Plain City Cemetery Incident

I wanted to share this interesting little incident that happened on Friday.

Amanda and the rest of the kids went to Utah for the weekend.  Aliza stayed because she had school and rode down with me on Friday.

As we neared Plain City I asked if she remembered Great Grandpa Milo.  She said that she did.  She then asked if we could drive past his house.  (She often asks to drive past places.)

We drove past and I asked if she wanted to stop at the Plain City Cemetery.  She said yes.

We stopped and walked over to Grandpa and Grandma Ross’ grave stone.

Aliza with Milo & Gladys Ross tombstone

Aliza with Milo & Gladys Ross tombstone

I asked if she wanted to see Grandpa Milo’s mother’s grave.  She agreed and we walked over to the grave of Ethel Sharp Ross.

I also took her to the grave of Paul Ross, 1922-1932, and I explained my relationship to him.

We then walked to the grave of Ethel Sharp Ross’ parents, Milo Riley and Mary Ann “Lillie” Stoker Sharp.

Aliza with Milo and Mary Ann "Lillie" Sharp, also Mary Ann Stoker.

Aliza with Milo and Mary Ann “Lillie” Sharp, also Mary Ann Sharp’s tombstone.

Aliza recognized the Lillie, although Lillian was only loosely named after this Lillie.  We use the Lillie spelling for her nickname based on this Lillie though.  I explained the Milo name, the relationships, and how Mary Ann on this stone is Mary Ann Bailey Sharp, Milo Riley’s mother.

We then walked over to Lillie’s father, William Edward Stoker.  In this picture below, you can see Mary Ann or Lillie Sharp’s proximity to her father’s grave.  Her mother died in England before the family could immigrate to Utah.

Aliza with William Edward Stoker

Aliza with William Edward Stoker’s grave stone

Needless to say, being related to some of the older graves in the cemetery, we are related to a number of the other families in the graveyard.  We walked around for quite a while talking about names and how they are related.

I started walking back toward the car and Aliza wanted to go back over by William Stoker.  I told her we did not have any more family graves over in that part of the cemetery.  She insisted, “we didn’t stop at the other family tombstone for a picture.”  Knowing there was no other family over there, I followed her so she could see for herself.

She then stopped at another grave.  She wanted to take a picture of it.  I told her we were not related to them and she said, “Yes we are, I want a picture.”  Rather than have a battle in the cemetery over it, I took her picture.

Aliza with William and Martha Wayment tomb stone

Aliza with William and Martha Wayment tombstone

If you look closely, you can see William Stoker’s grave behind William Wayment’s grave marker, and the Sharp tombstone right above Aliza.  I took the picture and it dawned on me, Amanda’s Great Grandfather’s middle name was Wayment and his mother had been a Wayment.  I was not sure if these Wayments were related to Amanda’s Wayments or not.

Sure enough, Aliza was right.  While not related to me, these were her relatives!  These are her 5th Great Grandparents through Amanda’s line.

I was a bit struck by the determination she had that we had another family grave I had not taken her.  Dumbfounded that they were in fact her family, and not mine!  It inspired and spooked at the same time.

Amanda’s Great Grandfather is Walter Wayment Hansen, 1904 -1995.  His mother is Martha Ann Wayment Hansen, 1877-1908.  Her father is Joseph Wayment, 1844 – 1931.  His parents are William Wayment, 1822 – 1883, and Martha Brown, 1823 – 1905, the individuals whose graves Aliza wanted a picture.  My father-in-law, Bryan Hemsley, did not remember they were buried in Plain City.

Martha Brown and William Wayment's tombestone

Martha Brown and William Wayment’s tombestone

A quick internet search located this brief history of William and Martha Wayment.  In reading, the Stokers and Wayments came to America both on the same ship, the Amazon!  Multiple linkages in history between the two families.  I corrected a couple of spellings in the biography.

Martha Brown was born May 26, 1823 in Bassingbourne, Cambridgeshire, England to William Brown and Mary Wade. Cambridge is a flat coastal plain located in the southeast part of England. The climate is moderate with much rainfall which produces much vegetation. Martha met and married William Wayment on Christmas Day December 25, 1841 in the Bassingbourne Parrish in Whaddon, Cambridgeshire, England. They both signed the certificate which seemed an unusual procedure to the clerk. William signed his name Whayment. He gave his age as 20 and was listed as a laborer. Martha gave her age as 19 and was listed as a s spinster. William and Mary made their home with h is widowed mother, Mary Rook Wayment. Several members of her family have told of this incident – “as a bride living in her mother-in-laws home”, Martha found that circumstances and conditions were not always pleasant. One stressful day Martha threatened to leave the home and her husband. She went into a small room (or a clothes closet) to get some of her things, her mother-in-law quickly closed and locked the door. There Martha was kept until she promised not to leave. Satisfactory adjustments were made and she kept her promise. Martha’s grandfather, William Brown of Whaddon has been described as a wealthy farmer. His son, Samuel, Martha’s father was disinherited after he married a servant girl, Mary Wade, who worked for his parents. He was a butcher by trade. He extended his business and it is said he became a well to do merchant. Martha had seven brothers and 1 sister all born in Bassingbourne. It is said the Browns were a family of large men, all of them being over 6 ft tall, and long lived. Martha was the only one to live to be over 80, however. Though a hard worker William, Martha father, never accumulated much wealth. Their modest home and limited circumstances was a source of embarrassment at times for Martha in England. William earning being sometimes about 8 shillings a week (about $2 in US dollars). But through careful management they were able to take care of their children as they came into the family. William and Martha had 6 boys and 2 girls, all born in Whaddon. Aaron, Joseph, Samuel, William Emily John Brown William Thomas, Martha. Seems as though it was necessary for them to come to America to develop their potential. The children hired out at an early age, working for farmers of the area. work included keeping birds out of the cherry trees and pulling poppies out of the grain fields. Often the children would leave home at 5:00 in the morning and work for 3 or 4 hours then they would be called in for breakfast. Some meals were very meager. The first missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints arrived in Liverpool, England July 20, 1837. Having sailed on the ship “Garrick” under the leadership of Heber C Kimball. Later working their way to the Whaddon, Bassingbourne area. after William and Martha heard their messages they opened their home to the missionaries. Many people of the community stirred up others to try to stop the spread of the gospel. This made it necessary to hold meetings and baptisms services at night to avoid the mobs that were a continually threat to them. The Brown family were especially bitter against the church. This caused William and Martha to delay joining the church although they were convince of the truth. Finally in 1850 William and Martha decided to disregard the threats of the Brown family. William was baptized May 1850 a few months later Williams mother, Mary Rook Wayment was baptized in 1851. The three of them continued to support the missionaries. Martha was baptized 1 May 1857 in spite of her families wishes. When her father learned of her actions he disinherited her except for the benefit o f a few schillings. All the children were each baptized into the church eventually. Joseph the oldest living son worked with his father fossil digging and earned enough money for his transportation to America. Joseph aged 19, 1863 booked passage on the “Amazon”. After Joseph left the family continued working together to meet their needs and maybe to emigrate? It took many years to reach their goal. by the spring of 1878 they were making final preparations to emigrate to Zion. They booked passage on the ship “Nevada” and sailed from Liverpool May 25, 1878. Travel was long and much seasickness. After arriving on the shores they rode west on Pullman cars to Philadelphia then changed here to “immigrant cars” which were very uncomfortable. The east was beautiful but the farther west they came the habitation vanished and scenes about them were dry and barren. They arrived in Ogden, Utah Territory June 1878 the family was met by son, Joseph and Samuel and taken to Samuel’s home in Plain City, After living here a few months they settled in the Salt Creek area close to Joseph on land he had purchased in 1872. Their home was a log house. William applied for homestead rights to a quarter section of land. They planted cotton wood trees, yellow roses, tea vines and other fast growing plants. They all continued being active in the church and received their endowments in the Salt Lake Temple. Martha was not idle as she received her citizenship papers November 16, 1885. In 1886 Martha received the property deed William had applied for Signed by President Grover C Cleveland, President of the United States of America Oct 18,1886 Martha cared for most of her needs but over the years became very overweight. The story is told: April 12, 1905 at age 82, she saw the traveling grocer coming & hastened to arrive home before him. Arriving about the same time, she told him she would have to gather her eggs for his pay. The grocer said he would go to other places and come back later. When he returned he could not find her, over exertion had brought on a stroke and she died. Her survivors were, Joseph, Samuel, John, William Thomas, Emily and Martha, 46 grandchildren and 29 great grandchildren. Her service held in the Warren church was overflowing with family & friends. She is buried in the Plain City Cemetery next to her loving husband April 14, 1905

 

John Reese’s 10th Grade Class

Top (l-r): John Reese, Ray Charlton, Earl Hipwell, Miriam Weatherston, Delmar White, Owen Wayment, Neta England.  Second: Orlo Maw, Warren Williams, Jean Etherington, Junior Taylor, Eugene Maw, Cleone Carver, Howard Hunt.  Third: Ellis Lund, Vera Wayment, Keith Hodson, Ted Christensen, Ruth Wade, Wayne Taylor, Milo Ross.  Bottom: LauRene Thompson, Frank Poulsen, Margaret Freestone, Ezma Musgrave.

This is the fourth of the class photos.  I believe this is actually the 1936-1937 year (Grandpa says in his writing it his his 10th Grade year).  This class attended Weber High School located in Ogden, Weber, Utah.  These students graduated in 1939.  Nearly all these students came from Warren, Plain City, West Weber, and those parts of the county for school.  Out of the whole picture, only one passed away in World War II (as far as I can tell, ALL the men served).

John Major Reese (1896-1976)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Delmar White (1921-2008)

Owen Urry Wayment (1921-2008)

Neta Elizabeth England (1920-2006)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

Elmer Taylor Jr. (1921-1985)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Vera Mary Wayment (1921-1989)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Ruth Wade (1921-Alive)

Wayne Taylor (1921-1969)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

Frank Dee Poulsen (1920-2010)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Ezma Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

John Reese’s 9th Grade Class

Back (l-r): Cleone Carver, Vera Wayment, Margaret Freestone, Emza Musgrave, Jean Etherington, LauRene Thompson.  Third: June Wayment, Miriam Weatherston, Ellis Lund, Ray Charlton, Ivan Hodson, Warren Williams, Ruth Wade, Tamara East, John Reese.  Second: Lyle Thompson, Milo Ross, Eugene Maw, Earl Hipwell, Bill Hill, Keith Hodson.  Front: Ted Christensen, Wayne Rose, Howard Hunt, Orlo Maw, Owen Wayment, Ellis Stewart, Delmar White.

Since I am on a kick of pictures from my Grandpa’s collection, here is the third of the four.  This is the 9th Grade class my Grandpa was in.  Mr. John Reece would be this class’s teacher the next year too.  I am pretty sure the 9th Grade was at Weber High School, but I have been unable to confirm what year switched between Plain City School and Weber High School in Ogden.  Several of these boys died in World War II. The ones with question marks are likely still alive.

Cleone Carver (1921-1994)

Vera Mary Wayment (1921-1989)

Margaret Freestone (1921-Alive)

Emza Ameriam Musgrave (1922-2007)

Vesey Jean Etherington (1921-2000)

LauRene Thompson (1921-2010)

June Ellen Wayment (1920-2012)

Miriam Weatherston (1921-2001)

Ellis Marion Lund (1921-1984)

Ray Charlton (1920-1991)

Ivan Alma Hodson (1919-1982)

William Warren Williams (1921-1988)

Ruth Wade (1921-Alive)

Tamara East (?-Alive)

John Major Reese (1896-1976)

James Lyle Thompson (1921-1999)

Milo James Ross (1921-2014)

Wilmer Eugene Maw (1920-2009)

John Earl Hipwell (1921-2000)

William Stanley Hill (1919-1945)

Benjamin Keith Hodson (1920-1970)

Edwin “Ted” Daniel Christensen (1921-2005)

Wayne East Rose (1921-Alive)

Howard Hunt (1921-1944)

Orlo Steadwell Maw (1921-2004)

Owen Urry Wayment (1921-2008)

Ellis Wayment Stewart (1921-1940)

Delmar White (1921-2008)