Cove Fort

Having taken work all over the western United States during the great depression, David Delos Donaldson finally landed employment at the Ogden Depot in 1937 as Supervisor of Maintenance.  In 1939, he took his wife, Berendena Van Leeuwen Donaldson, back to California for an extended trip to visit family on both the Donaldson and Van Leeuwen family lines.

David and Dena hit the 1939 San Francisco World Fair and then wound their way over to Phoenix and up through Utah back home to Ogden.  A number of photos exist from this trip, including these two from Cove Fort, Utah.

David and Dena Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

 

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

On 4 November 2017, our little Ross family traveled to Cedar City, Utah for the Cedar City Temple Open House.

We immensely enjoyed our visit.  Well worth the trip.  Beautiful temple in every regard.

Cedar City Temple

 

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at the Cedar City Temple Open House

 

Jill Hemsley with Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross at Cedar City Temple Open House

After we drove past Cove Fort on the way down, I kept thinking of the picture of my Great Grandfather David Donaldson and Grand Uncle Dave Donaldson from 1939.  I knew on the way back I wanted to stop and see if I could find the same site.

We stopped and had a great visit with the missionaries who serve at the site.  They also helped us find the spot of the picture from 1939 and we took the following picture.

Paul, Amanda, Aliza, Hiram, Lillian, and James Ross with Jill Hemsley recreating a 1939 photo of David and Dave Donaldson.

Here is the photo again for comparison.  The door behind Uncle Dave is the one behind Aliza and Jill.  The grey rock at the right of the bottom window behind me is the same to the right of Dave.

David and Dave Donaldson at Cove Fort, Utah

The missionaries had to visit with others about the history of Cove Fort.  The large tree in the old picture was only removed a few years ago, along with the well that David and Dave are standing in front.  We were able to figure out which side of the fort from the shadows (both sides look the same).  The fort was restored in the 1990s, so you can see the improvements in the windows, mortar, and the top of the walls above the roof.    But the photo is roughly the same area and vicinity.

I literally stood on the ground where my Great Grandfather David Donaldson walked some 78 years earlier.  Thanks to my family for indulging me.

The fort was an interesting place to learn and stop as well.  I recommend any passing through to stop.

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Plain City Clubbers

Back (l-r):William Freestone (manager), Norman Carver, Glen Charlton, Fred Singleton, and Elmer Singleton.  Middle: Clair Folkman, Dick Skeen, Albert Sharp, Abe Maw, Milo Ross.  Front: F. Skeen, Walt Moyes, Arnold Taylor, Lynn Stewart, Theron Rhead.

The caption to this newspaper clipping read as follows: “Favored by Many…Plain City’s hustling ball club has many of the bleacherites at the 1938 Utah farm bureau tournament picking it to walk off with the state title before the joust closes.”  The caption goes on to list the names of the individuals included in the photograph which I reproduced as the caption to the photo above.  I list the names just as they were listed in the caption for the photo.  The title of the article was “Plain City Clubbers Show Ability.”  The clipping is included in Grandpa’s clippings but we do not know exactly when it was published.  The team did end up going to Lagoon and playing Sandy for the state championship, but lost.

This team obviously played and practiced in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  Grandpa has told me numerous times how he used to play baseball.  With Grandpa just past 90, it is a bit hard to imagine him hustling after anything, let alone after a ball.  The other thing that struck me about this team is I expected them to all be much closer in age.

William Sessions Freestone (1901-1998)  Manager.

Norman Elmer Carver (1919-2001)

Alfred Glen Charlton (1919-1974)

Fred Singleton (?-Alive?)

Bert Elmer Singleton (1918-1996)  For those baseball fans out there, Elmer went on to play 24 seasons in his career.  He played for teams like Boston Braves, Chicago Clubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Washington Senators.

Clair Marcus Folkman (1910-1975)

Elwood “Dick” Francis Skeen (1908-1977)

Albert Sharp (1909-1984)

Abraham “Abe” Edward Maw (1906-1985)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

Elwood “F” Skeen (1908-1977)

Walter “Walt” Jeremiah Moyes (1907-1983)

George Arnold Taylor (1911-2000)

Lynn William Stewart (1916-2011)

William Theron Rhead (1914-1999)

John Reese’s 10th Grade Class

Top (l-r): John Reese, Ray Charlton, Earl Hipwell, Miriam Weatherston, Delmar White, Owen Wayment, Neta England.  Second: Orlo Maw, Warren Williams, Jean Etherington, Junior Taylor, Eugene Maw, Cleone Carver, Howard Hunt.  Third: Ellis Lund, Vera Wayment, Keith Hodson, Ted Christensen, Ruth Wade, Wayne Taylor, Milo Ross.  Bottom: LauRene Thompson, Frank Poulsen, Margaret Freestone, Ezma Musgrave.

This is the fourth of the class photos.  I believe this is actually the 1936-1937 year (Grandpa says in his writing it his his 10th Grade year).  This class attended Weber High School located in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  These students graduated in 1939.  Nearly all these students came from Warren, Plain City, West Weber, and those parts of the county for school.  Out of the whole picture, only one passed away in World War II (as far as I can tell, ALL the men served).

John Major Reese (1896-1976)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Delmar White (1921-2008)

Owen Urry Wayment (1921-2008)

Neta Elizabeth England (1920-2006)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

Elmer Taylor Jr. (1921-1985)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Vera Mary Wayment (1921-1989)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Ruth Wade (1921-Alive)

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Frank Dee Poulsen (1920-2010)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Ezma Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

Van Eliot Heninger’s Class

Back (l-r): Wayne Taylor, Frank Poulsen, Miriam Weatherston, Margaret Freestone, Emza Musgrave, Dorothy Richardson, Milo Ross, Earl Hipwell.  Middle: Ray Charlton, Junior Taylor, LauRene Thompson, Jean Etherington, Cleone Carver, Myrtle Hampton, Eugene Maw, Van Eliot Heninger.  Front: Keith Hodson, Orlo Maw, Howard Hunt, Ellis Lund, Delmar White, Ted Christensen, Lyle Thompson, Ivan Hodson.

Here is another photo, the second of the four, but from Grandpa’s 8th Grade year.  This was taken outside the old Plain City School in Plain City, Weber, Utah. The question marks probably mean they are still alive.

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Frank Dee Poulsen (1920-2010)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Emza Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

Dorothy Richardson (?-?)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Elmer Taylor Jr. (1921-1985)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Myrtle Hampton (?-?)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Van Eliot Heninger (1909-1989)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Delmar White (1921-2008)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Lyle Thompson (?-?)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

Gwendolyn Stewart’s Class

Back (l-r): Delmar White, Earl Hipwell, Harold Hunt, Ellis Lund, Milo Ross, Ray Charlton, Ted Christensen.  Middle: Lyle Thompson, Ivan Hodson, Wayne Taylor, Jack Wood, ? Singleton, Weldon Heslop, Warren Williams, Arthur Hunter, Gwendolyn Stewart.  Front: Ruby Illium, Miriam Weatherston, Margaret Freestone, Jean Etherington, LauRene Thompson, Neta England.

This is the first of four photos from Grandpa Milo Ross’ class pictures.  This photo is of the 1st Grade class for the school in Plain City, Weber, Utah for the year 1927-1928.  You may find it interesting to see how the individuals grow up over the next 10 years or so (through the four class photos).  Here is some biography on the individuals in the photo.  I started with spouses, but some married multiple times and it just became messy, sorry.

Delmar White (1921-2008)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Harold Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

James Lyle Thompson (1921-1999)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Jack Oliver Wood (1921-1961)

? Singleton (?-?)

Weldon Andrew Heslop (1919-1995)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Arthur Ralph Hunter (1921-1997)

Gwendolyn Stewart (1907-1998)

Ruby Illum (?-Alive)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Neta Elizabeth England (1920-2006)

Milo James Ross Obituary

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

University of Utah Veterans Commemoration in 2009

Milo James Ross, 93, peacefully slipped out of mortality in the comfort of his own bed in Plain City on 17 July 2014.

Milo was born 4 February 1921 in a log cabin north of Plain City to John “Jack” William Ross and Ethel (Sharp) Ross. His mother tragically died from childbirth in 1925. Milo and his siblings lived with his Ross grandparents until the costs proved too great and his Uncle Edward Sharp raised Milo in Plain City until adulthood.

He grew up tending to his Grandmother Sharp and spending most of his time farming with his many Sharp cousins and his siblings. He attended schools in Plain City and graduated from Weber High in 1939.

Milo met Gladys Maxine Donaldson at a Plain City celebration in 1940. They would meet from time to time for dancing at the Berthana in Ogden. Milo and Gladys married 4 April 1942 in her parent’s home on 8th Street in Ogden.

Milo enlisted in the Army in October 1942. He served in the 33rd Infantry Division, 130th Regiment, Company C. He trained in weapons and earned his expert ranking. He arrived in Hawaii in July 1943 and received the announcement that his son, Milo Paul, had been born. He served as part of the Philippine invasion force and they fought through the jungles and liberated Baguio City. He was injured five times, one while tending to other soldiers awaiting medical attention.

He was present at the Japanese surrender at Luzon as a Technical Sergeant in June 1945. He received two purple hearts and the Silver Star for his service at the end of World War II. His Company received a Presidential Citation for outstanding performance during armed conflict with the enemy in efforts to seize Hill X in Bilbil Mountain Province. At the time of Milo’s death, the military was preparing to award him another Purple Heart, another Silver Star, Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal & Bronze Star, World War II Victory Medal, Combat Infantry Badge 1st Award, Philippine Liberation Ribbon and Bronze Star, Honorable Service Button for World War II. He was also to be awarded the Philippine Liberation Medal and Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation Badge from the Philippine Government.

He returned home in 1945 and began working with his father-in-law. He eventually began building or remodeling homes. He estimated he had built over 120 homes and remodeled another 50 homes or buildings in his lifetime. Two more children joined Milo and Gladys in 1946 and 1948, Judy Ethel and Caroline. Milo and Gladys dedicated their lives to raising their three children and tenderly caring for Judy’s needs until she passed away in 1998.

Milo and Gladys solemnized their marriage 2 July 1976 in the Ogden LDS Temple with their daughter Judy by their side. Milo served in various callings as a humble servant favoring their time as temple workers in the Ogden Temple for almost a decade. Milo and Gladys also relished their time in raising their garden and providing its fruits to friends, family, the temple, and local hospitals.

Milo is survived by his son Milo (Janice) Ross of Hazelton, Idaho and daughter Caroline (Abram) Gallegos of Plain City. Eight grandchildren, Scott (Robyn) Ross of Kimberly, Idaho; Jeffrey (Holly) Ross of Jerome, Idaho; Becky (Joseph) Patterson of Portland, Oregon; Paul (Amanda) Ross of Burley, Idaho; Andra Ross of Heyburn, Idaho; Christy (Sterling) Neilson of Rupert, Idaho; Cindy (Steve) Pease of Albion, Idaho; and Lonny (Amy) Taylor of Declo, Idaho; seventeen great grandchildren; and eleven great great grandchildren.

Milo was preceded in death by his parents; his wife Gladys; all five siblings Hobart Day, June Stout, Paul Ross, Harold Ross, and Earnest Ross; daughter Judy Ross; grandson-in-law Bret Adams, and two great grandchildren.

The funeral will be held Tuesday 22 July 2014 at the Plain City 7th Ward Building, 2952 N 4200 W, a building he helped organize its construction, at 11:00 AM with Bishop Tom Matthews officiating.

Friends may call at Lindquist Mortuary in North Ogden at 2140 N 400 E (Washington Blvd) from 6 until 8 PM on Monday 21 July 2014. Friends may also call from 10:00 until 10:45 AM prior to the service at the church. Burial will be in the Plain City Cemetery beside his beloved Gladys and Judy.

Milo J Ross in army uniform squat

Wanner, John George, Jr. and Eliza Sterling/Regina Nuffer

I found this biography written by Mary Louise Wanner Andra of her parents.  I will write a separate history for them in the future, but I thought I would make this one available unadulterated by me (typed completely as written in the book, although I added the photo).

This biography was published in Whitney Centennial 1889-1989: Whitney’s First 100 Years.  It was published in 1991 by the Whitney Ward, written and edited by the Whitney Ward Centennial Book Committee.

John George Wanner Jr Family abt 1912. (l-r): Eva, William, Golden, Serge (sitting), John, Regina, Rulon, Willard, Mary.

Our father, John George Wanner, Jr., was born in Holzgerlingen, Neckarkreis, Wuerttemberg 29 October, 1870.  His parents were John George Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  He was the oldest in the family of five boys and five girls.

His father had a small farm and some cattle.  He was also a road overseer.  So dad, his mother and brother and sisters did most of the farm work.  They also got wood from the forest for winter fuel.

Dad’s parents were very religious people and belonged to the Lutheran church.  They were very hard workers and tried to teach their children correct principles.  Dad tried hard to follow in their footsteps.

His parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1891.  They made sure all their children were baptized as they became of age.  His parents could see that it was the only true church on the earth, and they wanted to go to America, where they could worship as they wished.  They also felt it would give their children a better opportunity in life.

His parents were the only ones in their respective families who joined the LDS church.  Our dad was baptized in July in 1891, and came to America with one of the missionaries – a brother Terrell who was from Providence, Utah.  Brother Terrell took good care of him and helped find work for him to do and provide for himself.

Dad got a job working for brother Fred Nuffer in Glendale, Oneida County (now Franklin County), Idaho.  In 1893 his father, mother, and his brothers and sisters came to Cache Valley from Germany.  Dad and brother Nuffer met them with a wagon and buggy in Franklin, Oneida County, Idaho, June 18, 1893.  I am sure he was happy to see his family again, as it had been almost two years since he had seen any of them.

Dad met a lovely girl from Providence, Utah, by the name of Eliza Sterling, and this relationship blossomed into marriage in 1894.  They were blessed with two sons, George and Earl Wayne.  This marriage was not a very happy one and they were divorced.

On the 31st of August 1898, dad married Regina Nuffer who was a sister of our uncle Charles August Nuffer.  [Daughter of the marriage of Eva Katherine Greiner and Johann Christopher Nuffer]  On 9 November 1899, they were blessed with twin boys, William and Willard.  As time went on they were blessed with more children, a total of five boys and two girls.

John & Regina Wanner

John & Regina Wanner

Dad went on a mission to Germany in the fall of 1907, leaving a wife and six children.  On March 8, 1908, their son Serge was born.  Mother and the family were living in a home John Nuffer built for dad.  It is a rock house on East Oneida Street in Preston, Idaho.  This house is still standing and is in good condition at this writing – June 1979.

When Serge was a few months old, mother took all the children and had a picture taken and sent it to dad so he could see the new baby.

While Dad was in Germany, he met William Andra’s mother and family and baptized the eldest daughter Freda.

In 1910, Dad’s mother and father sold their home and farm in Whitney to Dad.  This is the farm Lawrence Bodily now has.  Dad built a red barn that is still in use on the farm.  After grandpa and grandma sold their farm to dad, they moved to Logan, Utah.

In 1913 dad’s parents, brothers and sisters had a family reunion at their home in Whitney.  There was a large crowd and we all had a good time.

We all had to work hard and dad relied on his daughter Mary for many hard farm jobs.  However, on Saturday nights he would take us to the picture show and give us each 25¢ to spend on the show and treats.

In 1917, I begged to take the sewing class at the USAC in Logan, as I wanted to learn to sew.  However, I was only there a short time when dad brought me home to work on the dry farm.  I have always felt bad about this as I wanted to learn to sew.

My brother, William, enlisted in the Army on August 5, 1917.  He was with the 145th Light Field Artillery, Battery C.  He left Salt Lake City for Camp Kearney on October 11, 1917.  He left for France August 2, 1918.  William contracted the influenza and died December 1, 1918.  His body was brought home November 11, 1920, and interred in the Whitney Idaho Cemetery.

Just a few days before they got the sad news of William’s death, their son, Golden, died November 26, 1918 in Salt Lake City from influenza.

On January 8, 1921, dad sent his son Willard on a mission to New Zealand.

Dad and mother were to face still more sorrow when their son Rulon died February 26, 1924, in the Logan hospital.

Dad believed in missionary work with all his heart and soul and on December 15, 1925, he went to Tennessee on a six month mission.

In 1928, Serge went to New Zealand on a mission and died there October 5, 1929.  His body was brought home for burial.  The funeral was held in the old opera house in Preston, Idaho.  These were trying times for our parents.  Losing four sons, and all their bodies returned home in a box.  This left them with only one son and two daughters.

On April 7, 1930, dad sent Eva on a mission to California.  Dad was not a stranger to hard work.  He raised crops and took good care of his farm animals.  He took pride in having things looking neat and clean around the farm and yard.

When Dad operated his farm in Whitney, he was always up early in the morning and usually was the first to get to the beet dump in the morning.  The story is told about some of his neighbors who decided to beat him to the dump.  They got up extra early to get a head start.  Before they got to the beet dump, they could hear George Wanner going down the rad ahead of them.  They could hear him saying to his horses, “Gid up–gid up–gid up.”

When dad sold his farm in Whitney, he purchased 40 acres nearer to Preston and built a beautiful home on it.  Part of it is where the Oakwood School is now located.  When he retired he sold his farm and home to his daughter Mary and her husband William Andra.

Dad was successful in the various undertakings he engaged in.  He was one of the first in Preston to have an automobile.  When he brought it home he did not know how to stop it.  He yelled “whoa” when he got in the garage, but before he got it stopped he had gone through the end of the garage.

Dad built the two little homes on the west side of second east and first south in Preston, Idaho.  He also built three homes on first south and the south side of the street in Preston.  Dad and mother lived in one of them until she died in 1942.  Mother was ill for quite a while before she passed away.  Dad cared for her the best he could and would take her for little rides in the car.  She was unable to walk and dad would carry her on his back from place to place as they went visiting.

As many of you will remember, there was a humble side to dad.  I have seen him cry when bearing his testimony and when he was grieved over the death of a loved one, a relative, or friend.  He wanted to leave this world a better place than he found it, and I feel sure he made some contributions and brought this desire to fulfillment.

After mother died, dad remarried and went to live in Salt Lake City, Utah.  This marriage was not successful and they were divorced.  Later on he remarried again and was living in Florida.  He became ill and wanted to get back to Preston.  My son William went to Florida to bring him home, but when they got to Chicago, he was too ill to go on.  So, William put him in the hospital where he passed away on January 5, 1947.

Regina Nuffer was born January 26, 1869 at Neuffen, Germany, a daughter of Johann Cristoph and Eva Katharina Greiner, she came to Utah with her family after they were converted to the gospel.  She married Jacob Scheibel July 15, 1889, in Pleasant Valley, Carbon County, Utah.  Her first child, Alma Katherine Scheibel Naef, was born, September 27, 1889.  When her child was six months old, she and her husband separated and she moved back to Mapleton, Idaho, where she stayed with her parents on their farm.  During this period, she would help people when they were sick, and her mother would take care of her child.

In about 1893, after the death of her mother, she moved to Weber County, Utah, and worked for the Will Taylor family in Farr West and the Bowman family in Ogden.  She again returned to her father’s farm.  On her way home, she stopped in Logan and walked out to Providence to visit a friend.  While eating lunch, she happened to think that she had left her new coat on the train.  She went back to Logan to the train station and they sent out a tracer.  In a few days she got her coat back.  After returning to Idaho, she worked for several people in Franklin and Preston.  She lived in one room of her brother John’s home in Preston.  Her brother was on a mission in Germany at the time.

On August 31, 1898, she married John George Wanner in Logan, Utah.  That winter she lived on his ranch in Worm Creek or Glendale, Idaho.  In April she moved with her husband, daughter, and step son, Wayne, to the Bancroft flat, a little west of where Grace is now.

She was known as a fine, well mannered woman.  Her niece, Athene Hampton, said that toward the end of her life her health was not very good and she had a hard time speaking.  When Athene and Louisa Nuffer would visit, they would converse by writing notes to each other.  She died on March 10, 1942, in Preston, Idaho.  Her funeral in Preston was very well attended.