4th Grade, Paul Elementary, Paul, Idaho

Back Row (l-r): Brandon Rogers, Erica Jones, Paul Ross, John Hayhurst, Shana Thompson, Jeff Hayden, Shane Ball, Alissa Anderson, Robin Anderson; Middle Row: Amber King, Bobie Jones, Deanne Williams, Kody Nielsen, Cesar Boroquez, Dustin McClellan, Jamey Price, Jesse Jensen, Grace Williams; Front Row: Amanda Moore, Brandi Cole, Archie Winnett, Jennifer Gebauer, Shaun Bettazza, Erin Zemke, Rigo Arteaga.

As I mentioned before, Bobie Story let me scan some of our common grade school pictures. All mine were lost due to a flood of our basement while I was away in the England Manchester Mission. I am happy to have copies again. (I am still missing Ms. Suhr for 3rd grade and Mr. Mendenhall for 6th grade. If you have a copy, please let me scan!)

This is our 4th grade class picture from Paul Elementary, Paul, Idaho. This was the 1988 – 1989 school year.

Normally I organized photos with married names and dates. Since all are still alive, I will forgo any of the dates. I have added the married last name for the ones I know. If you have corrections, please let me know.

Miss Robin Anderson

Alissa Anderson

Rigo Arteaga

Shane Ball

Shaun Bettazza

Cesar Boroquez

Brandi Cole

Jennifer Gebauer

Jeff Hayden

John Hayhurst

Jesse Jensen

Erica Jones married Thorson

Amber King

Dustin McClellan

Amanda Moore married Kriwox

Kody Nielsen

Jamey Price married Crystal

Brandon Rogers

Paul Ross

Shana Thompson

Deanne Williams

Grace Williams married Wittman

Archie Winnett

Erin Zemke married McKindree

Advertisements

Preface to Jonas History

Many years ago, I obtained a copy of Carvel Lee Jonas’ book that he wrote on our particular Jonas family.  I cannot seem to find my copy of the book now, but about 10 years ago I typed up most of it.  I am going to make it available with full credit to him.  Hopefully we can build off his research.  I removed Carvel’s home address and phone number off this preface.  If you wish to contact him, please contact me.  Further, I hope you will take the spirit of his preface to heart.  If you have stories to add, documents to share, or corrections, please make them know.  The sooner the better as time is our enemy when it comes to history.
“After more than four years of research and compiling I am thrilled to offer this Jonas family history book to family members.  The more family members distribute this history book to other members, the more likely the history will survive into the future.  This is your book!  Use it to create greater family unity.  When thoughtfully read the reader will discover a wonderful spirit which is associated with this history.  To get that feeling it may need to be read more than once. 
“This history book was no easy task!  Information was collected from all over Utah, and also from Washington, Nebraska, Michigan, and Germany.  We are blessed as a family to have the Jonas family pedigree from Germany, which was finally discovered in 1985.  A feeling came to me that the records were in existence, and it was possible to trace the family surname back to Europe.  In the process of looking for clues to extend that pedigree, I discovered that I had collected a considerable amount of information.  Land records, church records, county records, census records, etc.  The idea came to me that since I had so much information I might as well collect all that I could and make a history book.  I collected more information and talked to older members of the family so that I could get to know the personal stories about different members of the family.  I’d write down everything that I was told.  When I finally had enough information I put it all into one story.  Then I would get more information and rewrite the story again.  Finally I added my research and some logical conclusions which would feel correct to the stories and rewrite them again.  A special thank you to Verla Jonas Andersen Lythgoe for her willingness to answer my questions and tell me stories about Joseph and Annette Josephine Nelson Jonas.  She is the main reason we have a story for them.  When she was younger she would get my grandfather, William Nelson Jonas, and her mother, Rosa Nelson Jonas, together in the same room and quiz them about Joseph and Annie Jonas.  Because she asked questions and because of her good memory we now have a wonderful story about Joseph and Annie Jonas.  I remember taking all the letters that cousin Verla had sent to me, and putting all the information into a short story.  Then I went to cousin Verla with the story and asked her what her opinion was.  She corrected a part and eventually added more to the story.  I added my personal impressions and finally typed the last revision.  That is how the story of Joseph and Annie Jonas came into existence.
“The following persons gave information to me so I could write the individual life stories found in this book.
“Verla Jonas Anderson Lythgoe; Merlin Jonas Andersen; Lillian Jonas Talbot; Joseph H. Jonas; Spencer Jonas;  Carvel Thompson Jonas; Vaughn Thompson Jonas; Annette Nelson Brown; Mabel Jonas Parvi; Mr. And Mrs. Otto Hansen; Armina Jonas Farnes; Calvin Andersen Jonas.  Also, the autobiography of August Nelson and the biography of Christian Andersen were used and quoted when they applied to our direct family line.  It should be noted that the life stories were written by a person who had never met anyone he wrote about.  I never even met my grandfather, William Nelson Jonas, except as a small child.  I relied on the documents which I found and the memories of the above mentioned family members.  If there is a comment about something you read it is up to you to take the responsibility and let me know about it.  This is not intended to be the last edition of this history.  It is hoped that when more information comes from you, the family member, that there will be a future edition. 
“This history was reproduced in an inexpensive way to assure that a copy may be given to every member of the family regardless of their financial situation.  Perhaps a future edition will be professionally bound.  Also, this book is designed so that you may add your personal history to this book.  An attempt was not made, and will not be made by me, to write stories for those who are still living.  Their stories would be better stories if you wrote them yourselves.  I’ve left the responsibility for your own personal histories to you. 
Sincerely,
Carvel Lee Jonas
West Jordan, Utah
84084
26 October 1987

1st Grade, Paul Elementary, Paul, Idaho

Back row (l-r): Mrs. Brenda Winward, Michael Hollis, Jamey Price, Amber King, Tracy Hitt, Danny Wright, Bobie Jones, Nicole Catmull; Middle Row: Nathan Jones, Adrianne Neibaur, Jerilynn Parks, Karlene Hansen, Lindsay Osterhout, Bonnie Torix, Conrad May; Front Row: Andrew Morgan, Matt Robbins, Amy Woodward, Alex Madrigal, Eric Zarybnisky, David Rios, Shana Thompson, Ivan Young, Paul Ross.

As I mentioned before, Bobie Story let me scan some of our common grade school pictures.  All mine were lost due to a flood of our basement while I was away in the England Manchester Mission.  I am happy to have copies again.  (I am still missing Ms. Suhr for 3rd grade and Mr. Mendenhall for 6th grade.  If you have a copy, please let me scan!)

This is our 1st grade class picture from Paul Elementary, Paul, Idaho.  This was the 1985 – 1986 school year.

Normally I organized photos with married names and dates.  Since all are still alive, I will forgo any of the dates.  I have added the married last name for the ones I know.  If you have corrections, please let me know.

I have a couple of memories about this photo I want to share.

Miss Winward graduated high school with my Mom.  She would tell me that all the time.  Later I knew she married to Ms. Goodsell and apparently moved away to Mountain Home or somewhere that direction.

I remember cheating off Jamey Price, who sat next to me.  I struggled with math and I seem to remember she let me.  Well, I got busted at some point.  My Mom sat me down for hours and hours and taught me how to count with cigarettes.  She got some flashcards and we slaved to make sure I knew how to do basic math.  By the time 3rd grade rolled around, I was a whiz at math and Ben Frank was my competition for speed on the multiplication tables.  I remember having a bit of a crush on Jamey too.

Another kid, whose last name was Bailey is not in this picture.  I remember he would eat crayons and play with the Elmers glue on the knees of his pants.  Jake?

This is the only year I remember having naps.  Finding a little place to lay down, relax, and catch a few z’s.

Miss Brenda Winward married Goodsell

Nicole Catmull married Manning

Karlene Hansen married Ashcraft

Tracy Hitt

Michael Hollis

Bobie Jones married Story

Nathan Jones

Amber King

Alex Madrigal

Conrad May

Andrew Morgan

Adrianne Neibaur

Lindsay Osterhout

Jerilynn Parks married Mower

Jamey Price married Crystal

David Rios

Matt Robbins

Paul Ross

Shana Thompson

Bonnie Torix

Amy Woodward married Noble

Danny Wright

Ivan Young

Eric Zarybnisky

 

2nd Grade, Paul Elementary, Paul, Idaho

Back (l-r): Mrs. Elaine Mayes, Bobie Jones, Justin Orr, Archie Winnett, Benjamin Wilcher, Kyle McCoy, Erin Zemke, Cody Strunk, Amanda Moore; Middle: Danny Wright, Jesse Jensen, Nathan Jones, Traci Gibbons, Paul Ross, Erica Jones, Shana Thompson, Brett Whiting; Front: Charlyn Robertson, Alissa Anderson, Kaleb Winn, Kimberly Isham, Kevin Orton, Cherrylin Tolle, Ivan Young, Leslie Durfee, Gina Chapa, Tasha Martsch.

Bobie Story let me scan some pictures she had of our grade school years. All mine were lost due to the flooding of our basement while in the mission field. I am happy to have copies again. (If anyone has Ms. Suhr for 3rd or Mr. Mendenhall for 6th, I would love to scan copies of your photos!)

This is my 2nd grade class from Paul Elementary, Paul, Idaho. This was the 1986 – 1987 school year.

Normally I go through and organize these photos with married names and dates. I will forgo the dates since we are all alive as far as I know. For the women, I added married names. If you have corrections or updates, I am happy to add.

Mrs. Elaine Mayes

Alissa Anderson married Green

Gina Chapa married ?

Leslie Durfee married Orthman

Traci Gibbons married Hollihan

Kimberly Isham married ?

Jesse Jensen

Bobie Jones married Story

Erica Jones married Thorson

Nathan Jones

Kyle McCoy

Tasha Martsch married ?

Amanda Moore married Kriwox

Justin Orr

Kevin Orton

Charlyn Robertson married Darrington

Paul Ross

Cody Strunk

Shana Thompson

Cherrylin Tolle married ?

Brett Whiting

Benjamin Wilcher

Kaleb Winn (I swear I thought his last name was Morrison)

Archie Winnett

Danny Wright

Ivan Young

Erin Zemke married McKindree

Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp written by Annie Thompson (27 August 1957)

I came upon this history and thought I would share it.  Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp is the mother of my William Sharp.  She was also the mother of Isabella Sharp Carlisle, Elizabeth Sharp Quayle, and James Sharp.  I don’t know where she got all of her information, hopefully from being passed down.  I will enter some updates in brackets.

LIFE HISTORY: Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp, written by Annie Thompson, (August 27, 1957).

“Elizabeth Cartwright Sharp was the daughter and only child, of George and Ann (Matthews) Cartwright, and was christened at Misson, Nottinghamshire, England, 20 December 1803. She died in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, probably late in the year 1850 [17 February 1851].

Elizabeth grew up a tall young lady, reared in an atmosphere of wealth and refinement. At the age of 17 her father died (burial 27 February 1820, age 46) and three years later, on 4 June 1823, her mother remarried to a widower named George Beighton. Little is known of this marriage except that George Beighton is purported to have gambled away at the races at Doncaster, the money belonging to Elizabeth’s mother.

On 29 December 1823, Elizabeth Cartwright was married at Mission to Thomas Sharp, and they became parents of eight children, four of whom died young in England; the other four, William, Isabella, Elizabeth and James emigrated to this country with their mother:

George Sharp, chr. 11 Nov 1824, Misson, Nottinghamshire, England
Mary Sharp, chr. 27 Nov 1825, “,”,”
William Sharp, born 10 Dec 1826, “,”,”
George Sharp, chr. 13 May 1826, “,”,”
Isabella Sharp, born 22 Dec 1831, “,”,”
Elizabeth Sharp, chr. 11 June 1834, “,”,”
Ann Sharp, chr. 29 July 1838, “,”,”
James Sharp, Born 7 Jan 1840, “,”,”
(Extract from the history of Isabella Sharp Carlisle)

Misson is a little town in the northern part of Nottinghamshire, in what used to be the Sherwood Forest, (made famous by the stories of Robin Hood). As well as having a historical setting, the place, at the time of Elizabeth Cartwright’s birth, was one of beauty, with its green pastures a bloom with cowslips.

Thomas Sharp died in 1841 at the age of 45 (buried 15 Jul 1841, Mission), leaving Elizabeth to care for the children.

Sometime about 1848, the LDS missionaries were preaching in the vicinity of Mission, and Elizabeth Sharp joined the LDS church, together with her eldest son, William, who was baptized 20 Jun 1848.

Elizabeth’s home was opened to the missionaries, and among the elders who stayed there was Elder George Emery.

Elizabeth Sharp decided to emigrate with her family to Utah, but her folks tried hard to discourage her from taking the hazardous trip; they told her if you leave for the west, “A red Indian will eat ye.” But Elizabeth’s determination prevailed, and in 1850 the family, consisting of the mother and her four children, booked passage for America. (The price of the ticket being twenty-five pounds sterling). They set sail from Liverpool, England, bound for New Orléans, Louisiana, USA, on 2 October 1850, on the sailing vessel “James Pennell”, commanded by Captain Fullerton. The voyage was a rough one and it took six weeks to reach their destination.

From New Orléans, they traveled by boat up the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri, a trip that was not a healthy one.

Shortly after the family reached St. Louis, the mother took sick and died, and was buried there. This left the children on their own. They found employment and Elizabeth and James married and stayed in Missouri.

William Sharp married Mrs. Mary Ann Bailey Padley, a young widow who had joined the church in England.

Isabella Sharp was baptized into the church while in St. Louis, and Joseph Carlisle. Elizabeth Sharp married John Quayle, and settled around St. Louis, and had a family of three children.

James, who was about twelve years old when his mother died, made arrangements to come to Salt Lake City, but the company he was to travel with finally turned back. He then found employment with a meat-packing concern in St. Louis (in which he later became a partner), and married Eudora Mann and had a family of five children.

Elizabeth Sharp Quayle and James Sharp never joined the church.

Both William Sharp and Joseph Carlisle were good athletes, and while in St. Louis, they challenged anyone to a wrestling match that cared to accept. They became well-known in this respect and they had few who accepted their challenge.

In 1853, both William Sharp and his family, which now consisted of his wife Mary Ann, his step-son Lorenzo Padley, and daughter Annie. Elizabeth who was born in St. Louis, and Joseph Carlisle and his wife Isabella Sharp Carlisle, started their journey across the plains. They drove a wagon for Williams Jennings, a Salt Lake merchant and freighter, (whether they drove one wagon or two is not known). They came in the Moses Clawson Co., arriving in Salt Lake City about September 15, 1853. (Journal History, Aug 18, 1853, pg. 5-7; Church Emigrations Vol. 2, 2, 1851 to 1863).

Joseph and Isabella Sharp Carlisle settled in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah; and William and Mary Ann Sharp settled in Plain City, Weber County, Utah.

Annie Thompson
August 27, 1957

My relationship: Elizabeth Cartwright- Thomas Sharp
William Sharp
Milo Riley Sharp
Edward William Sharp
Edward Junior Sharp

Written by Fred Nuffer for 1938 Cornerstone at USU

Old Main at Utah State Agricultural College (USU now), Logan, Utah, about 1900. The iconic front and tower were build in 1902.  Fred Nuffer provided 3,000 feet of cut stone for the construction of the south wing.

From Utah State’s Facility Planning.

“Old Main is the landmark of Utah State University and remains the oldest academic building still in use in the state of Utah.  In 1889, plans for “The College Building” by C. L. Thompson were selected by the Board of Trustees just two weeks after the land for the Logan campus was secured. The site was chosen the next day so that the main tower would be due east of the end of Logan’s Seventh Street —Today’s Fifth North.  Construction began immediately on the south wing of the three -part building and was completed in 1890.

“With more money appropriated in 1892 than anticipated, the Trustees hired [K]arl C. Schaub to redesign an enlarged structure and the construction began for the east part of the central section and the north wing.  It wasn’t until 1901 that the money was assured for the completion of the building. The front portion along with the tower was completed in 1902 with the design of H. H. Mahler.

Fred Nuffer provided his own contribution to the construction of the south wing of Utah State’s Old Main.  Another interesting side link, Karl Conrad Schaub’s widowed mother married Fred’s father, John Christoph Nuffer.  She was Anna Maria Alker who married him Conrad Schaub who left her widowed in 1894.  Fred Nuffer provided stone, Karl provided design.  Karl and Fred’s brother, John were friends and worked on buildings together.

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The full title of this article from the book was named, “WRITTEN BY FRED NUFFER AT REQUEST OF OFFICIALS OF UTAH STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE TO BE ENCLOSED IN CORNER STONE LAID IN 1938, TO BE OPENED IN 1988, THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THE COLLEGE.”

Utah State was founded in 1888.  It appears that the cornerstone was opened at 50 years in 1938 and a new cornerstone was sealed to be opened in 1988.  As Fred Nuffer was involved with some of the construction of the campus, he was requested to write for the cornerstone.  This was the original part of Old Main, south wing, of what is now Utah State University in Logan, Utah.

“I will recount in detail, as I remember it, the work done by myself and others in supplying stone for the construction of the Utah State Agricultural College buildings in Logan, Utah.

“In the year of 1891-1892, I made contract with Mr. Venables of Ogden to deliver about 3,000 cubic feet of cut stone.  Mr. Venables had previously tried to get the stone somewhere south of the valley, but found the stone unsuitable, and the party could not fill the order.  As I had furnished stone for several buildings in Logan, Mr. Venables came up to see me.  I lived near the quarry at that time.  He inspected the quarry and pronounced the stone suitable and gave me a contract to fill the order.  The quarry was located about ten miles up Cub River Canyon from Franklin, Idaho, on the left side slope going up the river, on a small tributary creek of Cub River called Sheep Creek.

“All work was done by hand.  The main ledge was about 20 feet above ground and about 20 feet wide and 400 to 500 feet long.  We used 12 foot churn drills and blasted large black loose from the main ledge.  We had to be careful how much powder we used so as not to shatter or cause seams in the stone.  We usually had to put a second charge in the opening made by the first charge to dislodge the block from the main ledge.  The block so dislodged was from 6 to 7 feet thick and about 20 feet long.  From then on, all tools used were hammers, axes, wedges, and squares.  Grooves were cut with axes wherever we desired to split the block, then wedges were set in the grooves about ten inches apart and driven in with hammers.  Then we dressed them down to the right measurement allowing one half inch for the stone cutters to take out all the tool marks we made.  Mr. Venables furnished bills for stone in dimension sizes as needed in the building.

“My brother, C[harles]. A[ugust]. Nuffer, worked on the job the whole time it lasted.  I also had a man by the name of Ed Hollingsworth of Preston, also Mr. A. Merrill and Mr. Abel Smart of Cub River, and Mr. Robert Weber of Providence.

“It took part of two years for the job, 1891-1892.  The hauling was all done with wagons and horses: 30 to 35 cubic feet was a good load for two horses.  The following names were the men doing the hauling: John McDonald of Smithfield, Jean Weber of Providence, and Jake Rinderknecht of Providence hauled more than any other.  He used to leave home at 3 a.m., load up the same day and get back to Logan by 3 p.m. the next day.  It was very hard on the horses.  I also hauled a good many loads with my own team.  All loading was done by hand on skids.

“I got 40¢ per cubic foot, of which 20¢ was paid for hauling.  We had a hard time handling the name stone to go on the front of the building.  When it was ordered it had 30 cubic feet in it and only one foot thick.  When the stonecutters got through with it they had found it too big to be hoisted in place so they made it smaller until there wasn’t much left.

“The most difficulty I had was in not getting my pay from Mr. Venables.  We overlooked a large 4-horse load at the final settlement.  A few minutes after I had signed the receipt for the final payment in full I discovered my mistake.  Mr. Venables refused to pay for it, although I produced the bill of lading signed by him.  He didn’t dispute the debt, but said he had a receipt paid in full.  He didn’t have anything, and the government property couldn’t be attached, so I was the loser of about $15, which seemed a lot of money to me at that time.

“by Fred Nuffer, Sr.

Birthday Season

I just passed by 37th birthday last month.  It came and went like all the others, just another day with a little extra sugar.

If the average lifespan of a male is 72 years, I am now officially over half dead.

With the passing of the date, I thought I would post some pictures of birthdays from days gone.  Some of this will surely be to the chagrin of my little sister, Andra.  But she was born the day before my birthday, so we inevitably had our birthday parties together.

Some of the photos were scanned from a scrapbook, so you will have to forgive some of the stickers and other related paraphernalia.

Maybe I didn’t have birthdays in later years, or at least no pictures in my collection to commemorate the day.

I think this is about my 5th birthday, Andra's 3rd at Grandma's house in Paul, Idaho.

I think this is about my 4th birthday, Andra’s 2nd at Grandma’s house in Paul, Idaho.

 

I think this is about my 5th, Andra's 3rd.

I think this is about my 5th, Andra’s 3rd.

 

This one you can see my arrowhead necklace I wore for many years. I loved that necklace.

This one you can see my arrowhead necklace I wore for many years. I loved that necklace.

 

I think this is about age 7 for me, age 5 for Andra.

I think this is about age 7 for me, age 5 for Andra.

 

I believe this is my 11th birthday, Andra's 9th.

I believe this is my 9th birthday, Andra’s 7th.

 

With Gwen Thompson at their home in Virginia.  This was my 26th birthday.

With Gwen Thompson at their home in Virginia. This was my 26th birthday.

%d bloggers like this: