The Blue Goose

This article was shared with me in 2010.  I downloaded it in 2011 with the intent to share it.  Finally I get around to it 9 years later!

Here is a history of Samaria, Idaho on the Malad City website.  http://www.maladidaho.org/samaria.html

Be aware, as of today, The Blue Goose is open for business, although limited hours.  https://www.facebook.com/thebluegooseSamaria/  The Facebook page has a number of historical photos of The Blue Goose.

The Blue Goose, Samaria, Idaho

This is the Historical Sketch shared with me regarding The Blue Goose.

“Historical sketch of The Blue Goose by Sherrie Daniels

“Until recently this building, owned by Merrill Price, had been a thriving business of one sort or another since its construction just before the turn of the century.  Most remember it as The Blue Goose, a local hot spot of Samaria, Idaho.

“Charming and unique, the structure was originally built for living quarters and a furniture store by Isaac Ike Evans.  Organs, rockers, bureaus and other fine wood furnishings could be purchased there and the only furniture store in Samaria at that time also served as a post office to a population of over 800 people.

“Later on, the furniture store was converted into a candy kitchen.  The new owner, D.D. Williams, sold pop and confectionaries, and had a pool table.  Many remember stopping as youngsters on their way to Mutual to share a soda and socialize.  They were always reminded not to be late for their church meeting by Mrs. Williams, who would usher them out the door at ten minutes till.  Later the teenagers would reunite there to pick up where they had left off.

“A barber chair was also in the south corner of the candy kitchen.  The late Ernest Williams recalled to me many a lazy afternoon spent indulging in second hand gossip and of yesterdays bygone.

“A 1936 calendar hung on the abandoned building’s wall when around 1945 David Bronc Jenkins and Muddy Waters (a nickname – no one seems to remember his real name) took over the building to open it as the local saloon and pool hall.  Card games were a favorite past time and a nickel a cue could buy a splendid time of pool hustling.

“Since then, the lease of the Goose slid through many hands.  To name a few, Ralph Hughes, Waldorf Morse, who gave it up to become Samaria’s school teacher, Ariel Jones, Wally Nicholas, Ralph Williams, Arthur Doc Smith, Ted Loomis and finally Bill Thorpe, the last owner of the lease.

“Many names have been pegged on it since that time such as The Samaria Bar, The Nugget, The Second Ward, The Bucket of Blood, and most everyone’s favorite, The Blue Goose.

“Often, as a little girl, I would trod barefoot down the hot oil road to stand hesitantly outside its door, then almost recklessly make my pretense début.  My father would be too involved in his card game of Cassino to raise an eyelid in acknowledgment of my statement, The cows are in their stalls waitin to be milked, Dad.

“Can’t leave now, would be the mumble that came from lips which were also juggling his Pall Malls.  Got one more hand to play.  Wait on the porch and Spug will bring you a soda.

“Now, to a child who is just learning her A.B.C.’ s and how to count, one became the most versatile number in our numerical system for although I know at least five hands had been played, can of soda, two packages of peanut M&M’s and one bellyache later, my father always swore to my mother (who by this time had already started the milking), Jest had to play that one last hand.

“Today the Goose stands empty.  Weeds grow where once was smooth trodden earth.  No dim light slithers out into the night to say a friendly Hello, I’m open to passersby.   No more tales absorb into the paint-thirsty woodwork on lazy summer afternoons.  No smoke curls out from the chimney ascending to a stark winter’s sky.  No more ringing of the cash register to signal the sale of an ice cream, a soda, or a beer.  But it stands, a structure representing people past and a memory for us in the present.

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