffen took part in the crusade of Friederich II.

“The 13th century was an especially high point.  Gottfried von Neuffen was a noted Minnesinger (Minstrel) from 1230 – 1250.  The Neuffens were on the side of the younger King Heinrich IV on his revolt against his father Kaiser Friedrich II.  As his troops were first besieged in 1235, Heinrich von Neuffen and his son Gootfried the minnesinger were among the captives.

“By the end of the 13th century the entire domain had gone to the lords von Weinsburg through marriage and purchase.  In 1301 Konrad von Weinsberg, husband of Luitgard von Neuffen, (the last Neuffen heiress) sold it to Count Eberhard I of Wurttemberg for 8,500 marks.

“From 1361 to 1363 and from 1365 to 1366 Hohen-Neuffen was the home of Count Ulrich IV von Wurttemberg.  He named Sir Hans Spaeth von Salzburg as first commandant of Hohen-Neuffen.  In 1512 he attacked Abbon Georg Fischer von Zweifalten over a dispute.

“Because of his quarrel with the Confederation of Schwabia, Ulrich had to flee.  His wife Sabina, who had left him, received the Hohen-Neuffen for herself and her children Anna and Christoph, and through war debts of the Confederation the fortress because an Austrian possession.

“After a 15 year exile, Count Ulrich again succeeded in acquiring the Hohen-Neuffen which was the last stronghold to open its door to him.

“When in 1546 the Duke Alba, at the behest of the Kaiser, came to Wurttemberg, Count Ulrich once again had to flee, but he regained his property in 1547.  It met with disaster in 1549 when lightning struck the powder magazine and was again repaired.  His successor was Count Fredrich I.

“At the beginning of the 30 Years War in 1618 the business of reinforcing, provisioning and manning the fortress became vital.  After the defeat of Noerdlingen in 1634, Wurttemberg was overrun by the Kaiser’s troops.  Hohen-Neuffen was the last stronghold.  After some trickery, the fortress was given back in 1639 to Lord Eberhard III.  A salvo of cannons from the castle announced the close of the terrible war in 1648.  Repairs after the war were very slow.

“In 1730 King Friederich I of Prussia with his son the crown-prince visited the Hohen-Neuffen.  In 1733 Count Karl Alexander wanted to modernize it after the fashion of the French fortresses, with the help of engineering specialists.  After his death the work continued for a time, but was soon discontinued. The unfinished portions deteriorated rapidly because no one seemed to be concerned.  After Karl Alexander’s death his financier, the hated Jew Suess Oppenheimer, was apprehended.

Hohen-Neuffen

“Karl Alexander’s successor, Count Karl Eugen, showed some interest in rebuilding, but the work did not continue for long.  By 1741 the chapel fell in and was allowed to remain so, since the estimated cost of repairs of 2,374 guilder was not available.

“A number of political prisoners had been quartered in Hohen-Neuffen during Karl Eugen’s reign.  His successor, County Ludwig Eugen, received a report from his commandant in 1793 stating that nothing noteworthy had occurred in Hohen-Neuffen.  The county replied that he was happy to hear that nothing else had fallen in.

Neuffen with the Hohen on the hill

“Napoleon’s troops paid the fortress little attention.  In 1796 it was decided by the legislative assembly that because of more urgent need of funds, none was to be used for the maintenance of the Hohen-Neuffen.  The French congress ordered it to be demolished.  The villagers began to take away stones and tile with which entire houses were said to have been built.

“World War II saw the ruins used as an observation post by the air force and it was bombarded by American troops at their entry in 1945 and they in turn were fired upon by the town of Neuffen.  However, the hall and knights chamber were reconditioned.

“In 1948 at a meeting of the cabinet of South Baden, Wurttemberg-Baden, and Wurttemberg-Hoenzollern, the Hohen-Neuffen was declared to be a ruin.  Since 1957 American archaeologists have been interested in the Hohen-Neuffen.

Hohen-Neuffen from a vineyard below

“NOTE: The above is edited from a translation of “DER HOHEN-NEUFFEN Rundgang Durch Die Ruine Die Geschichte De Festung”

“There are many stories and legends about the Hohen-Neuffen most of which are untrue.  The above is probably the most authentic abridgement of the available written history.

“There are persistent stories of our ancestors, the Neuffers, occupying the castle, most of them arising from the fact that several occupants had the name or title of van Neuffen.  However, it should be noted that while von is a German title its derivation comes from its literal meaning “from”.  Therefore, von Neuffen is not necessarily a name but merely means “from Neuffen”.  It is possible that some of the occupants were related to us.  However, there is no direct evidence of this fact.

Hohen-Neuffen and Paul Ross in 2008