Mission Journal of Johann Wendel

John & Mina Wendel

John & Mina Wendel

I need to give some background before I post this journal.  The past few weeks I have posted some stories of Theodor & Christiana Andra.  As the stories relate, Theodor died in 1902 due to a quarry accident.  Christiana and the children converted to Mormonism and the family moved to Utah.  After being in Utah for a few years, she met and married a widower, John Wendel on 22 May 1914 in the Salt Lake City Temple.

John became a father to her children who were teenagers.  William Fredrick Andra, the middle born knew him toward the end of his teenage years in this home.

Johann Wendel was born 27 September 1856 in Wasserberndorf, Mittlefranken, Bavaria and died 20 January 1930 in Salt Lake City, Utah.  He married Elisabeth Streckfuss 19 October 1880 in Wasserberndorf.  Elisabeth was born 21 February 1850 in Buchheim, Mittlefranken, Bavaria and died 31 August 1913 in Farmers Ward, Salt Lake, Utah.  Christiana Wilhelmina (going by Mina in Utah) was born 24 October 1869 in Radebuel, Dresden, Saxony and died 25 December 1957 in Salt Lake City.



PREFACE This Grandpa Wendel is a Grandpa to all his living descendants in the year 1978. The younger descendants may have to put 2 or 3 “greats” before the “Grandpa”, but he is indeed a Grandpa to all of us. Grandpa John Wendel was born September 27, 1856. He married Elizabeth Streckfuss on September 17, 1880, lacking ten days of being age 24. He joined the Church in the Nuremberg Branch on October 4, 1902, just past his 46th birthday. He emigrated with his wife to Salt Lake City, arriving here in August 1905 — not quite 49 years old. His dear wife was killed by a car in Aug. 1913. when he was almost 57 years old. He was in the Church a few months over 19 years when he was called on a Mission to his Native Land of Germany — a few months past the age of 65. He had re-married to Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke on the 22 May 1914 at the age of 57. He died in January 1930, a few months past the age of 73.

This Missionary Journal is written in the Gothic German handwriting and in the German Language. The average American missionary who has served a mission to Germany has not learned to read this Gothic German handwriting. Ursula Hilbert Wendel, an emigrant from Germany, the wife of John A. Wendel, a grandson to Grandpa Wendel, was able to read this journal. Uncle Leonard Michael Wendel brought this journal to Ursula about 1966 or 1967. Ursula’s children were quite small at the time and she had the constant care of her father and part of the time her father-in law. Consequently she was unable to translate the journal as rapidly as Uncle Leonard had hoped, because Uncle Leonard had desired that his oldest grandson should be given the journal, he requested his grandson, John Richard Wendel go to Ursula’s home and get the journal. At the Grave side of Leonard Fredrick Wendel in early June 1977 Pearl Wendel, a sister-in-law to Ursula approached John Richard Wendel and asked him to please bring the journal to the Wendel Family Reunion in July 1977, so that Ursula may finish the translation of it. This he did. God moves in a mysterious way His wonders to perform! At this time Ursula’s oldest son Ronald was on a Mission. So, to help out financially, Ursula obtained a job with one of the schools in Bountiful to help with the hot lunch program. In January and February 1978, Ursula was forced to quit her job and spend much time in bed because of trouble with her legs. During this time she was able to complete the translation of Grandpa’s Missionary Journal.

She then gave the completed work to Pearl Wendel, who had volunteered to type it and have copies made for as many of the descendants of Grandpa Wendel who desired them. This Journal should be of particular interest to the families in the Leonard Michael Wendel Line, because one of the first people whom Grandpa called on was the father of Frieda Johanna Neuner (Uncle Leonard’s wife). He also mentions finding Fredrick Kohles completely blind. I tried to find how he fit into the Kohles line, but from the Genealogy sheets which I have I was unable to fit him in. He may have been a cousin of Grandpa’s. I, as typist, have tried to put the translation into the American way of saying things without destroying the real meaning Grandpa meant to say. I have worked very closely with Ursula on this so that the translated Journal will tell the story Grandpa wrote.

The reader of this Journal should keep a few thoughts in mind to get the true understanding of Grandpa’s Mission. Apparently In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s the field of converts in Germany was ready to harvest. Many converts came into the Church and many emigrated to Utah to help build up the Kingdom here and enjoy the full blessings of the Gospel including Temple Work. World War I came along from 1914 to 1918. Germany and France were both hit hard by this war. To try to pick up the pieces and carry on as Nations was a great task. In 1922 and 1923 Inflation hit Germany so hard that it took bushel baskets of money to buy very little. The Spirit of Conversions seemed to have left this fruitful field. By the time Grandpa returned in 1922, it was an achievement and a fullness of joy just to have a long Gospel Conversation, let alone a Conversion. The Church also had grown fairly strong in Western U.S.A., so they were trying to encourage the members who were left and those newly converted to remain in the foreign countries and try to build up the Kingdom there. Elders often worked alone, and the discouraging moments often far exceeded the encouraging ones. The Great Grandsons and Great Grand-daughters of John Wendel, who have had the privilege of filling missions in the 1960’s and 1970’s when once again the Spirit of Conversion reigns upon the earth, will find that their mission journals and experiences were almost opposite to Grandpa Wendel’s. The number of Mission Fields have doubled many times since the early 1920’s. The Missionary Force is probably 10 or 20 times what it was then. Foreign Stakes are being created as rapidly as leadership will allow. Temples are being built in many Foreign Lands as rapidly as they can be built. The Modern Prophet’s Counsel “to widen our strides and hasten our pace” is being accomplished by the 1978 Missionaries. We hope the time spent in translating, typing, correcting and copying this journal will prove to be time well spent, by all those who will find true enjoyment in reading it, owning a copy, and having their testimonies strengthened by the testimony and experiences of Grandpa John Wendel. Sincerely, Pearl Wendel, 175 East 2nd South, Bountiful, Utah 84010


DIARY Missionary Journal of Johann Wendel MISSION TO GERMANY FROM JANUARY 25, 1922 TO OCTOBER 31, 1923

On January 25. 1922. 5:OO P.M. I left Salt Lake City, through Wyoming, Nebraska, Illinois, arrived in Chicago, January 27, 7:OO P.M. sight seeing on the 28th, like Museum, Post Office, Michigan Lake, climbed the highest building and in the evening at 7:OO P.M. on the 28th, leaving for Buffalo. We arrived here on the 29 of Jan. at 4:00 P.M. One hour delay and then on to Montreal, where we arrived Jan. 30 at 8:00 A.M. From Vermillion till Buffalo, we traveled on the big river to Niagara Falls. In Erie we saw a lot of cultivation of grapes. After our passport was inspected by the German Consulate in Montreal and $10.00 paid for, we left on the 30 of Jan. at 12:OO o’clock noon for St. John. We arrived there on the 31st of Jan. at 7:30 A.M.

On February 1st at 11:00 A.M. we got on the ship “Montcalm”. In the afternoon 3:30 P.M. the ship left the Harbor. On Feb. 2nd. 9:OO A.M. we arrived in Halifax, where the boat laid all day and night till 2:OO A.M. and loaded 16,000 barrels of apples, a lot of sugar and cheese. I could hardly believe what such a ship could carry. The boat is 560 feet long and keeps going by oil. The City of Halifax is very mountainous and was covered by snow.

On the 3rd of Feb. 1922 at 5:00 A. M. the ship left. Everything is very noble and modern and we are 212 man. in First Class.

On Sunday. February 9, 1922. we held Church Service from the Church of England in the Dinning Room.

On Feb. 9th, we passed the Coast of Ireland, where the water looks light green compared to the Atlantic Ocean’s dark blue or even black.

On Feb. 10th at 3:00 A.M. we arrived in Liverpool. We the German Brothers Pitsch, Pohlmann and I, together with 3 others had to stay here one day, because our Passports haven’t been inspected, by the English Consul.

On Feb. 11 at noon, we left the boat, took care of our luggage and at 2:00 P.M. left Liverpool for Grimby Dock, where we arrived at 6:20 P.M. At once we went to the boat for Hamburg, Germany. In the Evening at 7:30 P.M. the ship left and we arrive in Hamburg, Feb, 13th at 8:00 A.M. We stayed in Hotel Stein. The Voyage till Hamburg, Germany, with Passport difficulties, food and tips cost $274.00. In Liverpool, we stayed half an hour in the passenger train, where Apostle Whitney and two other Elders visited us.

On Feb. 15th. I saw the Exotic Garden, but because of snow, I didn’t see very much. Then I visited the Volksmuseum (People’s Museum) and there was a lot to see. With a guide, it cost me 6 Marks and 50 Pfennige (cents). In the evening I went to the Bible hour and I liked it very much.

Feb. 16th Today I shall study.

Feb. 17th At 12:30 P.M. I left Hamburg for Berlin and arrived here at 8:30 P.M. A few good women I met on the train, looked after me. They showed me the way to a lodging and carried my luggage. I met here Brother Stoddard, he is the Conference President.

On the 18th of Feb. he sent me to a family, where only the woman is a member of the Church. The first night, I slept in Brother Stoddard’s Lodge Samariter Str. 38.

On Sunday the 19th. I visited Sunday School and got invited for Dinner with another Elder. I had a good time. In the Evening, we went to the meeting, where I had to speak for the first time. Afterwards we blessed oil and a sick person. The members were all very good to me.

On Feb. 20th It is very cold in the lodge.

On Feb. 21st I received word from Swiss that I was transferred to Nuremberg. Tomorrow I shall leave. The name of the sister where I’ll stay is Anders, Guntenerstreet 24.

On Feb.22nd at lO:OO A.M., I left for Nuremberg by D Zug (fast Train) thru Wittenberg, Halle, Jena Saaletal (River Saale Valley) up to Lichtenfels, Bramberg and arrived in Nuremberg 8:30 P.M., where Brother Strebel picked me up from the station. He took me right from there to a farewell for Sister Keil and Brother Ludwig. On Feb. 23rd. I visited Brother and Sister Adelemann and a family Harold, where I found Friedrich Kohles completely blind. A sad fate.

On the 24th. I visited Carl Neuner in Failhof in the poor Hospital. He is very weak, but was very glad when I introduced myself as Father-in-law to his daughter and gave him $10.00 from his Son-in-law. I spoke a long time with him about the Gospel.

On the 25th. I visited the Eckardt Hamer family. He recognized me at once, but not his wife. I had a very warm welcome here. Afterwards I made a visit in Birkenwald, where I was strongly welcomed and fed well by the Hartmann family.

On the 26th. I went to Sunday School in Nuremberg, Bucherstrasse 90 and noon meeting. They welcomed me good and I had to speak.

On the 27th, I went tracting, but had no success.

On the 28th of Feb., we have been by Brother and Sister Schneider’s place.

On March 1st, I have been in Birkenwald, where I explained the Gospel to Hartmann.

On March 2nd, we have been in Fuerth by Brother and Sister Habermann, and in Feucht with the Dannenfelzer family. On the 1st Brother Strebel and I were in Ziegelstein too, a colonie 2 by Brother Mueller, who was ill.

On the 3rd of March, I have been to Mrs. Hartmann in Birkenwald and Janitor Schwarm and Hass, where I was welcomed friendly.

On the 4th, I stayed in bed, and on the 5th, we had Ward Conference. Brother Stoof (Stover) Conference President, from Stuttgart was present and we had four meetings.

On March 6th, I visited Mr. Baurner and L. Gruensteidel. I was welcomed good.

On the 7th to the 11th, I visited some friends and had opportunity to preach the Gospel and did tracting.

On the 12th of March. Sunday School and after that meeting, I went with Sister Saum and wrote some addresses down. I visited then ‘Gg.’ and Kath. Schmidthammer, where I stayed over night.

On March 13th, I visited Conrad Hassler, Geutherstr. 1. Here I was welcomed good also.

On March 14, 15, and 16th. I was ill and stayed in bed. In the evening on the 16th, I got up from bed and visited Anna Schmied. She is married to a man named Lechner. I didn’t recognize her anymore, with her 35 years she is an old woman.

Today March 17th. I received my eviction. Such a dangerous Individual has no right to be in the civilized City of Nuremberg.

On the 18th and 19th, I was in bed again.

On the 21st, I got up and received another eviction. I visited Walz and Ditsch. Ditsch wanted to convert me.

On March, 20th….thru the 23rd, I was in bed.

On the 23rd, much snow and wind.

Until April 1st, I visited several inactive members.

April 2nd, I have been to the meeting and Sister Huber was sustained as a Sunday School Teacher.

Yesterday, April 6th, I attended a meeting in the Hercules Veledroon, a very good one, arranged by the inter-National Jehovah Witnesses. The Lesson was: “Can men talk with the dead?” They pointed out, that the dead ones with whom the Spiritualists communicate, are not our dead persons, but the spirits who were cast out of Heaven. “Rev. John 12:4,9” They want to show off and tempt mankind.

April 11. I was busy a half a day in the city hall because of my eviction. I made a petition.

On April 18. 19t and 20th, I was ill at Brother and Sister Schneider’s.

On the 22nd, I went to Frankfurt for Conference. I feel better. I arrived in Frankfurt at 5:00 P.M. I stayed with Brother and Sister Anton Huck, Schillstreet 5, 2nd story. A place where I was welcomed good.

Sunday morning — Sunday School and 3:00 P.M. Meeting.

Monday from lO:OO A.M. till 3:00 P.M. Missionary meeting. Present were President Balif and President Stoof. Twenty-one men received good instructions how to tract. In the evening at 7:30 P.M. Priesthood Meeting until 10:00 P.M.

On Sunday I had to speak briefly and I mentioned by the way, that I would like to see from our big branches here a compliance for our German Wards in Zion, so that they may receive the blessings of Temple Work with us, and so on. After the meeting President Balif said to me, if I speak again about emigration, I would be released from my mission at once. Now I don’t understand how to reconcile this with my opinion, but I’ll try as much as possible to obey.

On Tuesday, we went home, 6:00 P.M. in Munich, in Wuerzburg some hours delay and so we could go and see the city. Twelve of us were from Nuremberg. Brother Strebel, myself and two Sisters Strecker drove home together, but first I came alone. The trip to Frankfurt and back cost 200 Marks. Frankfurt is a beautiful city and I liked it very much.

Today, Rain April 28th. I walked all day and visited four friends and explained the Gospel to them. Afterwards I visited 5 astray members, who didn’t want to know anything anymore, because they know already enough. The whole day I didn’t eat anything. So, late in the evening, I visited The Schmidthammer’s, they were just thru eating. They did not invite me, Well, the Gospel creates not all the time friends. On the way back home I wanted to buy something to eat, but all the stores were closed. When I reached home, my landlord, Brother and Sister Strebel had gone to bed already, I went to bed, the first time hungry and I felt very weak, and wished I were home and my mission complete.

On the 29th, I bought with Sister Ceder’s help a Fur for my Mina (2nd wife, Wilhelmina Christiana Knauke). Sister Strebel will send it to her. The price is 2600 Marks. Today I received my sanction for my stay until July 15th, and payed 442 Marks for it. Sometimes I feel very sad because people have so very little interest for the Gospel. We have rain again.

The weather suits my mood I am in today, May 1st.

May 6th. I visited several lukewarm members, and invited them to a special meeting, where they will have to declare if they are for or against the Church, concerning excommunication.

May 7th The divorced Mrs. Wieleitner got excommunicated from the Church today because of adultery. President Stoof was here today and we had all day long meetings, where I had to speak too. I administered to Sister Ceder also today because of her headache and blessed a child of Brother and Sister Wieleitner, which received the name of Bruno Wieleitner. The weather is beautiful today and it seems as Spring is coming.

May 8. Today Sister Stern’s son Bruno got buried at the Johannis Kirchhof Cemetary. He was a member, fallen away from the Church. The Sermon was given by a Priest. He was 20 years old. (Translator’s note* I guess the son was 20 years old, it is not quite clear, who; Priest or son.) Afterwards I visited some members and friends and talked with a Catholic nurse in the Hospital, about the Gospel but without success.

May 9. I visited Mrs. Hartmann’s family Reichel in Birkenwald and bore my Testimony; also to Hempfling and Hefner, where the women were very attentive.

May 13th. Today I went to the Cemetery (Sudfriedhof) where a former Co-worker, Work Master Schlegel from Birkenwald is buried. I visited him several times before his death. He associated with the International Bible Investigators and was buried from them also.

May 14th. Today was Mothers’ Day. It was appropriately celebrated and. the Mothers received flowers from six girls dressed in white. Brother Dinse remembered the Mission Mothers especially. It was a splendid Sabbath and we had a beautiful time.

May 25. In the morning 4:45 A.M. I drove to Steppach (I assume by train the only transportation possible) passed Strullendorf. Till here the fare was 18 Marks, and till Steppach 6 Marks. At noon I visited Gg (Georg) Holler in Pommersfelden the Castle. There was much to see, like wonderful paintings and a Hall that was completely adorned with sea shells, a herd of Deer with antlers, (Steinbocke) and so on.

May 24th I moved out from Mullner Street 23, Brother and Sister Strebel and moved in with Fritz Hefner, Peter Henlein Street 25 third floor.

May 25 to 26. I stayed over night in Steppach with Lisie Grau. I visited then Mrs. Vogel at the Hutzolmill, then preached the Gospel to the Holler Family afterwards traveled by train to Simmersdorf, paid 2 Marks for the ticket. Then I traveled to Horbach and to Weingartsgreuth, where I went to the Parson’s (Minister’s) Office, and received Genealogy from the Wendel families and paid 20 Marks for it. Then I went back to Weingartsgreuth and preached the Gospel to a family by the name of Kronester and tracted in this town. In Horbach I stayed over night with Blacksmith Master, Matthaeus Rost and preached the Gospel and gave him tracts also.

On the 27th. I went on to Wagenroth, where I looked up the minister for Genealogy and received some. Then I asked the Minister “What do you think about the Mormons?” He answered, “Well, you teach the Bible also, but the Bible contains many unclear passages, where one without a leader cannot understand what is said and therefore every Sect interprets it differently.” I wanted to give him tracts, but he refused to take them. Then I rode to Schluesselfeld, paid 3 Marks for the Ticket, from here I went to Ashbach and Wasserberndorf, visited on my way Blacksmith Matthaeus Hassler in Heucholheim; then Vogelsfrieden in Aschbach. In Wasserberndorf I lodged with my godmother.

May 28. I went to Wasserberndorf, my birthplace, and I found many changes there, my people and the town itself. Most of the old people are dead and the young ones grew up.

May 29. I visited F. Wendel in the Hutzol mill and the old Ritzau and many other acquaintances.

On the 30th, I went to Langenberg and Abtswind, where I stayed over night by F. Herrmann, visited the Wendel families in Langenberg and was here well received.

On the 31 st of May. I returned and had a long conversation with J. Uhl and also with Mrs. Doctor in Geiselwind.

On June 1st, I went to Fuettersee Kleinbirkach and Grossbirkach, Gg.(Georg) Kleinlein accompanied me. We had great joy as well as all others I met. With Mr. Teacher in Grossbirkach, we stayed a longer time and talked about the Gospel.

On the 2nd and 3rd, I made several visits in Wasserberndorf and preached the Gospel, but had not much success. I gave the teacher of Wasserberndorf tracts and explained the Gospel to him.


On June 5. I was in Church in Fuettersee. At noon Gg. Kleinlein visited me and we talked half the day about the Gospel. What kept him interested, June 6, I was in Burghasslach with H. Dekon for Genealogy and visited F. Paul and conversed with him for a long time about the Gospel.

On June 8. I went (by train) with Fritz to Ziegenbach and visited Gg. (Georg) Wendel and there I tried to explain the Gospel.

June 9 and 10. I stayed in Breitbach with Martin Kohles. There I met a man from Altenschoenbach and we talked for a long time about the Gospel. His name is K. Lamprecht and he is a Blacksmith.

On June 14. I went to Kirchrimbach and Taschendorf to get Family Records and in Taschendorf I had a conversation about the Gospel with the Minister for one hour. He don’t believe in a pre-existance. Furthermore, he could not understand how blessings can result in having a big family (many children).

June 17. I went back to Nuremberg.

June 18. We had a nice meeting, Brother Stoof gave a good speech. The branch was re-organized because the Branch President, Brother Strebel is emigrating to America (United States). Two Brethren were ordained in the Aaronic Priesthood. I ordained one of them, Brother Schneider, as a Teacher.

June 25, Today we had a beautiful meeting in the Forest and Sunday School in Erbanstegen. The Branch from Fuerth was present also.

July 6, We had a great Conference July 2nd in Stuttgart, where all the Missionaries from Holland, Swiss, Austria and all Germany were present. We received good instructions and it would be desirable if all the instructions could be followed. About 112 American Missionaries went to Oberammergau (The town for the Famous Passion Play in Germany). Most of the German Missionaries stayed in Stuttgart, probably because of lack of money. I went with Sister Zeter sight-seeing in Stuttgart and I liked it very much. I stayed three days in a Hotel, but it was too expensive; I paid 102 Marks the night. The last two nights I moved to Sister Zeter’s Landlord, which let me stay without any pay. They were real nice people, their name is R. Hald and they live in Strohbergstrasse 36, three stories high in Stuttgart.

July 5. We returned to Nuremberg and had there photographic pictures made.

July 9. Today the Branch Moegeldorf-Hammer was organized and the first meeting was held 3:00 P.M. In Nuremberg at Sunday School the following brethren from Salt Lake City were present: Brothers H. Rueckert, L. Schobert, Gasser and Little. In the evening we had a beautiful meeting in Nuremberg, and I blessed a child of Sister Buchholzer and gave her the name Bertha Edeltrude Buchholzer. In Stuttgart, I met many friends (acquaintances) from Salt Lake City. The first one I met was the son of Brother Curtis. I stayed there in one room with Brother Glissmeyer (Glissmaier) and saw Brother Pitsch and Brother Pohlmann, The first time again, since we departed from each other in Hamburg.

July 13. Today I was at a Catholic funeral. The wife of Mr. H. Popp, a past job-colleague, was buried at the South Cemetary. She was 39 years old.

On July l6th, We had some well attended meetings. . In the after noon at 3:00 P.M. I went from here to Moegeldorf with Mr. Hiltmann and his wife to her sister and brother-in-law whose last name was Fink. While there, we had a long conversation about the Gospel. We had a beautiful time. In the morning I visited M. Huegelschaefer and was invited for Dinner, and had opportunity too to explain the Gospel.

July 27. This morning I went with the Brethren Dinsi, Schmidt, Karl Weiss to Brother Binder to bless him. He has to go to the “Martha Haus” (Hospital) for a nose operation, because of probable cancer.

July 29. Today I went to Fuerth and visited Maria Klein of Holzberndorf. She lives with her daughters, one of them is married and lives in Marien Street 5. She is divorced, but her husband is married again.

July 30. I was laying in bed at night and had a toothache and was thinking about something, when suddenly someone called out loud “Hauner” Mr. Wendel. At once I recognized the voice of Woodworker Uhl from the Hutzelmuehle. I thought at once, why is he coming here. He probably came by train and has no night lodge (a place to stay for the night). At once, I jumped out of bed in my room, went to the window where I called out: “What is the matter?” I got no answer. I leaned out of the window and saw nobody. After a few minutes there came a few pedestrians. I turned on the light and it was 10 minutes before one o’clock in the morning. I layed down again. Now, I can understand when people have so many visions.

August 6. We had Fastmeeting. We had six meetings on Sunday. One before Sunday School, Brother meeting, Priesthood meeting, Fast meeting, and afterwards a short meeting, where a brother by the name of Foerster got excommunicated, who was against the Church and probably asked for his excommunication. Afterwards we visited Sister Ancon who is ill.

August 12. We drove to Munich for a Sunday School Conference and we arrived there at noon. In the evening we had Priesthood Meeting with President Stoof conducting. There was a Brother by the name of Spengler ordered to come, who was accused of adultery and therefore was to be excommunicated. But because he showed remorse and promised to improve and seriously repent, they forgave him.

Sunday, August 13, The Elders fasted for him. We had that Sunday three meetings and returned home in the evening at 9:00 P.M.

August 14th. We visited the Industrial Exhibition and the “Bavaria”.

On the 15th, We viewed Starnberg and Schlossberg. It was really nice there. But when we enjoyed the Observatory the most, did we get surprised by a rainstorm and got quite wet. Afterwards in the evening we returned to Munich. It was very cold on the ship and we did freeze very much.

On the 16th we drove back to Nuremberg and in the evening we had a meeting too. My hostess (or housewife for renting a room) baked a big Goloph (I guess a cake) for our return, that we enjoyed. Besides, there was a letter waiting for me from my Mina with five dollars in it.

On August 19. I went to Reusch to visit my friends there. I had opportunity, a Mrs. Rike Hahn, Stusdamm(?) was in the train who visited her Sister in Reusch. I saw my relatives again after a long time. My brother-in-law Gunder (?’) looks proportional good with his 82 years. With a daughter of my sister-in-law Geissendorfer, who is married to a man named Schumann in Reusch, I stayed over night. From Reusch I went to Ippesheim, where I stayed with M. Herrmann. I visited my old friends and afterwards I went to Gallhofen and Rakenlohr and visited all acquaintances and preached the Gospel to them as good as I could. I didn’t think that there are so many people who had never heard about Mormonism. M. Herrmannn, Gg. Serbi and two girls from my brother-in-law were interested about the Gospel.

On August 25th I went back to Nuremberg. In Ippesheim I registered for my stay.

On August 30th. I was in Fuerth with Brother Habermann where I was invited for dinner. In the evening we had a Bible hour (meeting) here in Nuremberg and from here we went to Sister Baer, who doesn’t feel good, and administered to her. She has a baby. Today, September 1. Gg. Friedrich Kohles was buried. He died August 30.

September 3rd We had 5 meetings. The evening meeting was well attended by friends. In the fast meeting Brother Piclo and myself blessed the child of Sister Baer and it received the name Dorothea Baer. We had a very good time there.

September 12th. Today I have to report a great joy. I received from my good wife a package. In it was: 6 cans of milk, sugar, one box crackers, candy, one dollar and 50 cents, a beautiful shirt, and a tie, I was very happy about it and also happy, Sister Fetzer let me know, she will send a full basket of clothing for our children at Christmas celebration, God helps all the time again.

Today the 23rd of September, we buried in Fuerth, Brother Ernsberger’s sister, Mrs. Beck. She wanted to be baptized, but got ill and died without being baptized. Brother Hans Schmidt and Brother Hofmann were the speakers at the grave and I dedicated the grave. The choir sang two songs.

September 25th. We rode to Frankfurt, where a Missionary Meeting was held, President Balif and President Stoof and all the Missionaries of Frankfurt were present.

On September 26. We had a meeting from 2:00 P.M. until 6:l5 P.M. and received good instructions and admonitions from the Presidents. In the evening 7:30 was a big meeting for members and friends which was very well attended.

On September 27. I stayed with Brother and Sister Gg. Schloer, Franken Allee 59. Here they Congratulated me on my Birthday. I received delicious pastry and Dinner.

On the 25th, I stayed over night with the family Wolfermann, Spahr Street 33- Besides I visited Elise Walz, who is married to a certain Mr. Wuenschbach, a Jew, and lives in Finkenhof Street 28. We had good weather and a pleasant time.

On the 28th. In the evening we rode back to Nuremberg again. By Gemuenden happened a big Train Accident and we saw many smashed train wagon (cars) and freight railroad wagon and had a delay of some hours till the rail road was cleared and we could pass. President Stoof rode with us to Nuremberg.

On September 29th. I visited together with Brother Stoof, some of my investigator families, which will get baptized in the near future.

On September 30. We had early in the morning 8:30 A.M. a small Missionary meeting with Brother and Sister Hofmann, KoernerStreet, where I was asked to ordain Brother E. Otto Holstein an Elder.

October 1. Was Fast meeting. We had five meetings. Brother Stoof was in Fuerth in the morning, and in the afternoon in Nuremberg, where he was present in the Priesthood meeting and Sacrament meeting. After the meeting, two brothers got ordained. Brother F. Georg Leupold became a Priest and Brother Bayerlein a Teacher. I ordained Brother Leupold and Brother Bayerlein was ordained by Brother Holstein.

On September 30th, we celebrated my Birthday with my landlord Hefner. They had baked and cooked a lot of food. Brother Stoof, myself, and my landlord’s family had a good time.

On October 3rd We had here in Nuremberg 18 Baptisms. They were performed in “Wild-Swimming pool”. Ten friends from Fuerth which were baptized by Brother Otterson and eight friends were from Nuremberg: Marie Walter Regina Schneider Babetta Walter Grethe Walter Elise Walter Elise Anna Walter Babatta Maria Zader Anna Katharina Eysser which I baptized I confirmed Marie Walter and Elise Anna Walter. We had a very good blessed time and many friends and members were present. And I am very grateful to my Heavenly Father for the great mercy I received that I may work in His Gospel.

October 4th was my 20th anniversary of my baptism and I was in Fuerth where I was baptized 20 years ago. Brother Habermann invited me and we had a good time together. In the Evening I went to the Bible Hour in Fuerth and I liked it very much.

October 5 I received a big package from my Anna which gave me great joy. Everything are Blessings of the Lord.

October 16. We had Relief Society, Two sisters were urged to come, Sister Amon and Sister Seykauf. Sister Amon claimed that Sister Seykauf did steal about 600 Mark from her. She surprised her when Sister Seykauf was busy with her purse. But Sister Seykauf denied it and threatened to leave the Church. Her excommunication was granted.

November 1. President Stoof was the Brethren and afterwards 7:15 a main meeting (like Sacrament Meeting). There were three branches, Nuremberg, West-Moegeldorf and Fuerth were present. Prosident Stoof gave us once more some good instructions and mentioned afterwards that this is his last meeting as Presiding Conference President because he will soon be released. Afterwards all the missionaries gave a speech, Brother Gardner spoke as successor of Brother Stoof, then Wendel, Brother Otteson, Brother Bigolow, then the three Branch Presidents, Holstein, Hofmann, and Weiss. After the meeting four Brethren from the Moegeldorfer Branch were ordained as Deacons. Brother Kuefner, Weiss, Loscher and Strecker. Brother Schwemmer from Nueremberg was ordained also. The Hefner family were present too, as friends.

November 4. Missionary meeting at Brother and Sister Hofmann.

November 6. Missionary meeting with Brother Hofmann

8, 11, and 15.

November 20 and 21. In Munich my Passport was extended.

On December 23. my Mina and Otto arrived here in Nuremberg.

Sunday the 24th, we had a Christmas celebration for the children in the Buchenstrasse 90. On the 25th, we went to Dinner at Brother Habermann in Fuerth,

On the 26th, we went to the Christmas celebration in the Tulnau Hall. It was everywhere real nice.

On December 27th, we both went to Stuttgart where a Missionary Conference was held. We stayed with Brother Mueller over night and also with the Hald family, who are good people.

On December 30th in the evening my Mina went by train to Meissen.

JANUARY 1923 On the 13th, 14th, and 15th. Conference in Frankfurt. Saturday Priesthood meeting from 7:00 until 9:30 (probably evening). Sunday, Sunday School from l0:00 until 12:00. Afternoon from 2:00 P.M. until 4:00 P.M. Meeting. Evening from 8:00 P.M. until l0:00 P.M. Meeting on Monday from 9:00 A.M. until 11:30 A.M. Missionary Meeting, then from 2:30 P.M. until 7:00 P.M. another Missionary Meeting.

On the l6th. at noon we went back home by train.

On the 23rd, Bible Hour in Hammer with Brother Schobert, with Heinrich Weis we ate and had Bible hour.

On January 28, I went to Meissen. My Mina was a little ill with influenza but she recovered again. In Meissen we were invited on the 29th by several friends; Zinka, Backer, Koehler.

On January 30, we went by train to Freiberg, passing through Dresden, and visited Hugo Mauermann’s relatives. We found there much poverty.

On the 31st, we went to Chemnitz and visited there the relatives. In the evening we attended Bible Hour, which was well attended and we liked it very much.

On February 1, I went back to Nuremberg and by train I passed through Hof and Bayreuth and arrived in Nuremberg at night 1:00 A.M. Mina went back to Meissen. I had some difficulties with my train ride. The Conductor said to me I should transfer in Hof, but I went naturally in good moods till Pirk. There a Conductor said to me, I should have transferred in Plauen. Then I rode two Stations back to Plauen and had to pay fair once more. From Plauen I went to Hof where I transferred again, came through Bayreuth to Nuremberg. The Railroad Company had several Trains restricted and also the Express train, because of occupation of the Ruhr Area by France, the coal is quite limited.

On February 6, I went to Ippesheim where I was expected by my relatives and was well received. I stayed over night with Karl Almoslechner, and the second night with his sister Wiesen. The Mayor by name of Doeller went with me to the City Hall in Uffenheim, where the District Official read to me, that a new law is effective since January 11, 1923. All Foreigners in the City or County have to be treated equal and a three week’s stay permit will be 35,000 Mark, more than three weeks till two months will cost 70,000 Mark. I induced my leave.

On the 12th of February, I received a letter from Anna, she informed me about a prescription for Gallstones.

On the I5th of February. I went early in the morning to Wuerzburg and from Sanitaetsrat Dr. Sprins, I received the prescription. I sent it to the drug store (Schwanenapotheke) to Steinbuehl with a letter and was able to receive the medicine. The medicine expenses were 750 Mark, the Doctor expenses were 3,000 Mark and the train expense was 1,680 Mark.

On February 16, we went to Berlin by train. There was a great conference. Apostle (David 0.) McKay was present. From the German Mission there were 207 Elders present.

We had on February 17th a Missionary Meeting from 9:00 o’clock A.M. until 5:00 o’clock P.M., Everyone was called on to speak.

On Sunday, February 18, we had meetings, Sunday School at 10:00 A.M. and so on! Saturday we had another evening meeting from 7:30 until 9:30 P.M. Sunday afternoon there was a general meeting from 2:30 until 6:00 and in the evening from 7:00 until 9:00 P.M. another meeting was held.

(NOTE: At the time of the typing of the mission diary of Johann (John) Wendel by Pearl Wendel in July 1978, it was revealed that Otto had been living in Preston, Idaho at the time Grandpa, John Wendel, received a Mission Call while living in Sugar House with Elder LeGrande Richards as his Bishop. Otto moved down to stay with Mina (Grandpa’s Second wife and Otto’s mother). In November 1922, Bishop LeGrande Richards then had a call for Otto to go to Germany on a Mission. Otto informed him that he had come to take care of his mother while her husband filled a mission. Bishop Richards just suggested that he take Mina with him. Even though it did take them a little longer to get ready, Otto did accept his mission call and his mother went with him. Part of her time was then spent with Grandpa in visiting various places, relatives and conferences. The remainder of her time was spent in Meissen visiting her sister and other relatives.)

MISSION JOURNAL CONTINUED: My wife was present, she came alone from Meissen, also our son Otto was here, he works in Stettin. We had dinner in a restaurant Sunday together with Brother Kraemer, Brother Hirschmann from Wien and Brother Mauermann. In the evening I lodged in a Hotel with my wife and several Brothers. Most of the brethren lodged in the hotel.

On Monday, my wife and I went to Lauchhammer where we stayed over night with brother-in-law Kamprathen, and were welcomed very friendly there. I saw here big manufacturers and a Priket (brown coal) factory. The brown coal is laying openly and maybe only 3 feet deep is cleared and then the coal is ready for processing; it gets ground up and then is pressed into the form of a Priket (which is about 12 inches long, 4 inches wide and about 6 inches high).

On February 20th, we went by train to Meissen, where my wife stayed with her sister.

February 22, I went by train back to Nuremberg again and arrived here safely in the morning at 9:00 o’clock. All expenses must have been about 70,000 Mark, February 24. I registered my stay in Nuremberg for three months and had to pay a fee of 210,100 Mark. They told me that I couldn’t do any more Mission Work. Today.

March 8th, the 3 month old daughter of the Kail family, living in Zirkelschmiedsgasse was buried. The father of the child is a member of the church, but the baby was not blessed by our Church. Our choir sang 2 songs, Brother Waldhaus gave a speech and I dedicated the grave.

Friday, March 9. Brother Schoberth, Brother Waldhaus and myself were invited to a wedding by Brother and Sister Hofmann. The son, Hans Hofmann married Sister Olga Kail, There were about 30 persons present, good dinner, music and dance and we had a good time.

March 13 Brother Schobert is ill. I conducted the Bible Hour in the home of Brother and Sister Adelmann.

On March 17 we had a celebration and Bazaar in Relief Society (I guess a Birthday Party of the Relief Society organized in 1842). It was held in the Bucherstrasse. There were several members from Fuerth and many friends present. It was pretty well attended. We had a good time. Many handmade items were displayed which the Relief Society had made and were selling. The proceeds were more than 97,000 Mark. Besides a good program was also presented.

On March 19. we had missionary conference in Stuttgart. Brothers Schobert, Waldhaus, Otterson and Brother Barri from Fuerth and myself went by train 8:30 from here and arrived in Stuttgart 1:00 P.M. We went right away to the meeting house. There we got a meal, afterwards was meeting held until 6:00 P.M. Then we went back to the Railroad Station, but we were too late. I went back to the meeting house and the Brethren Hamon and Braun went with me to Sister Christina Scholl, Schloss Strasse 57 first floor. I was welcomed here and stayed over night. In the morning at 6:30 we went by train.

On March 26, Brother Schoberth, Brother Otterson and myself administered to a friend by the name of Wilhelmine Carl, rossweidenmuehl No.31 Room 19, who has been ill for ten years already and cannot do anything and presumably was possessed by spirits.

On March 27. my Mina arrived from Meissen and March 28. we went by train to Wasserberndorf. We stayed here until the 2nd of April and then returned to Nuremberg. We received one round loaf of bread from G. Senft and sausage and eggs, which we shared with Hefners. April 7. I didn’t sleep very good last night, woke up at 2:00 o’clock in the morning. I ate in the evening one bowl of soup and two soft boiled eggs.

On April 14. I moved from my lodging people Hefner, Peter Henleiri Strasse 25 to Brother and Sister Hofmann, Koernerstrasse 58, third floor, I hope I can stay here until I go back. (To Utah.)

On April .15. We had a beautiful meeting in “Goldenen Schwan” ( a room in a Restaurant). The Sunday School got re-organized. Brother Huinrich Weiss as Superintendent was set apart by Brother Schobert. Brother Johann Leipold as first counselor was set apart by me, and Brother Willeithner as second counselor was set apart by Carl Weiss.

April 24. One day missionary meeting in Stuttgart.

May 10th. Mother and I went to Eichstaedt to visit Mrs. Fetzer, Friedhofstrasse 54. We were welcomed very well. Eichstaedt is a city with 3,000 Population, the majority is Catholic, and is surrounded by mountains. We visited several churches to look at, and in the Walburga, Church there is an Alter, the bones of the corpse of the holy Walburga rested in a tomb like place covered with stone plates. I was told, nobody could enter the tomblike place. The stone plates develop a moisture (caused from heat in the tomb) which they catch in containers and is used as holy Walburga oil. It is said the oil has a great healing power. There are many pictures which indicate the great healing power in miracles.

Today, May 12, Mother went to Kaubenheim.

May 19. We both went by train to Windsheim. In Neustadt, we had five hours delay, and we reached Windsheim at 10:00 o’clock. We stayed in Windsheim over night and had a good lodging for 2,800 Mark.

Penecost Sunday, we went to Buchhoim, Monday to Rudolshofen, where we were welcomed.

Tuesday we left by train from Ermetzhofen where Georg Streckfuss accompanied us to Hernbergtheim, from there we went to Ippesheim and we were made welcome by Wiessner, Herrmann and Almoslechner.

On May 23 we went back again to Nuremberg.

On May 24 in the evening 8:OO o’clock, we had baptisms in Wildbad. The following people were baptized: Georg Walther, Simon Genthner, Miss Seiferth, Luise Seiferth, Miss Haeberlein, Mrs. Genthner and Mrs. Grauf. Brother Schoborth executed the baptisms and I blessed the baptismal water. I confirmed Brother Genther and Sister Luise Seiferth, Brother Schoberth confirmed Brother Walther and Sister Haeberlcin, Brother Sinsul confirmed Sister_____________ Brother Kufner confirmed Sister______________ May 28. I went to Wasserberndorf and registered there, made several visits in town and attended a war monument dedication in the Churchyard of Hohn in Berg for the dead soldiers from 1914 until 1918.

June 3. We had Fast meeting, from 8:30 in the morning until 4:00 P.M. we had meetings. Brother Binder got ordained a Priest by J.W. Me.

On June 4. I went to Munich and had my Passport extended for six months. I had no good time there, it rained all the time. I visited the Hofkirche (famous Church in Munich), the Hofbrauhaus, the Art Museum and several other places.

June 9 until June 12. Conference in Stuttgart. I stayed with a Hald family, StrohbergStrasse 36, third floor, where I was made very welcome. I had a good bed and very good meals. Sunday morning I went on a walk with Mr. Hald. Tuesday, he accompanied me to the railroad station. Sunday, we had Sunday School, Priesthood meeting and in the evening Sacrament Meeting. Monday, we had from 9:00 A.M. until 1:00 P.M. and from 3:00 P.M. until 5:00 P.M. Missionary meetings.

Tuesday at noon, I arrived again in Nuremberg. With Brother Schoberth, I made some visits and in the evening we went to Hammer, where we had a small cottage meeting with the Weiss Family. Wednesday and Thursday, I didn’t feel very good and stayed in bed.

Friday, the 15th of June, I got up again and made several visits with Mina. The weather is always very cold and rainy.

June 21. I am ill and Minna is sick too, she has a rash on her face for eight days already, July 1st.

Fast meeting, Sunday School in the forest near Klettschen Fabrik. Brother Otto Baer was ordained a Deacon by me in the Bucherstrasse, July 1, 1923.

On July 9. Sister Haeberlein was set apart a teacher in the children’s class by me in the “Goldenen Schwan” (Resturant).

On July 25. Mina and I visited Brother Habermann in Fuerth. Afterwards, we went to the Klein family, where we had a good time. In the evening, we visited Brother and Sister Schneider and then we went to the Bible Hour where I received my release from Brother Erdil.

On the 27th. I visited with my Minna and several friends in Johan’s ——-. In the evening 5:00 o’clock, we went by train to Roethenbach, where we had a Bible hour (cottage meeting) with the Hahn Family. Brother Schugk gave the lesson. It was the third time I was in Roethenbach for the Bible hour. When we returned home at 9:00 o’clock in the evening, Brother Hofmann and myself went to Fuerth where we administered to Brother and Sister Plesol’s two children age one and one-fourth, and three years old. They were very ill. One o’clock in the morning we returned back home.

On July 31, We had 16 baptisms in the “Wildbad”. I baptized seven persons and Brother Schoberth baptized nine persons: M. Wilhelm Baer from Roethenbach Babetha Geist From Roethenbach Konrad Geist from Roethenbach Hahn from Roethenbach Frieda Naehr from Nuremberg Michael Oberseider from Nuremberg Margaretha Weis from Nuremberg Those are the persons I baptized. Anna Geist from Roethenbach Kunigunda Geist from Roethenbach Walburga Hahn from Roethenbach M. Margaretha Hofmann from Nuremberg Johanna Gak from Nuremberg Cristonsia Gak from Nuremberg V. Franz Stiller from Nuremberg Helena A. Stiller from Nuremberg Those are the persons Brother Schoberth baptized. *Angela Stiller from Nuremberg Page 46 was left blank.

On August 1, Our Otto came to visit us from Landsborg and we went to Fuerth to Brother Habermann’s home and had dinner at noon.

August 2. We visited the Naehr family, afterwards we visited Otto. Brothers Schoberth, Kanfild and myself then viewed the Klettsche Fabric (Plant).

August 3. We, Minna, Otto and I went to Streitberg and Muggendorf, where in Streitberg, we visited the Bing-Cave. The cave is 396 meters long and 70 meters under ground level and very interesting, because of its drop formations.

On August 12, We had a meeting in Erlenstegen in the forest and there we took a branch photograph.

Last Friday, we had a Farewell meeting for me and for Brother Schoberth, who went then to Breslau as Conference-President. August 19. I received word from Leonard, he paid for the (Schips ticket) Ship’s ticket, American Line, for Mother and F. Naehr.

(NOTE by Pearl Wendel: The Frieda Naehr who came home with Grandpa and Grandma Wendel was a niece to Frieda Johanna Neuner, who was the wife of Leonhardt (Leonard) Michael Wendel, the oldest son of Grandpa John Wendel.)

August 24. was farewell for Brother Dotzler, who received a Mission Call. August 28. We had in Nuremberg, a wonderful conference. The mission President, Brother Tadge was here and Brother Hueckert, from Fuerth, who is now released, was the first speaker, followed by Brother Erdli, Conference-President, and Brother Tadge was the last speaker. Brother Mueller conducted the meeting. There were more than 300 persons present. A great part of the attendance were investigators (friends). On August 27. Conference was in Fuerth. There were 400 persons present.

On August 29 We went with Frieda Naehr to Munich, American Embassy (Consulate) to obtain a Visa for Frieda. We have no idea yet, when we can leave here.

Today, September 1, I received a letter from Brother Schoberth from Breslau. September 1, 1923. There were seven Baptisms in Fuerth, but I could not attend,

On September 2, I was with my Mina in Fuerth, attending Fast meeting and afterwards visited Sister Igelhaud and the families of Klein and Goissler.

On September 14. Brother Canfild, Brother Cunningham and myself administered to Sister Leupold. She has (Ischias) like Arthritis, and is in great pain.

On September 15. We arrived by the Hefners and had a good dinner and supper.

On September 16, I blessed the oil in Sunday School (consecrated the oil). After Sacrament Meeting, Brother Canfild, Brother Sus, Brother Mueller and myself blessed the child of Brother and Sister Baer, which was born August 30, 1923, and gave it the name of Otto. I administered the blessing.

On September 17 at 9:00 o’clock in the morning, my Minna went by train to Meissen to say “Good bye” to her relatives.

On September 18. I went by train to Neustadt and visited there an old friend by the name of Vogel (Liessweth) (I guess Liessbeth), whom I hadn’t seen for about 33 years. Then I went by train to Windsheim and then to Buchheim, where I stayed for three days by Georg Streckfuss. They gave me a warm welcome. From here, I went by train, with Johan to Ermetzhofen and visited Mrs.______ Donner, who told me all about her suffering, but she was happy to see me. She went with me to Rudolshofen, where we visited my Brother-in-law Streckfuss. But I was not welcome here. The old ones and the young ones had a quarrel and Brother-in-law H. Georg said it would be the best for us to leave at once, because he cannot accommodate me, and the young ones would look upon me like a pig in a Jew court yard. It was raining real hard at this time, and so I stayed until the rain got less; and then I left without shaking the hands of the young ones. In the night I reached Uffenheim and went to the Busch family. His wife is a twin sister to Reuscher Gundel. They gave me a warm welcome and they were happy I visited them. Here I stayed overnight and in the morning I went to Gallhofen and I visited first the Serbin family. They were just butchering a pig. I didn’t go in the house, said “Good bye”, and went to the Herbst Family, who married the youngest daughter of Gundel. But they had not much time for me. Then I went away and walked in the Street. It was raining a lot and I opened up my umbrella and walked without turning around. It was one and one-half hours until I reached Oberruekelsheim. I had to turn around and walk half way back. After half an hour’s walk on a very dirty road I reached Herrnbergtheim and then to Ippesheim, where in the evening I reached cousin Wiessnar, very tired and stayed overnight. They gave me a very warm welcome. I stayed here until September 25th. There was an American visiting with his wife, who came from Wienna (Vienna). They visited his parents. We had a good conversation together.

On Sunday, he traveled back home to New York. Sunday I attended a funeral and Tuesday I went to Reusch and visited Brother-in-law Gundel. Here I met a son of the Busch Family, who is enrolled in the Technical College in Nuremberg. Then I went to W. Geissendorfer and her daughter, who is married to a certain________________ in Reusch. Then I went back to Ippesheim and from there bo Herrnbergtheim. From here I went back home by train to Nuremberg, and arrived in the evening at 8:00 o’clock.

On September 27, My Birthday, I was invited at noon by the Hefners and in the evening for Dinner by Brother and Sister Schneider. Later on at 9:00 o’clock in the evening came all the choir members and youth and gave a serenade of three songs “Befehl Du Deine Wege” – “Trust Your Ways In The Lord” “Du Was Ist Recht” – “Do What Is Right” and “Nocheinmal Will Ich Singen” – “Once More I Will Sing”. It made me very happy.

October 4, 1923. My Minna came back from Meissen.

On Friday, we went by train to Helmmitzheim and from there to Ziegenbach to Georg Wendel. They gave us a warm welcome and we stayed over night. The other day, Saturday, we went to Wasserberndorf. We arrived there in the evening. I gave notice of my leaving at the Registrar, and we visited several friends and stayed over night with the Rodammer’s. Next day at noon we went back to Nuremberg again by train.

On October 9, We left Nuremberg by train at 2:30 P.M. Anna Herold helped us carrying our small luggage to the Railroad Station. The Elders and several members and Sister Naehr accompanied us to the platform. There they wanted to give me a helping hand, but I refused. We rode then all night thru and arrived in Hamburg in the morning. There we came to the emigration building and stayed in one room with other people like a herd of sheep. One after another got called out and the emigration papers brought in order. Our turn was finally at 4:00 P. M. The other day we got vaccinated and that lasted almost all the day long because all the passengers for three ships were all together.

On the 12 of October, we all had a physical examination by an American Doctor. It lasted until noon. In the afternoon, we went into town for a little while. There are three mealtimes: at 8:00 A.M., 12:00 Noon, and 5:00 P.M. The food is good and enough of it. But the quarters I cannot praise. In our hall are forty-eight beds. The beds are very hard and cold. Men and women are separated and also the different races. With me, there are only Germans. There are four halls in those quarters. The Poles and the Jews are by themselves.

October 13. We all had to gather and then we received our Passports. Afterwards several formalities were settled and 12:00 o’clock, after we received a good bread and a piece of sausage from the barracks, we entered the ship. The bigger luggage was transported, the small ones we had to carry. From this ship, we all were transported to a Hall, where again, we got treated like a herd of sheep. Here again, several formalities were settled. Then, we were transferred again to another ship, which took us, after showing our papers, to the huge ship “Bayern”, which was pretty far away in the ocean. Here one had to show the passport to a German Officer, who put a seal on, and then one was allowed to enter the ship. We had difficulties. When our turn came, the officer put our Passports aside and said, we have to wait, probably to wait for the next ship, because we have not paid the consumption tax. Mina got real mad and scolded the Officer. The Officer said cold-hearted, “What will you do when I don’t let you go? It is the Americans fault that we have a bad life.” She gave him a Dollar and after the Captain from the ship came, we paid the consumption tax 240,000,000 Million Mark, he let us go. When we were on the Ship and got our cabin, the dining room, served coffey and cake. I have cabin No. 100 and Mina and Frieda have No. 58. In my cabin, there are 14 beds, and in Minna’s are 4 beds. In the evening was served goulash, potatoes, Tea, bread and butter. After the meal we had a concert. The mealtimes are arranged in three, one after another following divisions. We three are in the first division, at table No. 1 in front at the first chair.

October 14. Morning. Today is Sunday. The morning is quite calm, some fine rain, but the sun is always shining again. It is a little windy. In the morning was served fried eggs, bread, butter, coffee and rolls. Many people are sea sick and have to feed the fish. Some had to get up during the night to go on Deck, even one man from my cabin, who is from Nuremberg ______________________(probably space for his name). We feel so far, pretty good. Only I think a lot back on Nuremberg. At 10:00 o’clock I went to bed, as I was tired. At Noon we had noodles, red cabbage, Roast with sauce and coffee. In the afternoon it was raining quite a bit. We were mostly alone in the room. We were together with a man from Saxony, Leipzig, by the name of _________________________he is 56 years old. In the evening they served Potato salad, sausage, and meat balls, Tea and butter and bread.

October 15 Today, I slept very well, got up in the morning at 6:45 A.M. It is a beautiful morning. We went at once to the Deck. It is a little windy, but otherwise nice. The sun was a little hidden in the clouds when he came up, but then at once, it was a clear morning. Just now, we passed England and could see very close the English white coastline, like white rock. With the telescope, we could see English Towns and many fishing boats. For breakfast we had Coffee, Rolls, Hash (like fried cornbeef) delicate pickels and bread. It is a beautiful day today. The ocean seems so calm and the sun is shining so warm. Everybody Is on deck today. At noon we had pea soup, potatoes, lamb roast, sauce, green beans mixed with white beans, coffee and cake, bread and butter. After the meal, we saw at the English Coast seven English battleships maneuvering. Oh it is beautiful. Now I think of all those beloved ones we left behind in Germany, could they not be with us now? But it had to be farewell. At Noon, I had a conversation with a man from my cabin. He is from Berlin. He don’t think much about Religion, but was quite interested in the Gospel and wants to hear more about it.

October 16. Today I saw a Sunset. It was a bright sky and splendid to see how the sun disappeared in the water (Ocean). He went down European time 6:20 until 6:25 P.M. Our supper was fried or baked fish, potato salad, Sausage, bread, butter and Tea. In the evening, 9:00 P.M. I went to bed.

October l6.(?) The morning is beautiful. The Ocean is smooth like a mirror. I feel good, Breakfast Coffee, Rolls, Meatballs, butter and bread, Potatoes, and Schelle?

(NOTE by typist Pearl Wendel: page 25 under the date of October 16th where he is giving the breakfast menu, we now think the last food mentioned was “jelly”. However, if that is what he meant he misspelled it.)

Noon meal at l:00 P.M. Hamburg, Germany time: Potatoes boiled, beefbreast with Kohlrabi (German vegetable) cut in little squares, soup and coffee. The afternoon is a little windy. Now we are a short distance out of the Channel (between England and France). The time difference is one hour and 10 minutes. Evening meal: Potatoes, white cabbage, beef meat, bread, butter, cheese and tea. The Ocean is a little restless. The sunset was very beautiful from 7:50 until 7:55 P.M. Hamburg time.

October 17. This morning is very gloomy weather. The Ocean is still pretty calm. Breakfast: Rice, Macaroni with meat, coffee, bread with butter, I feel quite good. At noon: bread, peas, mash with meat, coffee, rolls, butter, meatsauce, potatoes, and pudding. Evening: Potatoes with beefbreast, sauce, coffee, bread, butter and pudding.

October 18. In the morning, I slept well, feel good, the weather is a little stormy and some rain. Breakfast: eggs fried with potatoes, coffee, bread, butter, and wek? The weather is very windy. The water splashed to the Deck. Noon Meal: Soup, potatoes, white cabbage, beefmeat, sauce, butter, bread, coffee, and cake. Afternoon sleep. The wind is pretty strong and the water always uplashes over the rail. Evening Meal: Ricemash with meat, frank furter Liverwurst, bread, butter, tea. I have not a good appetite.

October 19, slept good. The weather is gloomy and unfriendly. Breakfast: fried meat, potatoes, rolls, butter, I didn’t eat much. Noon Meal: Vegetable soup with sausage, potatoes, fish marinated with sauce, coffee and pudding. The weather is windy.

October 20. The weather is windy and gloomy. I layed down all day long. I have a temperature from my vaccination, evening meal: I ate herring (fish) and potatoes and went right after in bed again. Pain at the bladder.

October 21. In the morning the weather was rainy, later on it cleared up. Breakfast: fried eggs, coffee. Noon Meal: noodles with chicken soup, boiled chicken with sauce, rice, sweet rolls and coffee. At Evening Meal: Potatoes with sauce, Livercheese sausage, butter, coffee and bread. Afterwards there was a program in the Dining Hall, it was decorated. Several plays and productions were presented. I went to the Doctor, too. He bandaged my arm which is inflamed. I have pain.

October 22. I got up early and feel a little better. The weather is rainy and gloomy. In the night the Foghorn made noise every few minutes. Breakfast: mashed potatoes with cornbeef, pickles, coffee, rolls, butter, and one apple. Mina is not feeling well. Noon Meal: Potatoes, beef stew-roast, beets, sauce, noodles with vanilla and Coffee. The Ocean is wonderfully calm, but the fog is all around us. The foghorns shake the air uninterrupted. Mina is not feeling well. Evening mealt Rice, sauce, canned meat, tea, bread, and butter.

October 23. In the morning rainy. The Ocean is calm, the fog is decreasing. Mina is still sick . The Doctor gave her some medicine. My appetite is not big, but I feel good. Breakfast: Meatballs with sauce, coffee, bread, butter and raisins, Noon Meal: red cabbage with porkmeat, potatoes, sauce, and Coffee. Today I took up a collection for the Steward, but didn’t got very much, Mina is up again.

October 24. It is Mina’s Birthday, She feels a little bettor. Breakfast: Porkchops, one Apple, Coffee, rolls, butter, and jelly. After the meal we were all counted. Then we went on Deck, It is beautiful weather. The sun is shining warm and the Ocean is beautiful, beautiful mirrored in the sunlight. We stayed mostly on Deck. Supper: Soup with Livermeatballs, Sausage, Rolls, butter, and pudding with vanilla. Afterwards, we went once more on Deck. It was a beautiful warm and bright night.

October 25. In the morning 6:00 o’clock a tidal wave. One big wave came through our open port hole and flooded our cabin completely. It is raining and we have fog. Breakfast: coffee, two eggs, one apple, rolls, and butter. I have no appetite. Mina did not come for breakfast, she is in bed, I dreamed today about last Dec. 29 and 30th and about 2 Saturday and Sunday of February.

(It is a little confusing as to whether he meant two Saturdays and Sundays in February, or whether he meant the 2nd Saturday and Sunday of February. At the time of typing this I do not have that part of the diary here to look up and see if some outstanding things happened then.)

October 26, I got up this morning at 5:00 o’clock. At 5:30 Coffee, and then I went to the Deck. When the sun came up, we could already see land. It is a glorious morning. The sun came out of the Ocean in blue-red color. After awhile, we could see many ships. About 7:00 o’clock the Pilot ship picked us up and the German flag was taken down. The American flag and the Mail Flag were put up. Afterwards, another boat came and picked up the mail, and the mail flag was taken down again. Then another little boat came with the Doctor on it. Now, once more, there was a physical examination. Men and women had to disrobe separately and walk in front of the Doctor. When I noticed that this procedure was not done thoroughly, I didn’t follow it. There is a lot to see all around us. The ship is standing still at this time. It is 9:00 o’clock in the morning, American time and 3:00 o’clock P.M. Nuremberg time. At noon, we had once more a meal on the ship, then the amusement started. First, the people from second class could leave the ship, after them all American citizens. We had to go to the Custom hall and go through all the struggle, because Frieda was with us. We were once more counted and had to go from one room to the other again, then back to the ship where all the luggage was and then we went to the Island. Here, we came to a big building where we had to run up and down stairways. Each time we were sent from one place to another. All the time, there were three or four men, who looked at us and searched through our belongings, and with everyone we had to show different papers (like ship release papers, emigration papers). One had to follow the correct procedures. But we could not leave before we got another certificate, because we had no ticket for further traveling. We had to go back to New York, to the American Express Company and get our money. And so, we were sent from one place to the other, until we had permission to travel to New York. We went with several “suffernden” companions back, and there we ended up in a big hall. Afterward, we went with three other people to a Hotel, where a bellhop showed us the way. We had to climb stairs again to the elevated railway. Soon we could not drag our luggage anymore. After we rode a distance, we had to travel by foot again to the hotel, “The New Hotel Keller” 385 West Street, New York City. We had a pretty good place with a comfortable bed, which was pleasant after all those exhaustions. We paid five Dollars for three persons without meals.

On October 27. In the morning, I called President Roberts and Brother Ina was at the telephone. They sent a Missionary by the name of Carl B. Wever, 2825 Lincoln Ave., Ogden, who brought my ticket and our money, 200 Dollars, which was paid by the American Express Company. He helped us to get the two tickets for Mina, and Frieda. It cost $171.54 from New York City to Salt Lake City. We then went back once more to look after our basket luggage to get them to the railroad. Afterwards, we went again to the hotel and paid our bill and to eat something. Then we crossed the Street and entered a ship and went directly to the railroad Station. We did not have much time and left by train at 2:30 P.M. We had beautiful weather.

October 28. Sunday, we arrived in Chicago at 6:00 o’clock P.M. and held a delay until midnight 12:00 o’clock. In a Restaurant, we strengthened us a little, and the rest of the time we stayed in the Railroad Station. It is the most beautiful Railroad Station, I have ever seen.

October 29. Early in the morning (just past midnight) at 12:15 A, M. we left Chicago and arrived in Omaha (Nebraska) in the evening at 4:30 P.M. We had here a delay of 45 minutes. We had beautiful weather until we reached Council Bluff, then it started to snow violently. Now the train wagon (cars) starts to be shaky, so much so, that I can not write anymore, besides the ink is all gone, too.

October 30. The sun got up really beautiful and bright and it is a sunny day. We came to Juliusburg. There is a little snow cover and it is very cold. Even though the sun is shining so warmly, icicles and snow are hanging on the train wagon. By 11:00 o’clock A.M. we reached Cheyenne, (Wyoming). Here, we had a delay until 2:25 P.M. We went sight-seeing at the Capitol and the Museum. We saw here much Indian-war-equipment and works. Also several German war-equipment from 1870 and from World War I from 1914 until 1918. Afterwards, we got some food.

October 31 We arrived in Salt Lake City at 8:00 o’clock in the morning. Anna came with Loni to the Railroad Station and picked us up with the car. We went first to Fetters, where Leonard took Frieda home by car. Afterwards Loni drove us and Anna to her place, where we had a good meal. After that we went to Frieda, (probably Frieda Greaves— Mina’s daughter) then to Klara, then home to our paradise.

END OF MISSION FINAL NOTE by typist Pearl Wendel: A call made to Otto Andra — At the time of the typing of this diary by Pearl Wendel in July 1978, it was revealed that Otto had been living in Preston, Idaho at the time Grandpa, John Wendel, received a Mission Call while living in Sugar House with Elder LeGrande Richards as his Bishop. Otto moved down to stay with Mina (Grandpa’s Second wife and Otto’s mother). In November 1922, Bishop LeGrande Richards then had a call for Otto to go to Germany on a Mission. Otto informed him and he had come to take care of his mother while her husband filled a mission. Bishop Richards just suggested that he take Mina with him. Even though it did take them a little longer to get ready, Otto did accept his mission call and his mother went with him. Part of her time was then spent with Grandpa in visiting various places, relatives and conferences. The remainder of her time was spent in Meissen visiting her sister and other relatives. The Frieda Naehr who came home with Grandpa and Grandma Wendel was a niece to Frieda Johanna Neuner, who was the wife of Leonhardt (Leonard) Michael Wendel, the oldest son of Grandpa John Wendel.

Edward William Sharp

I thought I would write about Edward William Sharp today (some also list him as William Edward Sharp, I am not clear which is correct), known to the family as Uncle Ed.  He has a tender, yet thorny, position in the family.

Ed Sharp and Bob (?) 17 February 1949

Ed Sharp and Bob (?) 17 February 1949

Edward William Sharp was born 25 October 1887 in Plain City, Weber, Utah, the seventh child to Milo and Lilly Sharp.  My Great Grandmother, Ethel, was Ed’s younger sister, number 11 in line.  I have written more of Ethel’s marriage to Jack Ross.  Ed Sharp comes into the family line more closely when Ethel died in 1925.  She left behind five children, namely: June, Milo, Paul, Harold, and Earnest.  The four children were taken back to Paul, Minidoka, Idaho in 1925 to be raised by their Ross grandparents, James and Catherine Ross, while Jack got back on his feet.  As winter came and progressed the family struggled.  Earnest passed away the fall of 1925 in Rupert, Idaho.  Jack was gone for unknown reasons and James and Catherine called Ethel’s family to come get the four children.  Starting that winter of 1925-26, Milo Ross was raised by his Uncle Ed.  June went to live with her paternal grandparents, the Streeters in Ogden.  Paul and Harold were raised by Ed’s siblings, Vic Hunt and Del Sharp respectively.  Sadly, Paul fell from a loft in a barn in 1932, broke his arm, and suffered a concussion that would take his life in 1932.

Edward Sharp met and married Lillie Elva East 13 May 1909 in Plain City.  She was born 16 February 1888 in nearby Warren, Weber, Utah.  Together they had 10 children.

Lillie Elva East Sharp

Lillie Elva East Sharp

Edna Louise Sharp born 11 January 1910 in Plain City.

Florence Evelyn Sharp born 30 June 1911 in Plain City.

Marjorie Lillian Sharp born 23 June 1913 in Plain City.

Ethel Sharp born 8 July 1917 in Plain City.

Ethel Sharp and Wayne McCool

Ethel Sharp and Wayne McCool

Elmer George Sharp born 15 June 1919 in Plain City and died 12 November 1923 in Plain City.

Ruby Elaine Sharp born 13 February 1922 in Plain City.

Ruby Sharp

Ruby Sharp

Milo Riley Sharp born 27 November 1927 in Ogden.

Milo Riley Sharp (1924 - 1955)

Milo Riley Sharp (1924 – 1955)

Josephine Sharp born 18 March 1927 in Ogden.

Edward Junior Sharp born 24 January 1930 in Ogden.

Dean Sharp born 28 April 1935 in Ogden.

Lillie Sharp, Gary Blanch, and Dean Sharp

Lillie Sharp, Gary Blanch, and Dean Sharp

Back (l-r): Steven, Reed, Brent; Front: Lorraine, Lois, Dean, Teresa Sharp

Back (l-r): Steven, Reed, Brent; Front: Lorraine, Lois, Dean, Teresa Sharp

As a reminder, Grandpa, Milo Ross, was born in 1921 in Plain City.  He falls right in the middle of the entire family and became one of the siblings.  To tell the difference between Milo Ross and Milo Sharp, I will use their last name.

Milo James Ross

Milo James Ross

Unfortunately, things were not quite that easy.  Ed farmed a nice little farm in Plain City.  He also had some cows, pigs, and other animals.  The family grew up in the Depression with all the anxieties and difficulties that came with it.  Fortunately the farm was mostly paid for and the farm provided for itself and the family.

Despite technically being blood to Ed, Milo Ross was treated differently than the other children.  Milo Ross was not allowed to eat with the rest of the family.  When the family was done with the meal, then Milo Ross could eat.  Often alone.  Milo Ross was expected to work longer than the rest of the family, into the time while the rest of them ate.  Milo Ross was also expected to arise earlier and get things in order for the day before the rest of the family.  He did not often get to eat with the rest of the family for breakfast and often only got some bread and milk.  He was also given some of the more undesirable jobs around the farm.  For example, it was his job to tend the onions which often left him smelling of them and he found that embarrassing.

L-R: Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp, Howard Hunt, Milo Sharp, Ruby Sharp

L-R: Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp, Howard Hunt, Milo Sharp, Ruby Sharp

Ed also had some drinking issues and had a certain temper.  Of course his family saw the issues that arose as part of the alcohol, but it was Milo Ross who felt it.  He was the one who suffered the wrath of Ed’s drinking bouts at the end of a belt or sometimes worse.  While Milo Ross loved his cousin-siblings, the relationship was not as kindred with Ed.

On Horse l-r: Harold Ross, Howard Hunt, Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp (arm only), Janelle England, Eddie Sharp.  In front l-r: Ruby Sharp, Lucille Maw, and Milo Riley Sharp.

On Horse l-r: Harold Ross, Howard Hunt, Milo Ross, Josephine Sharp (arm only), Janelle England, Eddie Sharp. In front l-r: Ruby Sharp, Lucille Maw, and Milo Riley Sharp.

Ruby Sharp, Lois Robbins, Milo Ross, Milo Sharp

Ruby Sharp, Lois Robbins, Milo Ross, Milo Sharp

Milo Ross was only one year in age from Ruby who he ran around the countryside with.  They were close enough that they would hold hands.  They did quite a bit together.  He was also close to Milo Sharp, but he was still three years behind him in age.  The older siblings, Edna (who went by Louise), Florence, and Ethel were good to him, but were close to each other and did mostly their own thing.  Ed kept Milo Ross busy that he did not get as much time with the younger children but he grew close with Josephine and Edward (known as Eddie in the family).  Dean was young enough that he was around him some, but did not have as close of a relationship.

L-R: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp, and Bob Martin.

L-R: Ruby Sharp, Harold Ross, Milo Sharp, Milo Ross, Paul Ross, Ethel Sharp, and Bob Martin.

As I mentioned in the story of Ed’s parents William & Mary Ann Sharp, she also went by Lilly, the Sharp and Stoker families came to Utah as converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  A number of issues arose in Plain City and families left the church.  Ed’s parents followed that suit remaining with the Episcopalian faith.  Ed and Lillie did as well, but were not very active.  The Mormons continued to work on bringing the families back to the church.  The Sharp family started to work through Delwin’s family first and the faith spread through Ed’s nieces and nephews and into his own family.  Only one of Ed’s siblings joined the LDS faith while alive, and that was Vic in 1975.

Edward Sharp, Delwin & Vilate Sharp, 13 August 1957

Edward Sharp, Delwin & Violet Sharp, 13 August 1957

Marjorie, Ethel, and Ruby all joined through the waters of baptism on 12 May 1939.  Milo Ross joined 2 July 1939 (only after 18 as Ed would not give consent otherwise).  Louise, Florence, Milo Sharp, Josephine, and Eddie all joined 3 January 1943.  Dean was the last on 31 October 1943, he was not 8 in January to join with the remainder of his siblings.

As soon as Milo was of age, he looked for opportunities to get out.  He eventually married, moved in with his in-laws, and then the impending war took his services abroad.

Milo Ross did not tell only negative about Uncle Ed.  Grandpa regularly told of how he learned to work hard under Uncle Ed.  While somewhat an outsider, Ed kept in contact with the extended family and Grandpa’s position in the family meant he was regularly tending to his Grandmother, Lilly Sharp mentioned above.  While it was his strict duty to clean out his Grandma’s bedpan, keep the kitchen and house wood split and stocked, and whatever else she needed or wanted.  Grandpa relished those moments in her home and with her.

Lillie East Sharp died 4 September 1942 while separated from her husband.  She had started divorce proceedings but died before they completed.  She was buried in Plain City.  Milo Ross remembered her as a beautiful lady who he sometimes told his woes, but she acknowledged the issues but took no steps to resolve them.

Ed died 24 August 1962 in Othello, Adams, Washington.  The family brought him home and buried him in Plain City too.

William E Sharp Obit

Ross-Donaldson Wedding

David and Dena Donaldson are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Gladys Maxine to Milo James Ross, son of Jack Ross and the late Ethel Ross.  They were married in the Donaldson home on 8th Street in Ogden, Utah on 4 April 1942.  (This post originally appeared in 2010 and is reposed due to Grandpa’s death)

Gladys is a 1940 graduate of Ogden High School.

Milo is a 1939 graduate of Weber High School.  He is currently employed with American Packing and Provisioning Company as a supervisor in Ogden.

The couple will make their home in Plain City.

While short and sweet, there is much more of a story behind those words.  Milo and Gladys met  in 1940 when Gladys and her sisters rode their bikes all the way to a celebration in Plain City.  Later they would meet at the Berthana, which included a dance hall on the second floor (built in Ogden about 1914).  The Berthana later converted to a roller skating rink before closing in the 1970’s.  The building is still there although I do not know what the use for the building is currently.

David Delos Donaldson and Berendena Van Leeuwen are Gladys’ parents.  Read more of her parents at this link: Donaldson-Van Leeuwen Family.  David was a plumber by trade who had lung problems from being gassed in the Argonne of France in World War I.  He suffered from lung ailments the rest of his life.  He mostly worked in the Ogden area but worked prior to marriage in Phoenix, Arizona and Twin Falls, Idaho.  He also sought work in Boulder City, Nevada during the depression and as a steam and pipe fitter during World War II in Napa, California.  Apparently during World War II he worked almost exclusively in submarines.  You can read more of their marriage and family at the link above.  She went by the name of Dena her entire life.

Gladys and Maxine Donaldson ages 5 and 3.

Dena grew up LDS and David did not.  David’s parents were not active LDS and most of David’s siblings joined the LDS church between the ages of 10 and 22.  David and one brother did not.  Dena saw that all her children were raised LDS with little difficulty from David.  Apparently smoking is what kept him from being baptized (he picked up smoking after being gassed because he said it soothed his lungs).  When the time would come for Milo and Gladys to marry, they wished to be married in the temple.   For whatever reason, the Bishop determined that he was not going to allow them to be sealed without David being a member.  I do not know which Bishop, but I have a suspicion it was Gladys’ Bishop and that he knew the Donaldson family.  He probably hoped to bring errant David around so his daughter could get married.  The plan backfired.  It would not have worked anyhow because David was pretty set on Gladys marrying a wealthy man and would not have minded if the wedding had not gone through.  Milo said they wanted to get married and were not interested in waiting around for a Bishop to figure out what he was doing.  A week before they were actually married, they decided to elope.  They packed up and drove to Evanston, Wyoming on snow covered roads.  They arrived and decided they better do it proper with family around.  They enjoyed a meal and drove back to Ogden on a very snowy set of roads.  Leading them to get married in the Donaldson home the next week or so.  It would take them another 34 years before they finally made it to the temple to get sealed.  Perhaps the Bishop was inspired.

They married in April and World War II was in full swing.  They rented a place in Ogden for a few weeks until moving to Plain City and rented there (on 4700?) until they built a home after the war.  Milo and a group of buddies then went off to Fort Douglas to enlist in October 1942 rather than wait until they were drafted.  They anticipated at least a few more days or weeks in Utah before being shipped off.  However, Milo was put on a train that same day to Camp Lewis in Washington.  He spent the next two to four months there, he cannot remember for sure.  Gladys would move to Camp Lewis to be with him through basic training.  By this point the two knew they were expecting a baby.

Milo shipped out for Needles, California to Camp Ibis.  Due to his experience with building, he was one of the men asked to lay out some of the buildings for the latrines and then helped in starting the construction of those buildings.  Their division stayed there a few months before heading off to San Francisco from which he was put on a boat and headed to Hawaii.  He landed in Hawaii on the 4th of July 1943 with the loudspeaker welcoming the men to Hawaii and announcing the birth of a son to Sergeant Ross.  I have written of that baby at this link: Baby Milo Ross.

Gladys would live with her parents in Ogden until Milo returned from the rigors of war.  Her parents moved from their address on 8th Street down to Washington Boulevard during this time.

Milo worked for American Packing and Provisioning Company some in high school and on afterward until he went into the service.  American Pack would be sold to Swift & Company in 1949.  This packing plant would remain in use until the 1970’s when it was closed.

I have written previously about Milo’s loss of his mother in 1925 and her family keeping him from having contact with his father, John William Ross.  Here is the link: Ross-Sharp Wedding.  He was raised by his Uncle Edward William Sharp in Plain City.

Anyhow, the family would go on to have 2 more children in 1946 and 1948.  Milo received a homestead in Washington State in the late 1940’s, early 1950’s, but I do not know more about it.  The homestead is believed to have been abandoned because of medical needs of Judy and the family returned to a newly built home in Plain City around 1948 or 1949.  The family then built the current home at 2532 N. 4100 W. in 1955 and have resided there since.

Ross – Sharp Wedding

Jack and Ethel Ross holding June Streeter about 1920 in Paul, Idaho.

Milo Riley and Mary Ann “Lilly” Sharp are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Ethel to John William “Jack” Ross, son of James Thomas and Damey Catherine Graham Ross.  They were married at Fort Logan, Arapahoe, Colorado by an Army Chaplain (Julius J Babst) on 11 January 1920.

Jack is currently employed with the US Army as a cook at Fort Logan, Colorado.

The couple will return to make their home in Plain City, Utah as soon as he completes his enlistment with the Army.

Jack Ross was born 2 September 1890 in Pulaski, Pulaski, Virginia.  He was the second of four children born to James Thomas Ross and Damey Catherine Graham.  Read more about Jack’s parents here.  We really do not know much of Jack’s childhood.  His mother joined the LDS church on 27 February 1898 and his father on 17 April 1898 in an unknown location.  Jack and his older brother Robert Leonard joined on 30 July 1900.  I have been unable to find the Ross family on the 1900 Census.  By July 1906, the family was living in or near Welch, McDowell, West Virginia working in the coal mines when Fanny and James were baptized.  Jack married Nannie May Day (she went by May) on 6 July 1910 in Squire Jim, McDowell, West Virginia.  To this marriage was born Hobart Day Ross (who later went by Hobart Day) on 1 Jun 1911 in McDowell County, West Virginia.

James and May Ross holding Hobart about 1912

Jack’s younger sister, Fanny Elizabeth married Calvin Dickerson Phibbs on 22 December 1906 (listed as a miner) and then moved to Rupert, Minidoka, Idaho in 1912.  Initially Calvin and Fanny moved to Rupert and purchased 80 acres to the northeast of Rupert.  He dabbled with cattle and real estate while also working as an electrician.  (He was eventually elected as Rupert City Clerk and in 1918 as Minidoka County Probate Judge.  He was admitted as an attorney to the Idaho bar 15 December 1919.)  At any rate, in 1911 the construction of a new sugar factory in Burley, Cassia, Idaho was drawing a number of potential workers.  Word reached the remaining Ross clan in West Virginia, probably from Fanny, of the upcoming opening.  The remaining Ross family rode a train of coal from McDowell County directly to southern Idaho.

Jack’s wife, May, did not come with him for one reason or another.  She divorced him shortly afterward and remarried to Andrew Cleveland Parson(s?) on 22 November 1913 in Gary, McDowell, West Virginia.  We do not know anything of the Ross family between 1913 and 1917 other than they were working at Amalgamated Sugar in Burley.  Jack enlisted in the U.S. Army on 23 April 1917 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah and served in Battery E, 4th FA Rec Ser; Co. C, 21st Bn USG; 5 Rct Co (I do not know what any of that means) at Fort Logan, Arapahoe, Colorado, until 6 June 1919 when he was permitted leave.  He had obtained the rank of Sargent and was awarded the WWI Victory Button and Medal.  As far as I can tell, he never left U.S. soil.

Jack’s parents were working on farms around the area during the summers and then at the factories during the winter.  Robert listed his parents as living in Idahome, Cassia, Idaho in September 1918 when registered for the World War I Draft.  Jack’s parents moved to Paul, Minidoka, Idaho and started working on the first beet campaign in 1918 at the new Paul Amalgamated sugar factory.  Jack visited his parents in Paul on leave (starting 6 Jun 1919) and it was there he met Ethel Streeter running a store on Main Street, now Idaho Street, only a block or two from where his parents lived.  Jack reported back at Fort Logan on 13 August 1919 to 12 August 1920 when he was discharged from Fort Logan.

Ethel Sharp was born 9 April 1898 in Plain City, Weber, Utah.  She was the 11th child (8 siblings living by the time of her birth) of 12 children born to Milo Riley Sharp and Mary Ann Stoker, AKA Lillian “Lilly” Musgrave.  I have written about this family at this link: Sharp-Stoker Wedding.

Ethel was confirmed in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Plain City 15 May 1912.  Somewhere during this decade she was involved in a train accident on the Utah-Idaho Central Railway line between Plain City and Ogden, Weber, Utah.  I have been unable to locate any newspaper clippings or other information on this accident.  Anyhow, she obtained a settlement for her injuries.

She married Mark Lewis Streeter of West Weber, Weber, Utah on 7 May 1917 in Ogden.

Mark and Ethel Streeter

She made large deposits at Ogden First National Bank in June 1917, potentially her settlement.  We have checks from not long after that through August 1918 written out from Paul State Bank.  Interestingly, the checks state, “Paul is the Cream of the Minidoka Project, We Have the Cream of Paul.”

I have written about the photos recently found which include two photos of the Streeter Ice Cream & Confection Parlor.  Ethel Sharp and Streeter Confection.

Ethelyn June Streeter was born 4 June 1918 in Paul (she died in 2012).  Pictures of June are at the link in the preceding paragraph.  The divorce of Mark and Ethel was final after Mark had enlisted in the Army 3 March 1919.  Mark indicates in his autobiography that after he enlisted and left Ethel fell in love with Jack and that was the reason for their divorce.  Jack did not meet Ethel until June 1919, three months after Mark enlisted in the army.  Jack returned from his leave in Paul to Fort Logan in August 1919.  Ethel ventured to Fort Logan in January to marry Jack.  The 1920 Census lists him as a cook just days before Ethel arrived and the two were married.  She left little June with the Streeter family in Ogden.  We do not know much about the short dating period, but she traveled all the way to Colorado to marry him.  Whether she was head over heels for a poor military boy or something else, we do not know.  We do not know how long she stayed in Colorado or even if they came back together after his discharge.  We assume Ethel sold the store before going to Colorado.  After his discharge, Jack and Ethel moved to Plain City and he worked for Amalgamated Sugar Company at the Wilson Lane factory.  This was roughly a 7 mile walk to work one direction.  Milo James Ross was born 4 February 1921 in Plain City in a little log home just to the west and north of about 2971 N. 4200 W.  I have written of Milo James Ross at this link: Ross-Donaldson Wedding.  Here is a picture of the little log cabin in about 2005, shortly before it was torn down.

At some point, Jack and Ethel found their way back to Paul where Jack worked in the fields and at the sugar factory.  Paul Ross was born 14 February 1922 in Paul.  Work took Jack back to the Burley sugar factory and John Harold Ross (who went by Harold) was born 7 November 1923 in Burley and then moved back to Paul.  By 1924, Jack and Ethel were living with Jack’s parents and trying to make enough to get by.  Milo remembers walking to church in Paul before his mother died, he thinks a Presbyterian or Episcopal church.

To ease the load on his parents, the family moved back to Plain City.  Ethel gave birth to her last child, Earnest Jackson Ross, on 16 July 1925 in Plain City.

Sadly, Ethel passed away 21 days later on 6 August of puerperal septicemia (Blood poisoning from obstetric delivery).  Earnest lived to 20 September and he passed away in Idaho from malnutrition.  Jack is listed as the informant on the death certificate for Ethel.  Jack could not afford burial plots so Edward Sharp, Ethel’s brother, provided the burial plots where Ethel and Ernest are buried in Plain City.

Milo tells the story of the funeral for his mother.  He remembered that he was not permitted to look into the casket to see his mother.  The casket was up on the table and he could not see a thing and all he wanted to see was his mother.  Within days Jack took the four children back to Idaho and dropped them off with his parents.  Milo remembers his father riding the train holding baby Earnest in his arms.  Earnest passed away in Rupert.  James and Damey Ross took care of the remaining children through the winter of 1925-26.  June and Milo do not remember their father being there for the winter.  June’s only real memory of this period was of creamy buttered potatoes that were common and that she acquired a great love for.

By the time spring rolled around, Jack or his family had contacted Ethel’s family in Plain City and indicated they could not afford to feed and take care of the children anymore.  Os Richardson, Ethel’s brother-in-law drove to Idaho to pick up the four children.  Milo remembers the drive from Paul along the poplar lined highway from Paul past the sugar factory down into Heyburn, across the old river bridge through to Declo, Malta, Strevell, and back to Plain City.  The children were “farmed” out to family.  Milo was raised by his Uncle Ed Sharp, Paul by his Aunt Vic Hunt, and Harold by his Uncle Del Sharp.

We have very little information on what occurred in the life of Jack from this point on.  He found his way back to West Virginia where he tried to convince May to remarry him.  She had remarried and was having none of that.  This is the last time Hobart Day Ross ever saw his father.  Hobart went on to become a preacher.  He awoke blind one morning after being kicked in the head by a horse.

Jack found his way to Rock Springs, Sweetwater, Wyoming where he married a lady named Zana Cogdill on 29 November 1926.  She was previously married to Frank Coffey and was going by his name.  I have been unable to determine what happened to Frank.  She had a son already named Orval A Coffey. The 1930 Census on 2 April 1930 finds the two of them in Crawford, Delta, Colorado where he is working as a foreman in a battery shop and living with the brother of Zana’s first husband (?!?).

We do not believe this marriage lasted very long either.  Jack made several visits back to Plain City to see his children.  He would take a taxi out to Plain City, pick up Betty Booth, and the two would ride over to the fields where Milo was working.  We assume the same happened with Harold.  Paul died from a concussion in 1932 after falling out of a barn.  The car would pull up at the end of the field and would toot its horn and Milo could see the occupants wave.  It was not until he visited his father in 1948 that he realized this was his father waving at him across the way and that the lady was Betty Booth.  (Interestingly, Milo had given assistance to Betty Booth in the form of coal and helped pay some of her Dr.’s bills before she passed).

Jack reappears for the mandatory draft registration for World War II living in Stockton, San Joaquin, California working for Werl Zuckerman on McDonald Island with a Stockton mailing address.  He lists his nearest kin as his sister Ms. C. D. Phibbs (Fanny) living at 529 S. California Street in Stockton.

Milo received a telegram in 1948 telling him that his father was dying in a Veteran’s Hospital in Livermore, Alameda, California and that he was requested to come.  Milo tried to convince his brother Harold to go with him but Harold wanted nothing to do with his father.  Milo took the bus to Livermore and found the hospital. He arrived somewhere around midnight and found his way into the building and climbed up a couple of floors and found a corner he could sleep in until morning.  He heard coughs from a room and somebody in the room ask for the time.  He poked his head in and asked if anyone knew of Jack Ross.  Jack indicated he was in the room and wanted to know if it was Milo or Harold at the door.

They visited until an orderly came in and kicked him out.  He slept in a corner for a while and then told an orderly that he had come all the way from Utah to see his father and that his father was dying.  The orderly then let him stay with his father until he passed.

Fortunately, Milo and Jack were able to visit.  Milo asked why his father never came to visit and his father insisted that he wrote letters, sent gifts, and that the Sharp family kept the children from him.  He did not believe him at the time.  Vic Hunt, Ethel’s sister, had received the letters and told Milo about them after her husband and son were electrocuted in 1960 (thinking it was a form of punishment for her keeping them secret) but still did not give them to him. They passed to her son Harold in 1987, and to her grandson Archie in 2005.  Archie turned them over to Milo in 2010.

We know very little of his time in Wyoming, Colorado, or California before his passing.  Jack indicated in 1948 that life had been hard and he never had much.  So little is known of these years, hopefully some more of the story will come out in the future.

John Ross Tombstone

Irwin John Jonas

With the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the events that occurred on that date, I thought I would make a special tribute to my Grand Uncle Irwin John Jonas.  He participated in D-Day and lost his life on 11 July 1944, just over 70 years ago, near Saint-Lô, France.

Irwin John was born the third child to the marriage of Lillian Coley and Joseph Nelson Jonas.  He was born on Friday 2 September 1921 in Thatcher, Franklin, Idaho, at 6:30 PM, although likely born in Cleveland, Franklin, Idaho, while the family made a go of farming.  The family could not make farming work and moved to Lewiston, Cache, Utah as his father took a job with the Utah-Idaho Central Railroad.  When Irwin was about 6, the family moved to Uintah, Weber, Utah.  Joseph was promoted to Section Foreman and the family moved to Ogden, Weber, Utah.  It was in this place that Joseph was accidentally electrocuted in 1932.  Afterward the family moved back to Richmond, Cache, Utah, Lillian’s hometown.

Irwin Primary Graduation Certificate


The family moved around quite a bit and some of the children struggled with the moves and changes in homes.  The family lived in everything from a boxcar to a nice home in Ogden.  Joseph and Lillian were stern but loving parents, dealing with their own issues as well as with the children.

Irwin John Jonas

Irwin John Jonas

Lillian purchased a small home in Richmond with the funds from Joseph’s life insurance.  Lillian’s family helped raise the rowdy six boys, including Irwin, and youngest two girls.

Irwin Boy

Irwin continued through school.  He did not graduate high school, but at least made it a few years into North Cache.

Irwin High School Certificate

Here is a picture of Irwin at North Cache with Glacus Godfrey Merrill’s class.  Irwin is on the back row, third from the right, fifth from the left.  His brother, Norwood, my grandfather, is on the far right of the third row from the front.  You can see the other names for this photo here.

Glacius Merrill's Class about 1938 or 1939

Irwin Receipt

Shortly before his 18 birthday, 6 July 1939, Irwin enlisted with the Army.  He departed shortly afterward for training.

Irwin Jonas Departure

Unfortunately, the Army had a massive fire that destroyed most of the military records for World War II in 1973.

Irwin Jonas Guitar and FriendFamily recollect that he trained in the southwest as this picture also seems to show with the large cactus.

Irwin Jonas Target

He did make it to the rank of Sergeant in the Army.

Irwin Jonas Military

Irwin met Mary Elizabeth Popwitz at a dance at Camp McCoy, Sparta, Wisconsin.  They were later married 21 June 1943 in Winona, Winona, Minnesota.

Mary Popwitz and Winifred Perley

Mary Popwitz and Winifred Perley (Mary was Winifred’s Nanny)

Irwin wrote a Christmas Card home in December 1943 with the following photograph.

Irwin Jonas Christmas Card

Irwin was then sent to go overseas.  Irwin sent Mary to live with his mother in Richmond.  Mary gave birth to Robert Irwin Jonas in February 1944.  Irwin went to New York City in preparation for the D-Day Invasion.  At least that is the story told by family.

This following envelopes show Irwin was still in New York City in May and July of 1944.

Irwin Envelope 1944 May


Irwin Envelope 1944 Jul 8

An explanation could be the preparation for D-Day and not wanting to give anything away so they made it appear like it was in New York City.  Or it could very well be that he did not take part of D-Day and arrived after that date.  However, since he died on the 11th of July in Saint-Lô, it is unlikely he was in New York City on 8 July 1944.  Further that letter was dated 6 July 1944.  It was likely he was writing from France but marking the envelopes New York City.  At any rate, here is the single page of the postmarked 8 July 1944 letter.  You will have to click on it to read it properly, the pencil is hard to scan.  One of Irwin’s obituaries indicates he was sent to Europe in October 1943.

Irwin Jonas Letter 1944 Jul 6

Lillian received the dreaded personal visit from the Army in August 1944.  She received the following letter in September.


The US Army determined to bring Irwin’s body home to the United States rather than bury him in France.   Lillian and Mary finally received Irwin’s body in late January 1948.  His burial took place 6 February 1944 in Richmond.

Irwin Jonas Obituary

2014-06-26 20.15.08

Robert Irwin Jonas continued to grow under the love and care of his mother and grandmother.

Bob Jonas Baby

After Irwin passed away, Mary moved to Preston, Franklin, Idaho near her close friend Colleen Andra who would later marry Irwin’s brother, Norwood.

Bob Jonas Young Boy

Through the family, Mary and Bob moved to Ogden to work.  There, Mary, Irwin’s widow, met Irwin’s uncle Art Coley.  Irwin and Art were born the same year, even though Uncle and Nephew.  Arthur “Art” Christiansen Coley and Mary were married 3 May 1946 in Evanston, Uinta, Wyoming.

Art and Mary continued to raise Bob as their own.  Two additional sons joined the marriage, Stephen “Steve” G and Ronald Gary.

Steve, Bob, Gary

Steve, Bob, Gary


Steve, Mary, Gary, Bob

Steve, Mary, Gary, Bob


Bob Jonas Boy


Bob Jonas

Bob, Janet, and Bobby Jonas

Bob, Janet, and Bobby Jonas

As of my writing today, Mary is still alive.  She lives in an assisted living home in South Ogden, Utah.

Bob and Janet Jonas, Mary Coley, Steve and Julie Coley

Bob and Janet Jonas, Mary Coley, Steve and Julie Coley in 2004

Samuel Deer Davis

Another family history story.  This one is interesting in that his Idaho case went before the United States Supreme Court in Davis v. Beason.  This is the biography of Samuel Deer Davis (1859-1923) written by Dean G Grow, his great-grandson.  Samuel Deer Davis married Mary Jane Williams, daughter of Sarah Jane Davis and John Haines Williams.  Mary is the sister to David Davis Williams who I also previously shared his biography.


“This is the history of my great-grandfather, who was instrumental in the legal attempts that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints undertook to counter the continuing political and legal assault against the Church due to the practice of polygamy in the late 1880’s not only in Utah but in Idaho where he lived.

“Samuel D. Davis was born in Salt Lake City on 22 July 1859 to David Woodwell Davies and Mary Deer.  Samuel’s father had been a missionary in his native Wales for seven years before coming to America.  Aboard ship, David met his bride-to-be, Mary Deer, also a native of Wales.  When they arrived in Kansas City, Missouri, it was too late in the year, creating a delay in getting to the Salt Lake Valley.  So they decided to marry.  This occurred on 25 November 1852, in Kansas City.  They most likely traveled across the plains with a group of Welsh immigrants in the summer of 1853.

Samuel Deer Davis

Samuel Deer Davis

“After arriving in Salt Lake Valley, David being a painter and a glazier, set up his home and they began their life there.  David and Mary’s first son, David Thomas was born on 4 March 1854 in Salt Lake City.  Their second son, Woodwell was born in 1856 in Salt Lake City.  David was sealed to Mary on 2 March 1856 in the Presidents office in Salt Lake City.  At the same time and place, he was sealed to Elizabeth Berry, thus becoming a polygamist.  Elizabeth being a native of Bath, Summerset, England.  Their third son, Samuel Deer as indicated earlier was born in 1859.  They were all shown on the 1860 U. S. Census, living in the 8th Ward in Salt Lake City.  It was soon after that, Woodwell died, date unknown.  Their fourth and fifth sons, twins, Hyrum Eynon and Joseph were born on 15 August 1862.  Joseph died as an infant, but Hyrum lived to adulthood.  Their last son, Septimus was born and died soon after in 1864, probably about the time that his father David Woodwell, died of consumption (Tuberculosis) on 20 March 1864.  Thus Mary was left with three boys ages 10, 5, and 2.  I was unable to determine what happened to Elizabeth Berry.

“In November of 1864, Mary married a man named George R. McLaughlin of whom we can find no record of birth, death or census information.  They had a son George R. Jr. who was born 27 August 1865.  Their second child, Mary Ellen was born about 1866 and died soon after.   Mary’s second husband, George treated her harshly and abandoned her many times.  One time for almost a year.  The last time, she heard he was living in Cheyenne, Wyoming and had no plans to return.  She divorced him on the 20th of January 1868.  Thus Mary was continuously left with four boys to feed and care for.  It was soon after this that she became seriously ill and the doctor told her she would soon die.  Her last son, George was a toddler at the time.  A neighbor, Charles and Jemima Walker offered to adopt George and Mary regretfully consented as she didn’t want to leave such a young child.  Not long after, Mary recovered and went back to the Walkers pleading with them to return her son, but they refused.  They were still neighbors in the 1870 Census with the Walkers showing George as their son at age 5.  George died 29 January 1889 at the age of 24 in a train accident returning to Sugar House, Utah from an outing with friends to Red Bluff Quarry.

“Toward the end of the year, Mary met John Evan Price, another Welshman and became a polygamous wife of his on 26 December 1870.  Mary was 39 years of age and 14 years his junior.  He was in good financial circumstances at this time according to their granddaughter.  He had settled in Samaria, Oneida, Idaho on April 16, 1868 with one other family, being one of the first.  He is also credited with giving Samaria it’s name.  Several others settled there the next month.  A branch of the Church was organized there in November of 1868.  Elder Lorenzo Snow, then of the Twelve Apostles, visited in July of 1869 and approved of the city plot, encouraging the settlers to continue to build and plant there.

“John brought Mary and her children to Samaria after their marriage.  Two additional children were born to this union, Margaret Ann Price on 10 January 1872 and Elizabeth Jane Price on 17 March 1875, both in Samaria.  Unfortunately, John died within a few years on 22 June 1878 in Samaria leaving Mary a widow again.  But this time she was left in good circumstances where she was able to sell off property to new immigrants to Samaria.  She reverted back to her Davis name after 1880.  Her sons were now getting older.  Her oldest, David Thomas was married in Samaria to Amy Ann Sawyer on 7 January 1879 just 6 months after John Evan Price died.  Mary was the postmistress of Samaria for many years and the Relief Society President for 17 years in Samaria.  Eliza R. Snow stayed in her home during a conference in Samaria.

“Her second son, the subject of this manuscript, Samuel D., had no formal education but only that which was from his mother, Mary.  He married Mary Jane Williams on 11 Oct 1882 in the Endowment House in Salt lake City.  Their first child, Sarah Jane, was born in August of 1883 and died the same month.  Their second child, Woodwell Williams was born 17 November 1884.  It was during this time that his wife encouraged him to get some formal education.  He started by attending the district school in Samaria.  Afterward he attended the James Chandler school in Washakie, Utah.  It was a great sacrifice and struggle as he continued to farm and support his family during that time.  He had so much success as a scholar in Washakie, that in 1886 he attended the Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah.  He also studied law during his evenings.  His third child, Edgar Williams was born on 1 March 1887.  He soon became a partner in a law firm in Malad, Idaho of Evans, Gibbs and Davis.

Mary Jane Williams Davis

Mary Jane Williams Davis

“At this time there was much pressure on the local LDS communities by the Idaho politicians who were strongly anti-Mormon, about the Church practice of polygamy.  75% of the population lived in the eastern half of the state and about 20% of those were L. D. S. which meant that they represented a large voting block.

“These following steps were in relation to the 1884-1885 law, not the 1889 one which was taken to the Supreme Court.

“From E. Leo Lyman’s “Political Background of the Woodruff Manifesto”:  “William Budge, the leading spokesman for the Church in Idaho, tried to bring as much pressure as he could on the outcome of the case.  Budge used Utah Congressional delegate John T. Caine to generate pressures on the Judge Berry through political friends back home.  He also traveled to the Blackfoot judicial headquarters to confer with Berry before he rendered his decision.  The judge, who recorded the conversation as accurately as he could recall, claimed the Church leader first quoted U.S. Solicitor General Jenks as saying that if the test oath law was taken before the United States Supreme Court, “it would not stand for a moment.” Budge also stressed the crucial nature of the pending decision on the continued allegiance of the Idaho Mormons to the Democratic party (Berry 1888).

“Berry’s reply demonstrated considerable admiration for Mormon industry and economic accomplishments but firmly stated his intent to “administer the laws as they were.” He made it clear he could not allow political considerations to affect his decision and expressed regret that the Mormons could not bring their marriage relations into “regulation step” with the rest of American society (Berry 1888). The published decision {Idaho Daily Statesman, 17, 20 Oct. 1888; Wood River Times, 16, 17, 24 Oct. 1888) not only upheld the test oath but ruled the Mormon arguments that they no longer taught or practiced plural marriage were merely a temporary posture of no importance so long as the general Church had made no changes on the question. The kind of concession necessary to relieve the disfranchisement onslaught, Judge Berry stressed, was a formal renunciation of the doctrine at a Church general conference, not unlike what actually occurred several years later.”

“From the Encyclopedia Britannica: “They enacted a law in 1884-1885 that all county and precinct officers were required to take a test oath abjuring bigamy, polygamy, or celestial marriage; and under this law in 1888 three members of the territorial legislature were deprived of their seats as ineligible.  An act of 1889, forbade in the case of any who had since the 1st of January 1888 practiced, taught, aided or encouraged polygamy or bigamy, their registration or voting until two years after they had taken a test oath renouncing such practices, and until they had satisfied the District Court that in the two years after they had been guilty of no such practices.

“The earlier law had been tested by the Church in the territorial federal courts, but was unsuccessful.  This 1889 law, regarding voting, was commonly called “The Idaho Test Oath” which meant essentially that if you were a member of the Church, whether practicing polygamy or not, you could not vote and was retroactive to January 1 the year before.  It appears that the Church decided to test this law all the way to the United States Supreme Court.

“In Samaria on Oct 27, 1888, 26 men including Samuel D. Davis asked to have their names removed from the records of the Church with apparent approval of the Church leaders so that they could vote in the November 1888 election but primarily to provide a test case.  There were about 30 in Malad City who did the same thing.  The new law having been enacted after the men had voted, they were indicted almost a year later for conspiracy to break a law that wasn’t created until the following year.  The case became known as “Davis vs. Beason” and can still be found today by searching the internet.

“From the Deseret News on September 21, 1889:  “The perjury case against Mr. Evans of Malad having been disposed of in the District Court of that place, the next matters of importance tackled were the conspiracy cases. Indeed there was practically but one case, fifty six persons having been included in one indictment.

“The matter came up for trial before Judge Berry on Tuesday, Sept. 10th [1889]. There was much disappointment among the virulent anti-“Mormon” element over the result of the case of perjury against Mr. Evans and the officers said that in the conspiracy matter they would get a jury together that would convict this time.  For this purpose they scoured the country and imagined they had got what they wanted when the panel was completed.

“The charge preferred in the indictment against the fifty-six defendants was substantially that they had conspired together to break the laws of Idaho Territory, notably the Idaho test oath law, by agreeing to vote at an election when they knew that they had no right to do so.

“The case was tried and at 6 p.m. on Wednesday was given to the jury.  On Thursday the 12th at 2 p.m. the jury came into the court with a verdict, in which they found fifty-five of the defendants not guilty and one guilty.  The latter was Samuel D. Davis of Samaria.

“A new trial was asked for Mr. Davis by counsel for the defense and denied, and the  court sentenced him to pay a fine of $500.  The fine was not paid and Mr. Davis placed in jail for a maximum of 250 days [$2 a day].  Judge Berry was applied to for a writ of habeas corpus which was also denied, and an appeal from his action was taken to the Supreme Court of the United States.

“The matter is in the best possible shape it could possibly assume for final adjudication. None of the acquitted fifty-five defendants can be again placed in jeopardy on the same subject, either under the title of conspiracy or any other.  The appeal to the Supreme Court involves the validity of the infamous test oath law, which will therefore be decided one way or the other.

“The defense was conducted with marked ability, the attorneys being Mr. J. S. Rawlins of Salt Lake, and Mr. J. N. Kimball of Ogden.   Mr. Standrod and “Kentucky Smith” appeared on the part of the prosecution.”

“From the above article it is clear that it was “arranged” in advance that one person would be the focal point for the test case.  That person, having probably volunteered due to his legal schooling, was none other than Samuel D. Davis.  He obviously knew that he would spend some time behind bars, but was willing to do that for the Church.

“To give a better idea of the named individuals in this case, they are as follows:  Charles H. Berry, a former attorney general of Minnesota, later on, an associate justice of the Idaho Supreme Court who would have jurisdiction as the Judge in this case in Malad City.  Joseph S. Rawlins was a city attorney in Salt Lake City and worked with Brigham Young and following Church leaders on matters of law.  He later served in the Congress of the U. S. and assisted in gaining statehood for Utah.  He was also known as the “Red-headed Reactor of the Rockies” because he made such a fight about the confiscation of the Church property.  It was through his efforts that the property was eventually restored.  J. N. Kimball also served as a defense attorney for the Church in Ogden.  Drew W. Standrod came to Malad City, Idaho from Kentucky with his parents and took up the practice of law there.  He was elected as the prosecuting attorney there twice and later became a judge moving to Pocatello.  “Kentucky” Smith is actually H. W. Smith who was an anti-Mormon lawyer of prominence in Ogden, Utah and the author of the “Idaho Test Oath” law.  He also later became a judge in Idaho.  Sheriff Harvey G. Beason was an appointed sheriff who was just 29 years old at this time.  His was the other name in the test case.  He soon after moved to Montana and then to Gillette, Wyoming where he lived until his death in 1939.

“From another article in the Deseret News written in Samaria on September 30, 1889.

“”A very strange scene was witnessed here on the 25th inst. (Sept 1889)  It will be remembered that Mr. Samuel D. Davis of this place was found guilty not long since at the District Court held at Malad City, of voting at the election held here last fall contrary to the provision of the anti-Mormon Test Oath law, and that he was sentenced to pay a fine of $500 and costs, pending payment of which he was sent to the county jail.  He applied for a writ of habeas corpus which was denied by Judge Berry.  Application was then made direct to  Washington for a similar writ.  Here it was thought the matter would rest for the present. But not so; on Sept. 13, Sheriff Beason came to Samaria and levied an attachment on Mr. Davis’ property having an order from the court to sell at public auction enough to cover fine and costs.  On the  25th inst. said order was carried into effect.  Sheriff Beason, Attorney Standrod, Treasurer D. Tovey,  Commissioner P. Fredrickson and a few others came over.  The sale began at 2 o’clock.  Mr. Davis’ only horse was sold to Meyer Kohn of Malad, for $21.00. (Mr. Kohn has since offered to return the animal for the same price), which was about one-fifth his real value.  Mr. Davis interest in the firm of Evans, Gibbs, & Davis was knocked off to Standrod for $190.00.

“It was the Intention to sell the little home where Mrs. Davis and her two little children reside, but the title being defective it was abandoned. This was all that could be found to sell and the sale came to a close.

“The sheriff seemed very dry after his labors for he and his companions indulged quite freely.  They had apparently come over well prepared.”

“This article indicates that Samuel’s family also suffered because of the case.  The article was incorrect in that there were “two little children” in the home.  My grandfather, John Vincent “Vin” Davis was born on 6 July 1889 and was just a few months old when this took place, which means that there were two little children and one infant.  It also indicates that his fine was reduced almost 40% by the $211.00 amount recovered in the sale.  Therefore his sentence would be reduced by about 100 days, leaving 150 days remaining to be served.  From the Deseret News on 11 January 1890, it indicates that the hearing was held in the U. S. Supreme Court, probably a day or two earlier.  The hearing is several pages of arguments both for and against which I will not be discussing here.  It can also be found on the internet by searching “Davis vs. Beason”.  The ruling was handed down on 2 February 1890, upholding the Idaho law.  At this time Samuel had been in jail for 113 days.  I was unable to determine whether he remained the last 30 some days in jail or whether the Church paid the balance of the fine to release him or whether he was reimbursed for his personal losses.  During this era many members sacrificed much for their belief.

“President Wilford Woodruff issued the “Manifesto” a few months later on 24 September 1890, ending plural marriage in the Church.  The Idaho law was changed in 1893, the disqualification was made no longer retroactive, the two-year clause was omitted, and the test oath covered only present renunciation of polygamy, thus allowing members to vote once again.  It took until the 1980’s to get similar wording in the Idaho State Constitution removed.

“Samuel D. Davis continued in his practice of law and in 1899 he was appointed Probate Judge of Oneida County, Idaho.  He was twice elected to this office.  In 1901, after the formation of the Idaho State Bar, he took the examination for the bar and was admitted to practice in all the courts of the state.

“His wife of 21 years, Mary Jane Williams Davis died on 19 March 1903 in Samaria.  Later that year he moved his family of boys to Malad City to continue his practice and opened a new law office there.  His brother-in-law,  Isaac B. Evans, who had been on a mission in the south, introduced him to a woman in Salt lake City, whom he had known while on his mission.  She was Alice Godwin, daughter of Handy Haywood Godwin and Elizabeth Ann Naylor Godwin.  They were natives of Clinton, Sampson, North Carolina.  She was a true daughter of the old south.  Samuel was very interested and she was interested also, but I’m sure was concerned by the thought of finishing the raising of 7 boys.  But apparently she was up to the task as they were married in the Salt Lake Temple on 13 November 1905.  She bore him 3 more children.  First, Mary Naylor Davis, 13 September 1906, second, Alice Deer Davis, 18 January 1908 and Samuel Godwin Davis on 6 March 1911, all in Malad City, Idaho.

“He continued in Malad City until moving to Salt Lake City about 1918.  He was there in the January 1920 U. S. Census.  He probably moved to Twin Falls, Idaho in the summer of 1920 to accept employment as the City Attorney.  Two of his boys followed him there.  One, Eugene, who was still living with him and the other, John Vincent and his family, who was still living in Samaria.  In June of 1923, he was made the Twin Falls Police magistrate, but unfortunately, he died within 6 months on 13 December 1923.  After the funeral, his body was shipped back to Samaria to be buried.  His second wife, Alice moved to Salt Lake City, where she died 13 January 1945.  Her body was also returned to Samaria to be buried.

“From the Twin Falls Times News:  “Judge Davis was early admitted to the bar in Idaho, and served as county attorney and probate judge in Oneida county.  He attracted wide attention in the early days by his success as an irrigation and criminal lawyer.  It was his boast that some of Idaho’s best known attorneys had begun their legal training in his office.  He was an active and prominent member of the L. D. S. Church serving as member of the High Council in Malad and Twin Falls.”

“Thus ended a long legal career in the State of Idaho and the life of a man who was willing to stand for  his principles, even risking all his possessions at one time.  He died at the age of 64, which would be considered still young by today’s standards.  His part in the legal battle was apparently unknown to his children, grandchildren and their descendants.  My mother did mention many years ago that she had heard about the voting issue.  Those of his children as indicated earlier were very young and would not have known about the landmark legal case, unless he had related it to them.  He was a good man and his story needed to be told, so that all would be aware of his sacrifice during another time of great difficulty in the history of the Church.

Jordan-Watkins Wedding

Thomas and Margret Mordecae Watkins are pleased to announce the marriage of their daughter Margret to David Jordan, son of Benjamin and Mary Evans Jordan.  David and Margaret were married 21 September 1839 in Merthyr-Tydfil, Glamorganshire, Wales.

Much of the history below is taken from the sketch written by David and Margret’s granddaughter Martha Evans Anderson (1870-1930).  I have fleshed it out with dates and additional detail from source documents.

Margret Watkins was born 10 September 1816 in Merthyr-Tydfil.  She is believed to be the second of 5 children born to Thomas and Margret Watkins.  We really do not know a whole lot about Thomas and Margret Watkins.  A number of stories have survived which are shared below.

David Jordan was born 7 February 1820 in Merthry-Tydfil.  He is the first of four known children born to Benjamin and Mary Jordan.  Just like Margret’s parents, we really do not know much about this family.  At least minimal family history dates or stories have come down regarding either line.

Benjamin and Mary Jordan “were of a religious turn of mind and taught the Bible when he was just a boy, refined and of a gentle manner.”  Mary Jordan passed away in April 1843 when the family was still young.  The family consisted of David, Jane, Sarah, and John.  The Jordans were “a very refined and considered High Class people and of a high moral and religious character.  They were always proud of their personal appearance, always well dressed.”  The brothers were “devoted brothers, they lived and worked together with kind and friendly for each other.  When David and Margaret had children they all lived as a loving family together…this brother was named John Jordan.”

We really do not know anything of the Courtship between David Jordan and Margret Watkins.  “At this times Wales was in a prosperous condition and David and Margret were soon settled in which was very comfortable and spacious.  They had an extra room so that his father and one brother could live with them in their home.  His father lived only two weeks, when he died.  His brother continued to live with David and his wife.”

“Margret (Watkins) Jordan lost her mother when she was very young, leaving her father with a family of small children.  While the family was without the mother’s care, Margret met with an accident which left her with a crippled arm for the rest of her life.  This happened when she was about 2 years old…when her sister was carrying her on her back, when she slipped and fell.  Margret cried for days from pain before they learned that she had a broken arm at the elbow.  It had already started to set, it had been so long since it happened that they thought the child could not stand to have it rebroken and set properly, so it was never properly taken care of.”

“Margret’s father married again and brought into their home a most worthy and wonderful new mother to the children.  Grandmother used to tell us that she never remembered her real mother but their step mother was all that our real mother could have been.”

“When Margret was still in her teens and because of her crippled arm, she was apprenticed in a school for sewing.  The sewing at that time was all done by hand, they had no sewing machines.  Margret took to that kind of work very readily and was very satisfied to become a very good seamstress, while still a very young woman.  She was able to construct some of the finest work in the area.”

“Margret had a blind brother who learned to play the harp.  He was often requested to play, to entertain for groups at entertainments.  He carried his harp with him everywhere he went.  He was employed to play at different places and went alone to his employment places with his harp.  He became very popular and was loved by all his friends and family.”

“Margret continued to follow her trade as a seamstress after her marriage to Grandfather David Jordan, because she was very popular among the people of her community for her sewing.  As her family duties increased on her time, they had six children, two of which died in infancy, she gave up a lot of her sewing and devoted most of her time and energies to her family responsibilities.”

“David and Margret were among the very first in their area to embrace [T]he Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  They were baptized [18 January 1849].  Their children all grew up in the church.”

At this time there was a large branch of the Mormon church in their area of Wales.  “Their family was very faithful and devoted to their new church.  David was a good singer and also a composer and poet.”  He composed a number of beautiful poems.  One song was in honor of the Prophet Joseph Smith.  “As children, we remember hearing him sing this beautiful song, the music was very sweet and the words were all in Welsh.  We only understood it in part, but there was just something about the song that touched us very deeply.”

When they embraced the LDS church they had two little children, Mary and her older sister Gwyn who were 3 and 5 years old.  They were raised in the LDS church and were baptized when they reached 8 years old.

David and Margret’s first son was Thomas Jordan born December 1840 in Merthyr-Tydfil and dying June 1841.  We know very little about this little boy.

The first daughter was Gwenlliam Jordan born 2 August 1842 in Merthyr-Tydfil.  She was baptized in August 1851.

The second daughter was Mary Watkins Jordan born 5 December 1844 in Merthyr-Tydfil.  She was baptized 1 January 1852.

“David was a coal miner.  He and his brother went to work every day in the coal mines.  They were paid good wages at the time, so they did very well economically.”

“One day David’s shift in the mine interfered with his Priesthood meeting so he traded shifts with a friend of his.  He was the secretary of his group and felt like he should attend his Priesthood meeting.  Grandmother Margret told us that she remembers the incident very well.  It was a beautiful day and all was peaceful and calm.  Then at 9:30 am word came there had been an explosion in the mine.  People rushed to the place and it was soon learned that a large number of miners had lost their lives in the explosion and among them was David’s friend who was working in his place.  This was a great sorrow for David.  He loved this man very much and he was there instead of David.”

“As time went on, conditions changed.  Little by little the miner’s wages were reduced causing hard times.  Then there were strikes putting them out of work entirely for months.”

“Their two girls had by now grown into their teens.  They found employment and became independent.  There was also two little boys in the family.”  These two boys would have been David and Thomas.

Charles Jordan was born 3 November 1848 in Merthyr-Tydfil.  He died in December 1848.

Margret Jordan was born 26 Jul 1850 in Aberdare, Glamorganshire, Wales.  She died in June 1852.

David Moiah Jordan was born 7 June 1854 in Merthyr-Tydfil.

Thomas Jordan was born 17 March 1857 in Merthyr-Tydfil.

Ann Watkins Jordan was born in 1861 and we do not know how long she lived.

“Margret now returned to her sewing again to support the family during the hard times.  In a few years, the two girls got married and came to Utah, leaving their parents and the two brothers in Wales.  This happened in 1864.”

I have previously written about Gwenlliam Jordan and her marriage to David D Williams at this link.

“David and Margret had now been members of the LDS church for 20 years.  They were however very happy and contented until their daughters left for America.  They were also making every effort to join their daughters in Utah.

“Then they were made very sad by the death of their youngest son.  He was 11 years old.  Many of the members of their church had gone to Utah and they were feeling lonesome and sad.”  David Moiah Jordan died 14 October 1865.

“The Elders that served as missionaries in their area always found a big welcome in the Jordan home, even in the middle of the night would stop by and found a welcome and told them that it was like coming home.”

“They themselves were making every effort to prepare to go to Utah themselves.  They were planning to sail with the next company of Saints that were to leave by ship for New York.”

“It was now 9 years since their two daughters had gone to Utah.  One day the Elders called on them and told them that the next ship would sail in three weeks.  They counted their money which they had saved and it was not enough.  So they decided that they would have to wait for a later sailing date, until they could accumulate some more funds.”

“When they had secured the money they needed, they sent word to their daughters of their plans so they would expect them.”  The Jordan’s departed 29 July 1872 from Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

“After a lazy and weary journey crossing the Atlantic Ocean, they landed in New York City, on the 13th of August 1872 and remained in New York with their 15 year old son.  They found employment and remained there until October.  They received a letter from their 2 daughters containing money for them to continue to Utah.  Some of the money came from their daughter Mary’s husband, who sold his team of horses to get the money to send to them.”

They arrived in Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah on 10 November 1872 “after visiting in Ogden with their oldest daughter Gwenie Williams, and then they continued on to Brigham City where their daughter Mary Evans lived.  It is useless to try and describe how happy they all were to be back together again after 9 years of being apart, and praying for the time when they could all be together in Zion.”

David and Gwenlliam Williams

David and Gwenllian Williams

“The first winter in Utah was very hard on them because of the extreme cold temperatures and the abundance of snow.  It was particularly hard on Grandfather David because he was used to working underground in the coal mines of Wales.”

“Their daughter Mary and her husband William Evans were living in their two room log cabin at 1st East and 3rd South, just one half block south of the First Ward Meetinghouse.  They had 4 children by now, Margret, Mary Jane, Martha, and Abraham, who was just one week old when their grandparents arrived in Brigham City from Wales.  These newly arrived grandparents remained with William and Mary and their 4 children in their small home the rest of the winter of 1872.”

“At this time the railroad was being built from Ogden to Logan and the three men, Grandfather Jordan, son-in-law William, and the 15 year old son (Thomas) of David and Margret Jordan, all found work building for the railroad.  It was very difficult for David and his son to endure working out in the awful cold weather through that first winter.”

“Two years later, William Evans purchased another house on a large lot.  The house had 4 rooms in the Third Ward at the corner of 3rd West and 3rd North.  It was on the northwest corner of the intersection.  When they moved into the bigger house with their 4 children, they sold the old house to David and Margret who lived in their log home for the rest of their lives.”

“They lived comfortable and made it very attractive and comfortable.  They were neat and tidy people and they kept a beautiful garden which they were very proud of and they produced a lot of products for their table.”

“They were very interesting people to talk to and had many interesting and the conditions and memories of their lives in Wales and the extensive knowledge and testimony of the gospel, made it always a pleasure to visit with them.”

“As time went on they worked at many different things that there was to do around Brigham at that time, which was all real hard labor.”

David and Margret attended the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah to receive their own endowments on 10 October 1878.  David and Margret were sealed to each other the same day.

“Their son Thomas grew into manhood and they decided that they would build themselves a better house.  They erected the foundation and bought as much of the material for the house as they could the first year, with hopes that the next year they thought and hoped that they could continue building the house.”

“However, the winter came and there was no work to be had for them.  Their son Thomas decided to go to Evanston, Wyoming to work, putting up ice, and they had some relatives.  He obtained employment in one of the coal mines near by.  He was doing well and was very happy there with the thought that he would be able to help his parents with their new home building.”

“This was not to be because Thomas was severely injured in an accident and word was sent to his parents at Brigham City.  His father, David, went to Evanston to see his son but Thomas died just one hour before his father arrived on February 28, 1880.”

“This was a great sorrow to Thomas’ family and destroyed all their hopes for completing their home building plans.  When spring came, David sold all the building materials that he had accumulated for their new home, spent the rest of their lives in the original small log house.”

“Their sorrow over the loss of their son weighed so heavily upon them that it changed their life’s hopes for the future.  However, their faith and convictions in the gospel and the LDS Church which they accepted in Wales; and the trust in their Heavenly Father never failed them.  Faithfully they continued to attend all their church duties and their testimonies grew and were wonderful to hear them speak.”

“Grandfather David was able to adapt himself to most any kind of employment; and with the products of their well kept garden and the fruit that he raised in the years at their home, they had a comfortable living.”

“They also took a great interest in the Temple work of the church and were some of the first to attend the new Logan Temple after its dedication in 1877.”

“They had their family genealogy all in order so that when the temple was ready, so were they.  They traveled to Logan often to do temple ordinances for the members of their family and stayed a week at a time on many occasions to do this temple work.”

“This work of love continued until David’s health began to fail, but he continued to obtain information and prepare records on the members of their family for the work to be done in the temple for their dead ancestors.”

David and Margret were sealed to all their children in the Logan Temple 27 June 1888.  Gwenlliam and Mary were both happy to be physically present for the occasion.  All of the other children had passed away prior.

David Jordan

David Jordan

“Grandfather David Jordan’s life came to a peaceful end November 26, 1893 in Brigham City, Utah.  So peaceful and sweet was his passing away that our family can be proud of that dear old Grand Sire.  He was the first fruits of the gospel in our family.”

“Grandmother Margret was not the last one in their little home, and she felt the loss of her companion very keenly, but she was visited and comforted by her living daughter and grandchildren.  She wanted to continue living along in their home.”

“It had been 25 years since she and her dear husband came to live in that little log cabin; and there she wanted to stay until she could go to join her dear departed companion.”

“She lived another 7 years after her husband died.”

Mary Jordan Evans, LaVan Jones, Margret Evans Jones, Margret Jordan

Mary Jordan Evans, LaVan Jones, Margret Evans Jones, Margret Jordan

“She died November 19, 1902, at home in Brigham City, Utah.  She was buried in the Brigham City Cemetery beside her beloved husband.

A side note at the end of the above: “This was written by granddaughter Martha Evans.  This story was copied from a note book, in the hand writing of Martha Evans.”  “It is probably a repetition of the story I have previously translated from his hand-written record that I have previously had translated and distributed some years ago.  However, I am sure that it is more more in detail than the one I translated previously because there is much more of it.  Yours truly, Wesley Anderson 10 May 1986”

Gwenlliam passed away 3 September 1900 in Slaterville, Weber, Utah.  Mary passed away 8 December 1923 in Brigham City.