Life History of Louisa Zollinger

 

Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman, Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes, Karl, Athene Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The full title reads, “LIFE HISTORY OF LOUISA ZOLLINGER sketch written by JENNIE S. NUFFER early details furnished by MARY Z. BULLOCK and EDWIN J. NUFFER Written November, 20, 1952”

“Louisa Zollinger was born 24 January 1864, at Providence, Utah, the daughter of Ferdinand Zollinger and Louisa Meyer.  She was the eldest of five children, her brothers and sisters being Ferdinand (born 24 January 1866), Bertha (born 3 August 1867), Mary Elizabeth (born 3 March 1870), and Sarah (born 26 July 1875).  Two children died in infancy.

“Living in a pioneer community, Louisa was subjected to all the hardships and trials of her day.  She has related many incidents concerning Indians in the early days of Providence.  She received her education in the district school, having gone through the 8th reader.

“Louisa loved to sew, and before she was fifteen she took a dressmaking course from a lady by the name of Maggie Hyrion.  She learned to cut patterns to fit them to a model.

“She was a very spirited and independent girl, and being the eldest she enjoyed telling her brother and sisters what to do.  She did what she could to help with making a living.  When she was fifteen she worked for a time in the Blanchard Hotel in Logan.  One summer she spent working at the Box Elder dairy at two dollars per week.  She helped milk eighteen to twenty cows.  The next summer she worked at a Logan dairy where she helped with the milking and cheese making.

“Louisa was quite popular with the young people and attended the dances in the community.  One dress she used to wear is still remembered by her sister Mary.  A seamstress came to the home and remained one week to sew the dress, which was of black wool trimmed with heavy black satin.  The young crowd also enjoyed house parties, candy pulls, and sleight (sic) riding parties.

“September 18, 1884, she was married to .John Nuffer at Providence, Utah, and they were sealed in the Logan Temple 15 July 1891.  They then moved to Glendale, Idaho, where her husband had homesteaded and built a small rock house.  Here she made a home for her beautiful flowers.  Snakes were very numerous, and she often told how she would send the dog into the garden first to flush out the snakes before she went into pick vegetables.

“She returned to her mother’s home at Providence for the birth of her first son, Luther Jacob.  Her next two sons, John Willard and Louis Ferdinand, were born at Glendale.

“In the fall of 1890 the family moved to Preston, where her husband had been called by the Church to take charge and superintend the building of the Oneida Stake Academy.  They rented a home on State Street for about one year until John could get a home built for them, which was a four room frame house.  Two more sons were born here, Herman Christopher and Austin Eckertt.

“In the spring of 1895 her husband was called by the Church to go on a mission to Germany, his native land.  Although Louisa had five small sons and was expecting another child, she encouraged him to fulfill the call.  A few months after her husband’s departure, her sixth son, Karl Aaron, was born.  Louisa accepted her responsibilities gladly and cared for her little family.  They did not suffer for the necessities of life, as her husband had left her provided for, and they had two cows to provided (sic) them with milk.  She was also able to knit and sew for herself and children.

“Following her husband’s return her first daughter, Agnes Louisa, was born.  Shortly thereafter John built a larger house of rock for his family.  Myron David, Florence Myrtle, Edwin Joseph, and Athene Barbara were born in this home.  Louisa also raised her grandson Karl Luther, following the death of his mother [Luther’s son].

Karl Nuffer

“Two more lovely homes were built for her by her husband, one a red brick and the other a cement block, where she lived until her death.

“Louisa was very active in the Relief Society, and served as a visiting teacher for many years.  She was very outspoken in defending the things she believed in.  She encouraged her children to seek a higher education.  Seen have attended college, two have fulfilled missions, one son has served as a bishop of his ward, and all her children have gladly accepted positions in the various auxiliaries of the church.

“She taught her children industry and thrift.  She was generous in giving to the poor, and at the same time gave encouragement to all to better their lot.  She was a good cook and neat housekeeper, and her love of sewing was evidenced in the living clothes she made for herself and children.

“The first great sorrow in her life was the death of her son, Karl Aaron on 7 February 1905, at the age of ten years.  Herman Christopher died 23 August 1940, and Austin Eckertt 2 March 1944.

“During the latter part of her life her health was very poor, but with a strong will and determination she carried on her household duties.  Her last illness (cancer) was very painful, and she spent several weeks at the L.D.S. Hospital in Salt Lake City, and the Preston Memorial Hospital in Preston.  She was released to her home few days before her death on Thursday, 25 October 1945.  Besides her husband she was survived by eight of her children, all whom were at her bedside, also 30 grandchildren, and 22 great grandchildren.

“Beautiful and impressive funeral services were held the following Monday at 2 o’clock in the Preston First Ward Chapel.  Burial was in the Preston Cemetery on 29 October 1945.

“THE ZOLLINGER NAME

“Zollo was an old Teutonic name appearing in documents of the 9th century.  The story goes that the Zollingers operating a ferry across the Rhine River near the Lake Constance and charged a toll.  From this trade or occupation came the name Zoll, meaning toll collectors.  They were not the only ones engaged in this profession, for the Romans, prior to this time, had officials appointed to supervise river traffic and collect tolls.

“Farmers by trade, the Zollingers called their settlements Zollinc-hoven, meaning the farms of the Zolling clan.  In that day Zollic-hoven was the name of two different places, Zollikon and Zollikofen.  The present cities, Zollikon near Zurich and Zollikofen near Bern are ample evidences of the settlements and estates once occupied by the Zollingers centuries ago.

“In a manuscript appearing in the periodical of the Swiss Genealogical Society “Der Schweizer Sammler und Familienforscher” in 1935, page 57-58 and 84-85, is an essay with the title “Uber Namesforschung: Der name Zollinger”.  Its author, Gustav Zollinger, Dr. Dentist and member of the Swiss Genealogical Society brings to light in a very comprehensive way, the history and movements of our people in their many places and occupations, from which has evolved the name Zollinger in its many variable spellings.  His work is well documented with sources from court, land, census, death, parish, and tithing records.

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Blessing of Elder John Nuffer

Austin, Willard, Luther, Louis, Herman, Myron, John, Florance, Edwin, Louisa, Agnes, Karl, Athene Nuffer

This is an entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.

I have shared John’s biography previously.

“By Apostle George Teasdale (mouth) and Presidents Seymour B. Young and George Reynolds, in ordaining him a Seventy and setting him apart to the Swiss & German Mission, Salt Lake City, Apr 12, 1895.

Letter accepting mission call

“Reported by F. E. Parker:

“Brother John Nuffer, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, and virtue of the authority and power of the Holy Priesthood, we lay our hands upon your head, and ordain you a Seventy in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and we seal upon you every gift and grace and qualification pertaining unto this high and holy calling in the Melchizedek Priesthood, that thou mayst be a preacher of righteousness, and have authority to win people to repentance, to baptize by immersion for the remission of sins, to lay on hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost, and to officiate in the ordinances of the House of God.

“We say unto thee, that inasmuch as thou shalt go forth humbly before the Lord, seeking for the spirit of this mission and called unto which you are ordained, that you shall be a preacher of righteousness in very deed, remembering that it is not by the wisdom of men that souls are converted unto Him, but by the revelations and gift of God.  Remember that thou art a servant of God, sent forth to call the people to repentance and to warn them of judgments to come, and will be necessary for you to seek the guidance and direction of the Almighty in all things, so that you may be led to the honest in heart, so that you may be enabled to act in wisdom every day of your life, that you may accomplish the purposes unto which you are ordained.

“We re-seal and confirm upon thee all they former blessing, and set thee apart to a mission to the Swiss & German Mission, to labor under the president thereof, wherever thou shalt be directed.  And in as much as thou shalt seek for it, the Lord will guide and direct thee to the honest in heart, and will give thee the convincing power to His spirit; out of thy weakness thou shalt be made strong.  Thy tongue shall be loosed, and thou shalt preach the gospel in the power and demonstration of the spirit of God, and your testimony shall be powerful to the convincing of the honest in heart.

“We seal these blessing upon thee, and dedicate thee to the service of God, praying unto Him that thou mayst go in peace and return in safety, that thy life may be precious on the seas or on the land, that no accident of any name or nature may befall thee, but when thou hast finished thy mission, thou mayst return in peace and safety to thy home, bearing many sheaves with thee which blessing we seal upon thee in the name of Jesus Christ.  Amen.

John ended his mission 3 July 1897.

Johann Christoph Nuffer

John Christoph Nuffer

This is an entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.  The book does not give a source, but reads as an obituary, but I cannot tell which newspaper or publication.  Some of the mistakes in it seem to show it was not written by a family member.  May actually be more of a quick biography than an obituary.  Some day I may know the source.  I have kept the capitalization and spellings as in the article.

You can find the biography of Johann as written by his granddaughter Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef.

“JOHANN CHRISTOPH NUFFER, Pioneer was born at the City of NEUFFEN State of Wurtemberg, Germany on the 6th of March 1835.  His parents were JOHAN JACOB NUFFER and MARIE MAGDALENA KIRNER NUFFER: his grandfather JOHAN CHRISTOPHER NUFFER, his wife CHRISTINA KATHARINA PFEIFFER died and he married his second wife MARIE KATHARINA KLEIN.  His great grandparents wher JOHAN JACOB NUFFER and ANNA MARIE SCHWINDLIN.  She and their ancestors were living in the City of Neuffen, a small city at the foot of the Schwabisen Alb in Southern Germany.  JOHAN CHRISTOPH NUFFER, the Pioneer was married to Agnes BARBARA SPRING, who died Feb. 29, 1867.  He had two sons with her, JOHN NUFFER born Dec. 4, 1862 and FRED NUFFER born Jan. 20, 1864.  He married EVA KATHARINA GREINER who with him and the family consisting of JOHN and FRED NUFFER of his first wife and REGINA, KARL AUGUST & ADOLF, his second wife, emigrated to the United States in May 1880 and came to Logan, Utah in June 1880.  In the year 1879 he with his wife had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints.

“In the Fall of 1880 he moved with his family to Providence in 1883 they again moved to Worm Creek, then belonging to the Franklin Ward, later the Preston Ward.  His son John homesteaded 160 Acres at that place at the divide between Worm Creek & Cub River.  They lived at that place until the Spring of 1884, when he homesteaded 160 acres on the Cub River side of the divide, now belonging to the Mapleton Ward.  Feb. 26, 1893 his wife EVA KATHARINA died; with her he had the following children, REGINA, KARL AUGUST, ADOLF, and MARIE who died Oct. 5, 1900, at the age of 9 years.  In the year 1895 he again married, to ANNA ELIZABETH REBER, she died Dec. 1, 1901.  In 1903 he again married MARIE ALKER, SCHAUB.  He died Apr. 12, 1908.

The Nuffer name

Coat of Arms for Martin Neuffer, 1594-1638

I had another person e-mail me this week attacking that I had the wrong spelling of my family line: Nuffer.  I am pretty sure I have my line correct because it shows on all legal documents, tombstones, and everything else I have seen.  I know some of the other family have changed their names to other variations thinking it is more correct.  I don’t really care to argue or dispute it, my direct line in the United States is not in question, nor is it in Germany for the first few generations before or after our family left.  Where the variations go before that are upon the spelling of an author and the spelling of names were not standardized.

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.  I will quote from the book itself.

“The name Neuffer, Nuffer and its many forms is of Celtic Origin and later became an Alemann surname.

“The Celt’s were barbarian tribes which occupied Southwestern Germany from at least the late 6th century B.C..  They were remarkable for their height, muscularity and fair coloring.  Their basic economy was mixed farming.  They were noted for their high spirits and love of war and excitement generally.  They were hospitable, fond of feasting, drinking and quarreling, and incapable of prolonged concerted action.  They loved art and greatly prized music and many forms of oral literary composition.  (Encyclopedia Britannica).

“Many Celtic villages have been uncovered in the area of Southwest Germany where our ancestors came from.)

“The Alemanni or Alamanni were a loosely knit confederation of Germany tribes who were first mentioned in connection with a Roman attack on them in 213 A.D..  They were originally composed of fragments of several Germanic peoples.  They had no central government and only joined forces when it was necessary for their defense.  Their language became the High German Dialects used in the Southwesternmost part of the German speech area.  Modern alemannic dialects include Swiss German, Alsatian and the German dialects spoken in Liechtenstein and the extreme western part of Austria.  (Encyclopedia Britannica).

“This is probably a major contributor of the Swabian dialect that our ancestors and the current population of Wurttemberg speak.  It is significantly different from the modern High German.

“Stawitz has stated that the meaning of the name refers to adjectives such as Awake, Springhtly, Merry, Gay, Chipper, Hale & Hearty, Vivacious, Full of Life, Ardent, Fervent, Lively.  (“Richard Stawitz “Die Neuffer aus Munsingen”)

“The name is part of a great group of original surnames in Southern Germany ending in er and one of the seven most prominent names in the region of the State of Wurttemberg.  (Die Nueffer aus Munsingen 1400-1900 by Richard Stawitz)

“The German pronunciation of the name is as follows:  Nuffer = Noofa oo as in book, short a.  The above is only an approximation of the u sound since there is no sound in the English language that exactly duplicates the German u in this case.  Neuffer = Noifa, oi as oy in boy, short a.  Nufer = Newfa.  When a name ends in er the r is dropped.

“The family name may have been taken from the town of Neuffen.  However, this is not certain as it appeared in several areas at about the same time.  This is about the time of the first written records in that part of Germany.  Since it is apparent that the name preceded the first records it becomes impossible to trace its exact origin.

“Today in Germany the Family Neuffer is the largest and most prominent of the different Neuffer, Nuffer, etc. families and Nuffer is the second.  There have been many other spellings of the name such as Nifer, Neifer, Neiffer, Nyfer, Neyfer, Neufer, Nufer, Nufer, Nuofer, Nuover, Nuber, Nuffer, and others.

“Our family came from Neuffen and spelled their name Nuffer for the last 2 generations prior to emigrating and Nufer for 3 generations before that.  Prior to the early 1700’s we have no positively accurate genealogical connections but it appears that we are connected to the Neuffer family.

“Since coming to America most of the family have kept the name as Nuffer but some members have changed it to Neuffer or Nufer.  Given the fact that the name has changed several times over the history in Germany it cannot be said that there is such a thing as “the” correct spelling.

“It is interesting to note that in Germany today if you find a community with Neuffers in it you will seldom find any Nuffers there and vs.  In the town of Neuffen which is supposedly the source of the Neuffer name there are no Neuffers living there, only Nuffers.  There is no record of any Neuffers having been born there.  There are records however of Neuffers having lived there for short periods as Government or Church officials.

“There is no doubt that we can bear this name with pride and dignity when we understand the noble origins and the distrinction with which our forbearers have carried it.

Included with this explanation regarding the Nuffer name, there is also a letter from W. Peter Nuffer of Richfield, Utah dated 4 January 1990 to Lloyd Neuffer of Ogden, Utah.  This letter included an editors note: “Because of Peter’s wide experience, while living and working in Germany, in searching original records and talking to many people carrying the different forms of the Neuffer name, he was appointed, at the Nuffer family reunion, in 1988, to determine the proper spelling of the name.  His opinion, contained in his letter, was that the spelling used during life should be used.  An attempt to follow this idea was used in compiling this family history.

Here are the contents of the letter.

“Dear Lloyd,

“After researching and thinking more about the subject I think it would be a mistake to spell Johann Christoph’s name Neuffer on the cover of the book.  I fear it would bring considerable criticism to you and may weaken the authenticity of the book.  Expecially since any serious researcher would not be able to find convincing evidence to favor the spelling Neuffer in relation to Johann Christoph.

“You say that you have seen the Neuffer spelling on Logan Temple records.  I have not been able to locate that, in fact enclosed you will find a copy of the Logan Temple Index card which shows the spelling as Nuffer.  On his birth and marriage records in Neuffen the name is spelled Nuffer.  (See enclosed copy of the Neuffer parish records).  On the U.S. immigration records and the Wurttemberg emigration records it is also shown as Nuffer.  (see enclosed emigration index).

“You mentioned that the researcher you hired spelled it Neuffer.  This is the case only on the pedigree chart.  On the family group sheets it is spelled Nuffer.  I asked some researchers in the Salt Lake Family History Center why a researcher would have done this when the parish records that they used were clearly Nuffer.  They said that sometimes a researcher will use the same spelling all through a pedigree chart to maintain consistency even if the spelling is different for some individuals.  They said that this is especially true if it is the way the patron spells their name and if they indicate some sensitivity about the spelling.  They said a pedigree chart is only for convenience and is not considered an official document as a family group sheet is.

“As I have said before I have no hang up as to how anyone spells their name.  But I do feel strongly that when you use an individuals name such as Johann Christoph Nuffer it should be spelled the way he spelled it in life.

“Enclosed are some additional and updated sheets and a map for the book.

“Best Regard

“W. P. Nuffer

Del Monte Shield, July/August 1969 pt 3

Here is the last page (of three) given to me from Gib & Janet Richardson of my Grandfather, Norwood Jonas.  This picture resembles much the Del Monte plant in Burley, Idaho as I remember it as a kid.  My Grandma and I would go and drop things off from time to time.  I don’t remember what we dropped off, but we were there on a fairly regular basis.  I do not remember the plan having changed much at that time from 1969 to my memories in the mid 1980’s.

doc20150124225812_001

I remember as a boy my Mom would often remind me as we drove past Del Monte that my Grandfather helped build that water tower.  I don’t know how much he actually helped build it, but since he worked in maintenance I assumed he helped with its maintenance.  Who knows.  Too much time has probably passed to know for certain.  I tried locating information on the rest of the people in the pictures.  Many are likely still alive.  I tried searching names but none were an obvious match.  I will have to do more work to pin some of them down.

Jack Wilson Woolley, 18 Jan 1919 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon to 28 Jun 1973 in Ogden, Weber, Utah.

Ron Peters (? – ?)

Wilburn Norwood Jonas, 15 May 1924 in Richmond, Cache, Utah to 14 Mar 1975 in Burley, Cassia, Idaho.

Patrick Mellott (? – ?)

Jon Reinhold Sadler, 4 April 1940 in Nevada to 6 November 1978 in Roy, Weber, Utah.

Earl Moser (? – ?)

Sheldon Rawlings, 9 Mar 1927 in Fairview, Franklin, Idaho to 8 Feb 1993 in Bountiful, Davis, Utah.

Paul Wood (? – ?)

David Carter (? – ?)

Brent Chugg (? – ?)

Mary Jonas Coley Obituary

Bob and Janet Jonas, Mary Coley, Steve and Julie Coley

Bob and Janet Jonas, Mary Coley, Steve and Julie Coley

July 21, 1918 ~ August 12, 2014

OGDEN – Mary Elizabeth Jonas Coley passed away on August 12, 2014 at the age of 96. She was born on July 21, 1918 in St. Paul, Minnesota, and attended school in Owatana, Minnesota.

Mary married Sgt. Irwin J Jonas on June 17, 1943 in Rochester, Minnesota. He died at Normandy, France, on July 11, 1944, while serving in the U.S. Army. She married Arthur C. Coley on May 3, 1946. Arthur passed away on April 19, 2004.

She was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and homemaker. She loved her family dearly and was always there for them.

Mary volunteered in the PTA. She was employed at the Defense Depot Ogden, American Sportswear, and Brigham Apparel in Brigham City. She was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Mary and Art enjoyed fishing, hunting, camping, and traveling together. Mary loved to cook; she also enjoyed doing puzzles and embroidery.

Mary is survived by her two sons, Robert I. (Janet) Jonas, Roy, and Stephen G. (Julie) Coley, Roy; daughter, Sandra K. (Loran) Schnaidt, St. Louis, MO; daughter-in-law, Shirley Coley Larson, Farmington, NM; stepson, Lorus Evans, Hackensack, MN; six grandchildren, Rebecca, Christine, Dawn, Karla, Marne, and Kerry; 17 great-grandchildren; and seven great-great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by both of her husbands, Irwin J. Jonas, and Arthur C. Coley; son, Ronald G. Coley; and grandson, Robert I. Jonas II.

Funeral Services will be held Monday, August 18, 2014, at 11 a.m. at Lindquist’s Ogden Mortuary, 3408 Washington Blvd. Friends may visit with the family on Monday from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the mortuary.

Interment, Lindquist’s Memorial Gardens of the Wasatch, 1718 Combe Road. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to your favorite charity in memory of Mary Coley.

Send condolences to the family at: http://www.lindquistmortuary.com.

Biography of John Christoph Nuffer

This is the biography of John Christoph Nuffer written by Alma Katherine (Kate) Scheibel Naef, granddaughter of John Christoph Nuffer.  Kate’s parents are Jacob Schiebel and Regina Friederike Nuffer.  I will type it exactly as it is found in the book, “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,”  The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah.

Johann Christoph Nuffer

“When grandfather Nuffer was still in Germany, he was a dress goods weaver, did truck gardening, and also had a grape vineyard.

“At that time his family consisted of my grandmother, Eva Katherina Griner Nuffer, his second wife, my mother, Frederika (Regina), her two brothers Charles August and Adolph, and two sons, Fred and John, from his first wife, Agnas Barbara Spring Nuffer, who died in Germany.

“Their home was on Main Street and was made of lumber and rock.

“They belonged to the Germany Lutheren Church, and were visited by mormon missionaries who came from America to preach the Gospel to them.  This made their hearts rejoice and in 1879 they were converted to the mormon church or Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  Elder John Theurer of Providence, Utah, U.S.A. was the Elder that preached the gospel to them and later baptized them.

“At the time there was a canal or mill race that ran close to the back row of houses.  They had planned to do the baptizing at night so they would ot cause any disturbance around the neighborhood.

“At the time there was a family who had an upstairs in their house and they watched through the upstairs window and saw grandfathers family go out the back way into the canal.  As soon as this family saw them, they rumored it around the neighborhood, and before morning the whole neighborhood knew that the Nuffer family had been baptized into the mormon church and of course, persecusion started.

“After having been baptized, they had the desire to come to America, the promised land, to be with the main body of Saints.

“My grandmother, Eva Katherina Griner Nuffer, was a woman of great faith as I have heard my mother and Uncle John Nuffer speak of many times.  Uncle Fred said in his history that she was a good woman as well as a good mother.

Eva Kathrina Greiner

“They left Germany in 1880.  While coming across the ocean, the children had the measles so it was not a very pleasant journey.

“They arrived in Providence, Utah about 15, May, 1880 where they lived for three years.  It was while here that Mary (Maria) was born.

“Grandfather and family left Providence and moved to Mapleton or Cub River, which at that time was called St. Joseph.  At the time they put the Post Office in, there was already a St. Joseph in Idaho, so they had to give it a new name.  They named it Mapleton and it could well be called such for it was in the mist of so many beautiful maples.  The hills and canyons were loaded with these maples.

“The Nuffer ranch or homestead was located on the north-west of Mapleton which the Lord had well provided for the pioneers with black, furtile soil.

“Grandfather’s farm was cut in half by the main traveled road.

“On the east side was the land where his homes, stables, and orchards were located.

“The orchard was on a hill side a little north-west of the second house.  The orchard contained applies, different kinds of plums and prunes, cherries, pears, peaches, grapes, strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, and currents.

“On the side there were also many shade trees which furnished shade in the summer months for the buildings.  Some of those trees are still standing and are about 80 years old or more.

“On the west side of the road was a meadow.  A creek ran through this area.  The creek was loaded with bushes and willows which were used in making the fence which surrounded the homestead.  Uncle Charles August ad Adolph helped Grandfather make these fences.  Also they would help Grandfather with his farming.

“Also on both sides of the creek grew Timothy and Red Top which Grandfather used for hay.

“On a steep hill side to the west of this hay was a grove of Quaken-asp trees which were used for making fence posts.

“To the south of this meadow land was a pasture.  Besides being covered with short meadow grass, it had many wild violets and Johnny Jumpups.

“The many colors of violets resembled a beautifully spread carpet.

“This farm from one end to the other was a beautiful place, but, as time went on the hand of man destroyed this beauty.

“The first winter they lived in an unfinished log house.  The floor joist was in the floor, but winter came before they could get the lumber to finish it.  This was a very uncomfortable winter, and they were snowed in many months at a time and could not get to town for supplies, so they had to live on what they raised on the farm.

“Many times when sugar was not available, Grandmother would roast sugar beets in the oven and squeeze the joice out of them for sugar to keep her yeast alive and also for other sweetening purposes.

“When flour was scarce, they would grind wheat in the coffee mills to make their bread.

“The Germany people liked hot drinks, so they would roast barley or wheat and grind it to use for hot drinks.

“Since bottles and sugar were so difficult to get, they would dry many of the fruits and vegetables which they raised and also wild fruits such as Chokecherries and Serviceberries.

“They would also use wild gooseberries which grew along the creek and sweet them with honey when they were in season.

“When coal oil was not available for lights, they would make a wick out of cloth and soak it up with grease and let it burn.

“Grandmother would catch rain water in a barrel and put wood ashes in it to make the water soft when ther wasn’t any soap for washing.

“They made brooms out of fine willows to clean their shoes off with.

“I remember seeing these willow brooms leaning against the door.

“They also made baskets from small willows for cloths baskets or for whatever the need would be.

“It was in the house by the orchard on 20, February, 1893, that my grandmother, Eva Katherine Griner Nuffer died of pneumonia.

“I don’t know just how long Grandfather lived in this house when he married his third wife, Anna Elisabeth Weirman Nuffer.  She had three children, Fred, Ida, and Jake Weirman.

“Later they moved back to the first house they built in Mapleton.

“Later Grandfather built a one room log house a few rods west of the first house.

“Grandfather sold his ranch to the Hull Brothers of Whitney and moved to Preston.

“The home in Preston was a two-room frame house west of Uncle John’s rock house which was located in the south-east part of town.  That house is still there, but has had more rooms built on to it.

“The next place he moved to was Logan, Utah.  It was here, 1, December, 1901, that his third wife, Anna Elisabeth Weirman Nuffer died.

“While still living in Logan, Grandfather married his fourth wife, Maria Alker Nuffer.

“After living in Logan for some time, they moved back to Mapleton where Uncle Charles August Nuffer built them a one-room log house in his orchard.

“Uncle Charles August’s house was just over the ridge and not far from the old Nuffer home.  His house could be seen from Grandfather’s orchard.

“I don’t remember just how long they lived there before they moved back to Preston.

“Uncle John Nuffer and some of his boys built them a two-room rock (or cement) house.  It was across the street, south, and a little east of Uncle John’s old frame house.

“It was here in this house that Grandfather died 12, April, 1908.

“Grandfather had poor health the later fifteen or more years of his life.  He had terrible headaches, kidney trouble, and other such ailments as stomach and liver.  All these and more made him suffer a great deal.  Just before his death, he was nearly blind.

“I am grateful for my pioneer grandparents and the heritage they have given me.

“Prepared and arranged June 1961 by Laurine and LaNada Hancock daughter and granddaughter of Katherine (Kate) Naef

I wanted to add a couple of notes.

There appears some debate who had the middle name of Christoph, some believe it was only Sr, others only Jr.

Eva Katherine Greiner is the proper spelling.

Anna Elizabeth Weirman is Anna Elizabeth Reber who was a widow of Gottfried Weierman (some sourches Weiermann).

Maria Alker is Maria Anna Alker who was a widow of Conrad Schaub.