History of the Adolph Neuffer Family

Emma and Adolph Nuffer

Another entry from “We of Johann Christoph Nuffer, also known as: Neuffer, Nufer, Neufer,” The book was published in April 1990 by Dabco Printing and Binding Co in Roy, Utah. I will quote from the book itself.

The title of this entry in the book is “HISTORY OF THE ADOLPH NEUFFER FAMILY.”  I really don’t have much information on this family as can be evidenced by the quality of the photos I have as well.

“Adolph Neuffer was born in Neuffen, Wurtemberg, Germany, on April 14, 1875, a son of Johann Christoph and Eva Catharine Greiner Neuffer.  He came to the United States when he was only 5 years old.  His family settled in the small town of Providence, Utah,  All children 7 years old and younger wore long dresses.  His family moved to many different small town in Idaho.  Adolph was a stone mason by trade although he worked for Borden’s Milk Company for years before moving to Salt Lake City.  He met his future wife in Logan.  She was Emma Margaret Rinderknecht.  He married her on January 8, 1899.  They were endowed on January 14, 1900.  Adolph died September 21, 1955.  He is buried in the Elysian Burial Gardens in Millcreek, Utah.

“He was divorced from Emma after 44 years of marriage.  He married Grace Irene Frasure on August 9, 1943.  Later, they divorced.

“Adolph’s first wife was Emma Margaret Rinderknecht.  She was born in Providence, Utah, on May 15, 1873.  She was a twin.  Her twin brother, Joseph Hyrum, was given away at birth.  He died because the people he was given to didn’t know how to take care of him.  Emma had to work hard to help her widowed mother.  She would take vegetables to Logan to sell.  She also did washing for people.

“She was the mother of nine children.  Edna and Leona were children by her first marriage to James Peterson.

“Adolph and Emma had seven children together.  She died in Ogden on July 8, 1950.  She is buried in the Elysian Burial Gardens.

Ida, Elvin, Melvin, Lyman, Leona, Blanche, Edna, Dolores, Eva Nuffer

“Emma’s oldest daughter was Emma Edna.  She was born in Providence, Utah, on August 16, 1896.  She was married to Robert Early.  They had three daughters; Tacoma, and twins Doris and Dorothy.  Edna had one daughter, LaRue, by a previous marriage.  One twin, Dorothy, died as an infant.  Doris died when she was in her early twenties.  La Rue died in June, 1985.  Edna was divorced and later married Harold Hart.  They lived in Ogden,  Edna died August 26, 1969.

“Leona was born in Providence, Utah, on December 6, 1898.  She was married to William Walker.  They had four sons; Donald, Dale Lawrence (better known as “Bob”).  Then there was Billy who died when he was nine years old, and Dick died when he was about 26 years old.  Leona was divorced and later married Ray Andrus.  They lived in San Jose, California.  Leona died February 28, 1982.

“Lyman Adolph was born January 30, 1901, in Preston, Idaho.  He is married to Elizabeth Johanna Mellegers.  They had two children: Larry, who was drowned while trying to save another fellow; their daughter, LaRene, who lives in West Valley City.

“Eva Katharine was born in Preston, Idaho, on February 28, 1903.  She was married to John Allen Ricks.  They had one son, Jack Ricks.  They were divorced.  She married Earl Hansen; they were divorced.  She married Floyd Lutzai.  She died on November 1, 1973.

“Ida May was born on November 24, 1906, in Preston, Idaho.  She was married to William Henry Harman.  They had two sons, Bill and Bob.  She lives in 29 Palms, California.  Her husband has passed away.

“Blanche Josephine was born on March 12, 1908, in Preston, Idaho.  She married Christian Hansen, they had one daughter, Dorothy.  They were divorced.  Blanche married Neldon Peter Parker, they had one son, Blaine Parker.  He was drowned in the canal near their home.  They lived in Bennion.

“Elvin Joseph Neuffer was born on December 17, 1910, in Preston, Idaho.  He was married to Mildred Terry.  They had four children.  they are Marilyn, Nina, Bonnie, and Danny.  Millie had one son, Lynn, by a previous marriage.  Millie died at the age of 47, on September 3, 1964.  Elvin married Winona Mondragon, later divorced.  He then married Tessie Larsen, they divorced.  He married Joan Wheatly.  They have three children; Margaret, Jennifer and Joseph.  Elvin and his wife and three children live in Murray, Utah.

“Melvin Hyrum Neuffer was born on December 17, 1910, in Preston, Idaho.  H ewas fifteen minutes younger than his twin brother, Elvin.  He married Eveline D. Cornell.  They have six daughters; Shirlene, Kathleen (Kay), Susan, Holly, JuLee and Darla.  Melvin and Eveline have lived in the same house for 46 years, which is in Midvale, Utah.  They have been married for 52 years.

“Anna Dolores was born on May 12, 1913.  She was married to John Leonard Denovellis.  They only had one son, “Bud.”  Dolores and Johnny were both killed as they crossed State Street.  They were together.  They died September 9, 1979.

Written by Melvin H. Neuffer  108 East 7660 S  Midvale, Utah 84047

Adventuring in Alaska

My cousin, Deanne Driscoll, shared this article with me about my Great Uncle and Aunt Otto and Elizabeth Andra.

Otto and Elizabeth Andra family, August 1961

Otto and Elizabeth Andra family, August 1961

Adventuring in Alaska – for less than $120 a person

By Phyllis J Park Tribune correspondent

A three-and-a-half week tour through the rugged Canadian country …  spotting moose, lynx, mountain goats, there are and caribou along the highway …  Fishing, swimming and leisurely sightseeing their way to Alaska for less than $120 per person, proved to two Utah couples that vacation time can be “Adventure Time.”

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Andra, 4406 S. 3200 West street Granger, and Mr. and Mrs. Dan D. Lehman, 4425 Albright Dr., Holladay, were a bit apprehensive about tackling the Alaskan route and had been warned to be prepared for any emergency but, at the conclusion of their 7000 mile round trip with no flat tires, no car trouble, and good driving conditions, “We’re ready to go again next year, it was great!” they commented.

With a suitcase each, a grub-box with a small supply of food including dehydrated goods, a five gallon can a fresh water, and one spare tire, they started out.

They made camp by the roadside each night or at handy camp-grounds in the Yukon Territory, replenishing their food supply along the way and getting fresh water from nearby waterfalls and streams.  Meals were cooked over two one-burner gas stoves and they took the collapsible table and chairs for added comfort.

The Lehmans slept in sleeping bags on air-mattresses in a tent while the Andras “bedded down” in the back of their 1954 station wagon.

They took ten days to travel from Salt Lake City, to Alaska, going via Glacier National Park in Montana.

There were a few rough spots along the famed 1527 my all Alaska highway, built in 1942, connecting Dawson Creek, B.C.  With Fairbanks, but they found road repair crews constantly on the job and their only trouble came from dust and flying rocks from passing cars.

“Cautious driving was our secret to no car trouble!”  Mr. Andra stated “and we took our time, never going over 50 miles an hour, with frequent stops and lay-overs to enjoy the sights.”  At a service station half-way up to Alaska we heard a fellow in an expensive make car, bemoaning the fact he had already experienced 14 blowouts and when he “dug” away from us leaving a shower of gravel, we thought we knew the reason why.

“The milepost were what we liked,” they said.  It’s a simple yet thorough method of guiding travelers along the way by means of numbered milepost and a mileposts guide-book, describing conditions, accommodations, and services at each post.  There are also handy telephone boxes on poles along the roadside for emergency calls.

Six fun-packed days were spent in various cities in Alaska where they visit the huge gold dredges that strained out thousands of dollars worth of gold each day, splurged $25.00 for a fling at boating and fishing in the Valdez Harbor with the net result of 64 various, tasty fish, and they watched it become dark at 12:45 a.m. and begin to lighten up an hour later.

And what did the women wear on the trip?  “We packed lightly with pedal-pushers and blouses as the main items in our wardrobe,” said Mrs. Andra.  “We didn’t need our coats, it was hot in the daytime and sweaters were enough that night. We found we needed our two pairs of flat-heeled shoes and advise others to take plastic or rubber overshoes to use in the wet, muddy spots they may encounter.”

They said at the border it was necessary to show identification such as driver’s license or birth certificate and since Mr. Andra was born in Germany he had to show a passport.  And they had to assure customs officers that they have sufficient funds with them to cover their trip and possible emergencies.  Checking with your car insurance company concerning foreign coverage was suggested by these travelers, too.

The Salt Lake Tribune HOME Magazine, September 15, 1957, p 30.

Liz and Otto Andra

Liz and Otto Andra

Otto Carl Andra was born 15 May 1902 in Meissen, Germany.

Otto married 25 November 1925 in the Salt Lake Temple to Rebecca Amelia Christensen born 6 March 1904 in Mink Creek, Franklin, Idaho.  She died 16 December 1931 in Salt Lake City.

Otto and Rebecca had two children, Rebecca Ila Andra (1926-2006) and Otto Carl Andra (1929-1929).

Otto remarried 17 February 1932 in the Salt Lake Temple to Elizabeth Mauermann born 27 October 1911 in Salt Lake City.

Otto and Elizabeth had six children, Elizabeth, Iona, Carl Otto, Albert (1938-2009), Carol, and Virginia.

Otto died 20 June 1982 in West Valley City, Utah.

Elizabeth died 14 June 1998 in Salt Lake City.

Otto and both wives were buried in Wasatch Lawn Memorial Park, Salt Lake City.