Donald Wanner Andra

Uncle Donald Andra passed away recently.  I wanted to share his obituary and a number of the good photos I have of him.
Donald Wanner Andra, 82, passed away on Friday, May 6, 2016 at his home in Chubbuck. He was under the care of Hospice and it made his passing a little easier knowing he had been well cared for.
He was born the seventh of twelve children on 15 Jul 1933 in Preston, Idaho, to William Fredrick and Mary Louise Wanner Andra. He married Carolyn Jepsen in Pocatello on 10 Aug 1951 and again in the Logan, Utah Temple on 17 Apr 1953. He met Phyllis Beverly McKinney while working in New York and married her 21 Sep 1957 in Hogansburg and they were sealed 21 Jul 1958 in the Logan, Utah Temple. Both marriages ended in divorce. He met and married Lolane Schiess 7 Feb 1973 in Pocatello and they were sealed 6 Jun 1974 in the Salt Lake City, Utah Temple.
Don worked on the family farm near Preston growing up. He owned and operated Don’s Chubbuck Tire for more than 18 years. He raised, admired, and showed quarter horses for most of his life. He enjoyed hunting deer, elk, pheasant, antelope, moose, and more. He loved sports, especially baseball and football when his own family was involved. He regularly worked in the garden, tinkered in the shed building trailers and other useful things, and preferred a good game, laugh, or joke.
Don and Lolane served two missions together in the Washington DC North Mission assigned to as workers in the Washington DC Temple from Aug 2007 to Jan 2009 and the Idaho Pocatello Employment Resource Center Mission from June 2010 to Dec 2011.
Don and Lolane wintered each winter in St. George relishing their time together with family and seeking yard sales.
Don is survived by his beloved wife of 43 years, Lolane; five children, Lori Kaye Gleim (Larry) of Orem; Vicki Lee Shope (Alfred) of St George; Timothy Don Andra (Diane) of Boise; Jonathan Andra (Carrie) of Boise; Toni Lyn Andra of Pocatello; two step-children, Mark J Buffat (Tanna) of Pocatello; Cari Lyn Minnesota (Larry) of South Jordan; three siblings, Ross Leslie Andra (Adelaide) of Salt Lake; Dale Andra (Judy) of St George; Larry Eugene Andra (Barbra) of Preston; 23 grandchildren, and 19 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; eight siblings, William Fredrick Andra, June Johnson, Mildred Beck, Golden Rulon Andra, Colleen Mary Lloyd, Sergene Jensen, Robert Lee Andra, and Dennis Willard Andra.
A viewing will be held on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 from 6-8 pm at Colonial Funeral Home 2005 S. 4th Ave. Pocatello, ID 83201, 208-233-1500.
Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 11 am at the LDS Chubbuck 3rd Ward Chapel, 4773 Independence Ave. Chubbuck, ID 83202, with a viewing for one hour prior to the services at the church.
Interment, with Military Honors, will follow at Restlawn Memorial Gardens, 2864 S. 5th Ave. Pocatello, ID.
Sergene, Ross, Donald, Jon Wanner, unknown, Kay Wanner, Larry, Dennis, Sharon Johnson, Dale

Sergene, Ross, Donald, Jon Wanner, unknown, Kay Wanner, Larry, Dennis, Sharon Johnson, Dale

Donald, Sergene, Dale, Ross, Dennis

Donald, Sergene, Dale, Ross, Dennis

Donald, Dale, Ross, two unknowns

Donald, Dale, Ross, two unknowns

 

Donald, Millie, Larry

Donald, Millie, Larry

1960s Reunion: William, Donald, Larry, Bill, Golden, Dale, Ross

1960s Reunion: William, Donald, Larry, Bill, Golden, Dale, Ross

 

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Don Andra family

80's reunion, Larry, Dale, Colleen, Ross, Sergene, Donald, Golden

1982 Reunion: Larry, Dale, Colleen, Ross, Sergene, Donald, Golden

Donald & Lolane

 

1984 Reunion: Ross, Colleen, June, Millie, William, Golden, Donald, Larry

1984 Reunion: Ross, Colleen, June, Millie, William, Golden, Donald, Larry

 

1989 Reunion (b) June, Colleen, Mary, Sergene, William, Millie, Dale (f) Donald, Ross, Bill, Dale, Larry

1989 Reunion: (b) June, Colleen, Mary, Sergene, William, Millie, Dale (f) Donald, Ross, Bill, Dale, Larry

 

2004 Reunion, Millie, Larry, Ross, Dale, Donald

2004 Reunion: Millie, Larry, Ross, Dale, Donald

 

Donald, Paul Ross, Angela, Lolane

2007: Donald, Paul Ross, Angela, Lolane

 

2007: Rowing a boat at Jamestown, Virginia

2007: Rowing a boat at Jamestown, Virginia

 

Donald, Lolane, Lori Kaye, Larry

Donald, Lolane, Lori Kaye and Larry Gleim

 

2007 Andra Reunion: Donald's family at the reunion

2007 Andra Reunion: Donald’s family at the reunion

 

Donald and Lolane, Amanda and Paul, Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens, Richmond, Virginia

Donald and Lolane, Amanda and Paul, Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens, Richmond, Virginia

 

2008: Congress Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Amanda and Paul Ross, Donald

2008: Congress Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Amanda and Paul Ross, Donald

 

Ross, Donald

2010 Reunion: Ross, Donald

 

2010 Reunion: Ross, Donald, Larry, Sergene, Neil Anderson

2010 Reunion: Ross, Donald, Larry, Sergene, Neil Anderson

 

Lolane, Diane, Tim, Toni, Kevin Curbow, Donald, (f) Dustin, Cynthia

Lolane, Diane, Tim, Toni, Kevin Curbow, Donald, (f) Dustin, Cynthia

Day Reunites with Brothers

This was a newspaper clipping just sent to me a week or two ago.  I have read it before even though I do not have a copy.  I probably read it at Grandpa Ross’ home.  Either way, the occasion was just as momentous for Grandpa as it was for Hobart.

As I have mentioned before, Hobart is Grandpa’s half-brother through his father’s first marriage to Nanna May Day.  Hobart was born a Ross but at some point took his mother’s maiden name, Day.  John “Jack” William Ross married Ethel Sharp, Grandpa’s mother.  Milo James Ross and Hobart Day only met once.  Grandpa and his brother, Harold, paid for a bus ticket for Hobart to come to Utah in 1972.  Hobart was blind by that time.

Grandpa always told the story of when Hobart arrived at his home he gave him a little tour of the home.  Grandpa would walk into the room and would turn on the light.  Hobart would keep telling him, “You don’t need to turn the light on for me.”  Apparently they repeatedly got a kick out of that.

When Hobart returned to Virginia he spoke to the local newspaper about his visit.  That is where this article comes from.

Since it is hard to read (I was given a photo carbon copy of the newspaper), I will type what is says.  The scan of the article is available at the end.

“Day Reunites With Brothers

“By Cindy Conte

“‘I never saw my half brothers, but I thought of them often,’ said Hobert Day of 47 Peppers Ferry Rd, Fairlawn.  Hobert sat by the kitchen window, the rain beating against the panes as steadily…(fold in newspaper).  He continued, ‘I was sitting by the phone about eight weeks ago and decided to call them.  Milo Ross who is now 55 and his brother Harold, 52, invited my wife Edna and me to come out and visit them in Ogden, Utah.  Edna fell and was unable to go with me.  My half brothers paid for my tickets and I was on my way.  Every mile of the way I wondered if they would accept me or not, I had so many doubts.  When I arrived, my doubts were erased.’

“Hobert spent three days and nights with Milo and his wife Gladys and their children.  He visited Harold, his wife Joanne and their two children.

“‘They are carpenters and are doing real well’ said Hobert.  ‘It was a wonderful and very happy reunion.’

“Hobert was 11 months old when his parents separated.  His father traveled to California and in 1913 moved to Ogden, Utah, where he remarried a (unclear, her name was Ethel though) Sharp.  John Ross had four children by his second wife.  Milo Ross, Harold Ross and Paul Ross who died at the age of 12.  (Crossed-out, Ethel handwritten in) died in 1932 (actually 1925) giving birth to a girl (girl is crossed-out and ‘boy’ is written in).

“‘It was in 1939, I was 28 when I first saw my father.  He stood at the door and said “Hobert I’m John Ross your father.”  Then one Sunday he was gone and I never saw him again.  He died of an unknown illness in 1948.’

“Hobert is blind, but he is content with his life and he and Edna generate a lot of warmth in their home.

“Hobert smiled and said, ‘My brothers and their families are going to visit me and Edna some day.  I told them we couldn’t offer them as much as they could, but we can love them as much.’

Hobart died in 1983.  Grandpa and Harold did not make it to Virginia to visit.

 

Days

Betty Donaldson Obituary

Betty May Oram Donaldson, 83, passed away peacefully surrounded by many dear friends on November 13, 2014. She was born November 5, 1931 to Gloyd Hyrum Oram and Rosabelle Grant Oram in Ogden, Utah.

Betty Oram Toddler

Betty Oram as a toddler

She attended schools in Honeyville and Ogden. She met and married David William Donaldson on April 12, 1953 (in Las Vegas) and their marriage was later solemnized in the Ogden LDS Temple (2008). They enjoyed traveling, camping and fishing. After 54 years together, David died in 2007.

Gloyd and Betty Oram

Gloyd and Betty Oram

Betty loved her dogs, cooking, crocheting, listening to books on tape and visiting with friends and family. She worked as a medical record and lab technician. She was a member of the LDS Church Plain City 7th Ward.

Betty Oram

Betty Oram

She is survived by her sister, Marilyn Keyes of Williamsburg, Virginia, many cousins, nieces and nephews and lots of friends. She will be missed very much.

LaPriel Gailey and Betty Oram

LaPriel Gailey and Betty Oram

She was preceded in death by her parents and brother Donald Oram.

Betty with cup

A viewing for family and friends will be held on Friday, November 21, 2014 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Myers Ogden Mortuary, 845 Washington Blvd and Saturday from 9 to 10 a.m. at the mortuary. Graveside services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, November 22, 2014 at the Honeyville Cemetery, 6900 North 2500 West.

Betty and David (Dave) Donaldson

Betty and David (Dave) Donaldson

We would like to thank the Lotus Park Assisted Living personnel and Intermountain Homecare (especially Vickie, Launi and Misty) for their excellent care of Betty. We are very grateful for the assistance of Betty’s ward family during her last few weeks.

~

That is her obituary as found in the newspaper with two additions by me (in parenthesis).  I thought I would add a couple more side notes.

I have mentioned Betty and Dave in the history for Dave’s parents found at this link.

I am not sure the reasons, but it sounds like Betty was pretty much raised by her grandparents, Jedediah Mill Grant and Annie Kaziah Bowcutt.  Interestingly, Annie’s brother, Lorenzo, married my great grandmother Lillian Coley Jonas years after my great grandfather had passed away.  Betty had some interesting stories about Ren as he was known.  You can see pictures of Ren and his obituary at the link for Lillian.  She adored her Grandmother Annie Bowcutt Grant.  As I mentioned, I did not think to ask why, but she never told me much about her parents.  But she told me loads about her grandparents.  She even gave me a number of photos to scan of them, which I will likely post next week.

I liked to go and visit Aunt Betty.  Since she lived next to Grandpa and Grandma it was easy and convenient to go.  Sometimes though after spending a few hours with Grandpa and Grandma I wanted to get on the road but Grandpa would send me to Betty’s with something to give her and Dave (when he was still alive).  Grandma would even walk over with me sometimes.

Ross – Sharp Wedding

Jack and Ethel Ross holding June Streeter about 1920 in Paul, Idaho.

Milo Riley and Mary Ann “Lilly” Sharp are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Ethel to John William “Jack” Ross, son of James Thomas and Damey Catherine Graham Ross.  They were married at Fort Logan, Arapahoe, Colorado by an Army Chaplain (Julius J Babst) on 11 January 1920.

Jack is currently employed with the US Army as a cook at Fort Logan, Colorado.

The couple will return to make their home in Plain City, Utah as soon as he completes his enlistment with the Army.

Jack Ross was born 2 September 1890 in Pulaski, Pulaski, Virginia.  He was the second of four children born to James Thomas Ross and Damey Catherine Graham.  Read more about Jack’s parents here.  We really do not know much of Jack’s childhood.  His mother joined the LDS church on 27 February 1898 and his father on 17 April 1898 in an unknown location.  Jack and his older brother Robert Leonard joined on 30 July 1900.  I have been unable to find the Ross family on the 1900 Census.  By July 1906, the family was living in or near Welch, McDowell, West Virginia working in the coal mines when Fanny and James were baptized.  Jack married Nannie May Day (she went by May) on 6 July 1910 in Squire Jim, McDowell, West Virginia.  To this marriage was born Hobart Day Ross (who later went by Hobart Day) on 1 Jun 1911 in McDowell County, West Virginia.

James and May Ross holding Hobart about 1912

Jack’s younger sister, Fanny Elizabeth married Calvin Dickerson Phibbs on 22 December 1906 (listed as a miner) and then moved to Rupert, Minidoka, Idaho in 1912.  Initially Calvin and Fanny moved to Rupert and purchased 80 acres to the northeast of Rupert.  He dabbled with cattle and real estate while also working as an electrician.  (He was eventually elected as Rupert City Clerk and in 1918 as Minidoka County Probate Judge.  He was admitted as an attorney to the Idaho bar 15 December 1919.)  At any rate, in 1911 the construction of a new sugar factory in Burley, Cassia, Idaho was drawing a number of potential workers.  Word reached the remaining Ross clan in West Virginia, probably from Fanny, of the upcoming opening.  The remaining Ross family rode a train of coal from McDowell County directly to southern Idaho.

Jack’s wife, May, did not come with him for one reason or another.  She divorced him shortly afterward and remarried to Andrew Cleveland Parson(s?) on 22 November 1913 in Gary, McDowell, West Virginia.  We do not know anything of the Ross family between 1913 and 1917 other than they were working at Amalgamated Sugar in Burley.  Jack enlisted in the U.S. Army on 23 April 1917 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah and served in Battery E, 4th FA Rec Ser; Co. C, 21st Bn USG; 5 Rct Co (I do not know what any of that means) at Fort Logan, Arapahoe, Colorado, until 6 June 1919 when he was permitted leave.  He had obtained the rank of Sargent and was awarded the WWI Victory Button and Medal.  As far as I can tell, he never left U.S. soil.

Jack’s parents were working on farms around the area during the summers and then at the factories during the winter.  Robert listed his parents as living in Idahome, Cassia, Idaho in September 1918 when registered for the World War I Draft.  Jack’s parents moved to Paul, Minidoka, Idaho and started working on the first beet campaign in 1918 at the new Paul Amalgamated sugar factory.  Jack visited his parents in Paul on leave (starting 6 Jun 1919) and it was there he met Ethel Streeter running a store on Main Street, now Idaho Street, only a block or two from where his parents lived.  Jack reported back at Fort Logan on 13 August 1919 to 12 August 1920 when he was discharged from Fort Logan.

Ethel Sharp was born 9 April 1898 in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  She was the 11th child (8 siblings living by the time of her birth) of 12 children born to Milo Riley Sharp and Mary Ann Stoker, AKA Lillian “Lilly” Musgrave.  I have written about this family at this link: Sharp-Stoker Wedding.

Ethel was confirmed in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Plain City 15 May 1912.  Somewhere during this decade she was involved in a train accident on the Utah-Idaho Central Railway line between Plain City and Ogden, Weber, Utah.  I have been unable to locate any newspaper clippings or other information on this accident.  Anyhow, she obtained a settlement for her injuries.

She married Mark Lewis Streeter of West Weber, Weber, Utah on 7 May 1917 in Ogden.

Mark and Ethel Streeter

She made large deposits at Ogden First National Bank in June 1917, potentially her settlement.  We have checks from not long after that through August 1918 written out from Paul State Bank.  Interestingly, the checks state, “Paul is the Cream of the Minidoka Project, We Have the Cream of Paul.”

I have written about the photos recently found which include two photos of the Streeter Ice Cream & Confection Parlor.  Ethel Sharp and Streeter Confection.

Ethelyn June Streeter was born 4 June 1918 in Paul (she died in 2012).  Pictures of June are at the link in the preceding paragraph.  The divorce of Mark and Ethel was final after Mark had enlisted in the Army 3 March 1919.  Mark indicates in his autobiography that after he enlisted and left Ethel fell in love with Jack and that was the reason for their divorce.  Jack did not meet Ethel until June 1919, three months after Mark enlisted in the army.  Jack returned from his leave in Paul to Fort Logan in August 1919.  Ethel ventured to Fort Logan in January to marry Jack.  The 1920 Census lists him as a cook just days before Ethel arrived and the two were married.  She left little June with the Streeter family in Ogden.  We do not know much about the short dating period, but she traveled all the way to Colorado to marry him.  Whether she was head over heels for a poor military boy or something else, we do not know.  We do not know how long she stayed in Colorado or even if they came back together after his discharge.  We assume Ethel sold the store before going to Colorado.  After his discharge, Jack and Ethel moved to Plain City and he worked for Amalgamated Sugar Company at the Wilson Lane factory.  This was roughly a 7 mile walk to work one direction.  Milo James Ross was born 4 February 1921 in Plain City in a little log home just to the west and north of about 2971 N. 4200 W.  I have written of Milo James Ross at this link: Ross-Donaldson Wedding.  Here is a picture of the little log cabin in about 2005, shortly before it was torn down.

At some point, Jack and Ethel found their way back to Paul where Jack worked in the fields and at the sugar factory.  Paul Ross was born 14 February 1922 in Paul.  Work took Jack back to the Burley sugar factory and John Harold Ross (who went by Harold) was born 7 November 1923 in Burley and then moved back to Paul.  By 1924, Jack and Ethel were living with Jack’s parents and trying to make enough to get by.  Milo remembers walking to church in Paul before his mother died, he thinks a Presbyterian or Episcopal church.

To ease the load on his parents, the family moved back to Plain City.  Ethel gave birth to her last child, Earnest Jackson Ross, on 16 July 1925 in Plain City.

Sadly, Ethel passed away 21 days later on 6 August of puerperal septicemia (Blood poisoning from obstetric delivery).  Earnest lived to 20 September and he passed away in Idaho from malnutrition.  Jack is listed as the informant on the death certificate for Ethel.  Jack could not afford burial plots so Edward Sharp, Ethel’s brother, provided the burial plots where Ethel and Ernest are buried in Plain City.

Milo tells the story of the funeral for his mother.  He remembered that he was not permitted to look into the casket to see his mother.  The casket was up on the table and he could not see a thing and all he wanted to see was his mother.  Within days Jack took the four children back to Idaho and dropped them off with his parents.  Milo remembers his father riding the train holding baby Earnest in his arms.  Earnest passed away in Rupert.  James and Damey Ross took care of the remaining children through the winter of 1925-26.  June and Milo do not remember their father being there for the winter.  June’s only real memory of this period was of creamy buttered potatoes that were common and that she acquired a great love for.

By the time spring rolled around, Jack or his family had contacted Ethel’s family in Plain City and indicated they could not afford to feed and take care of the children anymore.  Os Richardson, Ethel’s brother-in-law drove to Idaho to pick up the four children.  Milo remembers the drive from Paul along the poplar lined highway from Paul past the sugar factory down into Heyburn, across the old river bridge through to Declo, Malta, Strevell, and back to Plain City.  The children were “farmed” out to family.  Milo was raised by his Uncle Ed Sharp, Paul by his Aunt Vic Hunt, and Harold by his Uncle Del Sharp.

We have very little information on what occurred in the life of Jack from this point on.  He found his way back to West Virginia where he tried to convince May to remarry him.  She had remarried and was having none of that.  This is the last time Hobart Day Ross ever saw his father.  Hobart went on to become a preacher.  He awoke blind one morning after being kicked in the head by a horse.

Jack found his way to Rock Springs, Sweetwater, Wyoming where he married a lady named Zana Cogdill on 29 November 1926.  She was previously married to Frank Coffey and was going by his name.  I have been unable to determine what happened to Frank.  She had a son already named Orval A Coffey. The 1930 Census on 2 April 1930 finds the two of them in Crawford, Delta, Colorado where he is working as a foreman in a battery shop and living with the brother of Zana’s first husband (?!?).

We do not believe this marriage lasted very long either.  Jack made several visits back to Plain City to see his children.  He would take a taxi out to Plain City, pick up Betty Booth, and the two would ride over to the fields where Milo was working.  We assume the same happened with Harold.  Paul died from a concussion in 1932 after falling out of a barn.  The car would pull up at the end of the field and would toot its horn and Milo could see the occupants wave.  It was not until he visited his father in 1948 that he realized this was his father waving at him across the way and that the lady was Betty Booth.  (Interestingly, Milo had given assistance to Betty Booth in the form of coal and helped pay some of her Dr.’s bills before she passed).

Jack reappears for the mandatory draft registration for World War II living in Stockton, San Joaquin, California working for Werl Zuckerman on McDonald Island with a Stockton mailing address.  He lists his nearest kin as his sister Ms. C. D. Phibbs (Fanny) living at 529 S. California Street in Stockton.

Milo received a telegram in 1948 telling him that his father was dying in a Veteran’s Hospital in Livermore, Alameda, California and that he was requested to come.  Milo tried to convince his brother Harold to go with him but Harold wanted nothing to do with his father.  Milo took the bus to Livermore and found the hospital. He arrived somewhere around midnight and found his way into the building and climbed up a couple of floors and found a corner he could sleep in until morning.  He heard coughs from a room and somebody in the room ask for the time.  He poked his head in and asked if anyone knew of Jack Ross.  Jack indicated he was in the room and wanted to know if it was Milo or Harold at the door.

They visited until an orderly came in and kicked him out.  He slept in a corner for a while and then told an orderly that he had come all the way from Utah to see his father and that his father was dying.  The orderly then let him stay with his father until he passed.

Fortunately, Milo and Jack were able to visit.  Milo asked why his father never came to visit and his father insisted that he wrote letters, sent gifts, and that the Sharp family kept the children from him.  He did not believe him at the time.  Vic Hunt, Ethel’s sister, had received the letters and told Milo about them after her husband and son were electrocuted in 1960 (thinking it was a form of punishment for her keeping them secret) but still did not give them to him. They passed to her son Harold in 1987, and to her grandson Archie in 2005.  Archie turned them over to Milo in 2010.

We know very little of his time in Wyoming, Colorado, or California before his passing.  Jack indicated in 1948 that life had been hard and he never had much.  So little is known of these years, hopefully some more of the story will come out in the future.

John Ross Tombstone

Our garden

After spending a day working in our yard, I thought about how little I felt like I really accomplished.  I mowed the lawn last night and today sprayed weeds, picked some dandelions, and turned over some soil for Amanda.  She planted flowers in the flower beds, jalapenos, peppers, zucchini, tomatoes, and squash.

As I puttered around the yard, I thought of how the British call their yard a garden.  Our garden is where we grow food, their garden is where they grow flowers, grass, and hedges.  Then I thought about how there are people and that is all they do for a living, maintain gardens/yards.  In honour of the season, I found some photos of gardens we have been to that seem to be more than just flowerbeds.  Sorry, no photo of our yard is included!

Here is a picture of one of the gardens at Lyme Park in Disley, England.

Garden at Lyme Park in Cheshire County, England

Garden at Lyme Park in Disley

A shot of the gardens at Mirabell Palace in Salzburg, Austria.

Some of the gardens at Mirabell Palace in Salzburg, Austria

Some of the gardens at Mirabell Palace in Salzburg

Some of the gardens at Hampton Court Palace in Richmond Upon Thames, England.

The garden of Hampton Court Palace, former home of Kings and Queens of England

The garden of Hampton Court Palace, former home of Kings and Queens, in Richmond upon Thames

Lastly, a view of one of the less ornate gardens at Maymont in Richmond, Virginia.

Part of the gardens at Maymont in Richmond, Virginia.

Part of the gardens at Maymont in Richmond

Presidents Day

In honour of Presidents Day this year I thought I would post a couple of pictures I have regarding Presidents of the United States.

Brad Hales, me, Anna Badger, and Jeana Stuart

Brad Hales, me, Anna Badger, and Jeana Stuart

Bush and Cheney Inauguration in 2008

Bush and Cheney Inauguration in 2008 in front of the US Capitol

George Washington statute by the Turnbull Commission of Five.  Adams, Jefferson, Washington, all became Presidents.

George Washington statue by the Trumbull Declaration of Independence.  Adams, Jefferson, Washington, all became Presidents, in US Capitol, Washington, DC

Martha and George Washington tombs

Martha and George Washington tombs in Mt Vernon, Virginia
Washington Equestrian Statute with Jefferson standing in front

Washington Equestrian Statue with Jefferson standing in front in Richmond, Virginia

Washington as a Mason in Alexandria, Virginia

Washington as a Mason in Alexandria, Virginia

James Monroe tomb, Richmond, Virginia

James Monroe tomb, Richmond, Virginia

Plaque on James Monroe's tomb

Plaque on James Monroe’s tomb

John Tyler Grave

John Tyler Grave in Richmond, Virginia

John Quincy and Louisa Adams' tombs

John Quincy and Louisa Adams’ tombs in Quincy, Massachusetts

John and Abigail Adams' tombs

John and Abigail Adams’ tombs in Quincy, Massachusetts

Thomas Jefferson's tombstone near Charlottesville, Virginia

Thomas Jefferson’s tombstone near Charlottesville, Virginia

That is pretty much the closest I got to any of these Presidents, that I can prove.  I have also been the resting spots of William Howard Taft, Harry S Truman, John F Kennedy.

Remember, Remember

Despite also being popular for Guy Fawkes Day which recently passed, Remember, Remember also relates to Remembrance Day, Armistice Day, or as we treat it in the United States, Veterans Day.  As an American, the day is more a holiday than a solemn occasion of reflection or remembrance.  Nevertheless, I thought I would honor it this week.

Arlington National Cemetery, Nov 2005

Interestingly, we find many people signing up for secession from the United States.  I find it interesting that Guy Fawkes Day and Remembrance Day are so close on the calendar and their memorable phrases start with the same repetition of the word “Remembrance”.  We seceded from the empire of Great Britain (which used to celebrate Empire Day on 24 May) and won the battle so secession became a legal right in the new colony.  Then part of that new colony seceded and lost the battle so secession was no longer a legal right.  The battle over secession is 1-1 on our soil but the latest precedent is against it.  Our Declaration of Independence is not a legally binding document, but it certainly underlines the presumption of which the nation was founded, and overturned in the Civil War.

Arlington National Cemetery, Nov 2005

Either way, we honor the veterans on both sides of those conflicts in this nation.  It just depends on where you live for which side you might feel a little more inclination.  Here in the west, we really acceded into the United States rather than won our right to be a part of this nation.  The French and Indian, 1812, and Civil War don’t mean much to us in Idaho.

Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, Nov 2005

When it comes to the world wars of our century, we have a part to play.  Plus it certainly helps to have people we personally know who served and fought in these battles.  Most of us know people who lost loved ones in these two wars.  Hence these wars and accompanying veterans are more honored at present.  In these wars we fought against forced accession into whatever nation was seeking to obtain.

World War II monument, National Mall, Washington, DC, Nov 2005

Then we found ourselves during Korea and Vietnam in what is named the Cold War.  We fought against forced accession by nations we did not agree with (we ignored the rest) but also sought to help other nations secede and ultimately become free and independent.  We helped win that battle with the freedom of nations that were under the control of the United Soviet Socialist Republic.  Elsewhere in the world, Belgium, Portugal, Germany, and the United Kingdom continued to allow other nations to become independent and we supported that movement.

Anna Badger, Jeana Stuart, and Brad Hales at the Iwo Jima monument in Arlington, Virginia, Nov 2005

American policy and law is less than clear on what exactly our position is on secession.  The national mood towards our veterans does not even seem to be as clear cut as it has been in times past.  A divide continues to build.  I am not really sure over what.  Whether we are for or against secession, those who are willing to fight for that right, rightly or wrongly, deserve our honor.  After all, far too many of them gave the greatest sacrifice a person can give.  We find it much more noble when a person voluntarily gives their life (whether they live or die) than those who are not allowed to choose to do so (but not to diminish their sacrifice).  I honor our veterans because of what they give and those who give their all.  Remember, those who live beyond the conflict still have to live with it the rest of their lives.  May we honor all veterans who fight for their cause (are terrorists veterans?).

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington, VA, Nov 2005