Unknown Pennsylvania Photo

Dad has continued to go through the items Grandpa and Grandma Ross left behind.  Here is a photo that unfortunately is likely lost to the past.  We are not sure why Grandpa and Grandma had it in their collection.  It could be an ancestor but it might simply be a flea market find.


Frankly, I cannot even tell for certain what the top of the photo is supposed to say.  Either way, there is the lady and the child in the bottom right corner.

The back of the photograph has “L. Whittling, Photographer, Cochranton, PA.” written on the back.   It also indicates “Presented to A Sawford”  For those interested, the back of the photo is shared below.

I attempted to find an A Sawford in the Cochranton area but did not immediately turn up anything definitive.  The other thing is we do not know if this person is related to Mr. or Ms. Sawford.  There is nothing to link Sawford to Cochranton.

One thing I can say, I do not have an ancestral line that came through Pennsylvania.  I cannot even find a relative that went to live in Pennsylvania on the Ross, Sharp, Stoker, Donaldson, or Van Leeuwen lines.  Hopefully with the limited information, someone related might be able to find this relative.



Airplane Junk

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Here is another random photo I had on my telephone.  This is a picture of a piece of airplane scrap that Grandpa had in his front yard.

The story goes that at some point in the past, this plane went down near Plain City.  I want to say the early 1960’s.  Grandpa picked up this scrap and kept it in his front yard since.  Not sure if the scrap landed near his home, I want to say I heard both variations on the story.   Grandpa has a copy of the newspaper article related to the crash.  If I come across the article as I scan things in the future, I will make it available.

Little Robin Hood

Here is a little picture of Hiram.  He likes to go around with a hanger pretending he is Robin Hood.  Grandpa decided to make him a little bow and arrows from his latest tree trimmings.  Hiram of course ran with it, even finding himself a hat and feather.  I am glad I snapped this picture while he was playing.

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Milo Ross random phone photos

I went through my phone photos the other day and found a couple of pictures of Grandpa, Milo Ross, I thought I would share.

These next four photos were from June 2013.  We stopped while traveling through.  You can see Grandpa goofing off in trying to get Hiram to take a $1 from him, whether from the floor, from his mouth, and Hiram was just not buying it as long as Grandpa still had his cane in hand.  Not sure why, but I snapped the picture of Grandpa going back into his home as we were leaving.

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Jon Williams took this picture of Grandpa and provided a copy to Grandpa.  Grandpa kept it on the wall and I took a picture of it.  I need to contact Mr. Williams and get a copy of the picture.

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Lastly,  I have this picture of Grandpa and Hiram just a month before Grandpa passed away.  Grandpa had thinned quite a bit and I believe you can see it in the photo.

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Then, a photo of some of the new medals Grandpa was going to be awarded.  Since he passed, we put them in a display case for the funeral.  The medals were all new even though some of the pins were awards he already had.

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Uncle Art’s Visit

14 Sep 1998, Paul Ross, Colleen Lloyd, Paul, Idaho

14 Sep 1998, Paul Ross, Colleen Lloyd, Paul, Idaho

This photo brings all sorts of memories for me.  I don’t have many pictures in my Grandma’s yard.  But this photo conjures all sorts of memories for so many reasons.  I stopped to visit Grandma one day and Uncle Art (1921-2004) and Aunt Mary Coley (1918-2014) were visiting.

Uncle Art took a liking to my little 1955 International R-100 and asked for me to take him for a ride in it.  He tried multiple times to convince me to sell it to him.  I would just laugh and tell him he did not have enough money for me to sell it to him.  Finally, he asked for a number and I threw out $5,000.  He said, “Well, at least let me pay for the ride.”  He had me pull in to the gas station and paid to fill it up.  We probably drove for an hour, he just wanted to keep going.

Uncle Art or Aunt Mary took the photo.  I think it says quite a bit for Grandma to lose her husband 23 years earlier but still to keep regular contact with her first husband’s Uncle and Aunt.  I have later found out she was quite good at keeping in contact with most of his family even despite other marriages and the passage of time.  I visited Clara McMurdie Coley in 2008, after probably 15 years since the last time I visited her (with Grandma), she commented that it had been quite some time since she had heard from Colleen.  I then told her Colleen had died 9 years previously and her comment was, “I wondered why I stopped getting letters and visits”, yet she did not know Grandma had passed.

I still have the shirt.  I wish I still had the shoes.  I wish I still had the truck.  I wish I still had Grandma.  But this picture also points out a little joke between us regarding her height and mine.  Hence the elbow on her shoulder.

I remember we enjoyed some ice cream with Uncle Art & Aunt Mary before I left.  Uncle Art shook my hand, gave me some $$ for my mission, and wished me well.  It is really the only memory I have of Uncle Art although I know I was around him more over the years.  He had a fun laugh, a sense of humor, love of old trucks, and seemed like a good man.

Separation Qualification Record

With the passing of my Grandfather, Milo James Ross, I have some documents available for me to scan and make available to others.  There is a heap of documents accumulated over 93 years to go through.  Nevertheless, I am happy to make this one available, and others in the future.

As this Separation Qualification Record indicates, “This record of job assignments and special training received in the Army is furnished to the soldier when he leaves the service.  In its preparation, information is taken from available Army records and supplemented by personal interview.  The information about civilian education and work experience is based on the individual’s own statements.  The veteran may present this document to former employers, prospective employers, representatives of schools or colleges, or use it in any other way that may prove beneficial to him.”

Separation Qualification Record page 1

Separation Qualification Record page 1

Separation Qualification Record page 2

Separation Qualification Record page 2

Old Ross/Sharp Photos

I thought some of you would like an update on a sort of miracle in the family.  Some old photos have surfaced in March and April of 2010 some of you will probably be very interested in.  (I republished this page because the links have all changed, so I just uploaded the pictures to avoid the link changes again.)  I also replaced the photos with fresh scans of the photos in February 2011.  If you downloaded the photos, you may want to download the newer scans.

Ethel Sharp was born in 1898 in Plain City, Utah to Milo Riley and Mary Ann Stoker Sharp.  Here is a photo of Ethel we found.

You can click on the photos for a closer look.

Another photo of Ethel and another friend, Gertrude Terry.  Ethel is on the right.

Gertrude Terry and Ethel Sharp

Another photo of Ethel and a cousin, Richard Thomas Stoker.

Ethel Sharp and Richard Stoker

Many of you are probably aware that Ethel Sharp was injured on the old electric train that went from Plain City in to Ogden.  After recuperating she took her insurance money, moved to Paul, Idaho, and opened a confectionery.  Here are two photos that recently surfaced of that little store in Paul, Idaho.  Obviously construction is not completed in this photo but the store was still open for business.

We don’t know the exact time frame when she purchased the confectionery, but some of the old checks, order sheets, and other paperwork call it the Streeter Confectionery.  We don’t know the location of this store, if she built it, or what happened to it afterward.

We do assume that she opened it while married to Mark Lewis Streeter who she married 7 May 1917 in Ogden, Utah.  We don’t know the exact date of the train wreck yet, but while in Paul she gave birth to a daughter 4 June 1918 named June Streeter.  Mark and Ethel couldn’t make things work and were divorced.  She remarried to Jack (John William) Ross 12 Jan 1920 at Fort Logan in Colorado.  Here is a photo of Jack and Ethel holding little June Streeter.

I have written more about Jack and Ethel at this link: Ross-Sharp Wedding.

4 Feb 1921, Milo James Ross was born in Plain City.

14 Feb 1922, Paul Ross was born in Paul, Idaho.  7 Nov 1923, John Harold Ross (Harold) was born in Burley, Idaho.

This is probably one of the last photos of Ethel Sharp Ross with baby Harold.

Here are some new photos of June, Milo, Paul, and Harold.  The first seems to be about 1925 and the later two around 1926 or 1927.

l-r: Harold, Milo, and Paul Ross with June Streeter

Ethel died of blood poisoning at 600 Cross Street in Ogden, Utah on 6 Aug 1925 after giving birth to Ernest Jackson on 16 Jul 1925 (he died 20 Sep 1925).  We don’t know why the family was in Plain City when she gave birth and passed away.  However, some time after the funeral Jack loaded up the children and took them to Rupert, Idaho to be with his parents for a time.  We don’t know where he went (find work, find a mother, who knows?).  However, after some time, we don’t know exactly how long, Jack’s parents could not take care of the 4 children anymore and asked the Sharp Family to come get them.

Os Richardson drove up to pick them up.  Eventually, June was raised by her Streeter grandparents; Milo was raised by Uncle Ed Sharp; Paul was raised by Aunt Vic Hunt; and Harold by Uncle Del Sharp.

Here is a picture of a bunch of Sharp cousins in a wagon in Plain City.

l-r: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp (cousin), and Bob Martin.

And another photo of Paul (R) and Harold (L).

Paul would die after falling out of a barn in 1932 just over 10 years old.

Now comes the story from the new photographs.  For reasons we do not know, the Sharp family did not like Jack Ross.  They did not allow him to visit his children.  All the mail received by any of the Sharp family for the Ross children was kept from them.  When Ethel’s mother (Mary Ann aka Lillie M Sharp) passed away, a photo album given to her passed to Vic Hunt.  Vic Hunt kept in her possession all the letters mailed from Jack Ross to the Ross boys as well as the photo album from which these photos come.  The photos and letters then passed to Vic Hunt’s son, Harold Hunt.  When Harold passed away in 2002, these passed to Harold’s nephew, Archie Hunt.  Archie just went through some of the stuff and found these items about March 2010 and gave them to Grandpa Milo Ross.

Milo James Ross went to visit Jack Ross in 1948 after receiving a telegram that Jack was dying in Livermore, California.  Jack mentioned to Grandpa that he had written after the boys went back to Utah, but Grandpa didn’t believe him.  Here we are, 70-80 years after the letters were written, and almost 90 years since some of the photos were taken.  Jack was vindicated to his own son 62 years later!  It was the first time Grandpa had seen the photos and letters he did not know existed.  How is that for a sort of miracle?  I hope at some point I can type up the letters and also make them available on here.  I know some of Grandpa’s family will have seen the photos, but know extended family will be interested in this find as well.

If anyone else has photos they would like to share, please let me know.  If you can fill any of the story, please let me know.

Oh, Grandpa finally answered one question he had when he visited his father in 1948.  One day working in the fields at Ed Sharp’s house as a kid, he saw a car at the end of the field.  The occupants did not leave the car but he could see a man watching him from the back window.  The car left and not until 1948 was it revealed to him that it was his own father looking at him across the field that day.  I can only guess what is going through Grandpa’s heart and mind as he reconciles his understanding of his own history in these letters.

l-r: Harold, Milo, Gladys, Milo, Caroline