Regina Nuffer Wanner Photo

Regina Friederike Nuffer Wanner

This is a picture of my Great Great Grandmother Regina Friederike Nuffer Wanner.  I have written a more thorough history of her before.

This large photo is in the possession of Karen Hodges of Preston, Idaho.  My Uncle Larry Andra was able to visit and get some pictures of the large photos.  I have already uploaded this to FamilySearch and linked her properly.  I recommend all go and see the free family history tree and related documents and memories/photos there.  http://www.familysearch.org

This painted picture does create questions for me.  I assume the photo has the angle to it because of how Larry took the photograph.  Was this portrait on the top of the stack as it appears to have the most damage to it of all the photos in the stack.  Was this photo done about the same time as George’s photo?  What was the occasion?

It isn’t the highest quality of portrait due to time and angle.  But it provides another glimpse into Regina Nuffer.  Here is another picture of her I very much appreciate.

Regina Nuffer and Alma Katherine Scheibel

John George Wanner Jr Photo

John George Wanner Jr

This is a picture of my Great Great Grandfather John George Wanner Jr.  His name in Germany was Johann Georg Wanner.  I have written a more thorough history of him before.  He went by George during his life since he was a Junior.

This large photo is in the possession of Karen Hodges of Preston, Idaho.  My Uncle Larry Andra was able to visit and get some pictures of the large photos.  I have already uploaded this to FamilySearch and linked him properly.  I recommend all go and see the free family history tree and related documents and memories/photos there.  http://www.familysearch.org

The photo, a painted picture, does create questions for me.  Why is he dressed up?  What was the occasion?  But the more interesting part of the photo is what is found on the back of the photo.

While the photo snapped by Larry cuts off some of the dates, it gives a great copy of his signature.  I don’t have the record of when he was ordained a High Priest, but he served as a missionary to California from 1 December 1933 to 6 April 1934.  He returned at age 63 so I don’t think this photo is of him at the same time, he just wrote the back of the photo over the age of 63.

Back of Picture of John George Wanner

It is nice to have a copy of his handwriting in addition to the photos we have of him.

Dapper Dan

Judy, Dale, Mary, Bill, and Ross Andra

Here is a classy photo developed September 1962.

Bill and Mary Andra, my great grandparents.

On the far left are Judith (“Judy”) and Dale Andra, they were married in June 1962.

On the far right is Ross Andra.

Sounds like this was just going to church, no special occasion.  This is in the yard of the home at 422 E 400 S, Preston, Idaho.

Jacob Friedrich Wanner

I received this history a few years ago.  I will provide it as it is written (only minor edits).  I have written before regarding Fred’s parents Johann George (John George) Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.

Back(l-r): Eva, Carma, Bert Wanner; Front: Lyman, Fred, Eva, Stanley Wanner

“(This History is written by Jacob’s daughter – Eva June Wanner Lewis – with the information sent in by Brother Fred, and Sister Mary Ann, and  her own sweet memories as well as information from Histories of Brothers and Sisters.)

“Jacob Friedrich Wanner was born January 14, 1881, in Gruenkraut, Germany, the 7th child of Johann Georg Wanner and Anna Maria Schmid.  They had a large family consisting of five boys and five girls.  They were quite poor so Grandfather went to work as a road overseer.  This left the farm work to Grandmother and the children.  They used the milk cows to do the farm work and then would milk them morning and night.  They also got wood from the forest for fuel.

Back(l-r): Mary, Christina, George, Pauline; Front: Anna, Fred, Louisa, Wilhelmina, Gottlop, John Wanner

“It rained a lot in Germany so the out buildings were connected to the house.  One time Grandma went downstairs to get some fruit.  She reached over and touched something hairy – she thought it was the devil!  It was a cow that had wandered down from the barn.

“Dad didn’t talk much about his life as a child but he did say he got a drum for Christmas and then it would disappear about New Year’s Day and he would get it for Christmas again the next year.  He may have been joking.

“The family belonged to the Lutheran Church and was very religious.

“In the summer of 1890 the Lord sent a man along the street in Gruenkraut where Grandpa worked.  He was a missionary from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.  He talked to Grandpa a long time and showed him the Book of Mormon.  He spoke in German.  When it came dinner time Grandpa took the missionary home and said,  “We’ll see Mother.”  From that day the missionaries stayed in their home and the family was soon converted.  They joined the church in 1891.

“Uncle George was baptized in July 1891 and went to America with one of the missionaries, Brother Terrell from Providence, Utah.  Brother Terrell helped him find a job to provide for himself.  He got a job with Fred Nuffer in Glendale.  Grandfather and Grandmother and the three oldest girls were baptized in October 1891.  Louise and Pauline were baptized in June 1894, Gottlob in June 1895 and Wilhelmina in August 1896.  Dad was baptized in Preston or Franklin, Idaho, on June 7, 1894, by Lars C. Larsen and confirmed a member of the church by Austin I. Merrill on June 7, 1894.  He was ordained an Elder by George C. Parkinson on September 27, 1903, and was married by Thos Morgan on September 30, 1903, at the Logan Temple.

“The family left Germany to come to America so they could worship the way the pleased.  It was a long, uncomfortable trip.  They took the train to the Rhine River and then boarded a boat and traveled up the Rhine, a journey of about 3 or 4 days.  Then another train took them to the North Sea where a ship sailed them to Amsterdam, Holland, and then on to England.  At Liverpool they boarded a ship and were on the ocean for 13 days.  Dad was 12 years old when they crossed the ocean and told us of the rough sea.  He had to hang on to his bunk with both hands to keep from being thrown to the floor.  He said he sure got sick of eggs.

“They arrived in New York and stayed there for 2 days.  Then they went to Chicago for a day and a night.  They then rode a train straight through to Franklin, Idaho, which took six days.  They arrived the 18th day of June, 1893.

“Uncle George and Fred Nuffer (the man he worked for) met them with a buggy and wagon and took them to Fred Nuffer’s place in Cub River.  They stayed for a while with the Nuffers and purchased a farm from John Nuffer in Glendale.

Gpa Wanner

“When Grandpa and Grandma moved to Whitney they sold the farm to Dad.  I don’t know if Dad or Grandpa build the sandstone house.  It had a kitchen, two bedrooms and a pantry.  It had a hand pump that pumped water from a spring.  Mary Ann and some of the children were born there.

“Dad met and married a lovely young girl, Mary Elizabeth Carter on September 30, 1903, in the Logan Temple.  They lived in Whitney, Idaho, until they bought the farm.  They worked hard to improve their farm and many times she helped him in the fields.  They built a three bedroom brick house that stood for many years until fire destroyed it years later.  Dad had a Delco generator in the garage so we had our own electricity.

Fred and Mary Elizabeth Wanner

“They had a lovely family, five girls and three boys:  Laverna C., Fredrick D., Lorin C., Florence E., Joseph J., Erma C., Mary Ann and Grace C.

“IN 1923 – Elizabeth died leaving seven children.  The youngest was almost 2 years old.  Laverna got married so that left Erma and MaryAnn to take care of the baby.  Erma would go to school one day and MaryAnn the next.  It was hard.  They tried to leave her with Aunt Ethel Barrington in Riverdale, but she got so lonely and cried all day so they went and got her.  Then Dad hired Eva Christensen to come and work as a housekeeper.  As time went on Dad and Eva (my mother) fell in love and was married June 26, 1925, in the Logan Temple. They had five children:  Carma C., L. Bertus, Eva June, Lyman G., and Stanley C.  We had a happy family life and dad always saw to it that we went to church and did what we were suppose to do.  He went when he could.  He always paid his tithing and other offerings.  He was honest in all his dealings.

Fred and Mary with (l-r) Laverna, Fred, Lorin.

“Dad was the first one in Glendale to buy a car.  We children were used to horses so we would say,  “Gid up, Gid up” when we got in the car.  About this time Dad was struck by lightening but was not harmed.

“Dad owned or had a share in the thrashing machine.  They would go around to all the farmers in Glendale and thrash the grain.  Then we would fix a big meal for all the men.   It was a real fun time for the children but a lot of work for the adults.  Dad worked as an oiler or on the thresher and had part of his finger taken off.  When we were little he told us a fox bit it off!

“Dad was a good farmer.  He took pride in all his work.  He raised hay, barley and wheat.  He always had 10 or 12 dairy cows.  He also had horses, pigs and chickens.  For many years we separated the cream from the milk in the old separator.  Then Dad took the cream to Preston to sell it along with the eggs.  In later years we had the milk truck come and pick up the milk so we didn’t use the separator anymore.  He also bought a grain chopper and prepared his own feed for the animals.  We had a big raspberry patch and used to sell raspberries for 8 quarts for a dollar.  Dad always had a big garden and a big potato patch.  He had a root cellar to keep potatoes, carrots, squash and apples over the winter.

“In the early 1930’s Dad bought silver foxes.  He built a high fence so they couldn’t get out.  He took great pride in his fox furs.  They were always excellent quality!  I remember watching him cure the furs and he took great care to make sure they were done right.  Dad always kept his barnyard as well as the rest of the farm in good repair and very neat.  His fences were always mended.

“Dad always took time out of his farm work to go to Franklin to celebrate Idaho Day on the 15th of June.  We would take a big picnic lunch and spend the day.  We rode the carnival rides and had a good time.  He always took us kids to Downata to go swimming when we finished first crop of hay.

“Dad liked a good joke… I remember how he would laugh.  He loved the radio and his favorite programs were Gang Busters, The Old Ranger and of course the news!  We all had to be quiet when the news came on.

“Dad was very active and was always working except on Sunday – there was never any work done on Sunday except chores.  He loved the Sunday paper.  He always bought the Denver Post.  It was a real shock to us when he had his heart attack because he was so active.  It happened one day when he was working in the barn.  We were all frightened and I called the neighbors to help us get him to the house.

“After that he had to be very careful so he sold the farm and moved to Preston.  They lived just down the street from MaryAnn.  He seemed to miss the farm and would putter around the yard.

“He died at the age of 74 on August 25, 1955.  He was buried in the Preston Cemetery.

The Durango Kids

“The Durango Kids”, Elizabeth, Otto, Bill, and Mary Andra in Mexico about 1945

Another photograph I found in the stack.  This one caught my eye because it has written “The Durango Kids” on the top of the photo in green ink.  I cropped it down to the actual photo so you don’t see “The.”

This photo, in talking with the remaining siblings, appears to have been about 1946.  Larry seemed to remember he was about 2-3 when they left to go to Mexico.  He recalled the babysitter wasn’t very nice so he got on his tricycle and started riding to Richmond to stay with his sister, and my Grandma, Colleen.  He only got as far as Whitney before someone picked him up and took him back home to Preston.

Nobody knows for sure where they went in Mexico.  I thought maybe the fact that “The Durango Kids” written on the photo might have indicated the City or State of Durango, but nobody has a clue.  All they know is that they went to Mexico.

Elizabeth Mauerman Andra (1911-1998) married to Otto Carl Andra (1902-1982).  Otto is William’s brother.

William Fredrick Andra (1898-1990) married to Mary Louise Wanner Andra (1901-1991).

I cannot make out the writing on Otto’s sombrero.  No clues there.

28 July 2018

Aliza, Hiram, and I went to Preston, Idaho at the end of July.  If anyone knows me, I like to stop and visit people, family, and cemeteries.  While we were out visiting, we made a few stops at some cemeteries.  I thought I would share these couple of photos with Aliza and Hiram with the tombstones of a few of their ancestors.  All on the same date!

This is the grave of Wilburn Norwood Jonas, 15 May 1924 – 14 March 1975, who is their Great Grandfather, my Grandfather. There are other posts on Norwood.  This grave is in Richmond, Utah.

Hiram and Aliza at Wilburn Norwood Jonas’ grave.

These are the graves of Joseph Nelson Jonas, 19 March 1893 – 6 September 1932, and Lillian Coley, 26 August 1898 – 11 February 1987, who are their Great Great Grandparents, father of Wilburn Norwood Jonas, whose grave you can see right behind Hiram.  I have also previously written about Joseph and Lillian.

Hiram and Aliza at Joseph and Lillian Jonas’ graves.

These are the graves of Hannah Maria Rogers, 4 June 1932 – 22 October 1894, and Stephen Coley, 28 January 1830 – 22 October 1913, who are their Great Great Great Great Grandparents.  This is the grandparents for Lillian Coley above.  For whatever reason I didn’t get a picture with Herbert and Martha Coley’s grave, the link between.  These graves are in Lewiston, Utah.  I have written of Hannah and Stephen also.

Hiram and Aliza at Hannah and Stephen Coley’s graves.

These are the graves of Mary Louise Wanner, 5 March 1901 – 30 August 1991, and William Fredrick Andra, 11 February 1898 – 13 March 1990, who are their Great Great Grandparents, parents of Colleen Mary Andra, wife of Wilburn Norwood Jonas.  I need to write a biography yet of Mary and William but have been overwhelmed by it in the past and just need to work on it some day.  These graves are in Whitney, Idaho.

Hiram and Aliza at Mary and William Andra’s graves.

These are the graves of John George (Johann Georg) Wanner, 29 October 1870 – 5 January 1947, and Regina Friederike Nuffer, 26 January 1869 – 10 March 1942, who are their Great Great Grandparents, parents of Mary Louise Wanner, whose photo is above, but also the tombstone to the left of Aliza’s head.  I have written of John and Regina in the past.

Aliza and Hiram at John and Regina Wanner’s graves.

These are the graves of Ezra Taft Benson, 4 August 1899 – 30 May 1994, and Flora Smith Amussen, 1 July 1901 – 14 August 1992.  There is no relationship with the Bensons, but it is the same cemetery as Wanners and Andras.  He was the 13th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  As such, the kids know him as a previous prophet of the Lord.  They were happy to make the visit.

Aliza and Hiram at Ezra and Flora Benson’s graves.

 

 

 

 

100 Years of Flanders

John William Ross tombstone

(I originally published this in 2008.  I edited it and updated it with pictures for today, the 100th Anniversary of the Armistice.)

I thought I would write a little in relation to Veteran’s Day.  For the most part, it seems this holiday is somewhat forgotten in the United States.  Really, American’s celebrate the same day on Memorial Day in May.  I can understand the European View of holding it on the 11th of November.  It is the day WWI ended.

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery, Nov 2005

I remember well the time I first experienced Veteran’s Day.  I sat in the Eccles Ward Chapel in Patricroft, England.  I sat there on 11 November 1999.  The services started at 11 AM.  We had the hymn, opening prayer, and a few comments by the Bishop until 11:11 arrived.  It was then we took two minutes to remember what was done.  Somehow those two minutes seared into my heart and soul.

Growing up in Idaho means we have little or no realization of any war.  There are small war memorials inside of cemeteries and an occasional one in a park to commemorate.  No war in modern days has taken place anywhere near Idaho.  Even the American Civil War means little to Idahoans.  My grandfather served in the Philippines during WWII but he spoke so little of it.  I had Uncles and Great Uncles who perished in WWI and WWII.  I have been to their graves but they are the dead, just like the other dead in the cemetery.  The idea of dying for one’s country meant very little to me.

Irwin John Jonas

One of my first memories of England is the day after we arrived.  We were taken into Altrincham Town Centre and there we proselyted for an hour on the way to the mission office.  I did notice the cenotaph.  I thought it rather oddly placed.

Arlington Cemetery

Arlington Cemetery, Nov 2005

While I served in Hyde, Cheshire one of the ways we knew where to turn in town was at the cenotaphs.  The same in Dukinfield.  When we arrived early at a member’s house we would loiter at the cenotaph to street contact until time for dinner.  Regularly I thought these things were oddly placed.  I knew they were naming those who died in the ‘Great War’.  For some reason or another I thought they doubled up on the names over the various cenotaphs.  It never occurred to me names are not typically duplicated on these things, or if they do, the intention is not to do so.

Ellis Seth Jonas

Suddenly I found myself sitting in a church meeting remembering.  These souls did not fight for my country.  However I felt come into my heart a gratitude for their sacrifice.  Could I do the same thing if called upon?  Somehow a dawning realization came upon me of the hundreds if not thousands of names I had seen on cenotaphs in my first year in England.  They were everywhere.  There were continuous reminders of the dead who fought for their country.

William Jr Military Pic

About a month later I found myself walking the streets of Runcorn, Cheshire.  There is a large cenotaph probably 15 feet tall.  The bus would drive by it every day.  I could not help but notice the little red, fake flowers on popsicle sticks stuck in the flower bed all around it.  The cenotaph meant more to me by this point but what were the little red flowers?  I noticed each of them had a name written on them and they appeared hand-made.

James William Ross

I asked what the little red flowers meant that were still scattered everywhere a month after the 11th of November.  I was then told about Flanders Fields and the poppies.  The poem was shared with me.  It made sense, I felt the poignancy of it.  I have a cousin, Harry Coley (1891 – 1917) who died in Broodseinde, Flanders, Belgium as part of the war.  His body was lost in the mud and potholes of the war and never recovered.

The imagery is intense while the poem isn’t all that catchy to me.  In fact, some of it still doesn’t make sense to me so I share only the first verse here:

In Flanders Fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

David Delos Donaldson (back), John Edmund Donaldson (left), and William George Donaldson

Would I have this type of courage?  Would I be willing to go and serve my country so willingly?  Even if I was drafted, unwillingly?  To set aside all other hopes and aspirations to serve my country?  I did so to serve a mission for my church.  I would think I would be willing to for my nation.  While I am not entirely enamoured with my country at the present, would I still be willing to do it?  Probably.

Art and Golden Coley

Art and Golden Coley

In fact, I feel some desire to serve in the military.  My life hasn’t permitted the chance and my wife is against the idea.  I don’t think I will be making the decision to join.  But I wish to honour those who do and especially those who died in doing so.  Accordingly, when I saw my clock at 11:11 this morning, I stopped for 2 minutes to remember.  What does our future hold?  I don’t know.  But our past is nobler because of these good souls who gave all.  Not only to join, but they never returned.  We were on the side of right then, and our nation was preserved.  I hope and pray our nation continues on the side of right and we will yet be preserved.

Guarding the tomb

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington, VA, Nov 2005

An Wanner uncle of mine arrived in Whitney, Idaho a year after his death in WWI.  His remains arrived in a lead casket which was buried with great fanfare for the small community.  WWII repeated this scenario with another Uncle, another family line, buried in Richmond, Utah.  His body arrived months later and he was interred with great fanfare.  May we live our lives in such a way, regardless if dying for our nation, but let us die in such a way that the community wishes to come out and pay homage for your great sacrifice for the future of man, good, and our country.

Milo James Ross